AccueilCalendrierFAQRechercherS'enregistrerMembresGroupesConnexion

Partagez | 
 

 Le gène p53

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
Aller à la page : 1, 2  Suivant
AuteurMessage
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15755
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène p53   Mer 7 Sep 2016 - 15:10

p53 has long been known to be a key protein associated with many cancers. Its main function is to suppress tumor formation in the body, and thus protect it from cancer development. However, p53 is considerably less stable compared to its two cousins, p63 and p73. Of the three proteins, p53 is the one that has deviated the most from its ancestral invertebrate version. All three proteins have a region in their sequences that is responsible for recognizing and binding to target gene sequences, called a DNA binding domain (DBD).

Loss of p53 function, which in most cases is caused by destabilizing DBD mutations, is prone to aggregation and formation of amyloid fibrils, an outcome that may be explained by its high instability. Additionally, p53 aggregates have a prion-like behavior, in which p53 mutants highjack normal p53 molecules and convert them into the inactive amyloid form.

Over 90% of p53 mutations leading to cancer development are in the DBD, making it an important target for new cancer therapies. However, the tendency of p53 to aggregate and form amyloids is an obstacle for developing new strategies.

To gain a deeper understanding of the molecular features underlying p53 DBD stability, amyloid formation, and aggregation, a research group led by Jerson Lima Silva at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, used microsecond timescale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, a computational method used for studying the precise movements of atoms over time. MD allows researchers to study biological processes at a level of detail that is difficult to obtain by conventional experiments, providing new insights into how proteins work and predicting the origins of malfunction.

In a study entitled "Aggregation tendencies in the p53 family are modulated by backbone hydrogen bonds," published in the journal Scientific Reports, the group investigates the DBD sequence and structure of the three proteins (p53, p63, and p73) and shows that although they have similar sequences and structures in their respective DBDs, p53 is more prone to aggregation than the other two. The study shows that the innate structural weakness of p53 is explained by a high incidence of exposed backbone hydrogen bonds that are vulnerable to water attack. In contrast, p63 and p73 have better protected hydrogen bonds, and can resist water invasion and subsequent aggregation. "Our work sheds light on the molecular features underlying p53 DBD stability. The new knowledge can be used to develop strategies for stabilizing p53 and diminishing its tendency to form amyloids," says Elio A. Cino, first author of the study.

The group is now performing studies to investigate how amyloid formation induced by common p53 mutations is associated with breast cancer, glioblastomas, and other malignant tumors, and is testing specific small molecules and peptides as a way to diminish p53 aggregation and formation of amyloid fibrils.


---

p53 est connue depuis longtemps pour être une protéine associée à la clé de nombreux cancers. Sa principale fonction est de supprimer la formation de tumeurs dans le corps, et ainsi le protéger contre le développement du cancer. Cependant, p53 est beaucoup moins stable par rapport à ses deux cousins, p63 et p73. Parmi les trois protéines p53 est celle qui a le plus déviée de sa version invertébrée ancestrale. Ces trois protéines ont une région dans leurs séquences qui est responsable de la reconnaissance et la liaison à des séquences cibles de gènes, appelé un domaine de liaison à l'ADN (DBD). (Dna Binding Domain)

La perte de fonction de p53, qui, dans la plupart des cas est causée par des mutations déstabilisantes de DBD, est sujette à l'agrégation et la formation de fibrilles amyloïdes, un résultat qui peut être expliqué par sa grande instabilité. En outre, les agrégats de p53 ont un comportement de prions, dans lequel des mutants p53 détournent les molécules p53 normales et les convertissent en  formes amyloïdes inactives.

Plus de 90% des mutations de p53 conduisant au développement du cancer sont dans le DBD, ce qui en fait une cible importante pour de nouvelles thérapies contre le cancer. Cependant, la tendance de p53 de s'agréger en formes amyloïdes est un obstacle pour le développement de nouvelles stratégies.

Pour acquérir une meilleure compréhension des caractéristiques moléculaires sous-jacents à p53 et à la stabilité des DBD, la formation d'amyloïde et l'agrégation, un groupe de recherche dirigé par Jerson Lima Silva à l'Université fédérale de Rio de Janeiro, Brésil, a utilisé des simulations à une échelle de temps de microsecondes (MD), un méthode de calcul utilisée pour étudier les mouvements précis des atomes au fil du temps. MD permet aux chercheurs d'étudier les processus biologiques à un niveau de détail qui est difficile à obtenir par des expériences classiques, offrant de nouvelles perspectives sur la façon dont les protéines fonctionnent et prédisent les origines du dysfonctionnement.

Dans une étude intitulée "Les tendances d'agrégation dans la famille de p53 sont modulées par des liaisons backbone (?) d'hydrogène», publié dans la revue Rapports scientifiques, le groupe étudie la séquence DBD et la structure des trois protéines (p53, p63 et p73) et montre que, bien que s'ils ont des séquences et des structures similaires dans leurs DBD respectives, p53 est plus sujette à l'agrégation que les deux autres. L'étude montre que la faiblesse structurelle innée de p53 est expliquée par une incidence élevée de liaisons "backbone"(?) d'hydrogène exposées qui sont vulnérables aux attaques de l'eau. En revanche, p63 et p73 ont des liaisons hydrogène mieux protégées, et peuvent résister à l'invasion de l'eau et de l'agrégation subséquente. «Nos travaux mettent en lumière les caractéristiques moléculaires sous-jacentes de la stabilité de DBD p53. La nouvelle connaissance peut être utilisée pour développer des stratégies pour la stabilisation de p53 et de diminuer sa tendance à former des amyloïdes», dit Elio A. Cino, premier auteur de l'étude.

Aujourd'hui, le groupe effectue des études visant à étudier la façon dont la formation de fibres amyloides induites par les mutations de p53 est associée au cancer du sein, au glioblastome, et à d'autres tumeurs malignes, et met à l'essai de petites molécules et peptides spécifiques comme moyen de diminuer l'agrégation de p53 et la formation de fibrilles amyloïdes.


_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15755
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène p53   Jeu 16 Juin 2016 - 12:06

Geneticists from KU Leuven, Belgium, have shown that tumour protein TP53 knows exactly where to bind to our DNA to prevent cancer. Once bound to this specific DNA sequence, the protein can activate the right genes to repair damaged cells.

All cells in our body have the same DNA, yet they're all very different. One cell may become a brain cell, the other a muscle cell. This is because not all genes are active -- or 'switched on' -- in every cell. Professor Stein Aerts and his team study the 'switches' that turn genes on and off. Gaining insight into these mechanisms is very important, because genetic defects and differences may not only be in our genes, but also in the 'switches' that control them.

It's a known fact that genes are activated when a protein binds to a specific sequence on our DNA. But how does this protein find its way in our extraordinarily complex DNA? Scientists have thus far been assuming that one protein could never locate the exact DNA sequence to activate a specific gene all by itself -- at least not in human beings. However, Professor Aerts and his colleagues from the Department of Human Genetics at KU Leuven, Belgium, have now shown that some of these proteins are in fact capable of locating their targets autonomously. Furthermore, the composition of some DNA switches turns out to be unexpectedly simple.

"We used next-generation sequencing to test the capacity of DNA sequences to act as switches for more than 1500 DNA sequences at the same time," explains Professor Stein Aerts. By way of comparison: in the past, researchers had to test all switches one by one. "We then used supercomputers and advanced computer models to examine the differences between effective and non-effective switches. That's how we discovered that TP53 is able to locate the exact DNA sequence to which it needs to bind -- all by itself."

"The protein TP53 plays a crucial role in the prevention of cancer. When a cell is damaged -- because of UV or radioactivity, for instance -- TP53 switches on the right genes to repair the cell. A cell sometimes loses TP53, so that cancer can start developing there. In about 50% of all cancers, there's a problem with the protein TP53. That's why it's so important to unravel its underlying mechanisms."

The findings of this study constitute a promising step towards unravelling the regulatory DNA code. The new techniques that were developed for this study will now be used to unravel more complex codes and to map more DNA switches. This is necessary to pave the way for future therapies that can specifically target the DNA switches to slow down the development of cancer.


---

Les généticiens de KU Leuven, en Belgique, ont montré que la protéine de tumeur TP53 sait exactement où se lier à notre ADN pour prévenir le cancer. Une fois lié à cette séquence d'ADN spécifique, la protéine peut activer les bons gènes pour réparer les cellules endommagées.

Toutes les cellules de notre corps ont le même ADN, mais ils sont tous très différents. Une cellule peut être une cellule du cerveau, l'autre cellule, un muscle. En fait, tous les gènes sont non-actifs  ou «en marche» - dans chaque cellule. Le professeur Stein Aerts et son équipe étudient les «commutateurs» qui transforment les gènes à "on" ou à "off". Mieux comprendre ces mécanismes est très important, parce que des anomalies génétiques et les différences peuvent être non seulement dans nos gènes, mais aussi dans les «commutateurs» qui les contrôlent.

C'est un fait connu que les gènes sont activés lorsqu'une protéine se lie à une séquence spécifique de notre ADN. Mais comment cette protéine trouve-t-elle son chemin dans notre ADN extraordinairement complexe? Les scientifiques ont jusqu'à présent supposé qu'une protéine ne pourrait jamais trouver la séquence d'ADN exacte pour activer un gène spécifique par elle-même - du moins pas l'adn des êtres humains. Cependant, le professeur Aerts et ses collègues du Département de génétique humaine à la KU Leuven, en Belgique, ont montré que certaines de ces protéines sont en effet capables de localiser leurs cibles de façon autonome. En outre, la composition de certains interrupteurs d'ADN se révèle surprenamment simple.

«Nous avons utilisé le séquençage de prochaine génération pour tester la capacité des séquences d'ADN pour agir en tant que commutateurs pour plus de 1500 séquences d'ADN en même temps», explique le professeur Stein Aerts. A titre de comparaison, dans le passé, les chercheurs ont du tester tous les commutateurs, un par un. "Nous avons ensuite utilisé des superordinateurs et des modèles informatiques de pointe pour examiner les différences entre les commutateurs efficaces et non efficaces Voilà comment nous avons découvert que TP53 est capable de localiser la séquence d'ADN exacte à laquelle il doit se lier -.. Par lui-même"

"La protéine TP53 joue un rôle crucial dans la prévention du cancer Quand une cellule est endommagé. - À cause des UV ou de la radioactivité, par exemple -. la TP53 active les bons gènes pour réparer la cellule Une cellule perd parfois TP53, de sorte que le cancer peut commencer à se développer là. Dans environ 50% de tous les cancers, il y a un problème avec la protéine TP53. Voilà pourquoi il est si important de démêler ses mécanismes sous-jacents. "

Les résultats de cette étude constituent une étape prometteuse vers démêler le code ADN réglementaire. Les nouvelles techniques qui ont été développées pour cette étude seront désormais utilisés pour démêler les codes plus complexes et plusieurs commutateurs d'ADN. Cela est nécessaire pour ouvrir la voie à de futures thérapies qui peuvent cibler spécifiquement les commutateurs d'ADN pour ralentir le développement du cancer.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15755
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène p53   Lun 18 Jan 2016 - 0:29

When it comes to genes associated with cancer, none have been studied more extensively than p53, a tumor suppressor gene that serves as the guardian of our genetic information. More than half of all cancers have mutations of p53, meaning that this particular gene must often be suppressed in order for a cancer to grow and spread.

P53 does not act alone in its protection of our genetic information. Telomeres -- structures of proteins that cap off and protect our DNA at the tips of chromosomes like the aglets or clear tips of shoelaces -- preserve these vital instructions as well. However, despite both p53 and telomeres offering similar benefits, the role of this key tumor suppressor gene as it relates to telomeres had never been properly described.

Now, new research from scientists at The Wistar Institute shows that p53 is able to suppress accumulated DNA damage at telomeres. This is the first time this particular function of p53 has ever been described and shows yet another benefit of this vital gene.

The findings were published in the European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO) Journal.

The gene p53 regulates our genome's integrity. When DNA is damaged by cellular stress or other means, p53 helps to activate the transcription of genes that help with controlling the cell cycle and inducing apoptosis, or cell death. However, prior studies have shown that p53 can bind at many locations across the genome, including many sites that are not responsible for activating these regulatory genes, and p53 itself has many distinct binding sites. Since both p53 and telomeres protect the genome, Wistar's team wanted to focus on these binding sites to see how the two might be more closely related than has ever been shown.

"We believed that p53 may be responsible for a more direct protective effect in telomeres," said Paul Lieberman, Ph.D., professor and program leader of the Gene Expression and Regulation program, director of the Center for Chemical Biology and Translational Medicine, and the Hilary Koprowski, M.D., Endowed Professor at The Wistar Institute, and lead author of the study.

Using ChIP-sequencing, which allows researchers to study interactions between proteins and DNA, a team of scientists at Wistar identified p53-binding sites in subtelomeres. These are segments of DNA situated in between telomeres and chromatin, the complex of DNA and proteins found in the nucleus of our cells.

The researchers found that when p53 was bound to subtelomeres, the protein was able to suppress the formation of a histone modification called gamma-H2AX. This histone is modified in greater amounts when there is a double strand break on DNA. If it persists, the break is not repaired, so suppressing its expression means that the DNA is being preserved. Additionally, p53 was able to prevent DNA degradation in telomeres, thereby keeping them intact and allowing them to more properly protect the tips of our chromosomes.

"Based on our findings, we propose that the modifications to chromatin made by p53 enhance local DNA repair or protection," Lieberman said. "This would be yet another tumor suppressor function of p53, thus providing additional framework for just how important this gene is in protecting us from cancer."

---

Pour ce qui est des gènes associés au cancer, aucun n'a été étudié plus largement que p53, un gène suppresseur de tumeur qui est le gardien de notre information génétique. Plus de la moitié de tous les cancers ont des mutations de p53, ce qui signifie que ce gène particulier doit souvent être supprimé pour qu'un cancer se développer et se propage.

P53 n'agit pas seul dans sa protection de notre information génétique. Les télomères - structures de protéines qui servent de capuchons et protègent notre ADN à l'extrémité des chromosomes - conservent ces instructions vitales aussi. Cependant, alors que p53 et les télomères offrent des avantages similaires, le rôle de ce gène suppresseur de tumeur en ce qui concerne les télomères n''avait jamais été correctement décrit.

Maintenant, une nouvelle étude de chercheurs de l'institut Wistar montre que p53 est capable de supprimer les dommages de l'ADN accumulé au télomères. Et c'est la première fois que cette fonction particulière de p53 a été décrite et cela montre encore un autre avantage de ce gène essentiel.

Les résultats ont été publiés dans le European Molecular Biology Organisation (EMBO) Journal.

Le gène p53 régule l'intégrité de notre génome. Lorsque l'ADN est endommagé par le stress cellulaire ou d'autres moyens, p53 permet d'activer la transcription de gènes qui aident à contrôler le cycle cellulaire et l'induction de l'apoptose, ou mort cellulaire. Toutefois, des études antérieures ont montré que p53 peut se lier à de nombreux endroits à travers le génome, y compris de nombreux sites qui ne sont pas responsables de l'activation de ces gènes régulateurs, et p53 lui-même a de nombreux sites de liaison distincts. Puisque les deux, p53 et télomères, protègent le génome, l'équipe de Wistar voulait se concentrer sur ces sites de liaison pour voir comment les deux pourraient être liées plus étroitement que ce qui a été déja démontré.

"Nous pensions que p53 peut être responsable d'un effet protecteur plus direct dans les télomères», a déclaré Paul Lieberman, Ph.D. et Hilary Koprowski, MD, professeur à La Wistar Institute et principal auteur de l'étude.

L'utilisation de séquençage par puce électronique, a permis aux chercheurs d'étudier les interactions entre les protéines et l'ADN, une équipe de scientifiques au Wistar a identifié les sites de liaison p53 avec les subtélomères. Il y a des segments d'ADN situées entre les télomères et la chromatine, c'est un complexe d'ADN et de protéines présentes dans le noyau de nos cellules.

Les chercheurs ont découvert que, lorsque p53 est liée aux subtélomères, la protéine est capable de supprimer la formation d'une modification de l'histone appelée H2AX gamma. Cette histone est modifié en plus grandes quantités quand il y a une double rupture des brins de l'ADN. Si elle persiste, la cassure n'est pas réparée, donc supprimer son expression signifie que l'ADN est préservé. En outre, p53 a été capable de prévenir la dégradation de l'ADN dans des télomères, ce qui les maintient intact et leur permettant de protéger plus correctement les pointes de ses chromosomes.

"Sur la base de nos conclusions, nous proposons que les modifications de la chromatine faites par p53 améliorer la réparation de l'ADN ou la protection locale", a déclaré Lieberman. "Ce serait encore une autre fonction de suppresseur de tumeur p53, fournissant ainsi le cadre supplémentaire pour l'importance de ce gène est en nous protégeant contre le cancer."


_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15755
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène p53   Mar 24 Nov 2015 - 18:17

A crucial tumor-thwarting gene protects an immune attack against lung cancer by blocking the key to an off switch on T cells, the customized warriors of the immune system, a team led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reports in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

"Identifying this role for tumor-suppressing p53 provides both a potential biomarker for response to important new cancer immunotherapy drugs and a possible new therapeutic pathway for treatment," said James Welsh, M.D., associate professor of Radiation Oncology at MD Anderson and senior author.

This preclinical research shows an experimental drug currently in phase I clinical trials can replace the immunity-protecting role lost when p53 fails.

The p53 gene is damaged, missing or under-expressed in 42 percent of common cancers and 70 percent of lung cancers. It's by far the most common mutation in cancer. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States, with an estimated 221,200 new diagnoses and 158,040 deaths in 2015, according to the National Cancer Institute.

Scientists have long known that p53 plays a central role in cancer control by regulating a process that forces abnormal cells to repair themselves and, failing that, to kill themselves.

Welsh and colleagues found that p53 also blocks a protein called PDL1 that tumor cells can wield to halt immune attack. Like a key, PDL1 connects with and activates a checkpoint molecule called PD1 found on the surface of T cells that shuts down those killer white blood cells. Two PD1-inhibiting drugs, pembrolizumab (Keytruda) and nivolumab (Opdivo) were approved this year for treatment of metastatic lung cancer. Both drugs help a significant fraction of patients, but not all.

p53 launches miR-34a to thwart PDL1

First author Maria Angelica Cortez, Ph.D., instructor of Experimental Radiation Oncology, identified the mechanism by which p53 blocks expression of PDL1.

"The interaction is specific: p53 activates the micro RNA miR-34a, which in turn directly blocks expression of PDL1," said Cortez. "If you lose p53 function, then miR-34a is lost and PDL1 is over-expressed."

Unlike messenger RNAs produced by genes that lead to production of specific proteins, micro RNAs do not code for proteins but instead regulate other genes.

While p53 had been linked to other aspects of immune response, the JNCI paper is the first to connect it to immune evasion by tumors and regulation of PDL1.

The team conducted a series of experiments in cell lines, miRNA target-predicting databases and tumor samples from non-small cell lung cancer patients. Then in a mouse model of NSCLC they showed that MRX34, alone or with radiation therapy, reduced PDL1 expression, preventing T cell exhaustion.

MRX34, a first-in-class miR-34-based cancer therapy being developed by Mirna Therapeutics in Austin, Texas, packages a synthetic version of natural miR-34a in a fatty nanoparticle called a liposome. The drug is in phase I clinical trials for advanced solid tumors, liver cancer and hematological malignancies at MD Anderson and other cancer clinics.

The researchers analyzed tumor samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas of 181 patients with NSCLC. Expression of p53 and PDL1 were inversely correlated, when one was high, the other was low and vice-versa. Tumors with p53 mutated had higher levels of PDL1 and lower levels of miR-34a.

High levels of p53, miR-34a increase survival

Patients with either low PDL1 and high p53 expression or with high p53 and miR-34a levels had longer median survival than those with low expression of p53 and miR-34a and higher PDL1.

Forced expression of miR-34a in NSCLC cell lines suppressed PDL1. Injecting MRX34 into lung cancer tumors in mice increased levels of miR-34a and reduced levels of PDL1. The team also showed that miR-34a binds to a specific site on the PDL1 gene to block its expression.

The researchers randomized mice to control, MRX34, radiation therapy or a combination of MRX34 and radiation. The treatment arms all led to increased numbers of T cells infiltrating the tumor, reduced numbers of T cells positive for the PD1 checkpoint, and slowed tumor growth, with the combination having the strongest effects.

Next steps

Studies under way include a retrospective analysis of the clinical outcome of patients treated with PD1 inhibitors to see whether p53 or miR-34a status at the initial biopsy predicted response.

While patients with PDL1 in their tumors have a higher response rate to PD1 checkpoint inhibitors, a fraction of patients without the biomarker also respond to these drugs. So additional biomarkers are sought to further guide treatment, Cortez said.

In the lab, the team is combining MRX34 with a PD1 inhibitor to see if the combination improves tumor response, Welsh said.


---

Un gène essentiel pour contrecarrer la tumeur empêche une attaque immunitaire contre le cancer du poumon en bloquant la clé d'un interrupteur sur les cellules T, les guerriers personnalisés du système immunitaire, selon une équipe dirigée par des chercheurs de l'Université du Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center dans les Journal de l'Institut national du cancer.

"L'identification de ce rôle pour le suppresseur de tumeurs p53 fournit à la fois un biomarqueur potentiel de réponse à d'importants nouveaux médicaments d'immunothérapie du cancer et une nouvelle voie thérapeutique possible pour le traitement", a déclaré James Welsh, MD, professeur agrégé de radio-oncologie au MD Anderson et auteur principal.

Cette recherche préclinique montre qu'un médicament expérimental actuellement en phase I des essais cliniques peut remplacer le rôle de l'immunité protégeant perdue lorsque p53 échoue.

Le gène p53 est endommagée, manquante ou sous-exprimé dans 42 pour cent des cancers communs et 70 pour cent des cancers du . Il est de loin la mutation la plus fréquente dans le cancer. Le cancer du poumon est la principale cause de décès par cancer aux États-Unis, avec une estimation 221,200 nouveaux diagnostics et 158,040 décès en 2015, selon l'Institut national du cancer.

Les scientifiques savent depuis longtemps que p53 joue un rôle central dans la lutte contre le cancer par la régulation d'un processus qui oblige les cellules anormales à se réparer elles-mêmes ou, à défaut, de se tuer.

Welsh et ses collègues ont constaté que p53 bloque également une protéine appelée PDL1 que les cellules tumorales peuvent utiliser pour stopper l'attaque immunitaire. Comme une clé, PDL1 se connecte avec une molécule active appelée point de contrôle PD1 trouvé sur la surface de cellules T qui arrête ces tueuses, les globules blancs. Deux médicaments inhibant PD1, lambrolizumab (Keytruda) et nivolumab (Opdivo) ont été approuvés cette année pour le traitement du cancer du poumon métastatique. Les deux médicaments aident une fraction significative des patients, mais pas tous.

p53 lance miR-34a pour contrecarrer PDL1

La première auteur Maria Angelica Cortez, Ph.D., instructeur de radio-oncologie expérimentale, a identifié le mécanisme par lequel p53 bloque expression de PDL1.

"L'interaction est spécifique: p53 active la micro ARN miR-34a, qui à son tour directement bloque l'expression de PDL1", a déclaré Cortez. "Si vous perdez la fonction de p53, miR-34a est perdu et PDL1 est surexprimé."

Contrairement aux ARN messagers produites par les gènes qui conduisent à la production de protéines spécifiques, les micro-ARN ne codent pas pour des protéines mais régulent d'autres gènes.

Alors que p53 avait été liée à d'autres aspects de la réponse immunitaire, le papier JNCI est le premier à le connecter à l'évasion immunitaire par des tumeurs et la réglementation de PDL1.

L'équipe a mené une série d'expériences dans des lignées cellulaires, des bases de données de miRNA aveec la prévision de cible et des échantillons de tumeurs de patients atteints de cancer du non à petites cellules. Puis, dans un modèle de souris de NSCLC, ils ont montré que MRX34, seul ou avec une radiothérapie, réduit l'expression de PDL1, ce qui empêche l'épuisement des cellules T.

MRX34, un traitement du cancer à base de miR-34 de première classe en cours d'élaboration par Mirna Therapeutics à Austin, Texas, emballe une version synthétique de miR-34a naturel dans une nanoparticule de gras appelé un liposome. Le médicament est en essais cliniques de phase 1 pour les tumeurs avancées solides, le cancer du foie et des hémopathies malignes au MD Anderson et d'autres cliniques de cancérologie.

Les chercheurs ont analysé des échantillons de tumeurs de l'Atlas du génome du cancer de 181 patients atteints de NSCLC. L'expression de p53 et PDL1 étaient inversement corrélées, quand l'une était haute, l'autre était faible et vice-versa. Les tumeurs p53 mutée avec des niveaux plus élevés de PDL1 et des niveaux inférieurs de miR-34a.

Des niveaux élevés de p53, miR-34a augmente la survie

Les patients atteints soit de faibles niveaux de PDL1 et une forte expression de p53 ou avec des niveaux élevés de p53 et de miR-34a avaient une survie plus longue médiane que ceux avec une faible expression de p53 et miR-34a et un PDL1 supérieur.

L'expression forcée de miR-34a dans des lignées cellulaires de NSCLC supprime PDL1. Injecter MRX34 dans les tumeurs de cancer du poumon chez les souris a acrru les niveaux de miR-34a et réduit les niveaux de PDL1. L'équipe a également montré que miR-34a se lie à un site spécifique sur le gène PDL1 pour bloquer son expression.

Les chercheurs ont randomisé des souris pour contrôler, MRX34, une radiothérapie ou une combinaison de rayonnement et de MRX34. Les groupes de traitement ont conduit dans l'ensemble à un nombre accru de cellules T infiltrant la tumeur, et à une réduction du nombre de cellules T positives pour le point de contrôle PD1, et ralentit la croissance tumorale, la combinaison ayant les effets les plus marqués.

Prochaines étapes

Les études en cours comprennent une analyse rétrospective de l'évolution clinique des patients traités avec des inhibiteurs de PD1 pour voir si p53 ou le statut miR-34a à la biopsie initiale prédit la réponse.

Bien que les patients avec PDL1 dans leurs tumeurs ont un taux de réponse plus élevé aux inhibiteurs de point de contrôle PD1, une fraction de patients sans le biomarqueur peuvent aussi répondre à ces médicaments. Donc des biomarqueurs supplémentaires sont recherchés pour guider un traitement ultérieur, dit Cortez.

Dans le laboratoire, l'équipe est à combiner MRX34 avec un inhibiteur de PD1 pour voir si la combinaison améliore la réponse de la tumeur.



_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15755
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène p53   Lun 25 Mai 2015 - 14:45

Removing accumulated mutant p53 protein from a cancer model showed that tumors regress significantly and survival increases. This finding, by an international team of cancer researchers led by Ute Moll, MD, Professor of Pathology at Stony Brook University School of Medicine, is reported in a paper published advanced online May 25 in Nature.


For two decades cancer researchers have looked unsuccessfully for ways to develop compounds to restore the function of mutant p53 proteins. This team of researchers discovered that eliminating the abnormally stabilized mutant p53 protein in cancer in vivo has positive therapeutic effects.

p53 is the most important tumor suppressor protein that protects our cells from becoming cancerous. However, mutations in p53 that insert incorrect amino acids can generate aberrant proteins with not only abrogated tumor suppressor function but newly gained oncogenic function (GOF) that promote malignant progression, invasion, metastasis and chemoresistance. Importantly, mutant p53 (mutp53) proteins undergo massive accumulation specifically in tumors, which is the key requisite for GOF. Mutp53 is expressed in 40 to 50 percent of all human tumors and although currently 11 million patients worldwide live with tumors expressing highly stabilized mutp53, it was hitherto unknown whether mutp53 is a therapeutic target to treat cancers.

"Our study clearly shows that mutp53 overexpressing tumors are dependent on continuous overexpression for survival and maintenance," said Dr. Moll. "This model has direct relevance for similar cancers in humans with the same mutation. Our work may have important clinical implications and be a foundation for a new way to treat mutp53-related cancers."

Dr. Moll explained that the methods researchers used to treat the mutp53 cancers are two-fold: genetic ablation of the mutp53 gene and pharmacologically attacking the molecular apparatus that is responsible for stabilization of mutp53.

They discovered that, overall, when mutp53 is depleted, tumors regress or stagnate for some time because tumor cells die. This results in mice surviving longer, gaining an increase of 37% to 59% in lifespan.

Dr. Moll added that if cancer researchers are able to identify human p53 tumors that are equally dependent on continuous p53 overexpression, the drug they used in this study could potentially improve clinical survival and/or enhance tumor sensitivity to other anti-cancer drugs.

---


Enlever la protéine p53 mutante à partir d'un modèle de cancer a montré que les tumeurs régressent significativement et que la survie augmente. Cette constatation, par une équipe internationale de chercheurs sur le cancer menées par Ute Moll, MD, professeur de pathologie à la faculté de médecine de l'Université Stony Brook, est rapporté dans un article publié en ligne avancée 25 mai à la nature.


Depuis deux décennies, les chercheurs de cancer ont examiné en vain des moyens de développer des composés pour restaurer la fonction des protéines p53 mutantes. Cette équipe de chercheurs ont découvert que l'élimination de la protéine p53 mutante anormalement stabilisée dans le cancer in vivo a des effets thérapeutiques positifs.

p53 est la plus importante protéine qui supprime des tumeurs et qui protège les cellules de devenir cancéreuses. Cependant, des mutations dans p53 qui insèrent des acides aminés incorrects peuvent générer des protéines aberrantes avec non seulement l'abrogation de sa fonction de suppresseur de tumeur, mais une fonction oncogène nouvellement acquise (GOF) qui favorisent la progression maligne, l'invasion, la métastase et la chimiorésistance. Fait important, les protéines p53 mutantes (mutp53) subissent une accumulation massive spécifiquement dans les tumeurs, ce qui est la condition essentielle pour une GOF. La Mutp53 est exprimée dans 40 à 50 pour cent de toutes les tumeurs humaines et même si actuellement 11 millions de patients dans le monde vivent avec des tumeurs exprimant fortement une mutp53 stabilisée, on ne savait pas jusqu'à maintenant si mutp53 était une cible thérapeutique pour traiter les cancers.

«Notre étude montre clairement que les tumeurs qui surexpriment mulp53 dépendent de cette surexpression pour continuer leur survie et leur maintenance", a déclaré le Dr Moll. "Ce modèle a une pertinence directe pour les cancers similaires chez les humains avec la même mutation. Notre travail peut avoir des implications cliniques importantes et être une base pour une nouvelle façon de traiter les cancers liés à mutp53."

Dr Moll a expliqué que les méthodes utilisées pour traiter les cancers mutp53 sont de deux ordres: l'ablation génétique du gène de mutp53 et attaquer pharmacologiquement l'appareil moléculaire qui est responsable de la stabilisation de mutp53.

Ils ont découvert que, dans l'ensemble, quand mutp53 est épuisée, les tumeurs régressent ou stagnent pour un certain temps parce que les cellules tumorales meurent. Il en résulte des souris survivantes plus, gagnant une augmentation de 37% à 59% en durée de vie.

Le Dr. Moll ajouté que si les chercheurs sont capables d'identifier les tumeurs p53 humains qui sont également dépendants de la surexpression de p53 continu, le médicament qu'ils ont utilisé dans cette étude pourrait potentiellement améliorer la survie clinique et / ou d'améliorer la sensibilité de la tumeur à d'autres médicaments anti-cancéreux.







_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15755
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène p53   Mer 19 Nov 2014 - 16:35

Scientists have found that altering members of the p53 gene family, known as tumor suppressor genes, causes rapid regression of tumors that are deficient in or totally missing p53. Study results suggest existing diabetes drugs, which impact the same gene-protein pathway, might be effective for cancer treatment.

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center investigation showed that, in vivo, the genes p63 and p73 can be manipulated to upregulate or increase levels of IAPP, a protein important for the body's ability to metabolize glucose. IAPP is found in some diabetes drugs already on the market.

The research findings were published in today's issue of Nature.

The study, led by Elsa R. Flores, Ph.D., associate professor of molecular and cellular oncology, centered on p63 and p73 because of the genes' ability to cause tumor regression or spur its growth due to their unique genetic makeup.

"P53 is altered in most human cancers and p53 reactivation suppresses tumors in vivo in mice. This strategy has proven difficult to implement therapeutically. We examined an alternative approach by manipulating the p53 family members, p63 and p73," said Flores.

Flores described two "warring" versions of p63 and p73 that are at odds when it comes to tumor suppression. One version, known as transactivation domain-bearing, is structurally and functionally similar to p53 in their ability to suppress tumors. The other version, which lacks this transactivation domain, actually prevents p53 from stopping tumor growth. Transactivation domains are specific regions within a protein known as a transcription factor that effect further downstream cellular responses.

"The p53 family interacts extensively in cellular processes that promote tumor suppression," said Flores. "Thus, a clear understanding of this interplay in cancer is needed to treat tumors with p53 alterations."

Flores' team found that by deleting the p63 and p73 versions that lacked transactivation domains, they were able to metabolically reprogram cells so that the cancer progression was stopped and reversed in p53-deficient tumors. This was accomplished through increasing levels of IAPP, a gene important to the body's use of insulin. IAPP encodes amylin, chains of amino acids that are co-secreted with insulin. Flores sees IAPP as significant in trying new therapeutic approaches for treating p53-deficient tumors.

"We found that IAPP is involved in tumor regression and that amylin, the protein encoded by the IAPP gene, stops a cell's ability to metabolize glucose, leading to programmed cell death," said Flores. "Pramlintide, a synthetic type of amylin that is currently used to treat type 1 and type 2 diabetes, caused rapid tumor regression in p53-deficient lymphomas of the thymus."

Flores tested Pramlintide on a variety of human cancer cell lines with p53 deletions and mutations and found the drug to be highly effective in inhibiting glucose metabolization and causing programmed cell death.

"This represents a novel strategy to target p53-deficient and mutant cancers," said Flores. She and her team also identified critical receptors on tumor cells with p53 deletions and mutations needed for Pramlintide to induce tumor regression. The receptors represent a potential prognostic marker for determining if Pramlintide will be effective in treating cancer patients with p53 deletions or mutations.

---

Des chercheurs ont découvert que les membres altérés de la famille des gènes p53, connu sous le nom de gènes suppresseurs de tumeurs, provoque une régression rapide de la tumeur qui sont déficientes en p53 ou totalement absente. Les résultats de l'étude suggèrent que des médicaments contre le diabète déjà existants, qui influent sur la même voie que le gène et la protéine, pourraient être efficaces pour le traitement du cancer.

L'Université du Texas a montré que, in vivo, les gènes p63 et p73 peuvent être manipulés pour réguler à la hausse les niveaux de IAPP, une protéine importante pour la capacité de l'organisme à métaboliser le glucose. IAPP se trouve dans certains médicaments contre le diabète déjà sur le marché.

Les résultats de la recherche ont été publiés dans le numéro d'aujourd'hui de la nature.

L'étude a été centrée sur p63 et p73 en raison de la capacité de ces gènes à provoquer une régression de la tumeur ou stimuler sa croissance en raison de leur constitution génétique unique.

"P53 est modifiée dans la plupart des cancers humains et la réactivation de p53 supprime les tumeurs in vivo chez la souris. Cette stratégie a été difficile à mettre en œuvre sur le plan thérapeutique. Nous avons examiné une approche alternative par la manipulation des membres de la famille de p53, p63 et p73", a déclaré Flores.

Flores a décrit deux versions "belligérantes" de p63 et p73 qui sont en désaccord en ce qui concerne la suppression des tumeurs. Une version, connue sous le nom de domaine du palier de transactivation, qui est structurellement et fonctionnellement similaire à p53 dans leur capacité à supprimer les tumeurs. L'autre version, qui manque de ce domaine de transactivation, empêche en fait p53 de faire l'arrêt de la croissance de la tumeur. Les domaines de transactivation sont des régions spécifiques à l'intérieur d'une protéine connue en tant que facteur de transcription qui affecte les réponses cellulaires plus en aval.

"La famille de p53 interagit beaucoup dans les processus cellulaires qui favorisent la suppression des tumeurs", a déclaré Flores. "Ainsi, une compréhension claire de ce jeu dans le cancer est nécessaire pour traiter les tumeurs avec des altérations du gène p53."

L'équipe de Flores a constaté que par la suppression des versions de p63 et p73 qui manquaient de domaines de transactivation, ils ont réussi à reprogrammer des cellules métaboliquement de sorte que la progression du cancer a été stoppée et inversée dans les tumeurs déficientes en p53. Cela a été réalisé grâce à des niveaux croissants d'IAPP, un gène important pour l'utilisation par l'organisme de l'insuline. IAPP code pour l'amyline, les chaînes d'acides aminés qui sont co-sécrétées avec l'insuline. Flores voit IAPP comme important pour essayer de nouvelles approches thérapeutiques pour le traitement des tumeurs déficientes en p53.

"Nous avons trouvé que l'IAPP est impliqué dans la régression des tumeurs et que l'amyline, la protéine codée par le gène de l'IAPP, arrête la capacité d'une cellule à métaboliser le glucose, ce qui conduit à la mort cellulaire programmée», dit Flores. "Pramlintide, un type synthétique de l'amyline qui est actuellement utilisé pour traiter le type 1 et le diabète de type 2, a causé la régression rapide de la tumeur dans les lymphomes déficientes en p53 du thymus."

Flores Pramlintide testé sur diverses lignées de cellules cancéreuses humaines avec des délétions et de mutations de p53 et ont trouvé que le médicament soit hautement efficace dans l'inhibition de la métabolisation du glucose et de provoquer la mort cellulaire programmée.

"Cela représente une nouvelle stratégie pour cibler les cancers déficients ou mutants en p53 ", a déclaré Flores. Elle et son équipe ont également identifié des récepteurs critiques sur les cellules tumorales avec des suppressions de p53 et les mutations nécessaires pour Pramlintide pour induire une régression de la tumeur. Les récepteurs représentent un marqueur pronostique potentiel pour déterminer si Pramlintide sera efficace dans le traitement de patients cancéreux avec des deletions ou des mutations du gène p53.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15755
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène p53   Sam 1 Fév 2014 - 18:49

De récents travaux menés par une équipe française dirigée par Hugues de Thé (Université Paris Diderot/ Inserm/ CNRS/AP-HP), ont montré que le mécanisme de la sénescence, caractérisée par un vieillissement normal des cellules, pourrait avoir une action anticancéreuse. Ces recherches montrent que les traitements ciblés contre une forme rare de leucémie (La leucémie aiguë promyélocytaire), entraîne une cascade d’événements moléculaires qui conduit à la sénescence cellulaire et à la guérison.

De précédentes recherches avaient déjà pu montrer que la protéine PML/RARA était responsable de la prolifération des cellules cancéreuses chez les patients atteints de leucémie aiguë promyélocytaire. Or, les traitements ciblés proposés contre ce cancer du sang combinent une hormone – l’acide rétinoïque – et un toxique – l’arsenic – et permettent une guérison définitive de la majorité des patients, bien que l'action précise de ce traitement sur les cellules malades ne soit toujours pas entièrement comprise.

Voulant élucider ce mécanisme, les chercheurs ont montré que ce traitement spécifique contre cette forme de leucémie provoquait de manière surprenante une cascade d’événements conduisant à la sénescence et à l'arrêt de la multiplication des cellules malignes. Selon cette étude, la protéine p53 jouerait un rôle clé dans le déclenchement de ce processus de sénescence.

Ainsi se dévoile, pour ce cancer précis, l'ensemble de la cascade moléculaire qui conduit à l’élimination des cellules malades et à la guérison totale du patient, par le seul traitement combiné acide rétinoïque/arsenic. Cette compréhension du mécanisme cellulaire et moléculaire de la guérison de la leucémie aiguë promyélocytaire pourrait déboucher à terme sur une utilisation thérapeutique élargie de cette voie PML/p53 pour combattre d'autres types de cancers.

Article rédigé par Georges Simmonds pour RT Flash

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15755
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène p53   Lun 4 Fév 2013 - 15:59


_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15755
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène p53   Ven 8 Juin 2012 - 7:31

(June 7, 2012) — A team of UC Davis investigators has found that a genetic mutation may play an important role in the development of prostate cancer. The mutation of the so-called p53 (or Tp53) gene was previously implicated in late disease progression, but until now has never been shown to act as an initiating factor. The findings may open new avenues for diagnosing and treating the disease.

Une équipe de chercheurs a dcouvert qu'une mutation génétique pourrait jouer un rôle important dans le développement du cancer de la La mutation de p53 ou Tp53 a été auparavant impliqué dans les derniers stades de la maladie mais jusqu'à maintenant on ne lui avait jamais démontré un quelconque rôle dans l'initiation de cette maladie.

The study was published online in the journal Disease Models & Mechanisms and will appear in the November 2012 print edition in an article titled, "Initiation of prostate cancer in mice by Tp53R270H: Evidence for an alternate molecular progression."

L'étude a été publié en ligne sous le titre "Initiation du cancer de la prostate chez des souris par Tp53R270H.

"Our team found a molecular pathway to prostate cancer that differs from the current conventional wisdom of how the disease develops," said Alexander Borowsky, associate professor of pathology and laboratory medicine and principal investigator of the study. "With this new understanding, research can go in new directions to possibly develop new diagnostics and refine therapy."

L'équipe a découvert un nouveau chemin moléculaire pour le cancer de la prostate qui diffère de celui qui est connu.Avec cette nouvelle compréhension la recherche pourrait aller dans de nouvelles directions et développer de nouveaux moyens de diagnostics et raffiner la thérapie.

The investigators developed a mouse model genetically engineered to have a mutation in the "tumor suppressor" gene, p53, specifically in the cells of the prostate gland. These mice were significantly more likely to develop prostate cancer than control mice without the mutation, and provided the first indication that the p53 mutation could be involved in the initiation of prostate cancer. They also note that the mutation of p53 in the prostate differs from loss or "knock-out" of the gene, which suggests that the mechanism is more complicated than simply a "loss of tumor suppression" and appears to involve an actively oncogenic function of the mutant gene.

Les chercheurs ont développé un nouvel modèle de souris qui développe un cancer de la prostate à partie de cette mutation du gène p53. Ce mécanisme semble plus compliqué qu'une simple perte totale du gène.

The p53 gene encodes for a protein that normally acts as a tumor suppressor, preventing the replication of cells that have suffered DNA damage. Mutation of the gene, which can occur through chemicals, radiation or viruses, causes cells to undergo uncontrolled cell division. The p53 mutation has been implicated in the initiation of other malignancies, including breast, lung and esophageal cancers.

La mutation du gène qui peut arriver à cause de produits chimiques de radiation ou de virus peut faire que les cellules ont une division incontrolée. Le gène p53 a été impliqué dans l'initiation de d'autres cancers comme celui du sein, du poumon et de l'oesophage.

Other studies have associated p53 mutation with disease progression in prostate cancer, but this is the first to find that it can have a role in the early initiation of prostate cancer, as well.

Until now, understanding of the role of p53 was that mutation occurred exclusively as a late event in the course of prostate cancer. Based on the findings in the new mouse model that the researchers developed, p53 mutation not only can initiate prostate cancer but might also be associated with early progression toward more aggressive forms of the disease.

Genetic mutations can initiate cancers in a variety of ways. Those include promotion of uncontrolled cell growth and loss of the gene's normal cell growth-suppressor functions. Exactly how the p53 mutation promotes the initiation and progression of prostate cancer remains to be clarified and is a focus of current research by the UC Davis team. They also are trying to gain an understanding of how the p53 mutation affects the effectiveness of standard treatments for prostate cancer, such as radiation and hormone therapy.

Les mutations génétiques peuvent initier le cancer de différentes façons. Ces façons peuvent être la croisasnce cellulaire incontrolée, la perte de fonctions comme le controle de la croissance normale de la cellule

Another application of the discovery could be the development of a new diagnostic test for prostate cancer based on the presence of the p53 mutation as a biomarker.

"Knowing that prostate cancer can develop via p53 mutation opens new opportunities for researchers in the field," said Borowsky. "This is a game-changer in the understanding of prostate cancer."

Savoir que le cancer de la prostate peut se développer à partir d'une mutation de p53 peut changer la compréhension des choses pour ce cancer

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15755
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène p53   Lun 14 Mai 2012 - 19:07

A new study describes a compound that selectively kills cancer cells by restoring the structure and function of one of the most commonly mutated proteins in human cancer, the "tumor suppressor" p53. The research, published by Cell Press in the May 15th issue of the journal Cancer Cell, uses a novel, computer based strategy to identify potential anti-cancer drugs, including one that targets the third most common p53 mutation in human cancer, p53-R175H.

Une nouvelle étude décrit une molécule qui tue sélectivement les cellules cancéreuses en restaurant la structure et la fonction d'une des protéines les plus communément mutées la p53. La recherche a utilisé une nouvelle startégie basée sur l'ordinateur pour identifié des médicaments potentiels anti-cancer incluant une recherche qui cible la troisième plus importante mutation : le p53-r175h.

The number of new cancer patients harboring this mutation in the United States who would potentially benefit from this drug is estimated to be 30,000 annually.

Le nombre de nouveaux patients qui ont cette mutation aux États-unis et qui bénéficieraient de ce médicament est estimé à 30,000/année.

P53 recognizes cellular stress and either puts the brakes on cell proliferation, or kills the cell if the damage is irreparable. The gene encoding p53 is mutated in over half of human cancers, and loss of p53 function has been linked to many aspects of cancer including aggressiveness, metastasis and poor response to chemotherapy and radiation. "Restoring the function of mutant p53 with a drug has long been recognized as an attractive cancer therapeutic strategy," explains senior study author, Dr. Darren R. Carpizo, from The Cancer Institute of New Jersey. "However, it has proven difficult to find compounds that restore the lost function of a defective tumor-suppressor."

P53 reconnait le stress dans une cellule et soit arrête sa prolifération soit tue les cellules si le dommage est irréparable.. Le gène qui encode p53 est muté dans plus de la moitié des cancers humains. et la peerte de p53 est lié à bien des aspects du cancee incluant l'agressivité, les métastases et une mauvaise réponse à la chimio et à la radiation. Restaurer les fonctions normales de p53 a longtemps été reconnu comme une stratégie intéressante contre le cancer, toutefois c'était difficille comme approche.

Dr. Alexei Vazquez, a co-author of the study, developed a computer based screening method to identify compounds that target tumor cells with p53 mutations, but not cells with normal p53. The screening method was unique because it involved cancer cells with diverse genetic backgrounds, a model that recapitulates what is seen in actual human cancers. This method identified several compounds that killed cancer cells containing mutant p53. One of the compounds did so by restoring the structure and function of the p53-R175H mutant. The researchers went on describe the details of the reactivation mechanism and showed that normal cells were not impacted by the compound.

Une des molécules tuait les cellules cancéreuses en restaurant ls fonction du gène p53-r175h muté. Les cellules saines ne sont pas endommagées.

In addition to identifying a compound for selectively restoring the function of the p53-R175H mutant, the findings also support the development of rationally targeted cancer therapies. "Anti-cancer drug development is moving in the direction of "personalized medicine" in which the drugs are chosen based on the molecular pathways that are deranged in an individual patient's tumor," concludes Dr. Carpizo. "Our findings support the growing trend in developmental therapeutics in which the efficacy of future cancer drugs will depend upon the knowledge of the patient's tumor genotype."

Nos découvertes supportent la tendance croissante dans laquelle l,efficacité des futurs médicaments dépendra de la connaissance du génotype de la tumeur.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15755
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène p53   Dim 22 Jan 2012 - 14:58



Lorsque la tumeur se développe, les cellules tumorales se reproduisent de manière anarchique, ne se détruisent pas et provoquent la maladie. Par conséquent, réactiver la protéine P53, inactivée dans la moitié des cancers en réactivant son gène aurait pu permettre de rétablir une réponse cellulaire normale. Cependant, les chercheurs ont découvert que la protéine P53 est elle-même régulée par Mdm2, elle-même régulée par la protéine kinase ATM.


Cette étude qui permet de mieux comprendre comment les régulations respectives des protéines P53 et Mdm2 s'organisent en réponse à un dommage à l'ADN pourra contribuer à établir de nouvelles approches thérapeutiques anti-cancéreuses.


_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15755
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène p53   Ven 20 Jan 2012 - 12:16

Cancers : la réaction en chaîne de P53 est décryptée
lequotidiendumedecin.fr 20/01/2012

Le gène codant la protéine P53, connu depuis 1979 pour sa qualité de suppresseur de tumeur, et trouvé inactivé chez 50 % des sujets atteints de cancer, est l’objet de toutes les attentions dans la recherche en cancérologie. Rétablir sa présence pourrait peut-être préfigurer une piste intéressante. P53 régule finement la prolifération des cellules et déclenche, selon les besoins, la réparation de la cellule ou son apoptose naturelle. Les scientifiques émettent l’hypothèse qu’en réactivant ce gène en cancérologie, on pourrait peut-être empêcher l’emballement de la multiplication cellulaire.

Une équipe française, Robin Fhraeus et coll. (INSERM U940, hôpital Saint-Louis, Paris), apporte de nouveaux éléments de compréhension du mécanisme d’action de P53 et du processus de cancérisation. Après une lésion sur l’ADN, une protéine intervient, Mdm2, nécessaire pour activer le gène p53. Ce qui peut se faire grâce à l’intervention de la protéine ATM kinase.

Les chercheurs ont remonté la cascade d’événements : l’activation de Mdm2 est due à sa phosphorylation par la protéine kinase ATM, elle-même activée en cas de stress cellulaire. Cette phosphorylation de Mdm2 est cruciale pour faire passer la protéine P53 de l’état de régulateur négatif à celui de régulateur positif, favorisant sa traduction par une action sur l’ARNm. Et cela conduit à une augmentation de la quantité de p53 dans la cellule.

« Mieux connaître les mécanismes moléculaires spécifiques mis en place lors du stress cellulaire pourrait aider à établir de nouvelles approches thérapeutiques anticancéreuses », concluent-ils.


_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15755
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène p53   Jeu 21 Avr 2011 - 0:02

(Apr. 20, 2011) — Researchers of Apoptosis and Cancer Group of the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL) have found that a small molecule, Nutlin-3a, an antagonist of MDM2 protein, stimulates the signalling pathway of another protein, p53. By this way, it induces cell death and senescence (loss of proliferative capacity) in brain cancer, a fact that slows its growth. These results open the door for MDM2 agonists as new treatments for glioblastomas.

Les chercheurs ont découverts qu'une petite molécuel, la Nutlin-3a, un antagoniste de la protéine MDM2, stimule le chemin cellulaire d'une autre protéine, la p53. De cette façon, elle induit la mort et la sénescence du cancer du un fait qui ralentit sa progression . CEs résultats ouvrent la porte pour les antagonistes de MDM2 commenouveaux traitements pour les glioblastomes.

Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common brain tumour in adults and the most aggressive. Despite efforts on new treatments and technological innovation in neurosurgery, radiation therapy and clinical trials of new therapeutic agents, most patients die two years after diagnosis. Avelina Tortosa, IDIBELL and University of Barcelona (UB) researcher, coordinator of the study, explained that one objective of her group is "to find substances that sensitize tumour cells to radiotherapy for more efficient treatments."

Le glioblastome est le plus commun des cancers du cerveau chez les adultes et le plus agressif. Un objectif du groupe est de trouver des substances qui sensibilisent les cellules cancéreuses à la radiothérapie et à des traitements plus efficaces.

New therapeutic targets

There is evidence that several genetic alterations promote the growth, invasion and resistance to stimuli that induce programmed cell death (apoptosis). In this sense, the pilot project TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas) has sequenced the genome of up to 25 glioblastomas noting that 14% of patients have an increased expression of MDM2 and 35% had alterations in p53 expres​sion(apoptosis-inducing). That's why research is now focused on the development of new therapeutic strategies that target the apoptosis in gliomas.

Il y a évidence que plusieurs altérations génétiques promeuvent la croissance, l'invasion et la résistance aux stimulis qui induisent l'apoptose. Le projet pilote TCGA a séquencé le génome de 25 glioblastomes et ont noté que 14% des patients ont une augmentation de l'expression de MDM2 et 35% ont des altérations de p53 (qui induit apoptose). D'ou cette recherche.

The aim of this study was to investigate the antitumor activity of Nutlin-3a in cell lines and primary cultures of glioblastoma. Researchers have shown that Nutlin-3a induces apoptosis and cellular senescence by stimulating the p53 pathway in cells, because cells with mutations in this protein don't produce this response. They have also discovered that the use of Nutlin-3a enhances the response of glioblastoma cells to radiotherapy. "The radiation induced DNA damage of tumour cells," explained Tortosa, "the cells activate repairing mechanisms and, if they are unable to repair, they destruct themselves (a mechanism known as apoptosis). With Nutlin-3a we have seen that increases tumour cell death and therefore increases the effectiveness of radiotherapy treatment. "

Les chercheurs ont montré que Nutlin-3a induit l'apoptose et la sénescence cellulaire en stimulant le chemin cellulaire p53. Il sont aussi découvert que l'emploie de Nutlin-3a rehausse la réponse des cellules de glioblastome à la radiothérapie.

In conclusion, the results suggest that the MDM2 antagonists may be new therapeutic options for the treatment of glioblastoma patients.

Les antagonistes de MDM2 peuvent être de nouvelles thérapies pour le traitement du glioblastome.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15755
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène p53   Sam 9 Avr 2011 - 8:16

The study, done in two mouse models of human cancer, looked at two compounds designed to activate a protein that kills cancer cells. The protein, p53, is inactivated in a significant number of human cancers. In some cases, it is because another protein, MDM2, binds to p53 and blocks its tumor suppressor function. This allows the tumor to grow unchecked. The new compounds block MDM2 from binding to p53, consequently activating p53.

L'étude, faite sur deux modèles de cancer humain, a regardé de près deux molécules faites pour activer une protéine qui tue les cellules cancéreuses. La protéine p53 est inactivée dans beaucoup de cancers humain. Dans quelques cas, c'est parce qu'une autre protéine, MDM2 se lie à p53 et bloque sa fonction de supprimer les tumeurs. Ceci permet à la tumeur de croitre sans contrôle. La nouvelle molécule empêche MDM2 de se lier avec p53 et donc active la protéine.

"For the first time, we showed that activation of p53 by our highly potent and optimized MDM2 inhibitors can achieve complete tumor regression in a mouse model of human cancer," says lead study author Shaomeng Wang, Ph.D., Warner-Lambert/Parke-Davis Professor in Medicine and director of the Cancer Drug Discovery Program at the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Pour la première fois, nous avons montré que l'activation de p53 par notre puissant inhibiteur de MDM2 peut ateindre une complète régression dans un modèle de cancer humain sur une souris.

Wang presented the study at the American Association for Cancer Research 102nd annual meeting.

Many traditional cancer drugs also activate p53 but they do so by causing DNA damage in both tumor cells and normal cells, causing side effects. These new MDM2 inhibitors activate p53 while avoiding the DNA damage common with other drugs. In this study, which was done in collaboration with Ascenta Therapeutics and sanonfi-aventis, researchers showed that these new drugs shrank tumors without significant side effects.

Plusieurs médicaments additionnels peuvent activer p53 mais ils le font en endommageant les cellules normales autant que les cellules cancéreuses. Les chercheurs ont démontré que ce nouveau médicament rétrécit les tumeurs sans effets secondaires.

Because p53 is involved in all types of human cancer, the new drug has potential to be used in multiple types of cancer. Further, the researchers also identified certain markers in tumors that predict which ones will be particularly sensitive to the MDM2 inhibitor, which would allow physicians to target the drug only to patients most likely to benefit.

PArce que p53 est impliqué dans beaucoup de cancers, le nouveau médicament a le potentiel d'être utilisé dans beaucoup de cancers. Les chercheurs ont identifié certains marqueurs qui prédisent lesquels seront particulièrement sensibles à l,inhibiteur de MDM2 ce qui permettra aux docteurs d'employer le médicament à bon escient.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15755
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène p53   Jeu 31 Mar 2011 - 9:30





L'aggrégation de protéine, généralement associé avec l'Alzeimer et la maladie de la vache folle, joue un rôle significatif dansle cancer. Dans un article, des scientifiques décrivent certaines mutations de p53, un important suppresseur de tumeur, qui font que les protéines commencent à s'agglutiner et non seulement perdre leur fonction de protection mais aide le cancer.



p53 joue un rôle central dans la protection contre le cancer

Dans l'étude, l'accent était mis sur la protéine p53 qui joue un rôle clé dans la protection du corps contre le cancer. Si p53 fonctionne normalement, il contrôle la division cellulaire. Si p53 perd le contrôle - par exemple quand il ya une mutation dans la protéine - les cellules commencent à se diviser de manière incontrôlée, ce qui peut conduire à une tumeur. Des mutations de p53 sont observées dans environ la moitié des cas de cancer, ce qui rend cette protéine une cible importante dans le développement de nouvelles thérapies anticancéreuses.

agrégats p53 mutées

Des chercheurs ont trouvé une nouvelle fonction de la protéine p53 "Les mutations dans p53 font perdre sa fonction de protection à l aprotéine. Les protéine changent de forme et commencer à s'Accrocher les unes aux autres et à se rassembler. L'activité de p53 disparaît de la cellule et elle ne peut plus exercer sa fonction de contrôle correctement." Le mécanisme a été rencontrée dans environ un tiers des mutations du gène p53.

changement complet de caractère

En outre, les mutations font acquérir à la protéine p53 un caractère complètement différent. Elle était un facteur de protection et se mute en une substance qui, en fait, aide croissance de la tumeur. Elle semble former des agrégats avec d'autres substances de contrôle (p63 et p73) dans la cellule, leur faisant perdre leur fonction aussi.


Ça ne me surprendrait pas du tout que cancer et Alseimer soit relié parce que depuis que j'ai le cancer j'ai perdu ma mémoire
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15755
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène p53   Dim 27 Fév 2011 - 16:20

(Feb. 25, 2011) — Like a bounty hunter returning escapees to custody, a cancer-fighting gene converts organ cells that change into highly mobile stem cells back to their original, stationary state, researchers report online at Nature Cell Biology.
This newly discovered activity of the p53 gene offers a potential avenue of attack on breast cancer stem cells thought to play a central role in progression and spread of the disease, according to scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Comme un chasseur d'évadés de prison, un gène qui combat le cancer rattrapemt les cellules qui s'échappent des organes en devenant des cellules souches hautement mobiles et les reconvertit en cellules stationnaires qu'elles étaient à l'origine. Cette nouvelle activité découverte au gène p53 offre une avenue pour attaquer les cellules souches cancéreuses du vues comme des cellules jouant un rôle central dans la progresssion et l'avancée du cancer.

Long known for monitoring DNA damage and forcing defective cells to kill themselves, p53 also activates bits of RNA that block two proteins, the researchers found. This prevents conversion of epithelial-differentiated cells, which line or cover an organ, into cells that resemble mesenchymal stem cells when stimulated by the TGF-B(beta) growth factor.

Longtemps connu pour monitorer les dommages sur l'Adn et forcer les cellules défectueuses à se tuer elle-mêmes, le gène p53 active aussi des morceaux d'Arn qui bloquent deux protéines. Cela prévient la conversion des cellules épithéliales différenciées, qui sont à la frontière ou couvre un organe, en cellules qui ressemblent à des cellules souches mesenchymales quand stimuler par le facteur de croissance TGF-ß

Mesenchymal cells are mobile adult stem cells that can reproduce themselves and differentiate into a variety of cell types
"Blocking this conversion from epithelial cell to a mesenchymal cell type is important because that change plays an essential role in cancer metastasis," said senior author Mien-Chie Hung, Ph.D., professor and chair of MD Anderson's Department of Molecular and Cellular Oncology.

Les cellules mesenchymales sont des cellules souches mobiles adultes qui peuvent se reproduire elles-mêmes et se différencier en une variété de cellules types "bloquer cette conversion à partir des cellules épithéliales est important parce que ça change des choses dans un processus essentielles de la métastase des cellules" selon Mien-chie Hung.

Cancer treatment potential

"We found that p53 activates the micro RNA miR-200c, which forces cells that have taken on stem cell traits to revert to epithelial form," Hung said. "Activating this pathway has therapeutic potential to target tumor-initiating cells that have stem cell characteristics."

"Nous avons découvert que p53 active le micro Arn miR-200c, ce qui force les cellules qui ont changé de revenir à la forme épithélial" dit Hung " Activer ce chemin cellulaire a un potentiel thérapeuthique pour cibler les cellules initiatrices de tumeurs qui ont des caractéristiques de cellules souches.

Research has shown that about 80 percent of all solid tumors begin in the epithelial cells. However, 90 percent of cancer deaths are caused by metastasis, the progression and spread of the disease to other organs.

The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and its opposite process play important roles in embryonic development. Research has connected EMT activation to cancer progression and metastasis. Recent studies tie EMT to gain of stem cell traits in normal and transformed cells.

La transition épithélial à mésenchémial (EMT) et son inverse joue un rôle important dans le processus du développement embryonnaire . La recherche a aussi fait le lien entre cette transition EMT et l'activation du cancer et de sa progression. De récentes études lie EMT à l'acquisition de caractéristiques de cellules souches dans les cellules normales et transformées.

Cell status depends on p53, miR-200c levels

A series of experiments established that the p53 protein activates the miR-200c gene to produce the microRNA and that expression of the protein and miR-200c moved up and down together.

Une séries d'expériences a établi que la protéine p53 active le gène miR-200c pour produire le microArn et que l'expression de la protéine et du micro ARN 200c montent ou descendent ensemble.

•Knockout experiments in normal breast epithelial cells consistently showed that p53 expression stifled the EMT transition.

•Cells with reduced p53 changed into mesenchymal-like cells.

•When miR-200c was overexpressed in cells with low levels of p53, the cells took on epithelial characteristics, indicating that p53 uses the microRNA to block or reverse the transition to mesenchymal-type cells.

•Mutated p53 failed to produce miR-200c, increasing stem cells in the cell culture.

•Tissue array analysis of gene expression in 106 human breast tumor samples showed that low p53 expression correlated with higher expression of two genes associated with EMT. Increased p53 raised levels of miR-200c and the expression of a gene associated with epithelial status.

Mutations of p53 occur in more than half of cancers and loss of p53 activity correlates with poor prognosis in several cancer types. Restoring functions lost by p53 mutation by re-expressing miR-200c might be a good therapeutic strategy for treatment of p53-deficient tumors, Hung said.

lire aussi la réactivation du gène p53
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15755
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène p53   Mar 7 Déc 2010 - 23:54



A pioneering clinical trial is testing the effectiveness in leukemia of a small molecule that shuts down MDM2, a protein that can disable the well-known tumor suppressor p53.

Un essai clinique est en train de tester l'efficacité d'une petite molécule qui annule l'effet de MDM2 dans la leucémie, MDM2 étant une protéine qui peut désactiver p53, un suppresseur de tumeur connu.


Michael Andreeff, M.D., Ph.D., professor of Medicine and chief of Molecular Hematology and Therapy in the Department of Leukemia at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, presented preliminary results of this ongoing Phase I study at the 52nd Annual Meeting of the American Society of Hematology. The clinical trial is under way at MD Anderson and five other sites in the United States and United Kingdom.

The first-in-class drug has shown clinical activity in some patients and been well-tolerated, Andreeff said.

Le médicament premier dans son groupe a montré de l'activité clinique pour quelques patients et a été bien toléré.

Andreeff has been researching the interaction between MDM2 and p53 for five years. He says he believes this study may lead to an effective new way to fight some types of cancer with fewer side effects.

"P53 can be activated by chemotherapy or radiation, but both of these therapies carry risks of causing secondary tumors," he said. "If we can activate this tumor-suppressor with a method that is non-genotoxic and does not cause damage to a patient's DNA, we may be able to help avoid secondary tumors caused by other treatments."


Too much MDM2 degrades p53


Normally, p53 halts the division of defective cells and forces them to commit suicide or lose the ability to reproduce. However, the tumor suppressor is disabled in many types of cancer, often because of gene mutations or defective signaling.

While mutations of the TP53 gene are rare in cancers of the blood, the p53 protein may be degraded by other factors, including high levels of MDM2, which binds to p53 and orchestrates its degradation.

La protéine p53 peut être dégadé par MDM2 qui se lie avec elle et orchestre sa dégradation.

Previous research has suggested that p53 activation by disrupting the binding of MDM2 to p53 may be a novel strategy for cancer therapy. In preclinical studies, small-molecule MDM2 antagonists called Nutlins were found to be effective in solid tumors, leukemia and lymphoma.

cela pourrait être une nouvelle stratégie pour combattre le cancer. Des études ont déja montré que de petits antagonistes de MDM2 appelés Nutlins s'étaient montrés efficace dans des tumeurs de leucémie et de lymphome.

The drug used in this study, RG7112, a novel small molecule being developed by Roche, is a member of the Nutlin family.

Le médicament utilisé dans cette étude était RG7112 une petite molécule développé par ROche.


Clinical effects seen


Patients with relapsed or refractory acute or chronic leukemia were given RG7112 orally each day for 10 days, followed by 18 days of rest. Forty-seven patients, including 27 with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), have been treated to date.

There has been evidence of clinical activity, and one patient with AML has been leukemia-free for nine months. Reductions in lymph node and spleen size, as well as in circulating leukemia cells, were seen in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL).

"RG7112 has been well tolerated, and we've seen some effectiveness," Andreeff said. "So far it has done exactly what we thought it would. This gives us evidence it can be used in patients, is well-tolerated and can be given in dosages that can escalate to a point that shows a higher response rate."


Next steps


Enrollment in this study is ongoing and will be updated. Future single-agent and combination studies of RG7112 in leukemias are planned.

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15755
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène p53   Ven 4 Juin 2010 - 12:00

About HDM2/p53 Inhibition

Inhibiting the interaction between p53 and HDM2 (human double minute 2, and its murine counterpart, MDM2) is a very promising approach to restoring the natural tumor suppression function of the p53 protein.

Inhiber l'interaction entre p53 et HDM2 est une approche très prometteuse pour restaurer la fonction naturelle de p53 qui est de supprimer les tumeurs.

The p53 tumor suppressor is a principal mediator of growth arrest, senescence, and apoptosis in response to cellular damage. It is called the "guardian of the genome" because of its role in controlling the cell cycle and monitoring the integrity of the genome. HDM2 is the principal cellular antagonist of p53, acting to limit the p53 growth-suppressive function. Loss of p53 function is involved in 50 percent of cancers, either through mutation, overexpression or amplification of HDM2 in wild-type p53 tumors.


Le suppresseur p53 est le principal médiateur de l'Arrêt de la croissance, de la sénécence et de l'apoptose en réponse aux dommages cellulaires. Il est appelé le gardien du génome parce que son rôle est de controler le cycle de la cellule et de monitorer l'intégrité du génome. MDM2 est la prinipale cellule antagoniste à p53, elle agit pour liimiter la fonction de suppression de croissance de p53. La perte de p53 est impliquée dans 50% des cancers soit à travers la mutation, la surexpression de HDM2 dans les tumeurs impliquants p53.


Dernière édition par Denis le Sam 22 Nov 2014 - 9:22, édité 1 fois
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15755
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène p53   Ven 13 Nov 2009 - 14:33

(Nov. 13, 2009) — The seeming invincibility of cancerous tumors may be crumbling, thanks to a promising new gene therapy that eliminates the ability of certain cells to repair themselves. Researchers at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine have discovered that inactivation of a DNA repair gene called Hus1 efficiently kills cells lacking p53 -- a gene mutated in the majority of human cancers.

L'apparente invincibilité des tumeurs cancéreuses pourrait commencer à se lézarder grâce à une nouvelle thérapie prometteuse qui élimine la capacité de certaines cellules de se réparer. Les chercheurs ont découvert que l'inaction de gène réparateur appelé HUS1 tue efficacement les cellules qui manquent de p53 qui est un gène muté dans la majorité des cancers humains.

Using a mouse model, senior author Robert Weiss, associate professor of molecular genetics, first author and graduate student Stephanie Yazinski and colleagues explored how cells respond when both genes are inhibited. When they inactivated the Hus1 gene in healthy mammary gland tissues, the researchers report, it caused genome damage and cell death. And when they studied the effects of Hus1 inactivation in p53-deficient cells, which are highly resistant to cell death, they discovered that the ability of Hus1 inactivation to kill cells was even greater.

Utilisant un modèle de souris, Robert Weiss a exploré comment les cellules répondent lorsque les 2 gènes sont inhibés. Quand il a inactivé le gène Hus1 dans des tissus de glandes mamaires, le chercheur a rapporté que cela causait des dommages et la mort de la cellule. Et lorsqu'il a étudié les effets de Hus1 dans les cellules manquant de p53 qui sont habituellement très résistantes à la mort cellulaire, il a découvert la capacité de l'inactivation de Hus1 de tuer encore plus de cellules.

The study is published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (Nov. 9).
"Our work contributes to an important new understanding of cancer cells and their weaknesses," Weiss said. "The mutations that allow cancer cells to divide uncontrollably also make the cancer cells more dependent on certain cellular processes. We were able to exploit one such dependency of p53-deficient cells and could efficiently kill these cells by inhibiting Hus1."

"Notre travail contribue à une nouvelle et importante compréhension de la cellule cancéreuse et de sa faiblesse." dit Weiss "Les mutations qui permettent au cancer de se diviser incontrolablement font aussi que les cellules cancéreuses sont dépendantes de certains processus. nous sommes capables d'exploiter une de ces dépendances et nous pourrions tuer les cellules cancéreuses dépendantes de p53 efficacement en onhibant Hus 1.

Weiss and his team have new experiments under way. "We've proven the power of inhibiting both pathways in normal tissue," said Weiss. "Now we want to extend our knowledge to cancerous tissue and determine if the loss of Hus1 will impact the ability of cancers with p53 mutations to take hold and grow."

"Nous voulons savoir maintenant si la perte de Hus 1 affectera la capacité des cancers avec la mutation p53 de tenir bon et de croitre."

Weiss's research was funded by the National Institutes of Health and is now funded through 2013 in part by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA).
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15755
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène p53   Mar 10 Nov 2009 - 11:58

(Nov. 10, 2009) — Oncologists have had their hands tied because more than half of all human cancers have mutations that disable a protein called p53. As a critical anti-cancer watchdog, p53 masterminds several cancer-fighting operations within cells. When cells lose p53, tumors grow aggressively and often cannot be treated.
Les oncologistes avaient les mains liées parce que plus de la moitié de tous les cancers humains subissent des mutations qui désactivent la protéine p53. Comme chien de garde du cancer, p53 gère plusieurs opérations qui combattent le cancer. Quand les cellules perdent p53, les tumeurs croissent agressivement et deviennent hors de contrôle.
These tumors might be tough, but they're not invincible, suggests a new study from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL). The chink in the tumors' armor, according to CSHL Associate Professor Alea Mills, Ph.D., is a protein called TAp63, an older sibling of p53 that's usually intact and not mutated in most cancers.
Ces tumeurs pourraient être résistantes mais ne sont pas invincibles suggèrent une nouvelle étude. La faiblesse dans l'armure de p53 est une protéine appelée TAp63, un protéine assez similaire à p53 qui reste intacte et ne mute pas dans l apolupart des cancers.
Mills and her team have succeeded in shutting off the growth of tumors in which p53 is missing by turning up the production of TAp63 proteins, which make up one class of proteins produced by the p63 gene. TAp63 completely blocked tumor initiation, the team found, by inducing senescence, a state of growth arrest in which tumor cells are still metabolically alive but fail to divide. More importantly, turning up the levels of TAp63 in cells that did not have p53 blocked the progression of established tumors in mice.
Mills a réussi a faire cesser la croissance des tumeurs dans lesquels p53 est manquante avec la production de la protéines TAp63. TAp63 bloque complètement l'initiation des tumeurs en introduisant l'état de sénescence, un état ou les cellules sont encore vivantes mais ou elles ne se divisent plus. Plus important encore, faire monter le niveau de TAp63 dans les cellules qui n'ont plus p53 arrêtent la progression des tumeurs établies chez les souris.
"We were very excited to see that TAp63 shuts down cancer completely independently of p53," says Mills. "This means that we now have a way of attacking cancers that have damaged p53, which are very difficult to treat in the clinic." The study, funded by a Research Scholar Award from the American Cancer Society, appears online ahead of print on November 8th in Nature Cell Biology.
"Nous sommes très excités que TAp63 arrêtent le cancer complètement indépendamment de p53." dit Mills "Cela veut dire que nous avons maintenant un moyen d'attaquer les cancers qui ont le p53 endommagés, ce qui est d'une grande difficulté en clinique."
TAp63 protects from cancer
"p63 is a double-edged sword," says Mills, who discovered it when she was a postdoctoral researcher almost a decade ago. Of the six different proteins that are produced from the p63 gene, three promote activities that could lead to cancer. The remaining three, which are TAp63 versions, do the opposite: prevent cancer by triggering senescence -- a process that shuts down the tumor.
"p63 est cependant une arme à double tranchant. Sur 6 protéines qui sont produites par le gène p63, 3 promeuvent des activités qui peuvent conduire au cancer et 3 font l'inverse et préviennent le cancer en mettant la cellule en état de sénescence.
Using a genetic maneuver called chromosome engineering, the CSHL team has found that TAp63 staves off cancer via senescence. The maneuver enabled them to specifically wipe out the TAp63 proteins while leaving the other p63 proteins intact. When exposed to the cancer-causing protein Ras, normal cells underwent senescence and could not form tumors. But cells without TAp63 failed to undergo senescence and developed into massive tumors.

When p53 and TAp63 were both missing, Ras caused extremely rapid and aggressive tumors. This tumor growth was much more severe than in tumors lacking either TAp63 or p53, suggesting that the two related proteins, working together, pack a stronger anti-cancer punch than either one alone.
A future anti-cancer strategy?
The team found that TAp63 could also substitute for p53 in its ability to halt tumor growth. When TAp63 was turned on in Ras-producing cells that were missing p53, tumors never started. "This suggests that TAp63 overrides cancer-promoting signals and prevents cancer from even forming," explains Mills.
The team went a step further and showed that in addition to blocking the initiation of tumors, TAp63 could also shut down tumors that were already established. With help from Professor Scott Lowe, Ph.D., another researcher at CSHL, Mills' team genetically tricked tumors into producing TAp63 when they were exposed to a compound called doxycycline.
Now being able to turn on TAp63 at will, the team transplanted these cells (which lack p53 and overproduce Ras) into mice and monitored for tumors. Once the tumors formed, a "mouse clinic" was set up: half of the "patients" were treated with doxycycline to induce TAp63 production, whereas the other half received a placebo. Tumor growth continued in the placebo group, with the tumors becoming five times larger within a week. In contrast, the tumors in the mice exposed to doxycycline were abruptly shut down, and the tumors even shrank in size. Mills speculates that the tumor cells disappear because the newly senescent cells might attract the attention of the immune system, which have the ability to destroy them.
Maintenant capable de faire produire le gène TAp63 à volonté, l'équipe de chercheurs a tranplanté ces cellules (avec un manque de p53 et une surprodustion de RAS dans des souris et ont surveillées les tumeurs prosuites. Une fois un groupe de souris spéciales formé, la moitié des "patients" ont été traités avec la doxycycline pour induire la production de TAp63 pendant que l'autre groupe recevait un placebo. La croissance des tumeurs a continué dans le groupe du placebo tandis que chez les souris exposées à la doxycycline, elle a été interrompue et même les tumeurs ont rétrécies. Mills a spéculé que les nouvelles cellules sénecentes ont pu attirer l'attention du système immunitaire qui a la capacité de les détruire
Mills proposes that robustly activating TAp63 might be a viable anti-cancer strategy in the future. Alternatively, finding ways to stabilize the TAp63 that is already being made in cells or blocking pathways that combat TAp63 activities might also work, she speculates.
Mills propose que TAp63 pourrait être une bonne stratégie anti-cancer dans le futur. Trouer des moyens de stabiliser TAp63 déja produite par les cellules pourrait aussi marcher a-t-elle spéculé.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15755
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Une combinaison de thérapie par les gènes.   Lun 15 Jan 2007 - 14:30

Un traitement génétique expérimental a permis de fortement réduire des cancers du chez des souris de laboratoire, selon une étude publiée lundi aux États-Unis.

Ces résultats encourageants pourraient ouvrir la voix à des thérapies plus efficaces et moins toxiques contre ce type de cancer chez les humains, selon les auteurs de ces travaux parus dans la revue Cancer Research.

Ces chercheurs ont indiqué que l'inoculation de deux gènes anti-cancéreux avaient résulté en une diminution de 75 % du nombre de cellules cancéreuses et de 85 % du volume des tumeurs chez les souris.


«Nous avons observé une régression importante des tumeurs avec des effets secondaires minimum], précise le Dr Jack Roth, professeur de médecine au centre du Cancer Anderson à l'Université du Texas et principal auteur de cette étude.

«La faible toxicité de ce traitement laisse aussi penser que nous pourrions administrer des doses élevées», ajoute-t-il.

Ces deux gènes, acheminés dans la tumeur par des nanoparticules, agissent en synergie pour induire l'auto-destruction des cellules cancéreuses, un processus appelé apoptose, ou suicide cellulaire.

Le premier gène appelé p53 qui conduit des cellules cancéreuses à se détruire est souvent absent ou défectueux dans les cellules cancéreuses.

Le second gène, le FUS1, est un inhibiteur de la tumeur absent de la plupart des cancers chez les humains. Le FUS1 est également dopé par les effets du gène p53.

Les cancérologues de centre Anderson sur le Cancer à Houston testent actuellement le gène FUS1 sur des malades souffrant de la forme la plus fréquente d'un cancer avancé du poumon.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15755
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène p53   Sam 19 Aoû 2006 - 8:42

Comme le sugère de nouvelles recherches : Le bien-connu suppresseur de tumeurs p53 semble inhiber l'angiogenèse par régulant à la hausse une enzime de collagène qui contient des fragments anti-angiogénique.

Utilisant des techniques de laboratoires, le docteur Michael R. Green, de l'université du Massachusset et ses collègues ont trouvé que le p53 active le collagène prolyl-hydroxylase, conduisant à un relâchement de fragments de collagène avec des propriétés anti-angiogéniques.

Des tests plus approfondis montrent que les cellules endotheliales furent incapables de proliférer quand les cellules sont conditionnées par p53 ou de l'enzyme de collagène prolyl-4-hydrolase. L'administration de pareilles enzymes chez les souris bloque la croissance tumorale chez la souris.
"Notre résultat révèle un lien entre le tumeur de suppresseur p53 et la synthèse d'un fragment de colalgène antiandrogénique.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15755
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène p53   Dim 6 Aoû 2006 - 15:12

Comme tellement de grandes découvertes scientifiques, p53 a été trouvé par accident dans les années 1970. Quand les protéines faites par le gène cultivé en laboratoire qui ont été découvertes dans des expériences faites sur un virus de singe qui causait des tumeurs, la plupart des chercheurs les ont écartés comme contaminants irritants. Toutefois, David Lane, à ce moment compagnon dansla reherche sur le cancer était intrigué. La protéine coquine apparaissait si régulièrement dans ses expériences et il était si sur d'avoir éviter la contamination, qu'il s'est senti obligé de trouver ce que c'était. Sa découverte que la protéine coquine était un joueur clé dans la cellule cancéreuse a fait le couvert de la revue NAture en 1979.


Les articles d'autres chercheurs comme Arnold Levine qui a fait la même découverte d'une protéine active dans les cellules cancéreuse a suivi rapidement. Les scientifiques ont appris beaucoup à propos de p53 qui est essentiel pour orchestrer une cascade d'évênements en réponse au stress cellullaire.



Les conditions comme le bas taux d'oxygène le niveua des nutriments dans les cellules, la surexposition au soleil ou aux radiations, aussi bien que les dommages à l'Adn envoient des signaux qui allument p53. Le p53 active alors une série de gènes sous ses ordre qui arrête la division cellulaire ou induit le suicide de la cellule, un processus appelé apoptose du grec apoptosis qui veut dire décrocher et qui était utilisé po.tiquement pour décrire la tombée des feuilles à l'automne. (il parait que les cellules qui sont dans ce stage ont l'air de feuilles qui tombent à l'automne au microscope)



En 1992, impatient de trouver si ce que les scientifiques avaient découvert dans leurs laboratoires étaient ce qui se passaient réellement en nous, Lane et Peter Hall, un spécialiste du cancer et de la recherche sur le p53, ont concocté une expérience dans un pub de la région de Dundee qui utilisait Hall comme cochon d'inde. Hall mettait son vras sous une lampe solaire pendant 20 minutes et on prenait ensuite un petit tissu de sa peau pour observer l'activité de p53.



"Nous soupconnions que si le gène répondait au stress dans les organismes vivants nous devrions voir une accumulation de p53 dans les cellules dans les cellules de peau soumis à la radiation et c'est exactement ce que l'on vit." dit Hall en roulant ses manches pour montrer les égratigures sur son bras. "nous avons fait des expériences sur moi parce que nous voulions des résultats rapides. Cela aurait pris des mois pour avoir une license pour faire des expériences avec des animaux.Les blessures se sont infectés mais l'expérience a brillament réussi" a-t-il plaisanté.




La session de lampe solaire était suffisante pour amorcer la réaction de p53 mais pas asses longue pour endommager l'ADN et, comme anticipé. Quand le gène est incapable de faire son travail de mettre de l'ordre, les cellules risquent de devenir cancéreuses. Le plus osuvent c'Est parce que le p53 a subi une mutation. Il y a de rares conditions par exemple, ou les gens naissent avec la mutation du gène p53 dans toutes leurs cellules. Les individus affectés par cette maladie sont extrêmement vulnérables au cancer et tendent à développer des tumeurs peut-être même dans la très jeune enfance et souvent plusieurs types de cancer durant leurs vies. ( parmi les gens qui n'ont pas cette maladie la proportion de ceux et celles qui développent plus d'un cancer est très petite.)

Étant hérité plutôt qu'acquis, le syndrome de Li-Fraumeni courrent dans certaines familles, explique Rosalind Eeles, qu iest une spécialiste clinique à l'hopital Royal de Marsden à Londres pour les gens avec ce sybdrome. " Mais parce que les cancers sont si dévastateurs et qu'ils arrivent à un si jeune âge, les familles n'ont pas beaucoup de membres en général.


Toutefois le gène peut être désactiver par d'autres moyens que les mutations ce qui explique ce qui arrive dans environ la moitié de tous les cancers dans lesquels ce suppresseur de tumeurs important est intact. quand le p53 a été vu dans les expériences avec le virus du singe par exemple la protéine a été capturé et estropié par le virus (ce que personne ne réalisait dans ce temps-là) Les chercheurs ont découverts également que dans le cancer du col de l'utérus causé par le virus HPV le p53 est dévoré par le virus ce qui fait que les cellules cancéreuses n'ont plus du tout de suppresseur de tumeurs.



Très récemment, le laboratoire Levine a découvert un mécanisme qui explique pourquoi le p53 ne peut pas prévenir le cancer du sein se développant dans certains cas. Les chercheurs ont trouvés que c'est parce que c'est tellement un gène puissant, capable de tuer ou d'arrêter les cellules, qu'il est tenu sous la garde d'un autre gène nommé mdm2 qui le rend actif ou inactif. "C'est comme un chien policier et un policier" explique un scientifique sur la relation entre mdm2 et p53. "Les policiers décident quand laisser le chien attaquer et quand le tenir en laisse. Si le policier relâche sa grippe, le chien peut causer des domamges" C'est comem cela avec p53 " Mdm2 est ec qui arrêtes p53 de tuer toutes nos cellules et de nous tuer.


Levine et ses collègues ont découverts que chez quelques personnes le mdm2 est plus actif que chez d'autres pour ce qui est de tenir le p53 en laisse. Ainsi le risque ce cancer est plus élevé chez les personnes dont le p53 est controlé plus drastiquement par le mdm2. Ce qui nous a surpris dit Levine a été qu'une varainte de mdm2 a de larges effets chez les femmes pré-ménopausées, qui ont de haut niveaux d'oestrogène". La conclusion qu'on peut en tirer c'est que le "policier" est influencé par les hormones, ce qui amplifie son effet sur le p53.

Avoir une action superactive de mdm2 est aussi une mauvaise nouvelle pour les fumeurs selon Levine. Le tabac est un stress, un carcinogène dans les poumons et fumer peut doubler ou tripler le risque du cancer du poumon.Mais 2 études établissent clairement que si vous avez ce risque génétique et que vous fumez, vous avez 10 fois plus de chance de développer un cancer. Le cancer du poumon est la plus importante cause de décès au Royaume-uni, avec u ne perosnne diagnostiqué au 15 minutes.



Pendant des décennies l'industries du tabac y a vu un argument pour dire que la cause du cancer du poumon était indéterminé et purement circonstanciel et qu'il n'y avait pas de preuves que le tabac causait directementl e cancer. Depuis le début des années 1990, l'agence international de recherche sur le cancer a tenu une base de données sur les mutations de p53. dans le cas du cancer du poumon, le p53 est muté et spécialement dans les endroits du poumon les plus cancéreux. En d'autres mots le gène est l'empreinte de lA'gent qui cause le cancer (le tabac)
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Marie



Nombre de messages : 398
Age : 57
Localisation : Picardie France
Date d'inscription : 22/05/2006

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène p53   Dim 6 Aoû 2006 - 13:38

bonsoir denis,

Je n'ai lu que la petite partie en Francais ,malheureusement mon Anglais me fait défaut,,
bisous
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15755
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Le gène p53   Dim 6 Aoû 2006 - 13:33




Une modélisation de l'Adn les molécules de p53 sont bleues.







C'est le gène p53. Ce gène contrôle le cancer et les scientifiques se font la course pour trouver le médicament miracle pour harnacher son pouvoir.
S'ils font ça bien, nous vivront de longues années en santé sans cancer. MAis s'ils font mal leur travail...bien vous ne voulez pas vraiment le savoir sit Sue Armstrong.



En 2002 quelques scientifiques du Texas qui travaillaient sur des souris génétiquement modifiés ont fait une erreur et ont eu une immense surprise. En faisant des recherches sur un gène connu pour être essentiel pour l aprotection du cancer, il sont créé quelques souris sans ce gène (appelé souris null). Ces créatures développaient le cancer très jeunes comme ils s'y attendaient. dans un autre groupe de souris, les chercheurs ont modifié le gène mais ils se sont apperçu que le gène était beaucoup plus actif que prévu.


Les souris étaient bien protégées du cancer comme les chercheurs l'avaient prédit mais ce que personne n'avait prévu c'est que les souris veilliraient exceptionnellement vite. En quelques mois seulement, elles avaient l'air de veille souris. "Leurs épines dorsales étaient courbées, elles étaient ridées et ébouriffées, le poil grisonnant, des chose comme ça" dit Larry Donehower de houston " Et elles ne vivaient que les 2/3 de leur temps de vie normal" Cette découverte accidentelle a ouvert un nouveua champs de recherches sur comment ce gène important pour le cancer pouvait aussi modifier le processus du veillissement.

Les gens savent depuis longtemps que le cancer et le veillissement sont reliés et que les probabilités d'avoir le cancer augmentent avec l'âge. Mais personne ne pensait qu'il pouvait y avoir deux cotés à une pièce de monnaie. En d'autres mots, ce qui fait plisser la peau, s'amincir les os et défailllir les organes peut être le prix qu'on a à payer pour ne pas avoir le cancer."Nous n'avons pas l'image complète à date' dit le professeur David Lane ' Mais il y a un joint à être brisé ici."



Cette découverte a été l'objet d'une grande attention de la part des spécialistes qui s'occupent du cancer et de ceux qui s'occupent du veillissement et ils ont commencé à collaborer pour la première fois. "Les implications cliniques sont claires " dit Lane " Les gens commencent à demander "Puisse-je manipuler le systèeme pour avoir le meilleur des deux mondes ?"Mais la découverte soulève des questions plus angoissantes. Est-ce qu'il serait possible que des traitements actuels pour le cancer, qui stimulent souvent l'activité de ce gène, fassent veillir prématurément certains patients et conduisent à des désordres qu'habituellement l'âge amène, telle la démence précoce ? Ou est-ce que les médicaments pour le cancer mettent les gens plus à risque d'avoir le cancer ? Est-ce qu,on est pas en train de jouer avec le jeu en jouant sur des gènes ? Personne n'a de réponses à l'heure actuelle.


Le gène au centre de ect intérêt est connu comme le gène p53, parce que le poids des molécules protéiniques qu'il produit est de 53,000. (Les gènes ne sont que faiseurs de protéines en fait ce sont ces protéines qui font tout le travail dans nos cellules. Les protéines sont produites seulement quand et où elles sont nécessaires à telle point que le besoin met la "switch" à "on" pour que le gène produise les protéines.) La fonction de p53 est de supprimer les tumeurs. Ce la se produit lorsque l'ADN qui se trouve dasn le noyeau de la cellule et qui contient toutes les informations de la vie a été endommagé. Il peut arrêter les cellulles qui ne sont pas correct de se reproduire et normallement c'est sa fonction de maintenance dans le corps jusqu'à ce que l'ADN soit réparé ou il peut incité la cellule à se suicider. Il est srunommé par Lane le gardien du génome à cause de ce rôle vital. Ce gène est trouvé muté ou inutile dans plus de 50% des tumeurs humaines. Comme le cancer est causé par un défaut génétique, le p53 mutant est le gène qui mute le plus souvent.


Une fois que le rôle de p53 a été connu, des centaines de biologistes moléculaires ont laissé tomber leurs projets et ont pris comme objet de recherche ce petit gène, enthousiasmé par l'espérance de vaincre le cancer, une maldie que vous et moi avons une chance sur trois de connaitre à un moment de notre vie et une chance sur quatre d'en mourir.
Le gène p53 est devenu le gène le plus étudié de l'histoire, générant 36,000 articles et rassemblant toutes les deux ans une très large communauté de scientifiques pour partager leurs dernières découvertes sur le gène.


Dernière édition par le Lun 7 Aoû 2006 - 9:43, édité 5 fois
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: Le gène p53   Aujourd'hui à 9:38

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
Le gène p53
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 2Aller à la page : 1, 2  Suivant
 Sujets similaires
-
» Enigme posée par une petite fille qui ne grandit pas ou le gène de l'immortalité
» Le gène RAS.
» Le gène DAPK1
» Le gène BRAF
» Des moyens de bloquer le gène et la protéine p21.

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
ESPOIRS :: Cancer :: recherche-
Sauter vers: