AccueilCalendrierFAQRechercherS'enregistrerMembresGroupesConnexion

Partagez | 
 

 Le cancer du sein triplement négatif. (2)

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
AuteurMessage
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16081
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le cancer du sein triplement négatif. (2)   Jeu 9 Mar 2017 - 19:27

Scientists on the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have designed two new drug candidates to target prostate and triple negative breast cancers.

The new research, published recently as two separate studies in ACS Central Science and the Journal of the American Chemical Society, demonstrates that a new class of drugs called small molecule RNA inhibitors can successfully target and kill specific types of cancer.

"This is like designing a scalpel to precisely seek out and destroy a cancer -- but with a pill and without surgery," said TSRI Professor Matthew Disney, senior author of both studies.

A Tool to Fight Prostate Cancer

RNAs are molecules that translate our genetic code into proteins. RNA defects can lead to cancers, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), myotonic dystrophy and many other diseases.

In their ACS Central Science study, Disney and his colleagues used DNA sequencing to evaluate thousands of small molecules as potential drug candidates. The researchers were on the lookout for molecules that could bind precisely with defective RNAs -- like keys fitting in the right locks.

This strategy led them to a compound that targets the precursor molecule to an RNA called microRNA-18a. This RNA had caught the attention of scientists who found that mature microRNA-18a inhibits a protein that suppresses cancer. When microRNA-18a is overexpressed, cancers just keep growing.

Disney and his team tested their compound, called Targapremir-18a, and found that it could target microRNA-18a and trigger prostate cancer cell death.

"Since microRNA-18a is overexpressed in cancer cells and helps to maintain them as cancerous, application of Targapremir-18a to cancer cells causes them to kill themselves," Disney said.

Disney said the precise binding of Targapremir-18a to microRNA-18a means a cancer drug that follows this strategy would be likely to kill prostate cancer cells without causing the broader side effects seen with many other cancer therapies.

And there may be even bigger implications. "We could apply the strategy used in this study to quickly identify and design small molecule drugs for other RNA-associated diseases," explained study first author Sai Velagapudi, a research associate in the Disney lab.

Testing the Strategy in Breast Cancer

The same screening strategy led the researchers to a drug candidate to target triple negative breast cancer, as reported in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Triple negative breast cancer is especially hard to treat because it lacks the receptors, such as the estrogen receptor, targeted with other cancer drugs. The Disney lab aimed to get around this problem by instead targeting an RNA called microRNA-210, which is overexpressed in solid breast cancer tumors.

The researchers tested their drug compound, Targapremir-210, in mouse models of triple negative breast cancer. They found that the therapy significantly slowed down tumor growth. In fact, a single dose decreased tumor size by 60 percent over a three-week period. The researchers analyzed these smaller tumors and discovered that they also expressed less microRNA-210 compared with untreated tumors.

Targapremir-210 appears to work by reversing a circuit that tells cells to "survive at all costs" and become cancerous. With microRNA-210 in check, cells regain their normal function and cancer cannot grow.

"We believe Targapremir-210 can provide a potentially more precise, targeted therapy that would not harm healthy cells," said study first author TSRI Graduate Student Matthew G. Costales.

Next, the researchers plan to further develop their molecule-screening strategy into a platform to test molecules against any form of RNA defect-related disease.

---

Les scientifiques du campus de l'Institut de recherche Scripps de la Floride (TSRI) ont conçu deux nouveaux médicaments candidats pour cibler le cancer de la et le cancer du triple négatif.

La nouvelle recherche, publiée récemment comme deux études distinctes dans ACS Central Science et le Journal de l'American Chemical Society, démontre qu'une nouvelle classe de médicaments appelés inhibiteurs d'ARN à petites molécules peuvent cibler avec succès et tuer types spécifiques de cancer.

«C'est comme concevoir un scalpel pour chercher précisément et détruire un cancer - mais avec une pilule et sans chirurgie», a déclaré TSRI professeur Matthew Disney, auteur principal des deux études.




Test de la stratégie dans le cancer du sein

La même stratégie de dépistage a conduit les chercheurs à un médicament candidat à cibler le cancer du sein triple négatif, comme indiqué dans le Journal de l'American Chemical Society.

Le cancer du sein triple négatif est particulièrement difficile à traiter parce qu'il manque des récepteurs, tels que le récepteur d'oestrogène, ciblé avec d'autres médicaments contre le cancer. Le laboratoire de Disney visait à contourner ce problème en ciblant plutôt un ARN appelé microRNA-210, qui est surexprimé dans les tumeurs pleines du cancer du sein.

Les chercheurs ont testé leur composé médicamenteux, Targapremir-210, dans des modèles murins de cancer du triple négatif. Ils ont découvert que la thérapie ralentit considérablement la croissance tumorale. En fait, une seule dose a diminué la taille de la tumeur de 60 pour cent sur une période de trois semaines. Les chercheurs ont analysé ces petites tumeurs et découvert qu'ils ont également exprimé moins de microARN-210 par rapport aux tumeurs non traitées.

Targapremir-210 semble fonctionner en inversant un circuit qui dit aux cellules de «survivre à tout prix» et de devenir cancéreuses. Avec le microRNA-210 en échec, les cellules retrouvent leur fonction normale et le cancer ne peut pas croître.

"Nous croyons que Targapremir-210 peut fournir une thérapie potentiellement plus précise, ciblée qui ne nuirait pas aux cellules saines", a déclaré le premier auteur de l'étude TSRI étudiant diplômé Matthew G. Costales.

Ensuite, les chercheurs prévoient de développer davantage leur stratégie de dépistage moléculaire dans une plate-forme pour tester les molécules contre toute forme de maladie liée aux défauts d'ARN.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16081
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le cancer du sein triplement négatif. (2)   Mar 7 Mar 2017 - 19:31

Researchers in China have discovered that a metabolic enzyme called AKR1B1 drives an aggressive type of breast cancer. The study, "AKR1B1 promotes basal-like breast cancer progression by a positive feedback loop that activates the EMT program," which has been published in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that an inhibitor of this enzyme currently used to treat diabetes patients could be an effective therapy for this frequently deadly form of cancer.

Around 15-20% of breast cancers are classified as "basal-like." This form of the disease, which generally falls into the triple-negative breast cancer subtype, is particularly aggressive, with early recurrence after treatment and a tendency to quickly spread, or metastasize, to the brain and lungs. There are currently no effective targeted therapies to this form of breast cancer, which is therefore often fatal.

Crucial to basal-like breast cancer's aggressiveness is a process called epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), in which the cancer cells become more motile and acquire stem cell-like properties that allow them to resist treatment and initiate tumor growth in other tissues.

Chenfang Dong and colleagues at the Zhejiang University School of Medicine in Hangzhou, China, found that the levels of a metabolic enzyme called AKR1B1 were significantly elevated in basal-like and triple-negative breast cancers and that this was associated with increased rates of metastasis and shorter survival times.

The researchers discovered that AKR1B1 expression was induced by Twist2, a cellular transcription factor known to play a central role in EMT. AKR1B1, in turn, elevated Twist2 levels by producing a lipid called prostaglandin F2 that activates the NF-B signaling pathway. This "feedback loop" was crucial for basal-like cancer cells to undergo EMT; reducing AKR1B1 levels impaired the cells' ability to migrate and give rise to cancer stem cells.

Knocking down AKR1B1 also inhibited the growth and metastasis of tumors formed by human basal-like breast cancer cells injected into mice. "Our data clearly suggests that AKR1B1 overexpression represents an oncogenic event that is responsible for the aggressive behaviors of basal-like breast cancer cells," Dong explains.

Moreover, epalrestat, a drug that inhibits AKR1B1 and is approved in Japan to treat peripheral neuropathies associated with diabetes, was similarly able to block the growth and metastasis of human basal-like breast cancer cells. "Since epalrestat is already on the market and has no major adverse side effects, our study provides a proof of principle that it could become a valuable targeted drug for the clinical treatment of basal-like breast cancer," Dong says.

---

Des chercheurs en Chine ont découvert qu'une enzyme métabolique appelée AKR1B1 entraîne un type agressif de cancer du sein. L'étude «AKR1B1 favorise la progression basale du cancer du sein par une boucle de rétroaction positive qui active le programme EMT», qui a été publié dans The Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggère qu'un inhibiteur de cette enzyme actuellement utilisé pour traiter les patients atteints de diabète pourrait être Une thérapie efficace pour cette forme souvent mortelle de cancer.

Environ 15-20% des cancers du sein sont classés comme basal-like. Cette forme de la maladie, qui tombe généralement dans le sous-type de cancer du sein triple-négatif, est particulièrement agressif, avec une récidive précoce après traitement et une tendance à se propager rapidement, ou métastases, au cerveau et aux poumons. Il n'existe actuellement aucune thérapie ciblée efficace pour cette forme de cancer du sein, qui est donc souvent mortelle.

L'agressivité du cancer du sein basal est un processus appelé transition épithélio-mésenchymateuse (EMT) dans lequel les cellules cancéreuses deviennent plus mobiles et acquièrent des propriétés de cellules souches qui leur permettent de résister au traitement et d'initier la croissance tumorale dans d'autres tissus.

Chenfang Dong et ses collègues de l'École de médecine de Zhejiang à Hangzhou, en Chine, ont constaté que les taux d'une enzyme métabolique appelée AKR1B1 étaient significativement élevés dans les cancers du sein de type basal et triple négatif et que cela était associé à une augmentation des taux de métastases et Temps de survie plus courts.

Les chercheurs ont découvert que l'expression AKR1B1 a été induite par Twist2, un facteur de transcription cellulaire connu pour jouer un rôle central dans l'EMT. AKR1B1, à son tour, les niveaux élevés de Twist2 en produisant un lipide appelé prostaglandine F2 qui active la voie de signalisation NF-B. Cette «boucle de rétroaction» est cruciale pour les cellules cancéreuses basales comme pour subir EMT; La réduction des taux d'AKR1B1 compromet la capacité des cellules à migrer et à donner naissance à des cellules souches cancéreuses.

Le knock down AKR1B1 a également inhibé la croissance et la métastase des tumeurs formées par des cellules de cancer du sein de type basal humaines injectées chez la souris. "Nos données suggèrent clairement que la surexpression AKR1B1 représente un événement oncogène qui est responsable des comportements agressifs des cellules de cancer du sein de type basal", explique Dong.

En outre, l'épalrestat, un médicament qui inhibe l'AKR1B1 et est approuvé au Japon pour traiter les neuropathies périphériques associées au diabète, était également capable de bloquer la croissance et la métastase des cellules humaines de cancer du sein de type basal. "Comme epalrestat est déjà sur le marché et n'a pas d'effets indésirables majeurs, notre étude fournit une preuve de principe qu'il pourrait devenir un médicament ciblé précieux pour le traitement clinique du cancer du sein basal-like", dit Dong.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16081
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le cancer du sein triplement négatif. (2)   Lun 6 Mar 2017 - 15:27

Mise à jour, l'article date de janvier 2017.

Les chercheurs de l'université de la Ruhr et du Centre de génomique de Cologne (Allemagne) ont testé les effets d'une molécule appelée capsaïcine (une molécule que l'on trouve couramment dans le piment) sur une culture cellulaire correspondant au cancer du sein triple négatif .

Ce cancer "triple négatif" est l'une des tumeurs cancéreuses les plus agressives et les plus difficiles à soigner car il ne répond à aucun autre traitement que la chimiothérapie .
Le piment réduit la capacité des cellules à se métastaser

Les scientifiques ont été motivés par d'autres études qui montraient que la capsaïcine inhibait la croissance des cellules cancéreuses en cas de cancer du côlon ou de cancer du poumon . Dans leur étude, ils ont découvert la présence de certains récepteurs olfactifs typiques (appelés récepteurs TRPV1) dans les cellules cultivées. Ces récepteurs étaient activés par la molécule épicée capsaïcine, ce qui avait pour effet de ralentir la croissance des cellules cancéreuses et de réduire leur capacité à se métastaser.

"Si nous pouvions activer ces récepteurs TRPV1 avec un médicament spécifique, cela pourrait offrir une nouvelle piste de traitement pour le cancer du sein triple négatif" a souligné les Dr Hanss Hatt, principal auteur de l'étude.

Celle-ci a été publiée dans la revue professionnelle Breast cancer .

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16081
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Le cancer du sein triplement négatif. (2)   Lun 28 Aoû 2006 - 11:59

Ce fil est la suite de http://espoirs.forumactif.com/t1746-le-cancer-du-sein-triplement-negatif
qui compte 61 autres articles sur le sujet du cancer du sein triplement négatif.

---

"Savoir si les facteurs de style de vie peuvent améliorer la survie après le diagnostic est une question importante pour les femmes diagnostiquées avec un cancer du sein hormone-récepteur négatif, un type plus agressif de cancer du sein."

Voir l'article au complet dans la sections alimentation dans le fil qui parle des vertus et des péchés du soja.


Dernière édition par Denis le Mar 21 Mar 2017 - 15:02, édité 6 fois
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: Le cancer du sein triplement négatif. (2)   

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
Le cancer du sein triplement négatif. (2)
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 1
 Sujets similaires
-
» S'engager au sein d'une association/Soutenir une cause
» Le parler de l'île de Sein

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
ESPOIRS :: Cancer :: recherche-
Sauter vers: