AccueilCalendrierFAQRechercherS'enregistrerMembresGroupesConnexion

Partagez | 
 

 La guerre contre le cancer du sein

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
AuteurMessage
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16503
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: La guerre contre le cancer du sein   Ven 4 Aoû 2017 - 19:07

According to the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the number of people beating a cancer diagnosis reached nearly 14.5 million in 2014 and is expected to rise to almost 19 million by 2024. Now, that's good news, but it doesn't mean that cancer researchers -- in the lab or clinic -- are resting on any laurels.

Cancer recurrence dogs laboratory scientists and clinicians alike. The NCI defines recurrence as cancer that returns after a patient has had no signs of out-of-control cell growth for at least a year. For example, although great progress has been made in increasing survival time for breast cancer patients, the disease still returns after treatment in 30 percent of women.

Cancer cells are smart and find ways to best even the newest of treatments. Chemo, radiation, targeted therapy, and other treatments may kill nearly all cancer cells, but some cells are either not affected, or change to survive treatment. In time, these surviving cancer cells replicate and wreak havoc. Determining who is at-risk for recurrence and how to stop it before it starts is a major research effort supported by Penn's Basser Center for BRCA, where researchers are ferreting out which patients might be most likely to become resistant to treatment, and devising new ways to help them.

Last week, Lin Zhang, MD, an associate professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, described in Science Translational Medicine, how his team treated therapy resistant cancer cells to renew their sensitivity to PARP inhibitors, a class of drugs that, when effective, prevent cancer cells from keeping up with DNA repair, causing them to eventually die.

"Our hope is to use PARP inhibitors combined with other drugs to treat patients whose BRCA-related cancers have become resistant to the drugs," Zhang said. "Strategies to enhance a cancer's response to PARP inhibitors would help thousands people."

Zhang's team began by combining the PARP inhibitor olaparib with 20 different helper compounds, and eventually discovered a family of drugs called BET inhibitors that work with olaparib to attack cancer cells. The BET-PARP inhibitor combo represses DNA repair, allowing PARP inhibitor-induced DNA damage to take over and kill cancer cells once again. BETs have been fast-tracked into clinical trials and have shown impressive slowing of tumor growth in multiple cancer types.

Zhang's team also found that the BRD4 gene is amplified in tumor cells of 20 common cancers. In fact, in a related study published earlier this summer, Jianxin You, PhD, an associate professor of Microbiology who studies viral cancers, showed that the BRD4 protein is a key player in regulating cell replication and the start of cancer. "We discovered that the BRD4 gene has more of a gene-expression-guiding compound attached to it in tumor cells of a rare carcinoma (and several other cancers) compared to non-cancerous cells," You said.

The study suggests that combining therapies with BET inhibitors might be a new way to treat BRD4-associated cancers. Several BET and kinase inhibitors targeting BRD4 and related proteins are now in clinical trials for blood and central nervous system cancers, among others.

Resistance to treatment can originate from many sources -- the immune system, the complex landscape of a tumor, or a patient's own genes. Without explicitly looking for it, Katherine Nathanson, MD, a professor of Medical Genetics and director of Genetics at the Basser Center, found another mechanism of resistance to DNA damaging agents. "Our primary question was not aimed at evaluating resistance to therapy, but we did end up there," she said.

Her group will soon publish a paper evaluating the genetic profiles of 160 breast and ovarian cancers associated with germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, in the largest study of these tumors to date. They were interested in determining what types of secondary, additional changes occur in primary BRCA1/2 germline mutation-associated cancers that might act in concert with BRCA1 and BRCA2 to drive the cancers.

As part of the study, they evaluated how frequently the non-mutated version of the gene lost its function in concert with the original BRCA1/2 germline mutation-associated cancers. In oncology terms, this double-hit status is called "loss of heterozygosity," or LOH, to signify that both versions (one from mom, one from dad) of the normal BRCA gene have been hobbled.

Historically it had been thought that all of tumors lose the second version of the gene, or have LOH; however, the team was surprised to find that was not the case. In fact, they saw that the genetics of the tumors that did not undergo LOH (LOH-negative) were significantly different than those that did undergo LOH (LOH-positive).

"What we found is that identifying LOH of BRCA1/2 may be useful to predict which patients might be at risk for primary resistance to DNA-damaging agents," Nathanson said. "We would only need to determine the LOH at a specific gene's location, which is more cost effective than sequencing a patient's whole genome, for example, and compatible with standard testing."

Knowledge gained in studies like the ones from the Zhang, You, and Nathanson labs have important implications for treating patients. By looking at a person's individual genetics and type of cancer, clinicians hope to better tailor care soon after diagnosis to improve survival. For example, in the case of LOH status guiding treatment decisions, Nathanson surmises that certain drugs already in today's cancer treatment arsenal will likely work for patients who are at risk for resistance due to their LOH genetics; however, it's a matter of choosing the right one. In other cases, early-stage clinical trials will need to be undertaken to validate the findings of preclinical studies, and new drugs and combination therapies may need to be developed to treat patients whose tumors are shown to be at risk for resistance. In each domain, the search for new information about cancer genetics and control of cell replication is expected to be a boon to oncologists trying to outsmart wily cancer cells.

---

Selon le National Cancer Institute (NCI), le nombre de personnes qui ont battu le cancer a atteint près de 14,5 millions en 2014 et devrait atteindre près de 19 millions d'ici 2024. Maintenant, ce sont de bonnes nouvelles, mais cela ne signifie pas que le cancer, les chercheurs - dans le laboratoire ou la clinique - se reposent sur leurs lauriers.

Le NCI définit la récurrence comme un cancer qui revient après qu'un patient n'a eu aucun signe de croissance cellulaire hors de contrôle pendant au moins un an. Par exemple, bien que de grands progrès aient été réalisés dans l'augmentation du temps de survie pour les patientes atteintes de cancer du , la maladie revient après traitement chez 30% des femmes.

Les cellules cancéreuses sont intelligentes et trouvent les moyens de faire mieux même avec les traitements les plus récents. La chimiothérapie, la radiothérapie, la thérapie ciblée et d'autres traitements peuvent tuer presque toutes les cellules cancéreuses, mais certaines cellules ne sont pas affectées ou changent pour survivre au traitement. Avec le temps, ces cellules cancéreuses survivantes se reproduisent et causent des ravages. Déterminer qui est à risque de récidive et comment l'arrêter avant son démarrage est un effort majeur de recherche soutenu par le Centre Basser de Penn pour BRCA, où les chercheurs se disputent les patients susceptibles de devenir résistants au traitement et de concevoir de nouvelles façons pour les aider.

La semaine dernière, Lin Zhang, professeur agrégé d'obstétrique et de gynécologie, a décrit dans Science Translational Medicine, comment son équipe a traité des cellules cancéreuses résistantes à la thérapie pour renouveler leur sensibilité aux inhibiteurs de PARP, une classe de médicaments qui, lorsqu'ils sont efficaces, empêchent les cellules cancéreuses de se conformer à la réparation de l'ADN, les amenant à mourir éventuellement.

"Notre espoir est d'utiliser des inhibiteurs de PARP combinés avec d'autres médicaments pour traiter les patients dont les cancers liés au BRCA sont devenus résistants aux médicaments", a déclaré Zhang. "Les stratégies pour améliorer la réponse d'un cancer aux inhibiteurs de PARP aideraient des milliers de personnes".

L'équipe de Zhang a commencé par combiner l'inhibiteur de PARP olaparib avec 20 composés d'aide différents et a finalement découvert une famille de médicaments appelés inhibiteurs BET qui travaillent avec de l'olaparib pour attaquer les cellules cancéreuses. Le combo inhibiteur BET-PARP réprime la réparation de l'ADN, ce qui permet aux dommages induits par l'inhibiteur de PARP d'absorber et de tuer les cellules cancéreuses une fois de plus. Les BET ont été rapidement suivis dans les essais cliniques et ont montré un ralentissement impressionnant de la croissance tumorale dans de multiples types de cancer.

L'équipe de Zhang a également constaté que le gène BRD4 était amplifié dans des cellules tumorales de 20 cancers communs. En fait, dans une étude connexe publiée plus tôt cet été, Jianxin You, Ph.D., professeur associé de Microbiologie qui étudie les cancers viraux, a montré que la protéine BRD4 est un acteur clé dans la régulation de la replication cellulaire et le début du cancer. "Nous avons découvert que le gène BRD4 comporte plus d'un composé guidant l'expression du gène qui lui est attaché dans les cellules tumorales d'un carcinome rare (et de plusieurs autres cancers) par rapport aux cellules non cancéreuses", a-t-il déclaré.

L'étude suggère que la combinaison de thérapies avec des inhibiteurs BET pourrait être une nouvelle façon de traiter les cancers associés au BRD4. Plusieurs inhibiteurs BET et kinase ciblant BRD4 et les protéines apparentées sont maintenant en essais cliniques pour le sang et les cancers du système nerveux central, entre autres.

La résistance au traitement peut provenir de nombreuses sources: le système immunitaire, le paysage complexe d'une tumeur ou les gènes propres à un patient. Sans le chercher explicitement, Katherine Nathanson, MD, professeur de génétique médicale et directrice de la génétique au Centre Basser, a trouvé un autre mécanisme de résistance aux agents nuisibles à l'ADN. "Notre principale question n'a pas été d'évaluer la résistance à la thérapie, mais nous avons fini par là", a-t-elle déclaré.

Son groupe publiera bientôt un article évaluant les profils génétiques de 160 cancers du et de l' associés aux mutations de la lignée germinale dans BRCA1 et BRCA2, dans la plus grande étude de ces tumeurs à ce jour. Ils étaient intéressés à déterminer quels types de changements secondaires et additionnels se produisent dans les cancers primaires associés à la mutation germinative BRCA1 / 2 qui pourraient agir de concert avec BRCA1 et BRCA2 pour conduire les cancers.

Dans le cadre de l'étude, ils ont évalué à quelle fréquence la version non mutée du gène a perdu sa fonction de concert avec les cancers originaux associés à la mutation de la ligne germinale BRCA1 / 2. En termes d'oncologie, ce statut de double impact est appelé «perte d'hétérozygotie», ou LOH, pour signifier que les deux versions du gène BRCA normal ont été contraintes.

Historiquement, on pensait que toutes les tumeurs perdent la deuxième version du gène, ou ont la LOH; Cependant, l'équipe a été surprise de constater que ce n'était pas le cas. En fait, ils ont vu que la génétique des tumeurs qui ne subissaient pas de LOH (LOH-négatif) était significativement différente de celles qui ont subi une LOH (LOH-positive).

"Ce que nous avons trouvé, c'est que l'identification de LOH de BRCA1 / 2 pourrait être utile pour prédire quels patients risquaient de présenter une résistance primaire aux agents nuisibles à l'ADN", a déclaré Nathanson. "Nous aurions seulement besoin de déterminer le LOH à l'emplacement d'un gène spécifique, ce qui est plus rentable que le séquençage du génome entier d'un patient, par exemple, et compatible avec les tests standard. "

Les connaissances acquises dans des études comme celles des laboratoires Zhang, You et Nathanson ont des implications importantes pour le traitement des patients. En regardant la génétique individuelle d'une personne et le type de cancer, les cliniciens espèrent mieux se soigner après le diagnostic pour améliorer la survie.

Par exemple, dans le cas du statut LOH, les décisions thérapeutiques de traitement, Nathanson considère que certains médicaments déjà présents dans l'arsenal de traitement du cancer vont probablement fonctionner pour les patients présentant un risque de résistance en raison de leur génétique LOH; Cependant, il s'agit de choisir le bon.

Dans d'autres cas, des essais cliniques de stade précoce devront être entrepris pour valider les résultats des études précliniques, et de nouveaux médicaments et des thérapies combinées devront peut-être être développés pour traiter les patients dont les tumeurs présentent un risque de résistance. Dans chaque domaine, la recherche de nouvelles informations sur la génétique du cancer et le contrôle de la réplication cellulaire devrait être une aubaine pour les oncologues essayant de vaincre les cellules cancéreuses.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16503
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: La guerre contre le cancer du sein   Mar 1 Mar 2016 - 12:18

An international study of almost 120,000 women has newly identified five genetic variants affecting risk of breast cancer, all of which are believed to influence how breast cells respond to the female sex hormone oestrogen.

Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer among women. Around one in eight women in the general population is expected to develop the disease at some point in her life. The majority of cases occur in women aged 50 and over.

The female sex hormone oestrogen acts as a trigger, binding to a molecule known as an oestrogen receptor in most breast cells and triggering a cascade of signals that cause the cell to behave normally. However, the oestrogen receptor is switched off in some cells and these do not respond to the hormone.

An international collaboration, led by researchers at the University of Cambridge and the QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, examined the DNA surrounding the gene for the oestrogen receptor -- known as ESR1 -- in women with different types of breast cancer against those of healthy controls to identify genetic variants responsible for an increased risk of breast cancer. The results are published today in the journal Nature Genetics.

Among their findings, the researchers discovered five cancer-risk variants based within or around the ESR1 gene. This gene has long been known to be related to the risk and progress of breast cancer, but little is understood of how it works and why it should affect breast cancer.

Of the five variants discovered by the team, four were more strongly associated with tumours where the ESR1 gene is switched off, so the tumour cells have no oestrogen receptors. These represent around one fifth of breast cancers.

One of these four variants was of particular interest as it was associated with a rarer type of breast tumour that contain active receptors for the protein known as 'human epidermal growth factor 2' (HER2). Such tumours can be treated by the drug trastuzumab (marketed as Herceptin). This is believed to be the first time a specific genetic risk factor for HER2 positive breast tumours has been found.

Dr Stacey Edwards' team from QIMR Berghofer, Brisbane, had been searching for gene regulatory elements around the ESR1 gene, which act like the volume controls on a radio or TV, turning the activity of the nearby genes up or down. There are two major types of gene regulators: 'enhancers', which increase activity of the genes express such that they make more protein, and 'silencers', which have the opposite effect.

When the Cambridge and Brisbane teams compared notes, they spotted that four of the breast cancer risk variants coincided with 'volume-up' enhancers. These particular regulators did not just affect the ESR1 gene but also other nearby genes. The variants that increased risk of breast cancer directly reduced the effectiveness of each enhancer, hence turning down the volume of ESR1 and the other nearby genes. This reduced the amount of oestrogen receptor produced by breast cells.

The researchers say that their results suggest the ESR1 gene works with other nearby genes to affect breast cancer development.

The fifth genetic variant was found to be more strongly associated with tumours where the oestrogen receptor is switched on. This variant coincides with and alters the effectiveness of 'volume-down' silencer, which means that it increases the amount of oestrogen receptor protein produced by breast cells.

"It's interesting that all five of the genetic variants that we have found affect levels of oestrogen receptors in breast cells," says Dr Alison Dunning from the Department of Oncology at the University of Cambridge, one of the lead authors on the study. "This suggests that there may be a 'Goldilocks' level of these receptors in breast cells: too few or too many and the breast cells are more likely to become cancerous."

"As our research looks at how tumours with and without the oestrogen receptor are regulated, it's possible it could help make sense of the enduring mystery of how tamoxifen works and why tumours develop in these two divergent ways," says Dr Edwards, one of the study's senior authors. "Our findings could open the way to developing new, more specific breast cancer preventions."

The genetic variants are all very common, each one carried by around one in three women. Each variant only increases the risk of developing breast cancer by a small amount.

Professor Doug Easton, another senior author from the University of Cambridge, adds: "breast cancer is a very complex disease, with many genes, and other factors, contributing to an overall increased risk of developing the disease. These five common variants that we have identified will contribute to an eventual predictive test for breast cancer risk, and for determining the risk of the particular subtype of breast cancer, that will include hundreds of similar variants."

Funding for the study came from organisations including the European Union, Cancer Research UK, the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia and the Australian National Breast Cancer Foundation.

Dr Alan Worsley, Cancer Research UK's senior science information officer, said: "We know that hundreds of genes are likely to play a role in how cancers start. And this latest study adds more detail to our genetic map of breast cancer risk, potentially helping understand which type of breast cancer is likely to develop based on a woman's genetic makeup. Understanding more about each individual's risk of cancer could help us find ways to potentially prevent the disease or pick it up in its earliest stages."


---

Une étude internationale de près de 120 000 femmes a récemment identifié cinq variantes génétiques affectant le risque de cancer du sein, qui sont soupçonnés d'influencer la façon dont les cellules mammaires répondent à la l'œstrogène, l'hormone femelle sexuelle.

Le cancer du sein est le type le plus commun de cancer chez les femmes. Environ une de huit femmes dans la population générale devrait développer la maladie à un moment donné dans sa vie. La majorité des cas surviennent chez des femmes âgées de 50 ans et plus.

L'oestrogène, une hormone sexuelle féminine qui agit comme un déclencheur de la liaison à une molécule connue comme un récepteur d'oestrogène dans la plupart des cellules du sein et qui déclenche une cascade de signaux qui provoquent la cellule à se comporter normalement. Cependant, le récepteur d'oestrogène est coupé dans certaines cellules et celles-ci ne répondent pas à l'hormone.

Une collaboration internationale, menée par des chercheurs de l'Université de Cambridge et l'Institut QIMR Berghofer recherche médicale, a examiné l'ADN entourant le gène du récepteur de l'œstrogène - connu sous le nom ESR1 - chez les femmes avec différents types de cancer du sein contre celles avec des contrôles corrects pour identifier les variantes génétiques responsables d'un risque accru de cancer du sein. Les résultats sont publiés aujourd'hui dans la revue Nature Genetics.

Parmi leurs conclusions, les chercheurs ont découvert cinq variantes de cancer à risque basés à l'intérieur ou autour du gène ESR1. Ce gène a longtemps été connu pour être lié au risque et le progrès du cancer du sein, mais peu est compris de la façon dont il fonctionne et pourquoi il devrait affecter le cancer du sein.

Parmi les cinq variantes découvertes par l'équipe, quatre ont été plus fortement associée à des tumeurs où le gène ESR1 est éteint, de sorte que les cellules tumorales n'a pas de récepteurs d'œstrogènes. Ceux-ci représentent environ un cinquième des cancers du sein.

L'un de ces quatre variantes est particulièrement intéressant car il a été associé à un type rare de tumeur du sein qui contiennent des récepteurs actifs pour la protéine appelée «facteur humain de croissance épidermique 2 '(HER2). De telles tumeurs peuvent être traitées par le médicament trastuzumab ( commercialisé sous le nom Herceptin). Cela semble être la première fois qu'un facteur de risque génétique spécifique pour HER2 des tumeurs du sein positif ait été trouvé.

L'équipe du Dr Stacey Edwards avait cherché des éléments régulateurs de gènes dans le gène ESR1, des éléments qui agissent comme les commandes de volume sur une radio ou d'un téléviseur, transformant l'activité des gènes voisins vers le haut ou vers le bas. Il existe deux grands types de régulateurs de gènes: «améliorateurs», qui augmentent l'activité des gènes expriment de telle sorte qu'ils font plus de protéines, et des «silencieux», qui ont l'effet inverse.

Lorsque les équipes de Cambridge et Brisbane ont comparé les notes, ils ont repéré que quatre des variantes de risque de cancer du sein ont coïncidé avec des activateurs de «volume-up». Ces régulateurs particuliers ne touche pas seulement le gène ESR1 mais aussi d'autres gènes voisins. Les variantes qui augmentent le risque de cancer du sein réduit directement l'efficacité de chaque amplificateur, donc de baisser le volume de ESR1 et les autres gènes voisins. Ceci a réduit la quantité de récepteur d'oestrogène produite par les cellules mammaires.

Les chercheurs disent que leurs résultats suggèrent le fonctionnement du gène ESR1 avec d'autres gènes à proximité pour affecter le développement du cancer du sein.

On a découvert que la cinquième variante génétique était plus fortement associée à des tumeurs où le récepteur d'oestrogène est allumé. Cette variante coïncide avec et altère l'efficacité du silencieux "le volume vers le bas», ce qui signifie qu'elle augmente la quantité de protéine de récepteur d'oestrogène produite par les cellules mammaires.

"Il est intéressant que les cinq variantes génétiques que nous avons trouvé aient une incidence sur les niveaux de récepteurs d'œstrogènes dans les cellules du sein», explique le Dr Alison Dunning du Département d'oncologie à l'Université de Cambridge, l'un des principaux auteurs de l'étude. "Cela donne à penser qu'il peut y avoir un niveau de ces récepteurs 'Goldilocks' (qui ont une valeur générale ?...) dans les cellules mammaires. Trop peu ou trop nombreuses, les cellules du sein sont plus susceptibles de devenir cancéreuses"

"Comme notre recherche porte sur la façon dont les tumeurs, avec et sans le récepteur des oestrogènes, sont réglementés, c'est possible qu'elle pourrait aider à comprendre le mystère durable de la façon dont le tamoxifène fonctionne et pourquoi les tumeurs se développent dans ces deux voies divergentes», dit le Dr Edwards, l'un des auteurs principaux de l'étude. "Nos résultats pourraient ouvrir la voie au développement de nouveaux moyens de prévention du cancer du sein, plus spécifiques."

Les variants génétiques sont tous très communes, chacune est portée par environ une femme sur trois. Chaque variante seulement augmente le risque de développer un cancer du sein par une petite quantité.

Le professeur Doug Easton, un autre auteur principal de l'Université de Cambridge, ajoute: «Le cancer du sein est une maladie très complexe, avec de nombreux gènes, et d'autres facteurs, contribuant ainsi à un risque global accru de développer la maladie Ces cinq variantes communes que nous avons. identifiés contribueront à un test prédictif éventuel pour le risque de cancer du sein, et pour déterminer le risque de sous-type particulier du cancer du sein, qui comprendra des centaines de variantes similaires ".

Le financement de l'étude provenaient d'organisations, y compris l'Union européenne, Cancer Research UK, la Santé nationale et du Conseil de recherches médicales de l'Australie et de l'Australian National Breast Cancer Foundation.

Dr Alan Worsley, scientifique principal responsable de l'information de Cancer Research UK, a déclaré: «Nous savons que des centaines de gènes sont susceptibles de jouer un rôle dans la façon dont les cancers commencent Et cette dernière étude ajoute plus en détail à notre carte génétique du risque de cancer du sein, ce qui pourrait aider à comprendre quel type de cancer du sein est susceptible de se développer sur la base de la constitution génétique d'une femme. comprendre plus sur le risque de cancer de chaque individu pourrait nous aider à trouver des moyens de prévenir potentiellement la maladie ou la traiter dans ses premiers stades ".

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16503
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: La guerre contre le cancer du sein   Ven 31 Juil 2015 - 16:59

The study is the first to examine the effect of blocking PHD2 expression in a spontaneous breast cancer model, which more closely mimics human cancer than the transplantable tumors used in previous research. The study also discovered an unexpected role for stromal fibroblast cells, cells that support cancerous tissue and promote cancer cell dissemination.

Global PHD2 inhibition safely reduces metastasis

A research team led by Peter Carmeliet (VIB/KU Leuven) discovered that genetic blockade of PHD2 substantially reduced breast cancer metastasis, the primary cause of death of breast cancer patients. Despite improvement in breast cancer therapy, the development of an efficient therapy to halt breast cancer metastasis is still a large unmet medical need. Their research also showed that, contrary to inconsistent results from previous experiments in suboptimal tumor models, blocking PHD2 expression does not promote tumor growth and is thus a safe therapeutic approach.

Shutting down cancer's escape routes

The study showed that PHD2 inhibition reduced metastasis through two novel mechanisms: by normalizing tumor vessels and by de-activating "cancer-activated fibroblasts." In tumors, the support fibroblast cells become highly activated and lay down connective support tissue, which cancer cells use as "highways" to travel on to escape to distant organs. However, most anti-cancer therapies have been focused on targeting the malignant cancer cells, not their neighbors, the cancer-activated fibroblasts. In fact, not a single therapy exists to de-activate these fibroblasts and thereby counteract metastasis.

Peter Carmeliet (VIB/KU Leuven): "We found that blocking the PHD2 oxygen sensor reduces the spread of breast cancer in two ways: first, it helps blood vessels in tumors to return to their normal, stronger state, reducing the opportunity for cancer cells to escape through the vessel wall. Second, it stops cancer cells from highjacking neighboring activated fibroblast cells and instructing them to build highways of connective support tissue that the cancer cells can use to migrate into other areas of the body."

PHD2 blockers are currently being tested in the clinic for the treatment of blood disorders (anemia or bloodlessness).

The research, which appeared in the July 2015 issue of Cell Reports, opens the door to further studies exploring the therapeutic potential of PHD2 inhibition in treating human breast cancer.

Royal recognition for groundbreaking cancer research

Earlier this month, Belgium's royal monarch honored Dr. Carmeliet for his years of dedication to unraveling the mysteries of cancer and the role new blood vessel formation (angiogenesis) in this deadly disease.

Frans van Daele (cabinet chief to King Philip of Belgium): "His Majesty is pleased to recognize Dr. Carmeliet's role as a scientific pioneer and ambassador, and his dedication to promoting high-quality research that can lead to the clinical development of lifesaving therapies to the benefit of society."

A humbled Baron Carmeliet -- as he may now call himself -- says he plans to continue investigating the mechanisms that drive cancer for many years to come.

---

Cette étude est la première à examiner l'effet de blocage de l'expression de PHD2 dans un modèle de cancer du sein spontanée, qui imite plus étroitement le cancer humain que les tumeurs transplantables utilisés dans la recherche précédente. L'étude a également découvert un rôle inattendu pour des cellules fibroblastes su troma, des cellules qui soutiennent le tissu cancéreux et favorisent la diffusion des cellules cancéreuses.

L'Inhibition de PHD2 réduit les métastases en toute sécurité

Une équipe de recherche dirigée par Peter Carmeliet a découvert que le blocage génétique de PHD2 réduit sensiblement les métastases du cancer du , la première cause de décès des patientes atteintes de cancer du sein. En dépit de l'amélioration dans le traitement du cancer du sein, le développement d'une thérapie efficace pour stopper les métastases du cancer du sein est toujours un grand besoin médical non satisfait. Leur recherche a également montré que, contrairement à des résultats incohérents à partir d'expériences antérieures dans des modèles de tumeurs sous-optimales, le blocage de l'expression de PHD2 ne favorise pas la croissance de la tumeur et est donc une approche thérapeutique sûre.

Arrêter les voies d'évacuation de cancer

L'étude a montré que l'inhibition de PHD2 réduit les métastases à travers deux mécanismes nouveaux: en normalisant les vaisseaux tumoraux et par désactivation "des fibroblastes de cancer activé." Dans les tumeurs, les cellules de fibroblastes de soutien deviennent très actives et fixent le tissu conjonctif de soutien, les cellules cancéreuses l'utilisent comme «autoroutes» pour voyager et s'échapper vers des organes éloignés. Cependant, la plupart des thérapies anti-cancéreuses se sont concentrés sur le ciblage des cellules cancéreuses malignes et non leurs voisines, les fibroblastes du cancer activés. En fait, pas un seul traitement existe pour désactiver ces fibroblastes et contrecarrer ainsi la métastase.

Peter Carmeliet dit: "Nous avons trouvé que le blocage du capteur PHD2 d'oxygène réduit la propagation du cancer du sein de deux façons: d'abord, elle aide les vaisseaux sanguins dans les tumeurs à revenir à leur état fort normal, réduisant la possibilité pour le cancer les cellules d'échapper à travers la paroi du vaisseau sanguin. En second lieu, il arrête les détournements de cellules cancéreuses détournements en cellules de fibroblastes activés voisins en les instruisant pour construire des routes du tissu de soutien conjonctif que les cellules cancéreuses peuvent utiliser pour migrer vers d'autres zones du corps ".

Les bloqueurs de PHD2 sont actuellement testés en clinique pour le traitement des troubles sanguins (anémie ou insuffisance).

La recherche, qui a paru dans le numéro de Juillet 2015 de Cell Reports, ouvre la porte à de nouvelles études explorant le potentiel thérapeutique de l'inhibition de PHD2 dans le traitement de cancer du sein humain.




_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16503
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: La guerre contre le cancer du sein   Ven 11 Juil 2014 - 15:48

For breast cancer patients, the era of personalized medicine may be just around the corner, thanks to recent advances by USC Stem Cell researcher Min Yu and scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School.

Pour les patientes avec le cancer du , l'ère des traitements personnalisés n'est plus très loin. Merci aux récentes avancées du chercheur Min Yu et aux scientifiques de l'hopital général du Massachussetts.

In a July 11 study in Science, Yu and her colleagues report how they isolated breast cancer cells circulating through the blood streams of six patients. Some of these deadly cancer cells are the "seeds" of metastasis, which travel to and establish secondary tumors in vital organs such as the bone, lungs, liver and brain.

Yu et ses collègues ont rapporté comment ils ont isolé des cellules cancéreuses du sein qui circulaient dans le sang de 6 patientes. Quelques unes de ces cellules sont les graines qui voyagen tpour aller métastaser ailleurs dans l'organisme.

Yu and her colleagues managed to expand this small number of cancer cells in the laboratory over a period of more than six months, enabling the identification of new mutations and the evaluation of drug susceptibility.

Yu est ses collègues ont fait en sorte de multiplier ce petit nombre de cellules en laboratoire pendant une période de plus de 6 mois, ce qui a permis l'identification des nouvelles mutations et l'évaluation de médicaments pour les contrer.

If perfected, this technique could eventually allow doctors to do the same: use cancer cells isolated from patients' blood to monitor the progression of their diseases, pre-test drugs and personalize treatment plans accordingly.

Si la technique pouvait être perfectionnée, elle pourrait éventuellement permettre aux docteurs de faire la même chose : utiliser des cellules des patientes isolées de leur sang pour comprendre les progrès de leur maladie, pré-tester les médicaments et personnaliser les traitements.

In the six estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer patients in the study, the scientists found newly acquired mutations in the estrogen receptor gene (ESR1), PIK3CA gene and fibroblast growth factor receptor gene (FGFR2), among others. They then tested either alone or in combination several anticancer drugs that might target tumor cells with these mutations and identified which ones merit further study. In particular, the drug Ganetspib -- also known as STA-9090 -- appeared to be effective in killing tumor cells with the ESR1 mutation.

Dans les 6 patientes acec un cancer du sein positif aux oestrogènes, les scientifiques ont trouvé des mutations acquises dans le récepteur d'oestrogène (ESR1) dans le gène PIK3CA et dans le gène FGFR2 parmi d'autres. Ils ont alors testé des médicaments seul ou en combinaison qui pourraient cibler ces cellules cancéreuses avec ces mutations spécifiques et identifier lesquels méritent de plus amples études. Le médicament Ganetspib ou STA-9090 apparait efficace pour tuer les cellules avec la mutation ESRT1.

"Metastasis is the leading cause of cancer-related death," said Yu, assistant professor in the Department of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine at the Keck School of Medicine of USC. "By understanding the unique biology of each individual patient's cancer, we can develop targeted drug therapies to slow or even stop their diseases in their tracks."

En identifiant la biologie unique du cancer de chaque patiente, nous pouvons développer des thérapies ciblées pour ralentir ou arrêter leurs maladies.

_________________


Dernière édition par Denis le Mar 1 Mar 2016 - 12:20, édité 1 fois
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16503
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: La guerre contre le cancer du sein   Mar 11 Mar 2014 - 12:31

Deux avancées majeurs ont été publiées cette semaine dans le domaine de la lutte et de la détection précoce du cancer du sein. Il s'agit, en premier lieu, des conclusions de l'étude SAFIR 01, coordonnée par le Professeur Fabrice André, oncologue à Gustave Roussy. Ces résultats montrent que l'analyse étendue du génome tumoral permet bien de déterminer si une patiente atteinte d'un cancer métastatique du sein doit ou on bénéficier de certaines thérapies ciblées.

Cette première mondiale ouvre enfin la voie à un traitement personnalisé de ce cancer très répandu grâce à l'identification d'anomalies dans le génome de la tumeur pour laquelle il existe un médicament ciblé agissant spécifiquement sur les cellules tumorales qui présentent ces anomalies, et permet de proposer un traitement sur mesure aux patientes.

Plus de 400 femmes atteintes d'un cancer du sein avancé ont participé à cette étude. Pour 46 % d'entre elles, une mutation génétique de la tumeur correspondant à un traitement ciblé a été identifiée et 28 % d'entre elles ont pu bénéficier d'une nouvelle thérapie dans le cadre d'un essai clinique. Elles sont 30 % à avoir présenté des signes d'effet antitumoral. L'analyse génomique a également révélé des mutations rares pour lesquelles il n'existe actuellement aucun traitement chez 39 % des patientes.

Comme le souligne Fabrice André, « Pour la première fois, nous démontrons que des technologies d'analyse étendue du génome tumoral permettent, en identifiant les mutations rares et fréquentes, d'orienter les patientes atteintes d'un cancer métastatique du sein vers des thérapies mieux ciblées. Ainsi, nous validons véritablement la faisabilité du concept de médecine personnalisée en pratique clinique ».

La seconde avancée, réalisée par des chercheurs américains et néerlandais dans le cadre d'une étude sur 244 femmes, résulte de plus de 20 ans de recherche et concerne la possibilité, d'ici quelques années, de pouvoir dépister de manière fiable le cancer du sein à partir d’un simple test respiratoire.

Le principe de ce test consiste à analyser des molécules volatiles contenues dans le souffle des patientes et qui pourraient s'avérer être des biomarqueurs permettant de détecter la présence de tumeurs. Reste cependant à s'assurer, par des études complémentaires, que les marqueurs identifiés sont suffisamment spécifiques pour permettre la détection fiable de tous les cancers du sein, ce qui nécessitera encore plusieurs années de travail.

Article rédigé par Georges Simmonds pour RT Flash

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16503
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: La guerre contre le cancer du sein   Ven 1 Fév 2013 - 8:03

A vaccine therapy designed to prevent breast cancer from recurring in women who have been treated for early-stage disease, but remain at high risk of forming new tumors, is now being evaluated in a multinational phase III trial after it succeeded in reducing relapse rates significantly in earlier trials.

Un vaccin fait pour prévenir le cancer du sein de revenir chez les femmes qui ont eu des traitements pour les premiers stages de la maladie mais qui restent à risque de faire de nouvelles tumeurs est maintenant évalué dans un essai clinique de phase III après qu'il a réussi à réduire le taux de rechûte de façon significative dans des essais antérieurs.

The therapy, NeuVax, directs the immune system to target HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2), an oncogene that promotes tumor growth associated with aggressive disease and poor survival and is expressed to some extent in about two-thirds of breast cancer tumors.

Neuvax, le vaccin en question, fait que le système immunitaire cible her2, un oncogène qui promeut la croissance de la tumeur associé avec une maladie agressive, une moins bonne survie et qui est exprimé dans une certiane mesure chez deux tiers des tumeurs du sein.

The drug represents a departure from the majority of cancer therapies now in clinical trials because of the early stage at which patients are enrolled, as well as its focus on prevention. While most new therapies are evaluated in later-stage patients with metastatic disease, the patients participating in the PRESENT trial (Prevention of Recurrence in Early-Stage, Node-Positive Breast Cancer with Low-to-Intermediate HER2 Expression with NeuVax Treatment; Galena Biopharma) have newly diagnosed cancer characterized as local regional disease, or stage 2 to 3a from a clinical perspective.

Le médicament représente quelque chose de différent de la majorité des thérapies maintenant en essais clinique en raison de la premi;re phase dans laquelle les patientes sont enrôlées parce qu'il met l'accent sur la prévention,
Alors que la plupart des nouvelles thérapies sont évaluées dans les stages avancées de la maladie métastasique, les patientes de cet essai sont des patientes au stage 2 ou 3a.


“This trial is for women who have completed standard- of-care therapy and are node-positive with tumors with low to intermediate expression of HER2, defined as 1+ and 2+, for whom there are currently no additional treatment options. It’s an unmet need because these patients are node-positive and have a high risk of recurrence,” said Elizabeth Mittendorf, MD, PhD, an assistant professor in the Department of Surgical Oncology at University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, and the trial’s principal investigator.

cet essai est pour les femmes qui ont compété la thérapie standand et ont eu des nodules positifs avec leur tumeur avec une expression de HER2 défini comme 1+ et 1+ pour lesquelles il n'y a pas de traitement additionnels disponibles. C'est un besoin qui n'est pas comblé parce que ces patientes ont (ou ont eu ?) des nodules positives et ont un grand risque de récurence.

About 40,000 of the approximately 230,000 women diagnosed each year with breast cancer fit this profile, said Mark Ahn, PhD, president and CEO of Galena Biopharma. “About 55% of women are node-positive, and this is the dominant clinical factor for predicting whether their cancer will return. They have a 25% chance of recurrence within 3 years, despite there being no evidence of disease following standard-of-care therapy. These are women with a median age of about 50 who are highly active with lots of life left, and who are keen to stay in remission,” he said, adding, “Of HER2- positive tumors, 20% to 30% are 3+ (high-level expression), and these patients receive trastuzumab therapy. However, about 50% to 60% are either 1+ or 2+, and these women are currently sent home to watch, wait, and worry about recurrence.”

Environ 40,000 sur 230,000 des femmes diagnostiquées chaque années avec le cancer du sont avec ce profil. À peu près 55% des femmes sont "nodules positives" et c'est un facteur clinique dominant pour prédire si le cancer reviendra ou pas. Elles ont 25% de chance que le cancer revienne en dedans de 3 ans, en dépit du fait qu'il n'y a pas de preuve de ça après la thérapie standard . Ce sont des femmes d'un âge moyen de 50 ans qui sont très actives avec encore beaucoup d'années devant elles et qui sont désireuses de rester en rémission. Des cancers Her2 + de 20% à 30% sont classées 3+ (expression de her2 à un haut niveau) et ces patientes recoivent Trastuzumab. Toutefois, de 50 à 60% des stages 1 et 2 sont renvoyés chez elles et attendent en s'inqiétant.

The trial is a randomized, double-blind study at 32 sites, with an estimated enrollment of 700 women with operable early-stage, node-positive breast cancer who have completed standard therapies that include surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. The primary outcome measure for the trial is an assessment of disease-free survival in the vaccine and control groups at 36 months. Secondary endpoints include measurement of disease-free survival and overall survival in both groups at 3, 5, and 10 years, and data collection on time to recurrence, time to local recurrence, time to distant recurrence, and time to bone metastases, as well as an overall safety profile.

Patients seeking to enroll in this trial undergo a two-step qualification process at one of the test sites to confirm their eligibility, Mittendorf said. A blood sample is sent to a central lab to determine the patient’s human leukocyte antigen (HLA) status, as the vaccine only works in patients who are A2- or A3-positive for these alleles, molecules that package the vaccine peptide and present it on the cell surface for recognition by the immune system. Patients must also undergo a series of tests, including a mammogram, computed tomography scan, and bone scan, to show that they are disease-free.

“They must begin their vaccination series within 2 months after standard therapy is completed,” she said, noting, “We’re identifying potentially eligible trial patients while they are still completing their standard treatment. This allows us to appropriately counsel patients and complete the necessary consenting and testing so that they can start their inoculations on schedule.”

Participants in the experimental arm of the trial are inoculated with a hybrid vaccine that includes NeuVax (nelipepimut-S), an E-75 peptide derived from HER2, combined with Leukine (sargramostim), an adjuvant that boosts the immune system. The mixture is injected intradermally once a month for 6 months, followed by booster shots five more times at 6-month intervals. Participants in the control arm receive injections of Leukine at the same intervals.

Ahn described NeuVax as a clone of HER2 that trains the body’s T cells to attack the tumor-expressing cells that become the basis for breast cancer relapse. “The body has a trillion T cells and between 15% and 40% are CTLs, or cytotoxic T cells, lymphocytes that can kill cancer cells. These T cells are trainable and can be turned on and directed at HER2; we can have 2% of CTLs to run around the body for 6 months to look for HER2,” he said.

Recurrence rates were cut in half for women who were vaccinated with NeuVax over the course of the earlier clinical trials, said Col. George Peoples, MD, a developer of the vaccine who is director and principal investigator for the Cancer Vaccine Development Program at San Antonio Military Medical Center and deputy director of the US Military Cancer Institute.


Peoples, the principal investigator for the phase I and II trials, said that the figure reflected outcomes for all women participating, regardless of dosage levels and including those who did not receive boosters. He noted that a series of dosages and schedules were tried with the vaccine before investigators determined which combination produced the most robust immune response.

The phase I/II clinical trial of NeuVax recently concluded, with the final patients completing their booster treatments and final follow-up visits in September 2012. Initially, patients in the earlier trials were given a series of up to six inoculations of NeuVax on a monthly basis. The trial physicians added a voluntary booster program as the trial progressed, however, when they determined that some patients’ immunity waned after the initial monthly series, translating to late recurrences of cancer in some. This declining immunity was identified by monitoring the patients’ T cells.

The results showed that at a median of 60 months, the disease-free survival for the booster group was 96% versus 80.5 % in the control group, with a recurrence rate for the booster group of about 4% versus about 19% in the control group.

Les résultats ont montré que sur 5 ans, le groupe avec le "booster" a un taux de non-récurence de 96% versus 80,5% pour le groupe de contrôle.

“In phase III, patients are getting an optimal dose. Phase I participants were rolled into phase II, and so those patients received a variety of doses including low doses, and some did not receive boosters,” Mittendorf said.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16503
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: La guerre contre le cancer du sein   Jeu 4 Jan 2007 - 17:39

Les résultats présentés à la réunion annuel de san Antonio sur le cancer du sein disent que le Novaldex réduit le risque de développer un cancer suite à une thérapie préventive.

Les données inclut 7,145 femmes qui sont à haut risque de développer un cancer et qui ont été suivi pour 10 ans. Ils ont trouvé que la rechûte était réduite de 29% pour les femmes prenant le médicament. L'effet préventif a été amélioré à 10 ans comparativement à 5 ans auparavant.



Les chercheurs conclut que les femmes à haut risque continue à bénéfivier des effets de tamoxifen même 5 ans après le commencement de la thérapie.

Parlez-en à votre praticien
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16503
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Taxotere + Cytoxan pour le cancer du sein   Ven 8 Déc 2006 - 11:57

Les résultats d'une étude clinique de phase III publiée dans le journal de l'oncologie clinique conclue que le Taxotere (docetaxel) + le Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide) résulte en une meilleure survivance au cancer que le traitement d'Adriamycine (doxorubicin) et Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide)

L'Adriamycine et le Cytoxan, connu comme la chimio AC a été le meilleur régime pour les patientes traités pour un cancer du sein à un stage précoce.

Les résultats de cette étude montre que la survivance sans cancer est de 86% pour celles traités avec le TC et de 80% pour celles traitées avec le AC. La survivance générale était de 90% pour les femmes traitées avec le TC et 87% pour les femmes traitées avec le AC.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16503
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: La guerre contre le cancer du sein   Jeu 16 Juin 2005 - 13:49

Cancer du sein: plus de cas, mais moins de morts --par Florence Sebaoun--

AP | 16.06.05 | 15:43


PARIS (AP) -- Prévention précoce, médicaments plus efficaces, meilleure connaissance du génome de la tumeur: à quelques jours de l'ouverture à Paris d'Eurocancer 2005, des spécialistes se sont félicités jeudi des progrès enregistrés dans le domaine du cancer du sein, un cancer en augmentation mais dont les femmes meurent de moins en moins(...)
A l'heure actuelle, de grands espoirs se fondent sur les analyses moléculaires à grande échelle de la tumeur qui permettent d'envisager «un traitement individualisé, à la carte» de ces tumeurs.
Ces techniques consistent à étudier simultanément plusieurs milliers de gènes ou de protéines et de définir des «profils d'expression génique» grâce auxquels, à terme, on saura qui de telle ou telle femme présente des risques de récidive et devra être traitée en conséquence et quel type de chimiothérapie sera la plus efficace pour une patiente donnée.

Dans le domaine de la chimiothérapie, les spécialistes disposent de médicaments de plus en plus efficaces, notamment hormonaux et immunothérapiques. Proposée de plus en plus tôt aux femmes ménopausées, l'hormonothérapie a pour objectif d'empêcher la survenue de métastases. «On remplace le tamoxifère par des inhibiteurs de l'aromatase (anastrozole, letrozole, exemestane) qui sont moins toxiques et plus efficaces», s'est félicité le Dr Giacchetti.
Aux Etats-Unis, le consensus est de traiter toutes les patientes dont la tumeur fait plus d'un centimètre par une chimiothérapie et/ou une hormonothérapie adjuvante. La chimiothérapie adjuvante est indiquée pour les tumeurs de plus de 5 mm, s'il existe des facteurs de mauvais pronostic associés.
Concernant l'immunothérapie, les anticorps monoclonaux, c'est-à-dire des anticorps produits par un groupe de cellules identiques (clone), ont montré leur efficacité. «Le HER2 est un oncogène impliqué dans le phénomène de croissance cellulaire anormale», a expliqué la spécialiste. «Si on surexprime cet antigène, on obtient un anticorps monoclonal».
L'Herceptin (trastuzumab), un anticorps humanisé ciblant directement le HER2, est aujourd'hui utilisé dans le cancer du sein métastatique dans lequel le HER2 est surexprimé (20 à 25% des cancers du sein).
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16503
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: La guerre contre le cancer du sein   Lun 30 Mai 2005 - 8:32

Cancer du sein: front dans la guerre anti-tumeur où la médecine avance bien

Dans la guerre menée contre le cancer, la médecine enregistre des succès très encourageants pour empêcher la réapparition de tumeurs du sein, révèlent les résultats de plusieurs essais cliniques étendus publiés ces dernières semaines.

Une analyse de 194 études conduites dans plus de vingt pays sur 145.000 femmes opérées d'un cancer peu avancé du sein, a montré qu'une combinaison de chimiothérapie et d'un traitement hormonal comme le tamoxifen, avait réduit de moitié leurs risques de mourir de la maladie pendant au moins 15 ans.

Cette recherche, plaide pour la poursuite d'un recours agressif à la chimiothérapie et à des traitement hormonaux après une opération chirurgicale, a commenté Sarah Darby de l'Université d'Oxford (Grande Bretagne), qui a conduit cette analyse parue le 12 mai dans la revue britannique The Lancet.

"Ces résultats expliquent pourquoi le taux de décès par cancer du sein continue à baisser nettement dans les pays industrialisés et prouvent que les traitements standards sont vraiment efficaces", a-t-elle ajouté.

Le nouveaux médicament vedette herceptine, de la firme Genentech, combiné aussi à de la chimiothérapie, permet de réduire de 52% la réapparition de certains cancers très agressifs du sein, selon une étude financée par l'Institut national américain du cancer publiée fin avril.

Pour le directeur du NCI, Andrew von Eschenbach, l'herceptine représente "une percée majeure pour des milliers de femmes atteintes d'un cancer du sein".

"Ces résultats constituent un exemple de plus indiquant que nous sommes à un tournant important dans l'usage de thérapies ciblées....", a-t-il ajouté dans un communiqué.

L'herceptine agit seulement pour les 20% à 30% des femmes ayant une forme de cancer caractérisée par une mutation génétique qui entraîne un excès de production de la protéine dite "HER-2".

Mais ajouté aux bons résultats du tamoxifen depuis plus de dix ans, qui est efficace pour 60% des femmes dont la tumeur est sensible à l'oestrogène, une hormone, les risques de mourir d'un cancer du sein vont probablement diminuer de 80%, avait estimé le Dr. Gabriel Hortobagyi lors de la conférence annuelle de l'"American Society of Clinical Oncology" réunie le week end passé en Floride.

Les premiers résultats d'essais cliniques de traitements expérimentaux, présentés au congrès de l'ASCO et considérés comme les armes moléculaires anti-cancer de la nouvelle génération, devraient encore faire baisser davantage la mortalité, selon les chercheurs.

Ces médicaments, qui ont déjà donné des résultats encourageants sur des cancers avancés du sein mais aussi du rein et de l'estomac, bloquent simultanément deux mécanismes du développement du cancer.

Il s'agit de la formation des vaisseaux sanguins nourrissant la tumeur et des signaux responsables de la prolifération des cellules cancéreuses.

Selon une autre étude, dévoilée à Orlando, un régime alimentaire faible en graisse permettrait aussi de faire diminuer de plus de 20% une réapparition d'une tumeur du sein chez des femmes âgée de 48 à 79 ans.

Enfin, un essai clinique présenté devant l'ASCO a montré que les statines comme le lipitor ou le zocor, de puissants réducteurs de cholestérol, réduiraient aussi les risques de cancer du sein de plus de 50%.

Le cancer du sein est la forme de tumeur cancéreuse la plus communément diagnostiquée -- avec 211.240 nouveaux cas attendus en 2005-- et la seconde cause de mortalité par cancer avec plus de 40.000 décès prévus cette année aux Etats-Unis.


Dernière édition par Denis le Sam 5 Aoû 2017 - 8:28, édité 8 fois
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: La guerre contre le cancer du sein   

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
La guerre contre le cancer du sein
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 1
 Sujets similaires
-
» La guerre contre Paris 1871
» Le Japon part en guerre contre les extra terrestres.
» UN PATRON EN GUERRE CONTRE SOCIETE GENERALE,CREDIT AGRICOLE
» Campagne de 1870-71 : Guerre contre la Prusse
» Paul Watson part en guerre contre les baleiniers japonais

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
ESPOIRS :: Cancer :: recherche-
Sauter vers: