AccueilCalendrierFAQRechercherS'enregistrerMembresGroupesConnexion

Partagez | 
 

 Toujours la piste des cellules souches.

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
AuteurMessage
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16503
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Toujours la piste des cellules souches.   Sam 27 Mai 2017 - 10:22

Melanoma is a particularly difficult cancer to treat once it has metastasized, spreading throughout the body. University of Illinois researchers are using chemistry to find the deadly, elusive malignant cells within a melanoma tumor that hold the potential to spread.

Once found, the stemlike metastatic cells can be cultured and screened for their response to a variety of anti-cancer drugs, providing the patient with an individualized treatment plan based on their own cells.

"The vast majority of suffering in cancer is caused by metastasis, and these stemlike cells are believed to be the culprit," said Kristopher Kilian, a professor of bioengineering and of materials science and engineering who led the research. "But when you take a patient's cells from a biopsy or excised tumor, they loose their stem cell characteristics once you take them out of the body. We are using chemistry to make designer surfaces to reprogram them to that stemlike state."

Kilian's team focused on proteins found in the tumor's environment within the body. They took 12 protein segments that bind to the surface of cancer cells, then mixed and matched them into 78 different combinations in an effort to recreate the body's complex chemical environment.

The researchers created arrays of chemical combinations on glass slides and cultured mouse melanoma cells on them to see which combinations triggered the cells to return to their metastatic state. They published their findings in the journal ACS Central Science.

"A plastic dish coated with these simple peptide combinations could be used to take a patient's cells, reactivate them to a stemlike state, and screen drugs on them. It's a way to efficiently generate these stemlike metastatic cells to develop patient-specific models for individualized medicine," Kilian said.

Screening drugs to specifically target the stemlike cells is important because they may not respond to the same drug that targets the main tumor, Kilian said.

The researchers said the array technique for finding stemlike cancer cells could work for many different types of cancer. They currently are working on breast and prostate cancers.

"This is where having a high-throughput technique like an array is very powerful," Kilian said. "If you have all the chemical combinations on a single chip, you find out which ones work. If you can isolate the metastatic cancer cells, you can understand them, and then you can treat them."

---

Le mélanome est un cancer particulièrement difficile à traiter une fois qu'il a métastasé, se propageant dans tout le corps. Les chercheurs de l'Université de l'Illinois utilisent la chimie pour trouver les cellules malignes mortelles et insaisissables dans une tumeur de mélanome qui supportent le potentiel de propagation.

Une fois trouvé, les cellules métastatiques de type souche peuvent être cultivées et criblées selon leur réponse à une variété de médicaments anticancéreux, fournissant au patient un plan de traitement individualisé basé sur leurs propres cellules.

"La grande majorité de la souffrance dans le cancer est causée par la métastase, et les cellules de type souche sont censées être le coupable", a déclaré Kristopher Kilian, professeur de bioingénierie et de sciences des matériaux et de génie qui a dirigé la recherche. "Mais lorsque vous prenez les cellules d'un patient à partir d'une biopsie ou d'une tumeur excisée, elles perdent leurs caractéristiques de cellules souches une fois que vous les retirez du corps. Nous utilisons la chimie pour créer des surfaces de concepteur pour les reprogrammer à cet état de souche".

L'équipe de Kilian s'est concentrée sur les protéines trouvées dans l'environnement de la tumeur dans le corps. Ils ont pris 12 segments de protéines qui se lient à la surface des cellules cancéreuses, puis les ont mélangés et les ont fait correspondre à 78 combinaisons différentes dans un effort pour recréer l'environnement chimique complexe du corps.

Les chercheurs ont créé des réseaux de combinaisons chimiques sur des lames en verre et des cellules de mélanome de souris cultivées sur celles-ci pour voir quelles combinaisons ont déclenché les cellules à revenir à leur état métastatique. Ils ont publié leurs résultats dans la revue ACS Central Science.

"Un plat en plastique recouvert de ces combinaisons de peptides simples pourrait être utilisé pour prendre les cellules d'un patient, pour les réactiver à un état de type souche, et faire des tests de médicaments sur eux. C'est un moyen de générer efficacement ces cellules métastatiques de type souche pour développer des modèles spécifiques au patient ", a déclaré Kilian.

Le dépistage des médicaments pour cibler spécifiquement les cellules souches est important car ils peuvent ne pas répondre au même médicament qui cible la tumeur principale, a déclaré M. Kilian.

Les chercheurs ont déclaré que la technique du tableau pour trouver des cellules cancéreuses semblables à une souche pourrait fonctionner pour différents types de cancer. Ils travaillent actuellement sur les cancers du et de la .

"C'est là où une technique à haut débit comme une matrice est très puissante", a déclaré Kilian. "Si vous avez toutes les combinaisons chimiques sur une seule puce, vous découvrez celles qui fonctionnent. Si vous pouvez isoler les cellules cancéreuses métastatiques, vous pouvez les comprendre, puis vous pouvez les traiter".

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16503
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Toujours la piste des cellules souches.   Ven 10 Mar 2017 - 17:20

Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma is a highly invasive form of cancer and frequently spreads to the cervical lymph nodes. Currently, cisplatin is the standard therapeutic drug used for people with HNSCC. Yet, more than 50 percent of people who take cisplatin demonstrate resistance to the drug, and they experience a recurrence of the cancer. The five-year survival rates remain sorely low and researchers still don't understand the underlying mechanisms behind head and neck squamous carcinoma. Therefore, said UCLA cancer biologist Dr. Cun-Yu Wang, who led the study, there's an urgent need to understand why people with this type of cancer are resistant to therapy and to develop new approaches for treating it.

Wang's research is published online in the peer-reviewed journal Cell Stem Cell.

Cancer stem cells are known to be responsible for tumor formation and development; they also self-renew and tend to be unresponsive to cancer therapy. These cells have been found in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Given the unique challenges that cancer stem cells pose for oncologists, it remains unclear what the optimal therapeutic strategy is for treating HNSCC.

To address this, Wang, who holds the Dr. No-Hee Park Endowed Chair in Dentistry at UCLA and holds a joint appointment in the UCLA Department of Bioengineering, and his research team first developed a mouse model of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma that allowed them to identity the rare cancer stem cells present in HNSCC using in vivo lineage tracing, a method to identify all progeny of a single cell in tissues.

The researchers found that the cancer stem cells expressed the stem cell protein Bmi1 and had increased activator protein-1, known as AP-1, a transcription factor that controls the expression of multiple cancer-associated genes. Based on these new findings, the UCLA team developed and compared different therapeutic strategies for treating head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. They found that a combination of targeting cancer stem cells and killing the tumor mass, consisting of high proliferating cells, with chemotherapy drugs resulted in better outcomes.

The team further discovered that cancer stem cells were not only responsible for squamous cell carcinoma development, but that they also cause cervical lymph node metastasis.

"This study shows that for the first time, targeting the proliferating tumor mass and dormant cancer stem cells with combination therapy effectively inhibited tumor growth and prevented metastasis compared to monotherapy in mice," said Wang, who is a member of the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center and of the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA. "Our discovery could be applied to other solid tumors such as breast and colon cancer, which also frequently metastasizes to lymph nodes or distant organs."

"With this new and exciting study, Dr. Wang and his team have provided the building blocks for understanding the cellular and genetic mechanisms behind squamous cell carcinoma," said Dr. Paul Krebsbach, dean of the UCLA School of Dentistry. "The work has important translational values. Small molecule inhibitors for cancer stem cells in this study are available or being utilized in clinical trials for other diseases. It will be interesting to conduct a clinical trial to test these inhibitors for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma."

---

Le cancer épidermoïde de est une forme très invasive de cancer et se propage fréquemment aux ganglions lymphatiques cervicaux. Actuellement, le cisplatine est le médicament thérapeutique standard utilisé pour les personnes atteintes de HNSCC. Pourtant, plus de 50 pour cent des personnes qui prennent le cisplatine démontrent la résistance au médicament, et ils éprouvent une récurrence du cancer. Les taux de survie à cinq ans restent très bas et les chercheurs ne comprennent toujours pas les mécanismes sous-jacents derrière le carcinome épidermoïde de la tête et du cou. Par conséquent, le Dr Cun-Yu Wang, biologiste du cancer de l'UCLA, qui a dirigé l'étude, il est urgent de comprendre pourquoi les personnes atteintes de ce type de cancer sont résistantes à la thérapie et de développer de nouvelles approches pour le traiter.




La recherche de Wang est publiée en ligne dans le journal peer-reviewed Cell Stem Cell.




On sait que les cellules souches cancéreuses sont responsables de la formation et du développement des tumeurs; Ils se renouvellent elles-mêmes et ont tendance à ne pas répondre au traitement du cancer. Ces cellules ont été trouvées dans le carcinome épidermoïde de la tête et du cou. Étant donné les défis uniques que posent les cellules souches cancéreuses pour les oncologues, on ne sait pas encore quelle est la stratégie thérapeutique optimale pour traiter le HNSCC.




Pour y remédier, Wang, titulaire de la chaire de médecine dentaire Dr. No-Hee Park, a été nommé conjointement au Département de bioingénierie de l'UCLA et son équipe de recherche a d'abord développé un modèle de souris de carcinome épidermoïde de la tête et du cou qui a permis d'identifier les rares cellules souches cancéreuses présentes dans HNSCC en utilisant le traçage in vivo de la lignée, une méthode pour identifier toute la descendance d'une cellule unique dans les tissus.




Les chercheurs ont découvert que les cellules souches cancéreuses exprimaient la protéine BMI1 des cellules souches et avaient augmenté la protéine activatrice 1, appelée AP-1, un facteur de transcription qui contrôle l'expression de multiples gènes associés au cancer. Sur la base de ces nouvelles découvertes, l'équipe de l'UCLA a élaboré et comparé différentes stratégies thérapeutiques pour le traitement du cancer épidermoïde de la tête et du cou. Ils ont constaté qu'une combinaison pour cibler les cellules souches cancéreuses et pour tuer la masse tumorale, constituée de cellules à prolifération élevée, avec des médicaments de chimiothérapie a donné lieu à de meilleurs résultats.




L'équipe a en outre découvert que les cellules souches cancéreuses étaient non seulement responsables du développement du carcinome épidermoïde, mais qu'elles causaient également des métastases ganglionnaires cervicales.




"Cette étude montre que pour la première fois que cibler la prolifération de la masse tumorale et les cellules souches cancéreuses du cancer avec la thérapie combinée inhibe efficacement la croissance tumorale et empêche les métastases par rapport à la monothérapie chez la souris", a déclaré Wang, qui est membre de l'UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Centre et de Eli et Edythe Broad Centre de médecine régénérative et de recherche sur les cellules souches à UCLA. "Notre découverte pourrait être appliquée à d'autres tumeurs solides telles que le cancer du et du , qui métastase aussi fréquemment vers  des ganglions lymphatiques ou des organes distants."




«Grâce à cette nouvelle étude, le Dr Wang et son équipe ont fourni les bases pour comprendre les mécanismes cellulaires et génétiques du carcinome épidermoïde», a déclaré le Dr Paul Krebsbach, doyen de l'UCLA School of Dentistry. «Le travail a d'importantes valeurs translationnelle. Les inhibiteurs de petites molécules pour les cellules souches cancéreuses dans cette étude sont disponibles ou utilisés dans des essais cliniques pour d'autres maladies.Il sera intéressant de mener un essai clinique pour tester ces inhibiteurs de la tête et du cou sur le carcinome épidermoïde . "

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16503
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Toujours la piste des cellules souches.   Mer 22 Fév 2017 - 16:55

Working with human breast cancer cells and mice, researchers at Johns Hopkins say they have identified a biochemical pathway that triggers the regrowth of breast cancer stem cells after chemotherapy.

The regrowth of cancer stem cells is responsible for the drug resistance that develops in many breast tumors and the reason that for many patients, the benefits of chemo are short-lived. Cancer recurrence after chemotherapy is frequently fatal.

"Breast cancer stem cells pose a serious problem for therapy," says lead study investigator Gregg Semenza, M.D., Ph.D., the C. Michael Armstrong Professor of Medicine, director of the Vascular Biology Program at the Johns Hopkins Institute for Cell Engineering and a member of the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center. "These are the cells that can break away from a tumor and metastasize; these are the cells you most want to kill with chemotherapy. Paradoxically, though, cancer stem cells are quite resistant to chemotherapy."

Semenza says previous studies have shown that resistance to chemotherapy arises from the hardy nature of cancer stem cells, which are often found in the centers of tumors, where oxygen levels are quite low. Their survival is made possible through proteins known as hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs), which turn on genes that help the cells survive in a low-oxygen environment.

In this new study, described Feb. 21 in Cell Reports, Semenza and his colleagues conducted gene expression analysis of multiple human breast cancer cell lines grown in the laboratory after exposure to chemotherapy drugs, like carboplatin, which stops tumor growth by damaging cancer cell DNA. The team found that the cancer cells that survived tended to have higher levels of a protein known as glutathione-S-transferase O1, or GSTO1. Experiments showed that HIFs controlled the production of GSTO1 in breast cancer cells when they were exposed to chemotherapy; if HIF activity was blocked in these lab-grown cells, GSTO1 was not produced.

Semenza notes that GSTO1 and related GST proteins are antioxidant enzymes, but GSTO1's role in chemotherapy resistance did not require its antioxidant activity. Instead, following exposure to chemotherapy, GSTO1 binds to a protein called the ryanodine receptor 1, or RYR1, that triggers the release of calcium, which causes a chain reaction that transforms ordinary breast cancer cells into cancer stem cells.

To more directly assess the role of GSTO1 and RYR1 in the breast tumor response to chemotherapy, the researchers injected human breast cancer cells into the mammary gland of mice and then treated the mice with carboplatin after tumors had formed. In addition to using normal breast cancer cells in the experiments, the team also used cancer cells that had been genetically engineered to lack either GSTO1 or RYR1. Loss of either GSTO1 or RYR1, the researchers report, decreased the number of cancer stem cells in the primary tumor, blocked metastasis of cancer cells from the primary tumor to the lungs, decreased the duration of chemotherapy required to induce remission and increased the duration of time after chemotherapy was stopped that the mice remained tumor-free.

Although the study showed that blocking the production of GSTO1 may improve the efficacy of chemotherapy drugs, such as carboplatin, GSTO1 is only one of many proteins that are produced under the control of HIFs in breast cancer cells that have been exposed to chemotherapy. The Semenza lab is working to develop drugs that can block the action of HIFs, with the hope that HIF inhibitors will make chemotherapy more effective.

---

Travaillant avec des cellules de cancer du sein humain et des souris, les chercheurs de Johns Hopkins disent qu'ils ont identifié une voie biochimique qui déclenche la repousse des cellules souches du cancer du sein après la chimiothérapie.

La repousse des cellules souches cancéreuses est responsable de la résistance aux médicaments qui se développe dans de nombreuses tumeurs du sein et la raison pour laquelle, pour de nombreuses patientes, les avantages de la chimiothérapie sont de courte durée.

«Les cellules souches du cancer du posent un sérieux problème thérapeutique», explique le chercheur de l'étude principale Gregg Semenza, MD, Ph.D., le professeur de médecine C. Michael Armstrong, directeur du programme de biologie vasculaire de l'Institut Johns Hopkins pour l'ingénierie cellulaire Et membre du Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center. «Ce sont les cellules qui peuvent se détacher d'une tumeur et métastaser, ce sont les cellules que vous voulez le plus tuer avec la chimiothérapie. Paradoxalement, cependant, les cellules souches cancéreuses sont très résistantes à la chimiothérapie.

Semenza indique que des études antérieures ont montré que la résistance à la chimiothérapie découle de la nature rustique des cellules souches cancéreuses, qui se trouvent souvent au centre des tumeurs, où les niveaux d'oxygène sont assez bas. Leur survie est rendue possible grâce à des protéines connues sous le nom de facteurs inducibles par l'hypoxie (HIF), qui activent les gènes qui aident les cellules à survivre dans un environnement pauvre en oxygène.

Semenza et ses collègues ont mené une analyse de l'expression génique de plusieurs lignées cellulaires de cancer du sein humaines cultivées en laboratoire après une exposition à des médicaments de chimiothérapie, comme le carboplatine, ce qui arrête la croissance tumorale en endommageant l'ADN des cellules cancéreuses . L'équipe a constaté que les cellules cancéreuses qui ont survécu avaient tendance à avoir des niveaux plus élevés d'une protéine connue sous le nom de glutathion-S-transférase O1, ou GSTO1. Des expériences ont montré que les HIF contrôlaient la production de GSTO1 dans des cellules de cancer du sein lorsqu'elles étaient exposées à une chimiothérapie; Si l'activité de HIF était bloquée dans ces cellules cultivées en laboratoire, GSTO1 n'était pas produit.

Semenza note que GSTO1 et les protéines GST connexes sont des enzymes antioxydantes, mais le rôle de GSTO1 dans la résistance à la chimiothérapie n'a pas besoin de son activité antioxydante. Au lieu de cela, suite à l'exposition à la chimiothérapie, GSTO1 se lie à une protéine appelée le récepteur ryanodine 1, ou RYR1, qui déclenche la libération de calcium, ce qui provoque une réaction en chaîne qui transforme les cellules ordinaires de cancer du sein en cellules souches cancéreuses.

Pour évaluer plus directement le rôle de GSTO1 et RYR1 dans la réponse de la tumeur du à la chimiothérapie, les chercheurs ont injecté des cellules de cancer du sein humain dans la glande mammaire des souris et ensuite traitées les souris avec carboplatine après la formation des tumeurs. En plus d'utiliser des cellules normales de cancer du sein dans les expériences, l'équipe a également utilisé des cellules cancéreuses qui avaient été génétiquement modifiés pour manquer soit GSTO1 ou RYR1. La perte de GSTO1 ou RYR1, selon ce les chercheurs rapportent, a diminué le nombre de cellules souches cancéreuses dans la tumeur primaire, a bloqué la métastases des cellules cancéreuses de la tumeur primaire aux , a diminué la durée de la chimiothérapie nécessaire pour induire la rémission et a augmenté la durée de Temps après l'arrêt de la chimiothérapie que les souris restent exemptes de tumeur.

Bien que l'étude a montré que le blocage de la production de GSTO1 peut améliorer l'efficacité des médicaments de chimiothérapie, comme le carboplatine, GSTO1 est seulement l'une des nombreuses protéines qui sont produites sous le contrôle des HIF dans les cellules de cancer du sein qui ont été exposés à la chimiothérapie. Le laboratoire de Semenza travaille à développer des médicaments qui peuvent bloquer l'action des HIF, avec l'espoir que les inhibiteurs de HIF rendront la chimiothérapie plus efficace.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16503
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Toujours la piste des cellules souches.   Mer 12 Aoû 2015 - 16:23

Simply put, cancer is caused by mutations to genes within a cell that lead to abnormal cell growth. Finding out what causes that genetic mutation has been the holy grail of medical science for decades. Researchers at the Texas A&M Health Science Center Institute of Biosciences and Technology believe they may have found one of the reasons why these genes mutate and it all has to do with how stem cells talk to each other.

The landmark studies by Texas A&M researchers Fen Wang, Ph.D., and Wallace McKeehan, Ph.D., appear in the Journal of Biological Chemistry. Wang and McKeehan studied a family of proteins that communicate between cells called fibroblast growth factor (FGF). This new research shows that errors in the way FGF is transmitted and received by cells can activate previously dormant stem cells in an organ, which can cause cancer.

"FGF is truly the Cinderella of cancer research. For decades it has been overlooked by big pharmaceutical companies because its role in cells is so complex. Now that we are starting to understand it, everyone is rushing to pay attention to the new star," said Wang, director of the Texas A&M Center for Cancer and Stem Cell Biology.

The Stem Cell Theory of Cancer

The duo's research, supported by the National Institutes of Health and Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas, further supports an existing theory that cancer is a stem cell disease. Multiple studies have shown that even within the same lesion, not all cancer cells are the same. Researchers also often find cancerous stem cells within a lesion, and many believe these cells are the key to preventing the initiation and relapse of cancer.

Stem cells have several different roles in human development. Many Americans are familiar with embryonic stem cells, which can become any cell or organ in the body; however, each organ in the body also contains non-embryonic stem cells that are specific to that organ. These organ-specific stem cells control reproduction and growth of the organ through replenishing damaged or aged cells, as well as regeneration of tissues.

Researchers now believe that cancerous stem cells may trigger reproduction and growth of cells within a cancer. These cancerous stem cells lurking within the cancer, under the radar of cancer drugs that target cell proliferation, may underlie the relapse of tumors after surgery of the primary tumor or other cancer treatments. Moreover, without the cancer, stem cells cannot metastasize, or spread.

Some breast and prostate cancer cases have fueled the cancer stem cell theory. Often years after the organ or the cancerous lesions are removed and the patient is declared cancer-free, breast or prostate cancer can return in other organs, indicating the cancer had metastasized before it was originally detected. Cancerous stem cells may be the reason for this.

The Role of FGF in Normal Cell Communication

Nearly every cell in the body expresses the FGF protein, but there are 22 different types, so researchers have struggled to understand their role in cell communication. Until recently it has been a mystery as to how one of the 22 different types of FGF were sent out by cell expressers and taken in by cell receivers.

In their studies released in July, the team traced the life cycle of multiple generations of cells to observe the normal pathways of FGF and what happens when a miscommunication occurs.

"This research is instrumental in establishing the way FGF is normally communicated in cells," Wang said. "Before we can know what's abnormal, we must first establish what is normal. It is particularly important to understand how FGF works in normal and cancerous stem cells."

The Role of FGF In Cancer Stem Cells

Recent research has shown that FGF appears to play a major role in breast and prostate cancer, which is why the duo decided to focus on the protein's role.

Wang and McKeehan discovered the specific pathways FGF uses to activate stem cells or to keep them dormant. This discovery has major implications for future cancer therapies.

"If we understand how to keep these cells dormant it means that although we may have to live with the presence of cancer stem cells, we can prevent them from causing the cancer to come back," Wang said. "That's what we are trying to understand. That is the future of cancer therapy."

Researchers liken an FGF miscommunication between cells to a game of "telephone." In this game, FGF miscommunication activates previously dormant stem cells in one organ, and proceeds to miscommunicate with other cells in the same system, enabling the cancerous stem cells to reproduce and spread, impacting other systems in the body.

While Wang and McKeehan's research is specific to prostate stem cells and prostate cancer, it could have implications for cancers in other organs as well. "Current cancer therapies such as chemotherapy and radiation only target actively proliferating cancer cells," Wang explained. "If we can control how cancerous stem cells remain dormant and how they are activated, we can cure cancer. The research is still in the very early stages but we have hope."


---


Autrement dit, le cancer est causé par des mutations de gènes dans une cellule qui conduisent à une croissance cellulaire anormale. Trouver ce qui entraîne que la mutation génétique a été le Saint Graal de la science médicale depuis des décennies. Des chercheurs de Texas A & M Health Science Center Institute of Biosciences et Technologie croient qu'ils pourraient avoir trouvé une des raisons pour lesquelles ces gènes mutent et cela a tout à voir avec la façon dont les cellules souches se parlent entre elles.

Les études marquantes de Texas A & M chercheurs Fen Wang, Ph.D., et Wallace McKeehan, Ph.D., apparaissent dans le Journal of Biological Chemistry. Wang et McKeehan qui a étudié une famille de protéines qui communiquent entre cellules appelées facteur de croissance des fibroblastes (FGF). Cette nouvelle recherche montre que des erreurs dans la façon dont le FGF est transmis et reçu par les cellules peuvent activer les cellules souches dormantes dans un organe, qui peut causer le cancer.

"Le FGF est vraiment le parent pauvre de la recherche sur le cancer. Pendant des décennies, il a été négligé par les grandes compagnies pharmaceutiques parce que son rôle dans les cellules est si complexe. Maintenant que nous commençons à comprendre, tout le monde se précipite pour prêter attention à la nouvelle star," a dit Wang, directeur du Centre de Texas A & M pour le cancer et biologie des cellules souches.

La théorie de cellules souches du cancer

La recherche du duo soutient en outre une théorie existante que le cancer est une maladie des cellules souches. De nombreuses études ont montré que, même dans la même lésion, ce sont pas pas toutes les cellules cancéreuses qui sont les mêmes. Les chercheurs ont également trouvent souvent cellules souches cancéreuses dans un lésion, et beaucoup pensent que ces cellules sont la clé de la prévention de l'initiation et de rechute du cancer.

Les cellules souches ont plusieurs rôles différents dans le développement humain. Beaucoup d'Américains sont familiers avec les cellules souches embryonnaires, qui peuvent devenir une cellule ou d'un organe dans le corps; cependant, chaque organe dans le corps contient également des cellules souches non embryonnaires qui sont spécifiques à cet organe. Ces cellules souches spécifiques d'un organe de contrôle de reproduction et de croissance de l'organe à travers les cellules endommagées ou âgées servent de réapprovisionnement, ainsi que la régénération des tissus.

Les chercheurs pensent maintenant que les cellules souches cancéreuses peuvent déclencher la reproduction et la croissance des cellules dans un cancer. Ces cellules souches cancéreuses qui se cache à l'intérieur du cancer, dans le radar de médicaments contre le cancer qui ciblent la prolifération cellulaire, peuvent sous-tendre la rechute des tumeurs après une intervention chirurgicale de la tumeur primaire ou à d'autres traitements contre le cancer. En outre, sans le cancer, les cellules souches ne peuvent métastaser, ou se propager.

Certains cas de cancer du et de la ont alimenté la théorie sur les cellules souches du cancer. Souvent ans après que l'organe ou les lésions cancéreuses sont enlevés et le patient est déclaré sans cancer, le cancer du sein ou de la prostate peut revenir dans d'autres organes, indiquant le cancer avait métastasé avant qu'il ait été initialement détecté. Les cellules souches cancéreuses peuvent être la raison de cela.

Le rôle du FGF dans la communication cellulaire normale

Presque chaque cellule dans le corps exprime la protéine FGF, mais il y en a 22 types différents, alors les chercheurs ont du mal à comprendre leur rôle dans la communication cellulaire. Jusqu'à récemment, ça a été un mystère sur la façon dont l'un des 22 types de FGF différents ont été envoyés par des expresseurs cellulaires et reçus par les récepteurs cellulaires.

Dans leurs études publiées en Juillet, l'équipe a tracé le cycle de vie de plusieurs générations de cellules pour observer les voies normales de FGF et ce qui arrive quand une erreur de communication se produit.

«Cette recherche a contribué à établir la façon dont le FGF est normalement communiquée dans les cellules", a déclaré Wang. "Avant que nous puissions savoir ce qui est anormal, nous devons d'abord établir ce qui est normal. Il est particulièrement important de comprendre comment fonctionne le FGF dans les cellules souches normales et cancéreuses."

Le rôle du FGF dans les cellules souches du cancer

Des recherches récentes ont montré que le FGF semble jouer un rôle majeur dans le cancer du sein et de la prostate, ce qui explique pourquoi le duo a décidé de se concentrer sur le rôle de la protéine.

Wang et McKeehan a découvert l'existence de filières spécifiques que FGF utilise pour activer les cellules souches ou de les garder en dormance. Cette découverte a des implications majeures pour les futures thérapies contre le cancer.

"Si nous comprenons comment garder ces cellules dormantes cela signifie que, bien que nous pourrions avoir à vivre avec la présence de cellules souches du cancer, nous pouvons les empêcher de causer le retour du cancer", a déclaré Wang. "Voilà ce que nous essayons de comprendre. Voilà l'avenir de la thérapie du cancer."

Les chercheurs comparent une mauvaise communication entre les cellules de FGF à un jeu de «téléphone». Dans ce jeu, la mauvaise communication de FGF active les cellules souches dormantes dans un organe, et les incite à mal communiquer avec d'autres cellules dans le même système, permettant aux cellules souches cancéreuses de se reproduire et se propager, ceci ayant impact sur les autres systèmes dans le corps.

Alors que la recherche de Wang et McKeehan est spécifique des cellules souches de la prostate et sur le cancer de la , il pourrait avoir des implications pour les cancers dans d'autres organes ainsi. "Les thérapies du cancer actuels tels que la chimiothérapie et la radiothérapie ciblent seulement les cellules cancéreuses proliférant activement», a expliqué Wang. «Si nous pouvons contrôler la façon dont les cellules souches cancéreuses restent dormantes et comment elles sont activés, on peut guérir le cancer. La recherche en est encore à un stade très précoce, mais nous avons espoir."











_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16503
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Toujours la piste des cellules souches.   Dim 4 Nov 2012 - 15:09

HOUSTON - A small slice of RNA inhibits prostate cancer metastasis by suppressing a surface protein commonly found on prostate cancer stem cells. A research team led by scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reported today in an advance online publication at Nature Medicine.

Un petit morceau de ARN inhibe les métastases du cancer de la en supprimant une protéine trouvée souvent sur les cellules souches du cancer de la prostate.

"Our findings are the first to profile a microRNA expression pattern in prostate cancer stem cells and also establish a strong rationale for developing the microRNA miR-34a as a new treatment option for prostate cancer," said senior author Dean Tang, Ph.D., professor in MD Anderson's Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis.

"Nos découvertes sont les premières à établir le profil d'un micro ARN pour les cellules souches de la prostate et aussi à bien établir les raisons de développer le micro-ARN miR-34a en nouveau traitements contre le cancer de la prostate."

MicroRNAs, or miRNAs, are short, single-stranded bits of RNA that regulate the messenger RNA expressed by genes to create a protein.

Cancer stem cells are capable of self-renewal, have enhanced tumor-initiating ability and are generally more resistant to treatment than other cancer cells. They are associated with tumor recurrence and metastasis, the lethal spreading of cancer to other organs. These capacities are more prevalent in cancer cells that feature a specific cell surface protein called CD44, Tang said.

Les cellules souches sont capables d'auto-renouvellement, augmentent la capacité d'initiation des tumeurs et sont généralement plus résistantes aux traitements que les autres cellules cancéreuses. Elles sont associés avec la récurrence des tumeurs et des métastases. CEs capacités sont encore plus prévalentes dans les cellules cancéreuses qui démontrent une protéine de surface appelée CD44.

"CD44 has long been linked to promotion of tumor development and, especially, to cancer metastasis," Tang said. "Many cancer stem cells overexpress this surface adhesion molecule. Another significant finding from our study is identifying CD44 itself as a direct and functional target of miR-34a."

"CD44 a longtemps été lié avec la promotion du développement de la tumeur. Plusieurs cellules souches cancéreuses sur-expriment cette molécule d'adhésion de surface. Une autre découverte importante de cette étude est d'identifier CD44 comme une cible directe et fonctionnelle de MiR-34a"


MicroRNA goes up, CD44 and cancer stem cells fall

In a series of lab experiments with cell lines, human xenograft tumors in mice and primary human prostate cancer samples, the researchers demonstrated that miR-34a inhibits prostate cancer stem cells by suppressing CD44.


Les chercheurs ont démontré que miR-34a inhibe les cellules souches du cancer de la prostate en supprimant CD44 dans des expériences en laboratoires.

miR-34a is greatly reduced in prostate cancer cells that express high levels of CD44 on the cell surface. In 18 human prostate tumors, the microRNA was expressed at 25 to 70 percent of the levels found in cells without CD44.
Prostate tumors in mice that also received miR-34a treatment were one third to half the average size of those in control group mice.
In CD44-positive prostate cancer cell lines, treatment with miR-34a resulted in greatly reduced tumor incidence. Most dramatically, in one cell line, tumor regeneration was blocked in all 10 treated animals, while tumors formed in all 10 animals treated with the control miRNAs.
Many characteristics of cancer stem cells - formation of self-renewing cells, clonal growth capacity and formation of spheres - were suppressed when miR-34a was overexpressed in prostate cancer cell lines.
Most significantly, intravenous treatment of tumor-bearing mice with synthetic miR-34a reduced tumor burden by half in one tumor type. It also steeply reduced lung metastases in another tumor type, resulting in increased animal survival.
Interestingly, the researchers observed a consistent, inverse relationship between miR-34a levels and CD44, the surface marker used to enrich prostate cancer stem cells. For example, the CD44 protein and CD44-expressing cancer cells were reduced in tumors treated with the microRNA. Tumors with miR-34a blocked had higher levels of CD44 protein and messenger RNA.
Finally, knocking down CD44 with a short hairpin RNA produced the same results as treating cells with miR-34a did - reduced tumor development, tumor burden and metastases.

"There are many companies developing microRNA-based drugs," Tang said. "Delivery of miRNAs is a challenge, but the field is moving fast through the preclinical stage."

Livrer les miR-arn est un défi mais tout le champs de recherche bouge rapidement à travers des essais précliniques.

Scientists from Austin-based Mirna Therapeutics collaborated on the study. Mirna has eight microRNAs in preclinical development, including miR-34a.

Read more: MicroRNA suppresses prostate cancer stem cells and metastasis - FierceBiotech http://www.fiercebiotech.com/press-releases/microrna-suppresses-prostate-cancer-stem-cells-and-metastasis#ixzz2BHUS7110
Subscribe: http://www.fiercebiotech.com/signup?sourceform=Viral-Tynt-FierceBiotech-FierceBiotech

http://www.fiercebiotech.com/press-releases/microrna-suppresses-prostate-cancer-stem-cells-and-metastasis

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16503
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Toujours la piste des cellules souches.   Mar 24 Avr 2007 - 14:28

Les cellules souches et le cancer du côlon.




Dans une autre expérience, Chu et ses collègues ont choisis des cellules du cancer du colon selon un marqueur moléculaire connu sous le nom de CD44 marqueur qui apparait à la surface de la cellule.


The marker was chosen because it fit the bill for a cancer stem cell, with earlier studies showing it "possessed a capacity to reproduce itself, regenerate, and produce tumors similar to the tumor of origin," he says.
Then, the researchers injected cells producing various amounts of CD44 into mice. Results showed that the mice developed tumors after being injected with as few as 10 cells producing high amounts of CD44. That's not many, when you consider there are billions of cells in the body, Chu says.

Le marqueur a été choisis parce il remplit les caractéristiques d'une cellule souche cancéreuse, ce qui veut dire que les cellules sont capables de se reproduire d'elles-mêmes, de se regénérer et de produire des tumeurs similaires.

Cancer cells that did not have CD44 on their surface were far less driven. Researchers had to inject 5,000 or more of these cells into the mouse to induce tumor growth, he says.

Les cellules cancéreuses qui n'avaient pas cd44 à leur surface étaient bien moins virulentes, les chercheurs devaient en injecter 5,000 ou plus pour que la tumeur croisse dans la souris.

Wicha notes that CD44 is present on the surface of lung, breast, and many other types of cancers as well. What this suggests, he says, is that novel drug treatments blocking CD44 would curb the growth of many tumor types, not just that of the colon.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16503
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Toujours la piste des cellules souches.   Jeu 19 Avr 2007 - 13:20

PTEN et HER2 régulent la fonction d'auto-renouvellement et celle d'invasion des cellules souches mamaires.

Deux gènes associés avec le cancer agressif du sein sont liés avec une fonction-clé des cellules souches mamaires selon les chercheurs de l'université du Michigan. Les gènes PTEN et HER2, sont impliqués tous les deux dans des chemins biochimiques cellulaires qui jouent un rôle dans l'auto-renouvellement, une propriété des cellules souches.


Selon ces chercheurs comprendrent les chemins qui régulent l'auto-renouvellement des cellules souches est important pour développer des thérapies qui ciblent celles-ci. Ces gènes pourraient aussi devenir des cibles d'intérêts dans le traitement des tumeurs avec l'herceptin.

"Nous croyons maintenant que nos résultats montrent des preuves que le cancer du sein vient d'erreurs qui se produisent dans les chemins biochimiques de l'auto-renouvellement que contrôlent les cellules souches
mamaires."


Selon Korkaya, les cellules avec des capacités en augmentation ou dérugulées d'auto-renouvellement initieront ou maintiendront les tumeurs qui sont résistantes à la thérapie.


Les deux gènes semblent influencer l'auto-renouvellement des cellules en contrôlant les deux différents bras du chemin celllulaire dit korkaya. dans le cancer du sein, la perte de PTEN est lié à 25% des cas et la surproduction de HER2 est lié à 40% de tous les cas. Les patientes avec la combinaison des deux ont un diagnostic plus mauvais.


Pour répliquer à ce phénomène clinique et étudier le lien entre les cellules souches qui se renouvellent elles-mêmes et les tumeurs, les chercheurs ont altéré l'expression des 2 gènes dans une lignée de cellules cancéreuses du sein. Les résultats en laboratoire confirment les données cliniques que l'un des deux défaut dans les gènes accroit de 5 fois la population des cellules souches, tandis que les 2 défaut accroissent de 10 fois le nombre de ces cellules. L'équipe a trouvé que la capacité de métastasé étaiet augmenté par ces expériences.


"En général, les tumeurs comprennent des cellules souches et des cellules normales. Mais si la population des cellules souches mutent dans les chemins cellulaires d'auto-renouvellement, elles vont commencer à se renouveler à un taux accéléré conduisant à une forme particulièrement agressive de cancer.


Les chercheurs croient que des études supplémentaires identifiront de nouveaux marqueurs qui donnera la possibilité aux physiciens de tester les patientes et de leurs donner de nouveaux traitements dessinés spécialemnt pour cibler ces cellules.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16503
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Toujours la piste des cellules souches.   Jeu 19 Avr 2007 - 12:46

Des récrentes découvertes à propos du rôle des cellules souches dans le cancer ont changé le territoire de recherche. Avec chaque nouvelle étude, les scientifiques en apprennnent plus sur les propriétés des cellules souches sur le site des organes et à travers le corps. De façon plus importante, les cellules souches sont vues comme la cause -et la cible de traitements potentiels - pour plusieurs, si ce n'est pour tous les cancers.
Au meeting annuel de l'association américaine, les chercheurs présents ont présenté de nouvelles découvertes sur les cellules souches pour la leucémie le cancer du et du ce qui ajoute aux preuves que peut-être le cancer est fondamentalement un problème de cellules souches.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: Toujours la piste des cellules souches.   

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
Toujours la piste des cellules souches.
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 1
 Sujets similaires
-
» Cellules souches:un pas de géant
» Les "mauvaises" cellules souches identifiées.
» Les cellules souches de la leucémie chronique.
» CELLULES-SOUCHES
» Un marqueur pour les cellules souches

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
ESPOIRS :: Cancer :: recherche-
Sauter vers: