AccueilCalendrierFAQRechercherS'enregistrerMembresGroupesConnexion

Partagez | 
 

 Le sarcome d'Ewing mieux compris.

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
AuteurMessage
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le sarcome d'Ewing mieux compris.   Dim 4 Déc 2016 - 15:45

Researchers of the Sarcoma research group of the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), led by Dr. Òscar Martínez-Tirado, have first described the methylation profile of Ewing's sarcoma (ES), a cancer of bone and soft tissues that mainly affects children and teenagers. Their analysis has unveiled the potential of the PTRF gene as a prognostic marker of the disease and as a possible future therapeutic target in conjunction with the new genomic editing tools available.

"This is the first time that the methylation profile of Ewing's sarcoma has been described," explains Dr. Òscar Martínez-Tirado, lead author of the study. DNA methylation is a type of epigenetic modification capable of controlling gene expression, that is, it can activate or deactivate genes that enhance to or block characteristics and processes in individuals, including the development of tumors. Using bioinformatic tools, the research team looked for common elements that allowed them to relate the set of differentially hypomethylated or hypermethylated genes they found in the tumor samples.

The researchers identified a group of 12 genes related to the structure of the cell membrane; Among them, the precursor of the protein PTRF particularly called their attention by its relation with the caveolae, small invaginations that are present in the membrane of some cells; the IDIBELL group has extensive experience in the study of these structures and their relationship with ES.

The team correlated the presence of PTRF in samples from 67 patients. "Initially, we saw that those patients who express PTRF have a better survival, therefore, we could consider this protein as a potential marker of prognosis of the disease," concludes Martinez-Tirado.

Normal cells with caveolae express both the PTRF protein and caveolin-1 (CAV1), another protein related to caveolae formation. In contrast, tumor cells in ES do not have caveolae, nor express PTRF. "This made us think about the possibility of exogenously reintroducing the precursor gene PTRF into the study cell lines," explains the researcher. "In those that also expressed CAV1, the reintroduction of PTRF triggered caveolae formation. For tumor cells, this modification of the structure is so stressful that it destroys them." In addition, researchers have shown that the formation of the caveolae in these cells activates a known cell death signaling pathway promoted by the p53 protein.

Current epigenetic drugs are rather nonspecific, but new CRISPR genomic editing tools have the potential to be used to demethylate specific genes from a tumor cell in the future. "If we are able to specifically act on the PTRF promoter gene so that the protein is expressed at normal levels, we would induce cell death and therefore we would have a promising new personalized therapeutic option for ES."

---

Les chercheurs du groupe de recherche sur le sarcome de l'Institut de recherche biomédicale de Bellvitge (IDIBELL), dirigé par Dr. Òscar Martínez-Tirado, ont d'abord décrit le profil de méthylation du sarcome d'Ewing (ES), un cancer des os et des tissus mous qui touche principalement les enfants et adolescents. Leur analyse a dévoilé le potentiel du gène PTRF comme marqueur pronostique de la maladie et comme une cible thérapeutique future possible en conjonction avec les nouveaux outils d'édition génomique disponibles.

"C'est la première fois que le profil de méthylation du sarcome d'Ewing a été décrit", explique le Dr Òscar Martínez-Tirado, auteur principal de l'étude. La méthylation de l'ADN est un type de modification épigénétique capable de contrôler l'expression génique, c'est-à-dire qu'elle peut activer ou désactiver des gènes qui améliorent ou bloquent les caractéristiques et les processus chez les individus, y compris le développement de tumeurs. En utilisant des outils bioinformatiques, l'équipe de recherche a cherché des éléments communs qui leur permettaient de relier l'ensemble des gènes différentiellement hypométhylés ou hyperméthylés trouvés dans les échantillons de tumeurs.

Les chercheurs ont identifié un groupe de 12 gènes liés à la structure de la membrane cellulaire; Parmi eux, le précurseur de la protéine PTRF a particulièrement attiré leur attention par sa relation avec les caveolae, petites invaginations qui sont présentes dans la membrane de certaines cellules; Le groupe IDIBELL possède une vaste expérience dans l'étude de ces structures et leur relation avec ES.

L'équipe a corrélé la présence de PTRF dans des échantillons de 67 patients. «Initialement, nous avons vu que les patients qui expriment PTRF ont une meilleure survie, par conséquent, nous pourrions considérer cette protéine comme un marqueur potentiel de pronostic de la maladie», conclut Martinez-Tirado.

Les cellules normales avec caveolae expriment à la fois la protéine PTRF et caveolin-1 (CAV1), une autre protéine liée à la formation des cavéoles. En revanche, les cellules tumorales dans ES n'ont pas de caveolae, ni d'expression PTRF. «Cela nous a fait penser à la possibilité de réintroduction exogène du gène précurseur PTRF dans les lignées cellulaires de l'étude», explique le chercheur. "Dans les cellules qui ont également exprimé CAV1, la réintroduction de PTRF a déclenché la formation des cavéoles. Pour les cellules tumorales, cette modification de la structure est tellement stressante qu'elle les détruit. De plus, des chercheurs ont montré que la formation des cavéoles dans ces cellules active une voie de signalisation de mort cellulaire connue promue par la protéine p53.

Les médicaments épigénétiques actuels sont plutôt non spécifiques, mais les nouveaux outils d'édition génomique CRISPR ont le potentiel d'être utilisés pour déméthyler des gènes spécifiques d'une cellule tumorale à l'avenir. «Si nous sommes capables d'agir spécifiquement sur le gène promoteur PTRF de sorte que la protéine est exprimée à des niveaux normaux, nous induirons la mort cellulaire et donc nous aurions une prometteuse nouvelle option thérapeutique personnalisée pour ES.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le sarcome d'Ewing mieux compris.   Mar 1 Mar 2016 - 12:43

In Ewing sarcoma, cancer cells' DNA is unwound abnormally from a condensed, compact state. Once sections of genetic code are open, key genes are turned on to help direct aggressive and cancerous cell growth.

In a first-of-its-kind-study, researchers at the University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center discovered and applied a new screening technique capable of testing thousands of potential drug compounds to see if those compounds can reverse abnormal DNA unwinding in Ewing sarcoma, a bone and soft tissue cancer that's most common in teens and young adults.

In a preclinical study published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers report that their screening technique identified a group of drug compounds that was particularly active in their cell model of Ewing sarcoma. More broadly, the researchers say they've shown proof of concept of a drug screening strategy that could be applied to an array of cancers.

"This is exciting because we have identified an overall strategy for discovering new drugs based on the signature of how DNA is packaged," said Ian J. Davis, MD, PhD, G. Denman Hammond Associate Professor in Childhood Cancer, a UNC Lineberger researcher, and an associate professor in the UNC School of Medicine Departments of Pediatrics and Genetics.

Most patients with Ewing sarcoma have a DNA mutation in their cancer cells that creates a completely new gene called EWSR1-FLI1. In a discovery led out of UNC-Chapel Hill in 2012, researchers found that this mutant gene creates a protein that travels to unexpected spots along the genome, causing it to unwind abnormally.

Researchers built on that finding to create a lab test reflecting the unique signature of DNA packaging in Ewing sarcoma. In this test, they only examined sections of chromatin that are unwound in the cancer cells, but not in normal cells.

"There are characteristic regions where this oncogene goes in Ewing sarcoma to open up regions of DNA," said Davis, a cancer researcher and pediatric oncologist at the N.C. Cancer Hospital. "So this offers us a unique signature for this cancer, one that is not observed in other cancers, creating an opportunity to use it in our new screen."

Drawing upon a specialized library of small molecule compounds in the UNC-Chapel Hill Center for Integrative Chemical Biology and Drug Discovery, part of the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, they tested hundreds of small molecules against their cellular model to see if the compounds restored normal chromatin structure. The library contains more than 1,000 compounds that were previously developed at UNC to target chromatin regulation as well as chromatin-targeted compounds acquired from other developers.

Through the test, they found that a class of compounds called histone deactylase inhibitors reduced chromatin accessibility at targeted sites. That class has been identified previously as a potential treatment for Ewing sarcoma, Davis said, but they also identified other novel molecules that were active in their screen.

The study's findings further validate the strategy of targeted drug discovery strategy, said study co-author Stephen Frye, PhD, Fred Eshelman Distinguished Professor in the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, a UNC Lineberger member, and the director of the drug discovery center.

"We could go and screen small molecules to just try to kill cancer cells, but lots of compounds that will kill cells are not interesting or worthwhile to pursue as drugs," Frye said. "In this case, we're screening for activity of these drugs against a specific chromatin structural defect that we know is unique to Ewing sarcoma." Frye added that their strategy opens the door for testing of chromatin altering drugs in other cancers.

"There is a huge, less explored class of compounds that we have designed to regulate chromatin," Frye said. "What's novel and interesting about our screening approach is we can test them without having to figure out every last detail about what goes wrong at a molecular level in Ewing sarcoma. We can simply say, we know there is a chromatin defect that's specific to this disease, and we have compounds that regulate chromatin, we can screen that set looking for a specific change in chromatin structure and then test active compounds for activity in models of cancer."

The researchers believe this screening approach might work in other cancers.

"We wanted to know if you can develop a screen that uses chromatin as a way of identifying small molecule drugs for cancer. The answer is yes, you can," Davis said. "If we can get this to work in one disease that has a very distinct profile for how DNA is packaged, maybe we can get it to work to identify potential drugs in other cancers."

---

Dans le sarcome d'Ewing, l'ADN de cellules cancéreuses est déroulé anormalement à partir, un état compact condensé. Une fois que les sections de code génétique sont ouverts, les principaux gènes sont activés pour aider la croissance directe de cellules agressives et cancéreuses.

Dans une première étude de son genre, des chercheurs de l'Université de Caroline du Nord Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center ont découvert et appliqué une nouvelle technique de criblage capable de tester des milliers de composés de médicaments potentiels pour voir si ces composés peuvent inverser le déroulement de l'ADN anormal dans le sarcome d'Ewing, un cancer des os et des tissus mous qui est le plus fréquent chez les adolescents et les jeunes adultes.

Dans une étude préclinique publiée dans les Actes de journal de la National Academy of Sciences, les chercheurs rapportent que leur technique de criblage a identifié un groupe de composés médicamenteux qui était particulièrement actif dans leur modèle cellulaire de sarcome d'Ewing. Plus largement, les chercheurs disent qu'ils ont montré la preuve de concept d'une stratégie de dépistage de médicaments qui pourrait être appliquée à un éventail de cancers.

"C'est excitant parce que nous avons identifié une stratégie globale pour la découverte de nouveaux médicaments basée sur la signature de la façon dont l'ADN est emballé», a déclaré Ian J. Davis, MD.

La plupart des patients souffrant d'un sarcome d'Ewing ont une mutation de l'ADN dans les cellules cancéreuses qui crée un nouveau gène, appelé EWSR1-FLI1. Dans une découverte conduit sur UNC-Chapel Hill en 2012, les chercheurs ont constaté que ce gène mutant crée une protéine qui se déplace à des endroits inattendus le long du génome, l'amenant à se détendre anormalement.

Les chercheurs ont construit sur cette constatation pour créer un test de laboratoire qui reflète la signature unique de l'emballage de l'ADN dans le sarcome d'Ewing. Dans cet essai, on examine seulement les sections de la chromatine qui sont déroulées dans les cellules cancéreuses, mais pas dans les cellules normales.

"Il y a des régions caractéristiques où cet oncogène va dans le sarcome d'Ewing ouvrir des régions d'ADN", a déclaré Davis, un chercheur de cancer et oncologue pédiatrique à l'hôpital N.C. cancer. "Cela nous offre une signature unique pour ce cancer, qui ne soit pas observé dans d'autres cancers, créant ainsi une possibilité de l'utiliser dans notre nouveau test."

Cherchant dans une bibliothèque spécialisée de petites molécules dans le Center Hill UNC-Chapelle pour la biologie intégrative chimique et la découverte de médicaments, une partie de l'école Eshelman UNC de pharmacie, ils ont testé des centaines de petites molécules contre leur modèle cellulaire pour voir si les composés restaurait la structure normale de la chromatine. La bibliothèque contient plus de 1000 composés qui ont déjà été mis au point à l'UNC pour cibler la régulation de la chromatine ainsi que les composés de la chromatine ciblées acquises auprès d'autres développeurs.

Grâce au test, ils ont constaté qu'une classe de composés appelés inhibiteurs de deactylase histones réduit l'accessibilité de la chromatine à des sites ciblés. Cette classe a été identifié auparavant comme un traitement potentiel pour le sarcome d'Ewing, selon Davis, mais ils ont également identifié d'autres molécules nouvelles qui étaient actives dans leur test.

Les résultats de l'étude valident la stratégie de la stratégie de découverte de médicaments ciblés, a déclaré le co-auteur Stephen Frye, PhD, Fred Eshelman professeur émérite à l'École Eshelman UNC de pharmacie, un membre UNC Lineberger, et le directeur du centre de découverte de médicaments.

«Nous pourrions aller et tester de petites molécules juste pour essayer de tuer les cellules cancéreuses, mais beaucoup de molécules qui tuent les cellules ne sont pas intéressantes ou ce n'est pas intéressant d'en poursuivre l'étude en tant que médicaments", a déclaré Frye. "Dans ce cas, le dépistage de l'activité de ces médicaments contre un défaut de structure chromatine spécifique que nous avons identifié est unique pour le sarcome d'Ewing." Frye a ajouté que leur stratégie ouvre la porte pour les tests de médicaments altérant la chromatine dans d'autres cancers.

"Il y a une énorme classe, moins explorée de composés que nous avons conçus pour réguler la chromatine», a déclaré Frye. «Ce qui est nouveau et intéressant sur notre approche de dépistage est que nous pouvons les tester sans avoir à comprendre chaque détail à propos de ce qui va mal au niveau moléculaire dans le sarcome d'Ewing. Nous ne pouvons tout simplement pas le dire, nous savons qu'il y a un défaut de la chromatine qui est spécifique à cette la maladie, et nous avons des molécules qui régulent la chromatine, nous pouvons filtrer cet ensemble à la recherche d'un changement spécifique dans la structure de la chromatine et ensuite tester les composés actifs de l'activité dans des modèles de cancer ".

Les chercheurs pensent que cette approche de dépistage pourrait fonctionner dans d'autres cancers.

"Nous voulions savoir si vous pouvez développer un test qui utilise la chromatine comme un moyen d'identifier les médicaments à petites molécules pour le cancer. La réponse est oui, vous pouvez", a déclaré Davis. «Si nous pouvons obtenir que cela fonctionne dans une maladie qui a un profil très différent de la façon dont l'ADN est emballé, peut-être que nous pouvons le faire fonctionner pour identifier les médicaments potentiels dans d'autres cancers."

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le sarcome d'Ewing mieux compris.   Lun 12 Oct 2015 - 13:29

A compound discovered and developed by a team of Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers that halts cancer in animals with Ewing sarcoma and prostate cancer appears to work against some forms of leukemia, too. That finding and the team's latest work was published online Oct. 8 in Oncotarget.

The compound is YK-4-279, the first drug targeted at similar chromosomal translocations found in Ewing sarcoma, prostate cancer and in some forms of leukemia. Translocations occur when two normal genes break off from a chromosome and fuse together in a new location. This fusion produces new genes that manufacture proteins, which then push cancer cells to become more aggressive and spread. One of those proteins is EWS-FLI1. YK-4-279 appears effective in controlling the cancer promoting functions of EWS-FLI1.

"EWS-FLI1 is already known to drive a rare but deadly bone cancer called Ewing sarcoma, which occurs predominantly in children, teens and young adults," says Aykut Üren, MD, professor of molecular oncology at Georgetown Lombardi. "It also appears to drive cancer cell growth in some prostate cancers."

In this new study led by Üren, mice with EWS-FLI1-driven leukemia were given injections of YK-4-279 five days per week for two weeks and compared with untreated mice. By the end of the first week the mice receiving YK-4-279 had much lower numbers of leukemia cells. At the end of two weeks the treated mice were nearly normal by many measures, while the untreated mice had overwhelming numbers of cancer cells and died on average after three weeks, the researchers say. By contrast, mice receiving only two weeks of YK-4-279 lived nearly three times as long.

"The fact that treated mice did not get sick from the YK-4-279 gives us an early indication that it might be safe to use in humans, but that is a question that can't be answered until we conduct clinical trials," Üren explains. "We are looking for ways that would allow us to administer more of it, or even to formulate a pill."

Üren says much more work remains for the team in order to translate this drug from a laboratory application into clinical trials.



---

Un composé découvert et développé par une équipe de chercheurs de Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center qui arrête le cancer chez les animaux avec le sarcome d'Ewing et le cancer de la prostate semble fonctionner contre certaines formes de leucémie, aussi. Cette constatation et le dernier travail de l'équipe a été publié en ligne le 8 octobre à Oncotarget.

Le composé est YK-4-279, le premier médicament ciblant les translocations chromosomiques similaires trouvés dans le sarcome d'Ewing, dans un cancer de la prostate et dans certaines formes de leucémie. Les translocations se produisent lorsque deux gènes normaux se détachent d'un chromosome et fusionnent dans un nouvel emplacement. Cette fusion produit de nouveaux gènes qui fabriquent des protéines, qui poussent alors les cellules cancéreuses à devenir plus agressives. Une de ces protéines est EWS-FLI1. YK-4-279 semble efficace dans le contrôle du cancer promu par EWS-FLI1.

"L'EWS-FLI1 est déjà connue pour entraîner un cancer des os rare mais mortelle appelée le sarcome d'Ewing, qui survient principalement chez les enfants, les adolescents et les jeunes adultes», dit Aykut Uren, MD, professeur d'oncologie moléculaire à Georgetown Lombardi. "Il semble également stimuler la croissance des cellules cancéreuses dans certains cancers de la ."

Dans cette nouvelle étude menée par Uren, les souris atteintes de leucémie conduite par EWS-FLI1 ont reçu des injections de YK-4-279 cinq jours par semaine pendant deux semaines et comparés aux souris non traitées. A la fin de la première semaine, les souris recevant YK-4-279 ont beaucoup moins de cellules leucémiques. Au bout de deux semaines, les souris traitées étaient presque normale dans de nombreuses mesures, tandis que les souris non traitées avait un nombre écrasant de cellules cancéreuses et mouraient en moyenne après trois semaines, disent les chercheurs. En revanche, les souris recevant seulement deux semaines de YK-4-279 vivaient près de trois fois plus longtemps.

"Le fait que les souris traitées n'ont pas été malades de la YK-4-279 nous donne une première indication qu'il pourrait être sûr à utiliser chez l'homme, mais qui est une question qui ne peut être répondu sans que nous effectuons des essais cliniques," explique Uren. "Nous cherchons des moyens qui nous permettraont d'en administrer plus, ou même de formuler une pilule."

Uren dit qu'il reste encore beaucoup à faire pour l'équipe afin de traduire ce médicament d'une application de laboratoire aux essais cliniques.


cliquez: http://espoirs.forumactif.com/t3280-tasquinimod (pour une explication sur le médicament YK-4_279 pour le cancer de la prostate.)

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le sarcome d'Ewing mieux compris.   Mar 27 Nov 2012 - 11:45

(Nov. 26, 2012) — Discovery of a new drug with high potential to treat Ewing sarcoma, an often deadly cancer of children and young adults, and the previously unknown mechanism behind it, come hand-in-hand in a new study by researchers from Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah.

La découverte d'un nouveau médicament avec un haut potentiel pour traiter le sarcome d'Ewing et d'un mécanisme inconnu jusque là qui le sous-tend viennent ensemble dans une nouvelle étude de chercheurs.

The report appears in the November 26 online issue of the journal Oncogene.

"Ewing sarcoma is almost always caused by a cancer-causing protein called EWS/FLI," said Stephen Lessnick, M.D., Ph.D., director of HCI's Center for Children's Cancer Research, professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Utah School of Medicine, and an HCI investigator.

Le sarcome d'Ewing est presque toujours causé par une protéine appelée EWS/FLI

In the lab, Lessnick and his colleagues found that an enzyme, called lysine specific demethylase (LSD-1), interacts with EWS/FLI to turn off gene expression in Ewing sarcoma. By turning off specific genes, the EWS/FLI-LSD1 complex causes Ewing sarcoma development. "This makes LSD-1 an important target for the development of new drugs to treat Ewing sarcoma," Lessnick said.

En laboratoire, des chercheurs ont trouvé qu'une enzyme appelée LSD-1 interagit avec EWS/FLI pour arrêtre l'expression de gènes dans le sarcome d'Ewing. EN arrêtant l'expression de ces gènes, le complexe EWS/FLI- LSD-1 cause le développement du sarcome d'Ewing. Cela fait de LSD-1 une importante cible pour le développement de nouveaux médicaments pour traiter le sarcome d'Ewing.

"For a long time, we've known that EWS/FLI works by binding to DNA and turning on genes that activate cancer formation," said Lessnick. "It was a surprise to find out that it turns genes off as well.

"The beauty, if there's anything beautiful about a nasty disease like this, is that if we can inhibit EWS/FLI, we can inhibit this cancer, because EWS/FLI is the master regulator of Ewing sarcoma," Lessnick added.

La beauté, si on peut parler de beauté à propos d'un cancer, c'est que nous pouvons inhiber EWS/FLI nous pouvons donc inhiber ce cancer parce que EWS/FLI est le régulateur principal du sarcome d'Ewing.

While Lessnick and his colleagues worked on EWS/FLI in their basic science lab, Sunil Sharma, M.D., director of HCI's Center for Investigational Therapeutics, professor in the Department of Medicine at the University of Utah, and an HCI investigator, had already focused on LSD-1 as a possible target for new cancer treatments and had been working for several years to design drugs that would inhibit its actions.

On travaille depuis plusieurs années pour faire un médicament qui inhibertait l'action de LSD-1

"We had found that LSD-1 was important for regulation of a variety of properties in several different cancers, including acute leukemias, breast and prostate cancers," Sharma said.

LSD-1 est important dans la régulation de plusieurs propriétés dans de nombreux cancers incluant la leucémie aigue le cancer du et de la

"After Steve showed that LSD-1 was directly regulating the function of EWS/FLI, we teamed up with him to see whether the LSD inhibitors we had discovered worked in Ewing sarcoma models," Sharma said. "Our tests in Ewing sarcoma tissue cultures show they are extremely potent."

Les inhibiteur de LSD se sont montré extrêmement puissants sur des tissus de sarcome d'Ewing en laboratoire.

Lessnick and Sharma are now working together to further test LSD inhibitors in animal models as they work toward approval of a first-in-man clinical trial. In addition, Lessnick's basic science research on LSD-1 in Ewing sarcoma continues. "We think it may play a larger role in Ewing sarcoma than simply turning off a handful of genes, and we're looking into that," said Lessnick.

Nous allons vers un essai clinique et nous croyons que cela va jouer un rôle plus grand que fermer une poignées de gènes et nous travaillons à cela.

"This is a great example of how collaboration between the therapeutics and basic science programs can lead to new treatments for patients -- one of HCI's highest goals," said Sharma.

C'est un bel exemple de collaboration entre la science fondamentale et la thérapeuthique.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le sarcome d'Ewing mieux compris.   Ven 7 Sep 2012 - 9:46

Cancer de l'enfant : un nouvel espoir face aux tumeurs d'Ewing

jeudi 06 septembre 2012

Une équipe de chercheurs de l'Institut Curie et de l'Inserm ont mis en évidence une nouvelle cible thérapeutique pour les tumeurs d'Ewing. Un nouvel espoir pour ce cancer qui touche principalement les enfants.



Chaque année, en France près de 100 nouveaux cas de tumeur d’Ewing sont diagnostiqués chez l’enfant, l’adolescent et le jeune adulte (avec un pic de fréquence à la puberté entre 10 et 20 ans). Appelée aussi sarcome d’Ewing, cette tumeur se développe essentiellement dans les os du bassin, les côtes, les fémurs, les péronés et les tibias. En 1984, l'unité d'Olivier Delattre de l'Institut Curie a identifié l’anomalie chromosomique responsable de cette tumeur1.

Les formes localisées sont traitées, dans la majorité des cas, par une combinaison initiale de chimiothérapie et de chirurgie. Mais au moment du diagnostic, un quart des jeunes patients sont déjà porteurs de métastases. Face à ces formes avancées, de nouvelles thérapies sont nécessaires pour améliorer le pronostic des patients. Publiés dans Cancer Research2, mercredi 29 août, les travaux des chercheurs de l'Inserm et de l'Institut Curie pourraient ouvrir la voie à une nouvelle piste thérapeutique pour soigner les formes avancées des tumeurs d'Ewing.

Partant de la découverte de l’anomalie chromosomique responsable de la tumeur, il a cherché à identifier des cibles en aval de cette altération. Ils ont mis en évidence une surexpression de la protéine kinase PRKCB dans toutes les tumeurs d'Ewing. "Cette dernière est cruciale pour la survie cellulaire in vitro et le développement tumoral in vivo" explique Franck Tirode. Cette surexpression de PRKCB est présente dans toutes les tumeurs d’Ewing. Véritable signature de ce cancer pédiatrique, elle pourrait devenir un marqueur diagnostique complémentaire de cette tumeur. Mais le principal espoir est d'ordre thérapeutique, puisqu'il existe déjà des inhibiteurs de la protéine PRKCB en cours d'essai clinique pour d'autres cancers. "Le plus grand bénéfice en termes thérapeutiques viendra très certainement de l'association d'un inhibiteur de la PRKCB avec d'autres molécules dirigées contre des cibles spécifiquement activées dans les tumeurs d'Ewing3", expliquent les auteurs de l'étude.

David Bême

1 - Il s’agit d’une translocation qui se produit, dans 85 % des cas, entre les chromosomes 11 et 22 et aboutit à la synthèse d’une protéine anormale EWS‐FLI1, et dans 10 % des cas, entre les chromosomes 22 et 21 et donne lieu à la synthèse d’une protéine anormale EWSERG. Il existe d’autres altérations, mais elles sont rares. La découverte de ces altérations génétiques a permis la mise au point, à l’Institut Curie en 1994, d’un test moléculaire diagnostic de la tumeur d’Ewing.

2 - Targeting the EWSR1-FLI1 Oncogene-Induced Protein Kinase PKC-β Abolishes Ewing Sarcoma Growth. - Tirode F et al. - . Cancer Res. 2012 Sep 1;72(17):4494-4503. Epub 2012 Aug 28. (abstract accessible en ligne)

3 - D'autres cibles thérapeutiques ont été identifiées pour cette maladie. La même équipe a identifié la protéine IGFBP-3, impliquée dans la prolifération anormale induite par la voie IGF-1.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le sarcome d'Ewing mieux compris.   Lun 13 Fév 2012 - 13:23

Tumeur d’Ewing : découverte de deux variants génétiques

D’après une étude qui vient de paraître dans la revue britannique Nature Genetics, des chercheurs français auraient découvert deux variants génétiques directement impliqués dans le développement d’une maladie rare des os qui touche surtout les enfants, la tumeur d’Ewing. Porteuse d’espoir pour les jeunes malades et leurs familles, cette avancée pourrait permettre de mieux comprendre les mécanismes à l’origine du développement de ce cancer, et ainsi, de mettre au point de nouvelles thérapeutiques pour le combattre.

Cancer osseux rare qui touche principalement l’enfant, l'adolescent, ou le jeune adulte jusqu'à 30 ans, la tumeur d’Ewing est plus fréquente chez les garçons d’origine européenne. D’après les épidémiologistes, cette maladie, particulièrement rare, touche 3 personnes sur un million. Elle se déclare quand les cellules du mésenchyme, tissu conjonctif qui sert de soutien aux autres tissus, deviennent cancéreuses sous l’effet de certains facteurs de croissance.

Afin de décrypter les mécanismes impliqués dans le développement du sarcome d’Ewing, Olivier Delattre, David Cox, et leur collègues de l'Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale (Inserm), de l'Institut Curie, et du Centre Léon Bérard (Lyon), sont partis du constat suivant : la majorité des patients touchés par cette maladie rare sont des jeunes d’origine européenne. Ils ont donc décidé de lancer une vaste étude sur le génome de ces patients.

A l’aide des derniers outils et des nouvelles technologies, les chercheurs ont réalisé, à partir de 680 prélèvements issus de la population française et de 3 670 issus de la population américaine d’origine européenne, une cartographie détaillée des variations génétiques individuelles.

Ils ont ainsi découvert que sur les 700 000 variations génétiques observées, 2 concernaient la tumeur d’Ewing. En effet, les porteurs de ces deux variants sont plus susceptibles que les autres personnes de développer la maladie. Les différentes analyses ont permis aux scientifiques de montrer que les deux régions concernées se trouvaient, pour l’une, à proximité du gène TARDBP qui possède des similitudes avec le gène à l’origine de la tumeur, et pour la seconde, à proximité du gène EGR2, qui fait partie des gènes régulés par le gène de fusion EWS-FLI-1, responsable de cette tumeur.

Ainsi, cette découverte devrait permettre de mieux comprendre les mécanismes cellulaires à l'origine du développement de la maladie, et à terme, d’ouvrir la voie à de possibles thérapeutiques.



_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Le sarcome d'Ewing mieux compris.   Ven 11 Mai 2007 - 8:06

Les mécanismes décryptés d'un cancer de l'enfant



Des chercheurs ont mis en évidence les cellules à l'origine du sarcome d'Ewing, une tumeur osseuse de l'enfant. Et ont été capables de « normaliser » ces cellules tumorales.
DES CHERCHEURS de l'Inserm à l'Institut Curie à Paris viennent de découvrir les cellules à l'origine du sarcome d'Ewing, cette tumeur maligne osseuse qui touche de 80 à 100 adolescents et jeunes adultes par an. Il s'agit des cellules du mésenchyme, un tissu conjonctif qui sert de soutien aux autres tissus. Cette découverte publiée le 7 mai dans Cancer Cell est d'un intérêt majeur car les chercheurs ont par la suite réussi à « forcer » les cellules tumorales à redevenir normales. Une telle approche ouvre des perspectives thérapeutiques nouvelles. Car il pourrait alors être possible de les rendre moins agressives et de s'opposer ainsi à leur prolifération.

Cette tumeur qui a un pic de fréquence au moment de la poussée de croissance osseuse, entre 12 et 20 ans, se développe le plus souvent au niveau des os des membres inférieurs (bassin, fémur, tibia, péroné). Elle se traduit par une douleur à la marche et une tuméfaction. Lorsqu'elle est située sur les côtes, le patient se plaint d'une masse douloureuse. Comme le sarcome d'Ewing possède un certain pouvoir métastatique, il n'est pas rare de voir apparaître des foyers cancéreux au niveau des poumons et de la moelle osseuse. En trente ans, son traitement d'abord axé sur la radiothérapie a profondément évolué. Il passe aujourd'hui par la chimiothérapie et l'exérèse de la tumeur au prix de possibles séquelles motrices. Dans les formes non métastasées, le pronostic est assez bon avec trois quarts de guérison.

Poussée de croissance

L'Institut Curie est le centre de référence pour la prise en charge clinique de ces jeunes patients en France mais aussi au niveau international. Il occupe aussi une place importante dans la recherche sur ces cancers pour lesquels il existe une signature moléculaire simple, ce qui est rare, à savoir une mutation spécifique à l'origine du développement tumoral.

Pour les sarcomes d'Ewing, cette signature a été identifiée et caractérisée au début des années 1990. L'équipe dirigée par Olivier Delattre, directeur de l'Unité Inserm 830 « Génétique et biologie des cancers », avait montré que cette tumeur était due à un échange accidentel de matériel génétique entre les chromosomes 11 et 22. Tant et si bien que les deux gènes cassés et recollés de façon anormale aboutissent à la naissance d'un gène muté dirigeant la mise en place d'un programme aberrant. Mais jusqu'à présent, depuis la description de ces sarcomes dans les années vingt par James Ewing il y avait beaucoup d'interrogations non résolues sur le type de cellule à l'origine de la tumeur : endothéliale, neurale, épithéliale, etc.

Après avoir mis en culture des cellules de la tumeur et ensuite inactivé le gène muté, les chercheurs de Curie en collaboration avec Pierre Charbord de l'Inserm à Tours ont réussi à « forcer » les cellules tumorales à retrouver leur statut d'origine. Ils ont ainsi découvert qu'il s'agit de cellules souches mésenchymateuses, capables de se différencier normalement en cellules soit osseuses, soit graisseuses.

« Pour essayer de comprendre la biologie des cellules tumorales et tenter de les contrecarrer, il est important d'abord de connaître la biologie des cellules normales correspondantes », explique Olivier Delattre. Or à l'adolescence, au moment de la poussée de croissance, les cellules normales sont soumises à une intense signalisation par l'hormone de croissance et par l'IGF (insuline growth factor). En cas de tumeur d'Ewing, ces cellules perdent leur capacité d'être régulées finement par l'IGF 1, d'où une prolifération sans contrôle.

Cette découverte va permettre aux chercheurs de construire un modèle animal de la tumeur d'Ewing, une étape essentielle à la mise au point de futurs traitements « qui agiraient par exemple contre la signalisation par l'IGF 1 », précise Olivier Delattre. Reste à intéresser les industriels à cette recherche qui concerne un tout petit nombre de malades. Un espoir cependant. Comme la signalisation par l'IGF 1 est fréquemment altérée dans certaines tumeurs de l'adulte, l'industrie pharmaceutique manifeste de l'intérêt pour ce type de recherches.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: Le sarcome d'Ewing mieux compris.   Aujourd'hui à 22:08

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
Le sarcome d'Ewing mieux compris.
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 1
 Sujets similaires
-
» Le sarcome d'Ewing mieux compris.
» le Sarcome d’Ewing
» Les mécanismes de la métastase mieux compris.
» Quel type de personnalité qui a le mieux compris la vie?
» cas de guérisons du sarcome?

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
ESPOIRS :: Cancer :: recherche-
Sauter vers: