AccueilCalendrierFAQRechercherS'enregistrerMembresGroupesConnexion

Partagez | 
 

 Le myélome multiple.

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
AuteurMessage
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15763
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le myélome multiple.   Lun 4 Juil 2016 - 11:44

Des chercheurs de l’hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, à Montréal, ont fait une avancée dans le traitement d’un cancer de la moelle osseuse, le myélome multiple, jugé incurable. L’équipe du Dr Jean Roy a traité 92 patients grâce à une greffe de cellules souches provenant du malade, suivie d’une seconde greffe, où le donneur était cette fois un membre de la famille. Ces deux interventions, qui permettent au système immunitaire d’orchestrer deux attaques complémentaires contre la tumeur, ont permis d’obtenir un taux de guérison de 41 %, inégalé pour ce type de cancer.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15763
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le myélome multiple.   Sam 25 Juin 2016 - 12:22

Although high-dose chemotherapy plus autologous transplantation has been a standard of care in the treatment of younger patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma, the advent of effective novel agents for the cancer over the past 15 years has raised the question of whether transplantation, with its myriad toxicities, is still necessary. The findings from a phase III study1 presented at the 2015 American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition suggest that it probably is—at least for now.

The randomized study, a joint effort between the Intergroupe Francophone du Myelome (IFM) trialists group and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI), compared a triplet combination of lenalidomide (Revlimid), bortezomib (Velcade), and dexamethasone (RVD) with the triplet plus transplantation conditioned with melphalan in 700 previously untreated French and Belgian patients with a median age of 58 years. Patients in both arms of the study also received 1 year of maintenance therapy with lenalidomide.

The results showed that although significantly more patients in the transplant arm achieved complete response than did patients in the triplet-only arm (58% vs 46%, respectively) and there was a progression-free survival advantage of 8.8 months, the 3-year post-randomization overall survival rate of 88% was similar between the two groups. Further, there were five deaths due to toxicities in the transplant arm, and more transplant patients than patients in the RVD arm experienced second primary malignancies, 23 vs 18, respectively, including secondary acute myeloid leukemia.
Paul G. Richardson, MD

Paul G. Richardson, MD

A parallel trial2 using a similar design but includes continuous administration of maintenance lenalidomide until disease progression in both arms is being conducted in the United States and is being led by Paul G. Richardson, MD, Clinical Program Leader and Director of Clinical Research, Jerome Lipper Multiple Myeloma Center, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute; and R.J. Corman Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School. Currently, the study has accrued more than 560 patients and is moving closer to the target number of 660 randomized patients.

The ASCO Post talked with Dr. Richardson about the results so far from the two studies, what clues are emerging about the future use of transplantation compared with novel therapies and which patients might benefit most from either approach, and the potential of turning myeloma into a chronic disease.

‘Unique Opportunity to Compare Data’

The purpose of the IFM/DFCI trial is to determine whether autologous transplantation is still required in the initial management of myeloma in younger patients in the era of effective targeted drugs. Please talk about the findings thus far from both the French and American trials.

In essence, both our study and the French trial are exploring the advantage of early vs late transplant in healthy patients aged 65 and younger and asking where transplantation belongs in the new therapeutic paradigm for multiple myeloma. To do this, we wanted to evaluate the use of RVD-based treatment both as induction and consolidation as well as the role of lenalidomide maintenance therapy.

A key point is that the French trial stopped lenalidomide maintenance after just 1 year as a regulatory requirement from the French authorities. However, in the United States, we pursued a trial design that was driven by data from the Alliance/CALGB 100-104 study, which showed a survival benefit with the use of continuous lenalidomide maintenance in the post-transplant setting. The U.S. trial is thus importantly different from that of our French partners.

The French study has shown an 8.8-month progression-free survival advantage in favor of the transplant arm vs the triplet arm with transplant kept in reserve, but no overall survival difference is seen. An important point of context to consider is that if maintenance therapy is given until disease progression, the progression-free survival benefit seen is of the order of 2.5 years; so if transplant generates 8.8 months of benefit, and continuous maintenance derives 2.5 years in other studies, answering the question in the U.S. trial of continuous maintenance therapy until disease progression becomes critically important.

Another important question is whether transplant is worth the potential toxicities. In the French study, there were both acute and long-term treatment-related toxicities that lead to death, which were numerically higher in the transplant arm than in the nontransplant arm, including a number of patients in the transplant arm who died of secondary leukemia. The numbers were fortunately very small overall, but they give us clues about why answering this question is so important for our patients in the longer term.

The U.S. trial is running parallel to the French study, and so far, our study has not shown any significant difference in outcome between the two arms, with a low event rate overall and excellent safety, which is very good news for our patients.

We know that the use of continuous therapy with effective immunomodulatory drugs has been shown repeatedly to be positive in terms of clinical benefit. So, answering the question of continuous therapy is vital, and Michel Attal, MD [of the Institut Universitaire du Cancer de Toulouse-Oncopole, in Toulouse, France, and lead author of the French study] was very clear at the ASH Annual Meeting about the necessity of this, and these two studies actually provide us with a unique opportunity to compare data from the two parallel experiences.

Transplantation for Younger Patients

With more targeted drugs for myeloma being developed, do you envision a time when transplantation might become obsolete?

Transplant provides a platform for rebooting the immune system, and the question is now how best to achieve it. Do you need high-dose melphalan for transplant conditioning, with its toxicity and side effects, which can be both short- and long-term, or can we achieve the same immunologic platform with fewer side effects and less risk in a different way?

I think transplantation is clearly an important option for younger patients, but I do not believe that one size fits all. In other words, does every myeloma patient need a transplant, and in whom should it be given early, rather than later? These are key questions for which we do not yet have answers.

Do we think every younger patient needs a transplant at some point in his or her disease course? Probably in the majority of cases, yes, but there are a number of patients who may not need a transplant, and then the question that arises is, if patients are living 10, 15, or 20 years with their disease, why would we accept an early toxicity risk if we don’t need to?

The importance of the U.S. trial is also that it is the first of its kind on this scale and reflects a new model, where we are trying to answer as many reasonable questions as we can within a large cooperative group trial setting to improve clinical practice. It also reflects a remarkable degree of collaboration among academia, the intergroups—specifically the National Cancer Institute Clinical Trials Network and the Alliance for Clinical Trials— our pharma partners, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

A Chronic Illness for Many

The newer therapies are probably allowing myeloma to be converted into a chronic disease but still not a curable one. Is that correct?

For an increasing proportion of patients, the disease is becoming a chronic illness, in which we are able to control their myeloma for up to 10 or 15 years, whereas in the past, survivorship was measured at a median of 2 to 3 years in older patients and 3 to 5 years in younger patients. So this reflects truly dramatic progress.

It is in this context that the results from the French and American studies matter so much, because, obviously, we want to provide patients with treatment that has the best long-term maximum benefit against their disease, but without potential toxicities that could possibly affect them for many years beyond treatment. Moreover, we have a wealth of new agents and emerging immuno-oncologic options that will make yet further improvements in outcome a reality. ■

Disclosure: Dr. Richardson has served on advisory committees for Celgene, Johnson & Johnson, Millennium, Takeda, Bristol-Myers Squibb, and Novartis.

---

Bien que la chimiothérapie à haute dose, plus la transplantation autologue a été une norme de diligence dans le traitement des patients plus jeunes atteints de myélome multiple nouvellement diagnostiqué, l'avènement de nouveaux agents efficaces pour le cancer au cours des 15 dernières années, a soulevé la question de savoir si la transplantation, avec sa myriade de toxicités est encore nécessaire. Les résultats d'une étude de phase III présenté à la réunion annuelle de l'American Society of Hematology suggèrent qu'elle l'est probablement moins pour l'instant.

L'étude randomisée, un effort conjoint entre l'Intergroupe Francophone du Myélome (IFM) trialists groupe et Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI), ont comparé une combinaison de trois médicaments : le lénalidomide (Revlimid), le bortezomib (Velcade), et la dexaméthasone (DRV) avec ce triplet + la transplantation conditionnée avec le melphalan dans 700 patients non traités antérieurement français et belges avec un âge médian de 58 ans. Les patients dans les deux bras de l'étude ont également reçu 1 an de traitement d'entretien avec lénalidomide.

Les résultats ont montré que, bien que beaucoup plus de patients dans le bras de greffe ont obtenu une réponse complète que les patients dans le bras de triplet seulement (58% vs 46%, respectivement) et il y avait un avantage de survie sans progression de 8,8 mois, le taux de survie de 88% de 3 ans post-randomisationqui était similaire entre les deux groupes. En outre, il y avait cinq décès dus à des toxicités dans le bras de greffe, et plus de patients transplantés que de patients dans le bras DRV qui ont connu des deuxièmes malignités primaires, 23 vs 18, respectivement, y compris la leucémie myéloïde aiguë secondaire.


Paul G. Richardson, MD

Un essai parallèle en utilisant une conception similaire, mais incluant l'administration d'entretien en continue du lénalidomide jusqu'à la progression de la maladie dans les deux bras est menée aux Etats-Unis et est dirigé par Paul G. Richardson, MD, Actuellement, l'étude a accumulé plus de 560 patients et se rapproche du nombre cible de 660 patients randomisés.

Le Dr Richardson, dans son résumé à L'ASCO, a parlé des résultats obtenus jusqu'à présent dans les deux études, quels indices émergent sur l'utilisation future de la transplantation par rapport à de nouvelles thérapies et lesquels les patients pourraient bénéficier le plus de ces deux approches, ainsi que le potentiel de transformer le myélome en une maladie chronique.

'Occasion unique de comparer les données'

Le but de l'essai / DFCI IFM est de déterminer si la transplantation autologue est toujours nécessaire dans la prise en charge initiale du myélome chez les patients plus jeunes à l'ère de médicaments ciblés efficaces.

En substance, à la fois notre étude et de l'essai français explorent l'avantage d'une greffe précoce vs une greffe tardive chez les patients en bonne santé âgés de 65 ans et plus jeune en se demandant où la transplantation peut être le plus bénéfique dans le nouveau paradigme thérapeutique pour le myélome multiple. Pour ce faire, nous avons voulu évaluer l'utilisation d'un traitement à base de RVD à la fois dans l'induction et la consolidation, ainsi que le rôle de la thérapie d'entretien lénalidomide.

Un point essentiel est que le test français arrête la lénalidomide après seulement 1 an d'après une exigence réglementaire des autorités françaises. Cependant, aux États-Unis, nous avons poursuivi une conception d'essai qui a été tirée par les données de l'étude de l'Alliance / CALGB 100-104, qui a montré un bénéfice de survie avec l'utilisation d'un entretien continu de lénalidomide dans un cadre post-transplantation. Le test américain a donc une importante différente de celui de nos partenaires français.

L'étude française a montré un avantage de survie sans progression  de 8,8 mois en faveur du bras de greffe vs le bras de triplet avec la greffe gardé en réserve, mais aucune différence de survie globale n'a été vu. Un point de contexte à considérer important est que si le traitement d'entretien est donnée jusqu'à la progression de la maladie, la prestation de survie sans progression vu est de l'ordre de 2,5 ans; donc si la greffe génère 8,8 mois de prestations, et l'entretien continu est de 2,5 ans dans d'autres études, répondre à la question dans le test américain du traitement d'entretien continu jusqu'à progression de la maladie devient d'une importance cruciale.

Une autre question importante est de savoir si la greffe vaut les toxicités potentielles. Dans l'étude française, il y avait deux toxicités liées au traitement, des toxicités aigues et à long terme qui conduisent à la mort, qui étaient numériquement plus élevées dans le bras de greffe que dans le bras non transplantés, y compris un certain nombre de patients dans le bras de greffe qui sont morts de leucémie secondaire . Les chiffres étaient heureusement très faible dans l'ensemble, mais ils nous donnent des indices sur les raisons de répondre à cette question est si importante pour nos patients à plus long terme.

Le test américain est en cours d'exécution parallèle à l'étude française, et jusqu'à présent, notre étude n'a pas montré de différence significative dans les résultats entre les deux bras, avec un faible taux global d'événements et une excellente sécurité, ce qui est de très bonnes nouvelles pour nos patients.

Nous savons que l'utilisation de la thérapie continue avec des médicaments immunomodulateurs efficaces a été démontré à plusieurs reprises comme être positive en termes de bénéfice clinique. Ainsi, répondre à la question de la thérapie continue est vitale, et Michel Attal, MD [de l'Institut Universitaire du Cancer de Toulouse-Oncopole, à Toulouse, en France, et auteur principal de l'étude française a été très clair lors de la réunion ASH annuel sur  la nécessité de cela, et ces deux études effectivement nous fournissent une occasion unique de comparer les données des deux expériences parallèles.

Transplantation pour les plus jeunes patients

Avec des médicaments plus ciblés pour le myélome en cours d'élaboration, envisagez-vous un moment où la transplantation pourrait devenir obsolète?

La transplantation fournit une plate-forme pour redémarrer le système immunitaire, et la question est maintenant de savoir comment mieux y parvenir. Avez-vous besoin de melphalan à haute dose pour la transplantation conditionné, avec sa toxicité et les effets secondaires, qui peuvent être à la fois à court et à long terme, ou pouvons-nous obtenir la même plate-forme immunologique avec moins d'effets secondaires et moins de risques d'une manière différente?

Je pense que la transplantation est clairement une option importante pour les patients plus jeunes, mais je ne crois pas que one size fits all. En d'autres termes, tous les patients avec le myélome n'ont pas besoin d'une greffe, et à qui doit-il être donné ?  plutôt que plus tard? Ce sont des questions clés dont nous ne disposons pas encore de réponses.

Pensons-nous chaque patient plus jeune a besoin d'une greffe à un moment de son évolution de la maladie? -Probablement dans la majorité des cas, oui, mais il y a un certain nombre de patients qui  peuvent ne pas avoir besoin d'une greffe, puis la question qui se pose est, si les patients vivent 10, 15, ou 20 ans avec leur maladie, pourquoi accepterions-nous un risque de toxicité précoce si nous ne devons pas?

L'importance du test américain est aussi qu'il est le premier de son genre à cette échelle et reflète un nouveau modèle, où nous essayons de répondre à autant de questions raisonnables que nous pouvons dans un grand cadre d'un essai de groupe coopératif pour améliorer la pratique clinique. Elle reflète également un remarquable degré de collaboration entre les universités, les intergroupes, spécifiquement l'Institut national du cancer, le  réseau d'essais cliniques et l'Alliance pour les essais -nos partenaires pharmaceutiques cliniques et aux États-Unis la Food and Drug Administration.

La maladie chronique pour de nombreux

Les nouvelles thérapies vont probablement permettre de convertir  le myélome en une maladie chronique mais pas une curable. Est-ce correct?

Pour une proportion croissante de patients, la maladie devient une maladie chronique, dans laquelle nous sommes en mesure de contrôler leur myélome jusqu'à 10 ou 15 ans, alors que dans le passé, le taux de survie a été mesurée à une médiane de 2 à 3 ans dans les anciens patients et 3 à 5 ans chez les patients plus jeunes. Donc, ce qui reflète des progrès vraiment importantss.

C'est dans ce contexte que les résultats des études françaises et américaines d'importance tant, parce que, évidemment, nous voulons offrir aux patients un traitement qui a le meilleur avantage maximal à long terme contre la maladie, mais sans les toxicités potentielles qui pourraient éventuellement les affecter pendant de nombreuses années au-delà du traitement. De plus, nous avons une richesse de nouveaux agents et d'options immuno-oncologique émergentes qui feront encore d'autres améliorations dans les résultats. ■


_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15763
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le myélome multiple.   Sam 16 Avr 2016 - 18:44

An experimental antibody treatment decreased by half the number of cancer stem cells that drive the growth of tumors in nearly all patients with multiple myeloma, a cancer of the bone marrow and bone tissue, according to results of a preliminary clinical trial led by Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center scientists.

The antibody, called Medi-551, was tested in 15 newly diagnosed patients with multiple myeloma who also received a monthly regimen of lenalidomide and dexamethasone -- already approved chemotherapy drugs that are often prescribed to treat multiple myeloma. The scientists are expected to present their findings April 19 at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2016 in New Orleans (abstract CT102).

The researchers, led by myeloma experts William Matsui, M.D., and Carol Ann Huff, M.D., measured the impact of the drugs on cancer stem cells by counting the stem cells in bone marrow and blood samples drawn from the patients at several points throughout the seven-month study, which ended in March 2016.

Bone marrow-derived cancer stem cells at first increased by an average of 2.5-fold in the patients after two cycles of lenalidomide and dexamethasone alone. After MEDI-551 was added in the third and fourth months of treatment, the number of cancer stem cells decreased by half, on average, in 14 of the 15 patients.

By contrast, five newly diagnosed multiple myeloma patients who did not receive the extra antibody treatment had their cancer stem cell numbers swell 9.3-fold after an average of four months' treatment with the other two drugs. There were no serious adverse side effects among the patients in the study of the antibody.

Matsui and Huff are part of the Johns Hopkins research team that in 2002 was among the first to identify and isolate cancer stem cells in multiple myeloma, which is diagnosed in approximately 30,000 people in the U.S. annually. Their subsequent research showed how these cancer stem cells contribute to relapse in patients with multiple myeloma, and the scientists have been looking for new ways to target these cells with treatments that can halt their ability to create mature tumor cells and trigger relapse.

The antibody MEDI-551 targets a specific protein called CD19 found on the surface of multiple myeloma cancer stem cells, explains Matsui. "We chose to carry out this clinical trial in newly diagnosed patients because our original data showed that CD19 was almost always expressed by myeloma stem cells in these patients, whereas we don't know if that is the case in more advanced patients," he says.

The researchers also tested two different ways to measure cancer stem cells in patients: in tissue samples aspirated from bone marrow and in blood drawn from the patients throughout the study. "We wanted to see if these two assays gave similar results, and in this clinical trial, they were almost identical," Huff says. "Since it is much easier to draw blood than bone marrow from our patients, we think that we can primarily use blood to track multiple myeloma stem cells in the future."

Although most of the patients experienced a decrease in multiple myeloma cancer stem cells after three doses of MEDI-551, these stem cells increased in two of the patients, each of who had their cancer grow or spread during the course of the study.

Matsui, Huff and their colleagues plan to conduct further studies to determine the long-term impact of the antibody treatment in patients with multiple myeloma and to find out how the antibody might work in combination with other treatments.

"In other studies at Johns Hopkins, we have found that antibody therapies can work much better after a bone marrow transplant, especially allogeneic transplants, where patients receive bone marrow cells donated from a relative," says Matsui.

###

Funding for the study was provided by MedImmune Inc., the developers of MEDI-551. Matsui and Huff have received research funding and honoraria from MedImmune.

Funding and drugs for the study described in this presentation were provided by MedImmune Inc., the developers of MEDI-551. Huff and Matsui respectively served as a paid scientific advisory board member and consultant to MedImmune Inc. These arrangements have been reviewed and approved by The Johns Hopkins University in accordance with its conflict of interest policies.

Other Johns Hopkins researchers who contributed to the study include Douglas Gladstone, Ivan Borrello, Qiuju Wang and Christian Gocke. Their co-researchers include Shannon Marshall, Parthiv Mahadevia, Boyd Mudenda and Ronald Herbst of MedImmune Inc.


---


Un traitement par un anticorps expérimental a diminué de moitié le nombre de cellules souches cancéreuses qui stimulent la croissance des tumeurs chez presque tous les patients atteints d'un myélome multiple, un cancer de la moelle osseuse et du tissu osseux, selon les résultats d'un essai clinique préliminaire menée par la Johns Hopkins Kimmel scientifiques Cancer Center.

L'anticorps, appelé Medi-551, a été testé chez 15 patients nouvellement diagnostiqués avec le myélome multiple qui ont également reçu un traitement mensuel de lénalidomide et de dexaméthasone - des médicaments de chimiothérapie déjà approuvés qui sont souvent prescrits pour traiter le myélome multiple. Les scientifiques devraient présenter leurs conclusions 19 Avril à l'American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Réunion annuelle 2016 à la Nouvelle Orléans (abstract CT102).

Les chercheurs, dirigés par des experts du myélome William Matsui, MD, et Carol Ann Huff, MD, ont mesuré l'impact des médicaments sur les cellules souches du cancer en comptant les cellules souches dans la moelle osseuse et des échantillons de sang prélevés sur les patients en plusieurs points tout au long des sept étude -mois, qui a pris fin en Mars 2016.

Les cellules souches cancéreuses dérivées de la moelle des os ont d'abord augmenté en moyenne de 2,5 fois chez les patients après deux cycles de lénalidomide et la dexaméthasone seule. Après que MEDI-551 ait été ajouté dans les troisième et quatrième mois de traitement, le nombre de cellules souches cancéreuses ont diminué de moitié, en moyenne, chez 14 des 15 patients.

En revanche, cinq nouveaux patients atteints de myélome multiple qui ne reçoivent pas le traitement d'anticorps supplémentaires ont vu leur nombre de cellules souches du cancer gonfler de 9,3 fois en moyenne après un de traitement de quatre mois avec les deux autres médicaments. Il n'y avait pas d'effets secondaires indésirables graves chez les patients dans l'étude de l'anticorps.

Matsui et Huff font partie de l'équipe de recherche Johns Hopkins qui en 2002 a été parmi les premiers à identifier et isoler les cellules souches cancéreuses dans le myélome multiple, qui est diagnostiqué chez environ 30 000 personnes aux États-Unis chaque année. Leur recherche ultérieure a montré comment ces cellules souches du cancer contribuent à la rechute chez les patients atteints de myélome multiple, et les scientifiques ont été à la recherche de nouvelles façons de cibler ces cellules avec des traitements qui peuvent mettre fin à leur capacité à créer des cellules tumorales matures et déclencher une rechute.

L'anticorps MEDI-551 cible une protéine spécifique appelée CD19 trouvé sur la surface de plusieurs cellules souches du cancer du myélome, explique Matsui. «Nous avons choisi de réaliser cet essai clinique chez les patients nouvellement diagnostiqués parce que nos données d'origine a montré que CD19 était presque toujours exprimé par les cellules souches myélome chez ces patients, alors que nous ne savons pas si tel est le cas chez les patients les plus avancés," il dit.

Les chercheurs ont également testé deux façons de mesurer les cellules souches du cancer chez les patients: dans des échantillons de tissus à aspiration de la moelle osseuse et dans le sang tiré des patients tout au long de l'étude. "Nous voulions voir si ces deux essais ont donné des résultats similaires, et dans cet essai clinique, ils étaient presque identiques», dit Huff. "Comme il est beaucoup plus facile de prélever du sang que la moelle osseuse de nos patients, nous pensons que nous pouvons utiliser principalement le sang pour le suivi de plusieurs cellules souches de myélome dans l'avenir."

Bien que la plupart des patients ont connu une diminution de multiples cellules souches cancéreuses de myélome après trois doses de MEDI-551, ces cellules souches a augmenté dans deux des patients, chacun ayant eu leur cancer pousser ou se propager au cours de l'étude.

Matsui, Huff et leurs collègues projettent de mener d'autres études pour déterminer l'impact à long terme du traitement d'anticorps chez les patients atteints de myélome multiple et pour savoir comment l'anticorps pourrait fonctionner en combinaison avec d'autres traitements.

"Dans d'autres études à Johns Hopkins, nous avons trouvé que les thérapies d'anticorps peuvent travailler beaucoup mieux après une greffe de moelle osseuse, en particulier les greffes allogéniques, où les patients reçoivent des cellules de moelle osseuse donnés par un parent», dit Matsui.


Voir aussi au sujet du gène TJP1  : http://espoirs.forumactif.com/t2131-protease-et-inhibiteur-de-proteases-ou-de-proteasomes
et http://espoirs.forumactif.com/t2131-protease-et-inhibiteur-de-proteases-ou-de-proteasomes#35838

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15763
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le myélome multiple.   Mar 8 Mar 2016 - 12:19

Despite new therapies, Multiple Myeloma (MM) remains incurable causing most patients to ultimately develop drug resistance and succumb to the disease. The pursuit of drugs that inhibit cell cycle regulators especially cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), has been an intense focus of research in cancer. A new study by researchers at The Tisch Cancer Institute at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai has shown that targeting both CDK4 and ARK5, proteins responsible for maintaining energy balance within the cell, was extremely effective in causing cell death in myeloma. Their research, published in the March issue of the journal Cancer Research, identifies new targets for myeloma drug development.

Multiple myeloma (MM) is a fatal blood cancer accounting for over 10,000 deaths in the United States each year. Better understanding of the molecular basis of myeloma has led to a growing list of treatments for this challenging disease. Despite recent advances in new therapies, this disease remains incurable with a median survival of 7 to 8 years.

"Even in the era of great drug development, there is an urgent need an urgent need to develop drugs that are less toxic and achieve longer remissions for all patients," said Samir Parekh, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Hematology and Medical Oncology, and Oncological Sciences at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and co-author of the study.

The team along with Onconova Therapeutics, Inc. USA developed a compound, ON123300 that included multi-targeted inhibitors ARK5 and CDK4. The researchers treated both primary myeloma cells and cells line with ARK5/CDK4 inhibitor ON123300 which resulted in tumor cell death, and halted cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo mouse models.

"ARK5 is critical for myeloma survival and this study suggests a novel function for ARK5 in bridging the mTOR and MYC pathways," said Deepak Perumal, PhD, lead author of the study and post-doctoral scientist, Hematology and Medical Oncology at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. "Given that MYC is critically over expressed in myeloma, we sought to determine whether selective inhibition of ARK5 and CDK4 could be an effective way to target MYC-driven proliferation in myeloma."

Researchers evaluated the effect of ARK5/CDK4 inhibitor ON123300 against myeloma cell lines and primary samples from patients with recurring myeloma. Myeloma cells were sensitive to ON123300 while normal peripheral blood cells were spared from the effects of the compound confirming a potent and specific anti-cancer effect of ON123300.

"Our study results show that ON123300 induces cell death and negatively regulates key oncogenic pathways in multiple myeloma cells," said Dr. Parekh. "This is the first report showing potent cytotoxicity of CDK4/ARK5 inhibition in MM and provides the foundation for further clinical trials using CDK4/ARK5 inhibitors to improve outcomes for MM patients."


---


Malgré de nouvelles thérapies, le myélome multiple (MM) reste une maladie incurable et la plupart des patients développe une résistance aux médicaments. La recherche de médicaments qui inhibent les régulateurs du cycle cellulaire kinase dépendante de la cycline (CDK), a été un foyer intense de recherche sur le cancer. Une nouvelle étude menée par des chercheurs de l'Institut Tisch Cancer à l'École Icahn de médecine de Mount Sinai a montré que le ciblage à la fois CDK4 et ARK5, les protéines responsables du maintien de l'équilibre énergétique au sein de la cellule, était extrêmement efficace pour provoquer la mort cellulaire dans le myélome. Leur recherche, publiée dans le numéro de Mars de la revue Cancer Research, identifie de nouvelles cibles pour le développement de médicaments contre le myélome .

Le myélome multiple (MM) est un cancer du sang mortel qui représente plus de 10.000 décès aux Etats-Unis chaque année. Une meilleure compréhension de la base moléculaire du myélome a conduit à une liste croissante de traitements pour cette maladie difficile. Malgré les progrès récents dans les nouvelles thérapies, cette maladie reste incurable avec une médiane de survie de 7 à 8 ans.

«Même à une époque de grand développement de médicaments, il y a un besoin urgent de développer des médicaments qui sont moins toxiques et de réaliser plus de rémissions pour tous les patients», a déclaré Samir Parekh, MD, professeur agrégé de médecine, d'hématologie et d'oncologie médicale, et sciences oncologiques au Mount Sinai School of Medicine et co-auteur de l'étude.

L'équipe avec Onconova Therapeutics, Inc. USA a développé un composé, ON123300 qui comprenait des inhibiteurs à cibles multiples ARK5 et CDK4. Les chercheurs les cellules de myélome primaires avec l'inhibiteur ON123300 contre  ARK5 / CDK4 ce qui a entraîné la mort des cellules tumorales et stoppé la croissance des cellules cancéreuses in vitro et dans des modèles murins in vivo.

"ARK5 est essentiel pour la survie de myélome et cette étude suggère une nouvelle fonction pour ARK5 pour combler les voies mTOR et MYC», a déclaré Deepak Perumal, PhD, auteur principal de l'étude et chercheur post-doctoral, d'hématologie et d'oncologie médicale à Icahn School of Médecine du Mont Sinaï. «Étant donné que MYC est critique et surexprimé dans le myélome, nous avons cherché à déterminer si l'inhibition sélective de ARK5 et CDK4 pourrait être un moyen efficace de cibler la prolifération entraînée par MYC dans le myélome."

Les chercheurs ont évalué l'effet de l'inhibiteur de  ARK5 / CDK4,
ON123300, contre des lignées cellulaires de myélome et des échantillons primaires provenant de patients atteints d'un myélome récurrent. Les cellules myélomateuses étaient sensibles à ON123300 tandis que les cellules sanguines périphériques normales ont été épargnés par les effets du composé confirmant un effet anti-cancer puissant et spécifique de ON123300.

"Nos résultats de l'étude montrent que ON123300 induit la mort cellulaire et régule négativement les voies oncogéniques clés dans les cellules du myélome multiple », a déclaré le Dr Parekh. "Ceci est le premier rapport montrant la cytotoxicité puissante d'inhibition CDK4 / ARK5 MM et fournit la base pour d'autres essais cliniques utilisant des inhibiteurs CDK4 / ARK5 pour améliorer les résultats pour les patients atteints de MM."

_________________


Dernière édition par Denis le Mer 1 Juin 2016 - 7:32, édité 1 fois
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15763
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le myélome multiple.   Mar 20 Jan 2015 - 13:27

Multiple myeloma is a malignant disease characterised by proliferation of clonal plasma cells in the bone marrow and typically accompanied by the secretion of monoclonal immunoglobulins that are detectable in the serum or urine. Increased understanding of the microenvironmental interactions between malignant plasma cells and the bone marrow niche, and their role in disease progression and acquisition of therapy resistance, has helped the development of novel therapeutic drugs for use in combination with cytostatic therapy.

Together with autologous stem cell transplantation and advances in supportive care, the use of novel drugs such as proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulatory drugs has increased response rates and survival substantially in the past several years. Present clinical research focuses on the balance between treatment efficacy and quality of life, the optimum sequencing of treatment options, the question of long-term remission and potential cure by multimodal treatment, the pre-emptive treatment of high-risk smouldering myeloma, and the role of maintenance. Upcoming results of ongoing clinical trials, together with a pipeline of promising new treatments, raise the hope for continuous improvements in the prognosis of patients with myeloma in the future.

Professor Martin Bornhäuser and Doctor Christoph Röllig, both experts in the field of blood cancer at the Carl Gustav Carus Medical Faculty of the TU Dresden, have now turned their long-term clinical and research experience in treatment of multiple myeloma into an instructive review for other physicians. The review has just been electronically published ahead of print in the medical journal The Lancet. After a short introduction into the current understanding of myeloma disease biology, the authors then describe the standard diagnostic work-up and provide a clear overview on the best available treatment options. These include established drugs such as melphalan or steroids, novel substances such as bortezomib and lenalidomide and also therapies using stem cell transplantation.

Multiple Myeloma is one of the most common blood cancers, mainly diagnosed in elderly patients. As life expectancy increases, the frequency of the disease has therefore increased during the last decades. Both deeper insights into disease biology including interactions between malignant plasma cells and their bone marrow environment, and the design and clinical testing of new drugs have led to a considerable improvement in the prognosis of this mostly incurable disease during the last years. The right timing and the choice of the best treatment match for the particular myeloma stage and the needs of the individual patient are essential for optimal disease control.

Bornhäuser and Röllig present a structured guidance when and how which treatment should be used and introduce new ways to paralyze the cell cycle of cancer cells or to attack malignant cells by transfusing specific immune bodies. These new therapy approaches will help to further increase the prognosis of myeloma patients in the near future.

Myeloma patients can get individual treatment advice and information on participation in clinical trials in the myeloma outpatient clinic at the Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik I of the university hospital Dresden.


---

Le myélome multiple est une maladie caractérisée par une prolifération maligne des cellules plasmatiques clonales de la moelle osseuse et généralement accompagnée par la sécrétion d'immunoglobulines monoclonales qui sont détectables dans le sérum ou l'urine. Une meilleure compréhension des interactions entre les cellules plamatiques cancéreuses dans le microenvironnement et la moelle osseuse, et leur rôle dans la progression de la maladie et l'acquisition de la résistance à la thérapie, a permis le développement de nouveaux médicaments thérapeutiques pour une utilisation en combinaison avec la thérapie cytostatique.

Avec la greffe autologue de cellules souches et les progrès dans les soins de soutien , l'utilisation de nouveaux médicaments comme les inhibiteurs du protéasome et médicaments immunomodulateurs ont augmenté les taux de réponse et la survie sensiblement dans les dernières années. La recherche clinique actuelle met l'accent sur l'équilibre entre l'efficacité du traitement et la qualité de vie, le séquençage optimal des options de traitement, la question de rémission à long terme et la guérison potentielle par traitement multimodal, le traitement préventif à haut risque de myélome asymptomatique, et du rôle de maintenance. Les prochains résultats des essais cliniques en cours, avec un pipeline de nouveaux traitements prometteurs, laissent espérer des améliorations continues dans le pronostic des patients atteints de myélome dans l'avenir.

Professeur Martin Bornhauser et le docteur Christoph Röllig, les deux experts dans le domaine du cancer du sang à la Faculté de médecine Carl Gustav Carus de la TU Dresden, ont maintenant tourné leur expérience clinique et la recherche à long terme dans le traitement du myélome multiple en un résumé instructif pour les autres médecins. Le résumé vient d'être publié par voie électronique avant impression dans la revue médicale The Lancet. Après une courte introduction dans la compréhension actuelle de la biologie de la maladie myélome, les auteurs décrivent ensuite la démarche diagnostique standard et offrent un aperçu clair sur les meilleures options de traitement disponibles. Il s'agit notamment de médicaments existants tels que le melphalan ou des stéroïdes, de nouvelles substances telles que le bortézomib et lénalidomide et les thérapies utilisant également la transplantation de cellules souches.

Le myélome multiple est un des cancers du les plus communs, principalement diagnostiqués chez les patients âgés. Comme l'espérance de vie augmente, la fréquence de la maladie a donc augmenté au cours des dernières décennies. Les deux aperçus plus profonds dans la biologie de la maladie, y compris les interactions entre les cellules malignes de plasma et leur environnement de la moelle osseuse, et la conception et les essais cliniques de nouveaux médicaments ont conduit à une amélioration considérable dans le pronostic de cette maladie incurable surtout pendant les dernières années. Le bon timing et le choix de la meilleure correspondance de traitement pour la phase de myélome particulière et les besoins de chaque patient sont essentielles pour le contrôle optimale de la maladie.

Bornhauser et Röllig présentent un guide "quand et comment" structuré dont le traitement devrait être utilisé pour introduire de nouvelles façons de paralyser le cycle cellulaire des cellules cancéreuses ou d'attaquer les cellules malignes par des transfusions organes immunitaires spécifiques. Ces nouvelles approches de thérapie aideront à augmenter encore le pronostic des patients atteints de myélome dans un proche avenir.

Les patients atteints de myélome peuvent obtenir des conseils de traitement individuel et de l'information sur la participation à des essais cliniques dans la clinique ambulatoire myélome au Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik I de l'hôpital universitaire de Dresde.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15763
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le myélome multiple.   Lun 9 Sep 2013 - 18:02

Sep. 9, 2013 — Clinical researchers at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre have discovered why multiple myeloma, an incurable cancer of the bone marrow, persistently escapes cure by an initially effective treatment that can keep the disease at bay for up to several years.


The reason, explains research published online today in Cancer Cell, is intrinsic resistance found in immature progenitor cells that are the root cause of the disease -- and relapse -- says principal investigator Dr. Rodger Tiedemann, a hematologist specializing in multiple myeloma and lymphoma at the Princess Margaret, University Health Network (UHN). Dr. Tiedemann is also an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto.

The research demonstrates that the progenitor cells are untouched by mainstay therapy that uses a proteasome inhibitor drug ("Velcade") to kill the plasma cells that make up most of the tumour. The progenitor cells then proliferate and mature to reboot the disease process, even in patients who appeared to be in complete remission.

"Our findings reveal a way forward toward a cure for multiple myeloma, which involves targeting both the progenitor cells and the plasma cells at the same time," says Dr. Tiedemann. "Now that we know that progenitor cells persist and lead to relapse after treatment, we can move quickly into clinical trials, measure this residual disease in patients, and attempt to target it with new drugs or with drugs that may already exist. Dr. Tiedemann talks about his findings: click here to watch.

In tackling the dilemma of treatment failure, the researchers identified a cancer cell maturation hierarchy within multiple myeloma tumors and demonstrated the critical role of myeloma cell maturation in proteasome inhibitor sensitivity. The implication is clear for current drug research focused on developing new proteasome inhibitors: targeting this route alone will never cure multiple myeloma.

Dr. Tiedemann says: "If you think of multiple myeloma as a weed, then proteasome inhibitors such as Velcade are like a persnickety goat that eats the mature foliage above ground, producing a remission, but doesn't eat the roots, so that one day the weed returns."

The research team initially analyzed high-throughput screening assays of 7,500 genes in multiple myeloma cells to identify effectors of drug response, and then studied bone marrow biopsies from patients to further understand their results. The process identified two genes (IRE1 and XBP1) that modulate response to the proteasome inhibitor Velcade and the mechanism underlying the drug resistance that is the barrier to cure.

Dr. Tiedemann is part of the latest generation of cancer researchers at UHN building on the international legacy of Drs. James Till and the late Ernest McCulloch, who pioneered a new field of science in 1961 with their discovery that some cells ("stem cells") can self-renew repeatedly.

The science has continued to advance unabated ever since, and notably with key discoveries by Dr. John Dick of cancer stem cells first in leukemia and next in colon cancer. Dr. Tiedemann's new findings underscore the clinical importance of understanding how cells are organized in the disease process.

---

Des chercheurs cliniques du Princess Margaret Cancer Centre ont découvert pourquoi le myélome multiple, un cancer incurable de la moelle osseuse , échappe constamment aux traitements initialement efficaces qui peuvent tenir la maladie en échec pendant plusieurs années.


La raison, expliquée par la recherche publiée aujourd'hui en ligne dans Cancer Cell , est une résistance intrinsèque découverte dans les cellules progénitrices immatures qui sont la cause de la maladie - et de la rechute - dit le chercheur principal, le Dr Rodger Tiedemann, un hématologue spécialisé dans le myélome multiple et le lymphome. le Dr. Tiedemann est également professeur adjoint à la Faculté de médecine, Université de Toronto.

La recherche démontre que les cellules souches ne sont pas touchées par la thérapie principale qui utilise un médicament inhibiteur du protéasome ( " Velcade " ) pour tuer les cellules plasmatiques qui constituent la majorité de la tumeur. Les cellules souches prolifèrent alors et maturent pour redémarrer le processus de la maladie , même chez les patients qui semblaient être en rémission complète .

"Nos résultats révèlent un moyen d'avancer vers un traitement pour le myélome multiple, qui consiste à cibler à la fois les cellules souches et les cellules plasmatiques dans le même temps , " explique le Dr Tiedemann . " Maintenant que nous savons que les cellules progénitrices persistent et conduisent à une rechute après le traitement, nous pouvons nous déplacer rapidement dans les essais cliniques, mesurer cette maladie résiduelle chez les patients , et tenter de cibler de nouveaux médicaments ou des médicaments qui peuvent déjà exister.

En abordant le dilemme de l'échec du traitement , les chercheurs ont identifié une hiérarchie de maturation des cellules cancéreuses dans les tumeurs multiples de myélome et ont démontré le rôle crucial de la maturation des cellules de myélome dans la sensibilité à l'inhibiteur du protéasome . L'implication est claire pour la recherche pharmaceutique actuelle axée sur le développement de nouveaux inhibiteurs du protéasome : cibler cette voie seule ne pourra jamais guérir le myélome multiple.

Dr. Tiedemann dit: «Si vous pensez au myélome multiple comme une mauvaise herbe , les inhibiteurs du protéasome comme Velcade sont comme une chèvre pointilleuse qui mange les feuilles matures dessus du sol , produisant une rémission , mais ne mange pas les racines , de sorte que un jour, les mauvaises herbes reviennent " .

L'équipe de recherche a analysé initialement par essais de criblage à haut débit 7.500 gènes dans les cellules du myélome multiple pour identifier les effecteurs de la réponse aux médicaments , et a ensuite étudié des biopsies de moelle osseuse de patients afin de mieux comprendre leurs résultats. Le processus a identifié deux gènes ( IRE1 et XBP1 ) qui modulent la réponse à Velcade, l' inhibiteur du protéasome, et au mécanisme sous-jacent de la résistance aux médicaments qui est la barrière à guérir.





_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15763
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le myélome multiple.   Lun 18 Juin 2012 - 11:49

(June 15, 2012) — Researchers from the University of Notre Dame have engineered nanoparticles that show great promise for the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM), an incurable cancer of the plasma cells in bone marrow.

Les chercheurs ont fait des nanoparticules qui montrent de grandes promesses dans le traitement du myélome multiple.

One of the difficulties doctors face in treating MM comes from the fact that cancer cells of this type start to develop resistance to the leading chemotherapeutic treatment, doxorubicin, when they adhere to tissue in bone marrow.

Une des difficultés auquelles font face les médecins en traitant le myélome multiple vient du fait que les cellules cancéreuses commencent à faire de la résistance à la doxorubicine quand elles adhèrent aux tissus dans la moelle osseuse.

"The nanoparticles we have designed accomplish many things at once," says Başar Bilgiçer, assistant professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering and chemistry and biochemistry, and an investigator in Notre Dame's Advanced Diagnostics and Therapeutics (AD&T) initiative.

Les nanoparticules que nous avons ingénirées accomplissent plusieurs tâches à la fois.

"First, they reduce the development of resistance to doxorubicin. Second, they actually get the cancer cells to actively consume the drug-loaded nanoparticles. Third, they reduce the toxic effect the drug has on healthy organs."

1) les nanoparticules réduisent la résistance au médicament doxorubicine. 2) elles enocurages les cellules cancéreuses à gober le médicaments dans les nanoparticules 3) ils réduisent les effets toxiques du médicament sur les organes sains.

The nanoparticles are coated with a special peptide that targets a specific receptor on the outside of multiple myeloma cells. These receptors cause the cells to adhere to bone marrow tissue and turn on the drug resistance mechanisms. But through the use of the newly developed peptide, the nanoparticles are able to bind to the receptors instead and prevent the cancer cells from adhering to the bone marrow in the first place.

Les nanoparticules sont enduits avec un peptide spécial qui cible un récepteur spécifique sur l'extérieur des cellules du myélome multiple. Ces récepteurs font que les cellules adhèrent à la moelle des os et initie l arésitance au médicament. Mais par l'usage du peptide, les nanopraticules peuvent se lier aux récepteurs et empêcher les cellules cancéreuses d'adhérer aux tissus de la moelle des os.

The particles also carry the chemotherapeutic drug with them. When a particle attaches itself to an MM cell, the cell rapidly takes up the nanoparticle, and only then is the drug released, causing the DNA of cancer cell to break apart and the cell to die.

Les particules tranportent aussi le médicament avec elles. Quand une nanoparticule s'attachent aux cellules MM, la cellules gobe rapidement la nanoparticule et seulement alors le médicament est relâché causant la mort de la cellule.

"Our research on mice shows that the nanoparticle formulation reduces the toxic effect doxorubicin has on other tissues, such as the kidneys and liver," adds Tanyel Kiziltepe, a research assistant professor with the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and AD&T.

Notre recherche sur le souris montre que la formulation des nanoparticules réduit les effets toxiques sur les autres tissus aussi comme les reins et le foie.

"We believe further research will show that the heart is less affected as well. This could greatly reduce the harmful side-effects of this chemotherapy."

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15763
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le myélome multiple.   Ven 3 Fév 2012 - 15:07

Selon le Dr Batuman, professeur de médecine et de biologie cellulaire à Downstate , actuellement, le myélome multiple reste une maladie incurable, malgré l’utilisation de greffes de cellules souches, chimiothérapie à haute dose, et le rayonnement, de nouvelles modalités de traitement sont nécessaires d’urgence.

Or, une nouvelle étude de SUNY Downstate Medical Center à Brooklyn, New York, montre que le MAL3-101, un inhibiteur de la protéine de choc thermique 70 (Hsp70), semble avoir de puissants effets anti-tumoraux sur le myélome multiple.

«Les résultats de notre étude sont très encourageants», déclare le Dr Batuman. « Si ce n’est pas un remède et il faudra attendre quelques temps avant que le composé soit développé comme un médicament, nous croyons que MAL3-101, lorsqu’il est utilisé en synergie avec les thérapies existantes, pourrait réduire les concentrations de médicament et éviter les résistance au traitement. »


_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15763
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le myélome multiple.   Jeu 2 Fév 2012 - 21:46

Le Pr Dumontet travaille avec son équipe "Anticorps et Cancer" à la mise au point de nouveaux traitements destinés aux patients atteints d'hémopathies malignes, tels que le myélome multiple. Ils se concentrent sur l'utilisation d'un facteur de croissance, administré conjointement à la chimiothérapie qui augmenterait l'efficacité de ce traitement.

Augmenter l'efficacité d'un tel traitement a pour obectif de pouvoir en diminuer la dose à administrer ! Les études cliniques sur ce traitement innovant sont prévues dans les années à venir... D'aute part, l'équipe du Pr Dumontet travaille sur le concept d'anticorps anti-cancer, tant utilisables en hématologie qu'en cancérologie générale, anticorps dont on ne connaît pas encore toutes les ressources, mais qui pourraient permettre de mieux traiter et d'adopter de meilleures stratégies face au cancer.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15763
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le myélome multiple.   Ven 2 Déc 2011 - 11:22

Ces anomalies génétiques, identifiées par des scientifiques de l'Institut britannique de recherche sur le cancer et d’autres institutions de recherche au Royaume-Uni, en Allemagne et en Suède pourraient être à l’origine de 30% des myélomes multiples ou cancers de la moelle osseuse. C’est la première étude à identifier des mutations génétiques associées au développement de ce cancer rare et mortel. Des conclusions publiées dans l’édition du 27 novembre de la revue Nature Genetics.

L’étude a été menée auprès de personnes atteintes de myélome multiple, un type relativement rare de cancer qui se développe dans la moelle osseuse et peut ensuite attaquer et provoquer une réduction des os (voir visuel ci-contre). Ce cancer de la moelle osseuse est caractérisé par la multiplication dans la moelle osseuse d’un plasmocyte anormal. Cette maladie touche environ 4.000 personnes en France, soit environ 5 cas pour 100.000 habitants.

Les chercheurs ont comparé le patrimoine génétique soit le génome de 1.675 personnes souffrant de myélome multiple avec celui de 5.903 individus sains, résidents au Royaume-Uni et en Allemagne. Les chercheurs ont ensuite identifié les variations les plus fréquemment présentes chez les personnes atteintes de la maladie. Une fois ces variations identifiées, les chercheurs ont ensuite tenté de reproduire leurs résultats sur un autre échantillon de 169 patients atteints et auprès de 927 témoins.

2 variations identifiées associées à une augmentation de 30% du risque global de développer le myélome multiple : Une variante à une augmentation de 32% du risque de myélome multiple, l'autre à une augmentation de 38%. Dans le code de l'ADN, à chaque séquence spécifique correspond des fonctions spécifiques.

Quels gènes ? Les chercheurs ont donc enfin étudié les régions où les variations identifiées étaient situées pour voir si ces régions étaient situées à l’intérieur ou à proximité de gènes.

· L'une des variantes (appelée rs1052501) résidait dans le gène ULK4, responsable de la production d'une protéine mais les chercheurs n’ont pu expliquer si ce changement pouvait contribuer directement au développement du myélome multiple. La même variation a également été identifiée à proximité du gène TRAK1, qui code pour une «protéine du trafic », un type de protéine utilisée pour déplacer d'autres protéines. Il est possible que la mutation puisse affecter le transport des protéines et soit ainsi responsable du développement de la maladie.
· La seconde variante (rs4487645) est présente dans un autre gène appelé DNAH11 et proche d'un autre gène, CDCA7L. Mais là encore, les chercheurs ne savent expliquer.

Bien qu'il soit entendu que la composante génétique participe au risque de myélome multiple, c’est la première étude à identifier les variations génétiques qui lui sont liées. Il reste néanmoins difficile de comprendre comment ces variations participent au développement de ce cancer. En particulier, parce que tous les patients atteints ne sont pas porteurs des mutations génétiques identifiées. Cependant ces résultats conduisent déjà à une meilleure compréhension des causes de la maladie et apportent une première piste de recherche pour de nouveaux médicaments.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15763
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Le myélome multiple.   Mar 5 Juin 2007 - 13:39

A study, lead by Dr. Laura Rosiñol, researcher of the Haematooncology Group of Hospital Clínic-IDIBAPS (Barcelona) in collaboration with Dr Joan Blade, researcher in the same group, administered alternately two drugs (Bortezomid and Dexamethasone) before conducting autologous bone marrow transplantations. The aim of this second phase trial was to assess the treatment's overall response rate, its toxicity in patients, the possibility of recovery of innate stem cells, and the response kinetics which is calculated by measuring M-protein concentrations in serum and urine. M-protein is associated with myeloma presence.

Une étude, conduite par les docteures Laura Rosinol et Joan Blade, chercheuses à Barcelone, a consisté a adminitrer alternativement 2 médicaments (bortezomib et dexamethasone) avant de procéder à la transplantation de la moelle épinière. Le but de cette essai de phase II a été de vérifier la réponse totale, la toxicité chez les patients, certaines possibilités des cellules souches et la réponse kinétique qui est mesurée d'après les concentrations de la protéine M dans le sérum et les urines. La protéine M est associée avec la présence du myélome.


This research work, conducted in the frame of the PETHEMA network, has been coordinated by Hospital Clínic de Barcelona and had the participation of eight more Spanish hospitals: Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, Hospital Clínico Salamanca, Hospital de Sant Pau, Hospital Clínico de Madrid, Hospital La Princesa, Hospital 12 de Octubre and Hospital La Fe. A total of 40 patients between 41 and 65 years with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma participated in this study. All of them underwent six treatment cycles with a 10-day break between each, and were administered Bortezomid or Dexamethasone alternately.


This study has showed very relevant facts. The first notable fact is that there was a global reduction of M-protein concentration in both urine and plasma, reflecting a global reduction of tumour cells. Thus, a highly efficient anti-myeloma effect was observed, and the post autologous transplantation response index was favourable: a 94% response, one third of which (33%) was of complete response (CR) and 22% was a very good partial response (VGPR).

Ainsi un grand effet anti-myélome a été observé et la réponse post auto-tranplant a été favorable : 33% des patient avaient une répnse complète (une rémission complète) 22% ont eu une très bonne réponse partielle.

Another surprising result was the speed at which the effect was achieved -- i.e. the highest reduction in M-protein was detected within the first four treatment cycles. It should be mentioned that the first two cycles already caused an 82% reduction. These results set the base for further clinical trials in order to reduce the total number of previous medication cycles. A change like this in the therapeutic guidelines would not only anticipate transplantation but would also result in reduction of both economical costs and medication.

Last but not least, the observed good treatment tolerance and the ample recovery of bone marrow stem cells reinforce this therapy as the best option against multiple myeloma before autologous transplantation.

About multiple myeloma

Multiple myeloma is a type of bone marrow cancer, consisting in abnormal proliferation of plasma cells --blood cells producing antibodies that help the body's immune system fight disease. The treatment for this kind of cancer consists of a therapy provoking a decrease in tumour cells previous to successful autologous bone marrow stem cells transplantation.

The pre-transplantation therapy used until now made patients undergo chemotherapy. This treatment form did not assure the posterior recovery of the patients' own stem cells, while causing significantly increased toxicity levels. For this reason, a number of studies alternating drugs have been conducted during the last years, being less toxic for the patient, highly aggressive against myeloma and allowing optimal recovery of stem cells.

An example is the study that used Thalidomide and Bortezomid. In the first place the US FDA approved the use of Thalidomide combined with Dexamethasone (Rajkumar SV et al ) but the treatment only gave a slightly elevated total remission and no overall improvement was observed after transplantation. In a second case, Bortezomid was administered together with Dexamethasone (Jagannath et al ). The total remission results were notable, but toxicity levels in patients was still too high.


Dernière édition par Denis le Mar 21 Fév 2012 - 11:40, édité 2 fois
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: Le myélome multiple.   Aujourd'hui à 8:12

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
Le myélome multiple.
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 1
 Sujets similaires
-
» Le myélome multiple.
» classification.... myélome multiple
» Nouvelle combinaison de traitement pour le myélome multiple.
» La perifosine.
» Le rôle de Rankl dans l'ostéosarcome

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
ESPOIRS :: Cancer :: recherche-
Sauter vers: