AccueilCalendrierFAQRechercherS'enregistrerMembresGroupesConnexion

Partagez | 
 

 Comment le système immunitaire est désactivé

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
AuteurMessage
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16325
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Comment le système immunitaire est désactivé   Sam 20 Mai 2017 - 12:48

While studying the underpinnings of multiple sclerosis, investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital came across important clues for how to treat a very different disease: cancer. In a paper published in Science Immunology, a group of researchers led by neurologist Howard Weiner, MD, describe an antibody that can precisely target regulatory T cells which in turn unleashes the immune system to kill cancer cells. The team reports that the antibody decreased tumor growth in models of melanoma, glioblastoma and colorectal carcinoma, making it an attractive candidate for cancer immunotherapy.

"As a neurologist, I never expected I would be publishing a paper about cancer immunotherapy, but as my team studied a subpopulation of T cells that are supposed to prevent autoimmune disease, we had an idea: if cancer is the opposite of an autoimmune disease, we could turn our investigations around and think about how to restore the immune system's ability to prevent cancer's growth," said Weiner, co-director the Ann Romney Center for Neurologic Diseases at BWH.

The Weiner lab has been studying regulatory T cells (Tregs) for many years. Tregs, which help maintain the immune system's tolerance of "self," can, inadvertently, promote cancer's growth by preventing the body's immune system from detecting and attacking cancer cells. The researchers found that they could precisely target Tregs using an antibody that locks in on a molecular complex that's uniquely expressed on the cell surface of Tregs. The team developed these so-called anti-LAP antibodies initially to investigate the development of multiple sclerosis, but realized their work had implications for the study of cancer.

Previous studies have shown that LAP+ cells are increased in human cancer and predict a poor prognosis. Being able to target these cells could offer a new way to treat the disease.

In the current study, the team used preclinical models to investigate how well anti-LAP antibodies could work in blocking the essential mechanisms of Tregs and restoring the immune system's ability to fight cancer. They found that anti-LAP acts on multiple cell populations to promote the immune system's ability to fight cancer, including increasing the activity of certain types of T cells and enhancing immune memory.

"In addition to studying its therapeutic effect, we wanted to characterize the mechanism by which the anti-LAP antibody can activate the immune system," said lead author Galina Gabriely, PhD, a scientist in the Weiner laboratory. "We found that it affects multiple arms of the immune system."

The current study has been conducted in preclinical models of cancer. In order to move this work toward the clinic, Tilos Therapeutics will be expanding on the Weiner lab's research to modify the antibody for use in humans, a process that usually takes several years.

"I see this work as the perfect example of how research in all branches of immunology into the mechanistic underpinnings of disease can have a huge impact on other fields, such as oncology," said Barbara Fox, PhD, CEO of Tilos Therapeutics.

---

Tout en étudiant les fondements de la sclérose en plaques, les chercheurs de Brigham and Women's Hospital ont rencontré des indices importants sur la façon de traiter une maladie très différente: le cancer. Dans un article publié dans Science Immunology, un groupe de chercheurs dirigé par le neurologue Howard Weiner, MD, décrit un anticorps qui peut cibler précisément les lymphocytes T régulateurs qui, à leur tour, libère le système immunitaire pour tuer les cellules cancéreuses. L'équipe rapporte que l'anticorps a diminué la croissance de la tumeur dans les modèles de mélanome, de glioblastome et de carcinome colorectal, ce qui en fait un candidat attrayant pour l'immunothérapie contre le cancer.

"En tant que neurologue, je n'ai jamais pensé que je publierais un document sur l'immunothérapie contre le cancer, mais comme mon équipe a étudié une sous-population de cellules T qui sont censées prévenir une maladie auto-immune, nous avons eu une idée: si le cancer est le contraire d'une maladie auto-immune , Nous pourrions faire passer nos enquêtes et réfléchir à la façon de restaurer la capacité du système immunitaire à prévenir la croissance du cancer ", a déclaré Weiner, co-directeur du Centre Ann Romney pour les maladies neurologiques chez BWH.

Le laboratoire Weiner étudie les cellules T régulatrices (Tregs) depuis de nombreuses années. Tregs, qui aident à maintenir la tolérance du système immunitaire contre «soi», peuvent, par inadvertance, favoriser la croissance du cancer en empêchant le système immunitaire du corps de détecter et d'attaquer les cellules cancéreuses. Les chercheurs ont constaté qu'ils pourraient cibler précisément Tregs en utilisant un anticorps qui se verrouille sur un complexe moléculaire qui s'exprime uniquement sur la surface cellulaire de Tregs. L'équipe a développé ces anticorps anti-LAP initialement pour enquêter sur le développement de la sclérose en plaques, mais a réalisé que leur travail avait des implications pour l'étude du cancer.

Des études antérieures ont montré que les cellules LAP + sont augmentées dans le cancer humain et prédisent un mauvais pronostic. Être capable de cibler ces cellules pourrait offrir une nouvelle façon de traiter la maladie.

Dans l'étude en cours, l'équipe a utilisé des modèles précliniques pour étudier à quel point les anticorps anti-LAP pourraient fonctionner pour bloquer les mécanismes essentiels de Treg et restaurer la capacité du système immunitaire à lutter contre le cancer. Ils ont constaté que l'anti-LAP agit sur les populations de cellules multiples pour promouvoir la capacité du système immunitaire à lutter contre le cancer, y compris l'augmentation de l'activité de certains types de cellules T et l'amélioration de la mémoire immunitaire.

"En plus d'étudier son effet thérapeutique, nous voulions caractériser le mécanisme par lequel l'anticorps anti-LAP peut activer le système immunitaire", a déclaré l'auteur principal Galina Gabriely, Ph.D., scientifique du laboratoire Weiner. "Nous avons constaté qu'il affecte de multiples bras du système immunitaire".

L'étude actuelle a été menée dans des modèles précliniques de cancer. Afin de déplacer ce travail vers la clinique, Tilos Therapeutics se développera sur la recherche du laboratoire Weiner pour modifier l'anticorps utilisé chez l'homme, un processus qui dure habituellement plusieurs années.

"Je vois que ce travail est l'exemple parfait de la façon dont la recherche dans toutes les branches de l'immunologie dans les fondements mécaniques de la maladie peut avoir un impact énorme sur d'autres domaines, comme l'oncologie", a déclaré Barbara Fox, Ph.D., PDG de Tilos Therapeutics.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16325
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Comment le système immunitaire est désactivé   Mer 15 Mar 2017 - 13:53

One reason we survive into adulthood is that cell-killing T cells usually recognize and eliminate cancerous or pathogen-infected cells. But prolonged overactivity of immune cells summoned to a tumor or infection site can render them useless to dispatch invaders, a cellular state immunologists call "exhaustion." Fortunately, cancer researchers are devising effective immunotherapies to counter exhaustion and re-motivate immune cells to eradicate a patient's tumor.

To bolster these approaches, La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology (LJI) scientists Anjana Rao, Ph.D., and Patrick Hogan, Ph.D., are asking what genes become activated when immune cells flag. Their new study, published in this week's online issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, reports first that the DNA structure of exhausted T cells differs from that of normal cells. That discovery led them to compile an updated list of candidate DNA binding proteins that may drive exhaustion programs in immune cells. This work provides researchers with additional factors that could be targeted as part of next-generation immunotherapies.

"Immunotherapies are showing real effectiveness in patients, but in some cases effectiveness is short-lived." says Hogan, a professor in the Division of Signaling and Gene Expression and a study author. "To continue to make real advances in the clinic we must keep refining these approaches. One way we do that is by understanding how tumors talk immune cells out of doing their job."

To observe how T cells lose their steam in the tumor environment, the team prepared two populations of genetically engineered T-cells: a test group that recognizes a tumor antigen and thus can be rendered non-functional by chronic exposure to the tumor (the exhaustion group), and a control group that remains functional because it doesn't recognize any tumor antigen. That readied them to compare what goes awry molecularly inside exhausted compared to fully competent T cells.

They did that by injecting the T cells into model mice bearing melanomas to monitor how each test group would behave in a real tumor. Both populations congregated in tumors, but over time cells of the exhaustion group began to display high levels of "exhaustion markers" (as anticipated), because they were overstimulated by the tumor antigen. Among those markers was PD-1, a molecular bad actor notorious for blocking cell-killing capacity of T cells (PD-1 inhibitors, for example, captured headlines two years ago when proven effective against some forms of metastatic melanoma). By contrast, control T cells that the group recovered from a tumor displayed much lower levels of exhaustion markers, simply because they did not perceive the tumor. The next step was to identify genes switched on in the exhausted group and determine how that happened.

To do that the team combined two methods, RNA-sequencing and ATAC-sequencing. RNA-sequencing identifies genes switched on, while ATAC-sequencing identifies genomic regions where the DNA helix is more loosely wound relative to the rest of the genome. Finding these regions provides molecular geneticists with major clues about what's going on in a cell, as non-compacted DNA generally contains genes undergoing active expression and binds factors that activate those genes.

ATAC-sequencing revealed almost 2000 newly "accessible" regions in failing T cells, a number the group pared down to 450 after subtracting comparable regions in stimulated control T cells. The group then examined the DNA sequence in "exhaustion-related" stretches and deduced, using bioinformatic analysis, what cellular proteins might be recruited to those loci to activate exhaustion-specific gene expression programs.

That analysis revealed the footprints, or binding sites, of many familiar players, one a DNA binding protein called NFAT. "These regions overlapped with regions we previously mapped as NFAT binding sites in T cells chronically exposed to virally-infected cells," says Hogan. "This could mean that common pathways direct cells toward exhaustion in cancer and chronic infection."

However, one group of suspects uncovered by the analysis, a family of proteins called Nr4a, had little previous connection with exhaustion in T cells. Further analysis strongly suggested that Nr4a proteins contribute solely to exhaustion, unlike NFAT, which plays a complex, context-dependent role in T cells. The conclusion was clear: DNA binding factors like NFAT and Nr4a proteins likely work in concert to drive T cell dysfunction.

The paper's lead author, Giuliana Mognol, Ph.D., says the fact that Nr4a proteins appear to function exclusively in T cell exhaustion is a critical finding. "PD-1 inhibitors have produced great results as immunotherapies," says Mognol, a postdoc in the Hogan laboratory. "Even so, more than 50% of patients do not respond to this therapy. Identifying new molecules that could be targeted together with PD-1 could be important for combination approaches, which are likely the future of immunotherapy."

One goal of next-gen immunotherapies might be to restore durable immune responses by reversing genomic changes seen in exhausted T cells, possibly by re-compacting DNA that unwinds as T cells become impaired. Whether that's possible remains unresolved. For example, this paper reports that tumors in melanoma model mice treated with PD-1 blockers shrink as T cell function improves, but that their immune cells showed only minor changes in DNA conformation.

"What we saw in that experiment was a change in cell signaling -- not a reversal of structural changes in the T cell genome," says Hogan. "But I don't want to be pessimistic and say that's impossible. Now that we've defined what some of those changes are, our next task is to develop tools to reverse them."

---

Une des raisons pour lesquelles nous survivons à l'âge adulte est que les cellules T tueuses de cellules reconnaissent et éliminent habituellement les cellules cancéreuses ou infectées par les pathogènes. Mais une hyperactivité prolongée des cellules immunitaires appelées à une tumeur ou un site d'infection peut les rendre inutiles à envoyer contre les envahisseurs, un état cellulaire immunologistes appellent «épuisement». Heureusement, les chercheurs sur le cancer élaborent des immunothérapies efficaces contre l'épuisement et pour re-motiver les cellules immunitaires pour éradiquer la tumeur d'un patient.

Pour renforcer ces approches, les scientifiques Anjana Rao, Ph.D., et Patrick Hogan, Ph.D., (LJI), se demandent quels gènes deviennent activés lorsque les cellules immunitaires signalent des envahisseurs. Leur nouvelle étude, publiée dans le numéro en ligne de cette semaine des Actes de la National Academy of Sciences, rapporte d'abord que la structure de l'ADN des cellules T épuisées diffère de celle des cellules normales. Cette découverte les a conduits à compiler une liste mise à jour des protéines candidates de liaison d'ADN qui peuvent conduire des programmes d'épuisement dans des cellules immunitaires. Ce travail fournit aux chercheurs des facteurs supplémentaires qui pourraient être ciblés dans le cadre de la prochaine génération immunothérapies.

«Les immunothérapies montrent une efficacité réelle chez les patients, mais dans certains cas, l'efficacité est de courte durée. Dit Hogan, professeur à la Division de la signalisation et de l'expression génétique et auteur d'une étude. "Pour continuer à faire des progrès réels dans la clinique, nous devons continuer à affiner ces approches. Une façon de le faire est de comprendre comment les tumeurs convainquent les cellules immunitaires de ne pas faire leur travail."

Pour observer comment les lymphocytes T perdent leur vigueur dans l'environnement tumoral, l'équipe a préparé deux populations de cellules T génétiquement modifiées: un groupe d'essai qui reconnaît un antigène tumoral et peut donc être rendu non fonctionnel par exposition chronique à la tumeur (l'épuisement Groupe) et un groupe témoin qui reste fonctionnel parce qu'il ne reconnaît aucun antigène tumoral. Cela les a préparés pour comparer ce qui se passe mal à l'intérieur des celllules épuisées par rapport aux cellules T pleinement compétentes.

Ils l'ont fait en injectant les cellules T dans des souris modèles portant des mélanomes pour surveiller comment chaque groupe d'essai se comporterait dans une tumeur réelle.

Les deux populations se sont rassemblées dans les tumeurs, mais au fil du temps les cellules du groupe d'épuisement ont commencé à afficher des niveaux élevés de "marqueurs d'épuisement" (comme prévu), parce qu'ils ont été surestimés par l'antigène tumoral.
Parmi ces marqueurs figurait le PD-1, un mauvais acteur moléculaire notoire pour bloquer la capacité de destruction cellulaire des lymphocytes T (les inhibiteurs de PD-1, par exemple, ont occupé les titres il y a deux ans lorsqu'ils étaient efficaces contre certaines formes de mélanome métastatique).

En revanche, les lymphocytes T témoins que le groupe a récupérés à partir d'une tumeur ont affiché des niveaux beaucoup plus faibles de marqueurs d'épuisement, simplement parce qu'ils ne percevaient pas la tumeur. La prochaine étape consistait à identifier les gènes activés dans le groupe épuisé et à déterminer comment cela se produisait.

Pour ce faire, l'équipe a combiné deux méthodes, le séquençage ARN et le séquençage ATAC. Le séquençage d'ARN identifie les gènes activés, tandis que le séquençage ATAC identifie des régions génomiques où l'hélice d'ADN est plus lâchement enroulée par rapport au reste du génome.

Trouver ces régions fournit aux généticiens moléculaires des indices majeurs sur ce qui se passe dans une cellule, comme l'ADN non compacté contient généralement des gènes en cours d'expression active et lie les facteurs qui activent ces gènes.

Le séquençage ATAC a révélé près de 2000 nouvelles régions "accessibles" dans les cellules T défaillantes, un nombre le groupe réduit à 450 après soustraction de régions comparables dans les cellules T de contrôle stimulées.

Le groupe a ensuite examiné la séquence d'ADN dans les étirements «liés à l'épuisement» et a déduit, à l'aide de l'analyse bioinformatique, quelles protéines cellulaires pourraient être recrutées sur ces loci pour activer des programmes d'expression génétique spécifiques à l'épuisement.

Cette analyse a révélé les empreintes, ou des sites de liaison, de nombreux acteurs familiers, l'une protéine de liaison à l'ADN appelée NFAT. «Ces régions se chevauchaient avec des régions que nous avions précédemment cartographiées comme des sites de fixation de NFAT dans des cellules T chroniquement exposées à des cellules infectées par le virus», explique Hogan. "Cela pourrait signifier que les voies communes dirigent les cellules vers l'épuisement dans le cancer et l'infection chronique."

Cependant, un groupe de suspects découvert par l'analyse, une famille de protéines appelée Nr4a, avait peu de connexion préalable avec l'épuisement dans les cellules T. Des analyses plus poussées suggèrent fortement que les protéines Nr4a contribuent uniquement à l'épuisement, contrairement à la NFAT, qui joue un rôle complexe et dépendante du contexte dans les cellules T. La conclusion était claire: les facteurs de liaison à l'ADN comme les protéines NFAT et Nr4a fonctionnent probablement de concert pour entraîner le dysfonctionnement des lymphocytes T.

L'auteur principal du document, Giuliana Mognol, Ph.D., affirme que le fait que les protéines Nr4a semblent fonctionner exclusivement dans l'épuisement des cellules T est une découverte critique. "Les inhibiteurs de PD-1 ont produit de grands résultats comme immunothérapies", dit Mognol, un postdoc dans le laboratoire de Hogan. "Même si, plus de 50% des patients ne répondent pas à cette thérapie. L'identification de nouvelles molécules qui pourraient être ciblées ensemble avec PD-1 pourrait être importante pour la combinaison

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16325
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Comment le système immunitaire est désactivé   Dim 13 Sep 2015 - 13:29

Mise à jour, l'article date du 22 avril 2015

Concrètement, l’équipe de recherche UCL dirigée par Sophie Lucas et Pierre Coulie, en collaboration avec la société de biotechnologie arGEN-X, a mis au point un agent thérapeutique qui stimule les réponses immunitaires d’une manière originale. Cet agent cible un type particulier de cellules immunosuppressives, connues sous le nom de « lymphocytes T régulateurs » ou « Tregs ». Les Tregs ont pour mission naturelle de restreindre l’activité du système immunitaire. Chez les personnes en bonne santé, les Tregs agissent comme des modérateurs, ou comme des pompiers pour éviter les incendies qui pourraient être causés par une activité immunitaire excessive. Ainsi, les Tregs nous protègent des maladies dites « auto-immunitaires », telles que la sclérose en plaques ou le diabète de type I, en empêchant l’embrasement de l’activité de lymphocytes dirigés contre nos propres tissus. Les Tregs exercent cette fonction immunosuppressive en produisant une sorte d’hormone, le TGF-beta, qui inhibe les lymphocytes. Dans l’analogie entre un Treg et un pompier, le TGF-beta est l’eau projetée par sa lance d’incendie.

Chez les malades atteints d'un cancer, les Tregs fonctionnent de manière exagérée : ils s’accumulent dans les tumeurs qu’ils inondent de TGF-beta, paralysant ainsi les lymphocytes qui pourraient détruire les cellules cancéreuses. L’agent thérapeutique proposé par les chercheurs de l’UCL agit sur les Tregs : il bloque leur système de production du TGF-beta, en verrouillant, en quelque sorte, la lance d’incendie. Plus précisément, cet agent thérapeutique est constitué d’anticorps monoclonaux dirigés contre « GARP », une protéine requise pour la production de TGF-beta par les Tregs humains. Cet agent thérapeutique devrait permettre d’attiser l’activité des lymphocytes capables de détruire les tumeurs.

Ce nouvel agent thérapeutique n’a été testé que chez la souris jusqu’à présent. Les chercheurs de l’UCL devront évaluer son efficacité chez les patients atteints d'un cancer. Il pourrait se révéler utile également pour traiter d’autres maladies associées à une insuffisance de fonction du système immunitaire, comme certaines infections chroniques.

https://www.deduveinstitute.be/fr

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16325
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Comment le système immunitaire est désactivé   Jeu 8 Jan 2015 - 18:41

T cells play an important role in the immune system, destroying pathogens and controlling the body's immune responses. Every T cell has its own special T cell receptor (TCR) on its surface that only recognizes one specific substance. Many T cells are generated whose TCR would recognize and destroy endogenous cells if left to develop unchecked. To protect the body, the majority of these autoreactive cells are destroyed before they fully mature.

A small number of these autoreactive T cells are selected to become regulatory T cells. These "guardians of the immune system" play an important role as they are capable of suppressing excessive immune responses. Scientists know that Tregs need the receptors that recognize endogenous material in order to develop properly. They know little, however, about what they need them for after this.

Marc Schmidt-Supprian, Tenure Track Professor at TUM since March 2014, has been exploring this question with his team at the III. Medizinische Klinik at TUM Klinikum rechts der Isar. Working with other research groups in Rijeka (Croatia), Osaka (Japan) and the German cities of Munich, Freiburg and Dresden, he and his team deactivated the T cell receptor at a specific point in time on mature Tregs in genetically modified mice. They then monitored what happened next with the TCR-less cells.

T cell receptor signals are a crucial part of Tregs

Their experiments clearly showed that the defective Tregs were not able to carry out their protective function without the T cell receptor. Furthermore, the Treg pool fell significantly as these cells were no longer multiplying. The scientists also discovered that two of Tregs' most well-known central molecular properties -- the production of Foxp3 protein and specific chemical changes to DNA -- were still present in the defective T cells.

"Without their receptor, the Tregs are still clearly identifiable as Tregs. However, they lose a large part of their cellular identity. They also lose their special ability to suppress excessive immune reactions," explains Christoph Vahl, lead author of the study. "The Tregs obviously need continuous contact with their environment to function correctly. This is presumably the reason why they need a receptor that recognizes endogenous substances and continuously sends signals."

"During the course of our research, we uncovered a very important mechanism for suppressing excessive responses and responses targeted against the human body. These findings could be relevant for situations where it would be beneficial to weaken the control of Tregs over immune responses, for example in the treatment of cancer," concludes Schmidt-Supprian.

---

Les cellules T jouent un rôle important dans le système immunitaire, dans la destruction des agents pathogènes et le contrôle des réponses immunitaires de l'organisme aussi. Chaque cellule T a son propre récepteur spécifique de cellules T (TCR) sur sa surface qui ne reconnaît qu'une substance spécifique. De nombreuses cellules T sont générées dont le TCR reconnaîtrait et détruirait les cellules endogènes si on les laissait se développer sans contrôle. Pour protéger le corps, la majorité de ces cellules autoréactives sont détruites avant qu'elles arrivent à pleine maturité.

Un petit nombre de ces cellules T auto-réactives sont choisies pour devenir des cellules T régulatrices. Ces «gardiennes du système immunitaire" jouent un rôle important car elles sont capables de supprimer les réponses immunitaires excessives. Les scientifiques savent que les Tregs ont besoin de récepteurs qui reconnaissent le matériau endogène pour se développer correctement. Ils en savent peu, cependant, sur ce qu'elles ont besoin pour après cela.

Marc Schmidt-Supprian, professeur Tenure Track at TUM depuis Mars 2014, a exploré cette question avec son équipe. Lui et son équipe ont désactivé le récepteur des cellules T à un moment précis dans le temps sur des Tregs matures dans des souris génétiquement modifiées. Ils ont ensuite surveillés ce qui arriva ensuite avec les cellules TCR-moins.

Les signaux des récepteurs de cellules T sont un élément crucial de Tregs

Leurs expériences ont clairement montré que les Tregs défectueuses n'étaient pas en mesure de mener à bien leur fonction de protection sans le récepteur des cellules T. En outre, le nombre de Treg a chuté de façon significative alors que ces cellules ne se multipliaent plus. Les scientifiques ont également découvert que deux des propriétés moléculaires centrales les plus connus de Tregs - la production de protéines Foxp3 et les changements chimiques spécifiques à l'ADN - étaient encore présentes dans les cellules T défectueuses.

«Sans leur récepteur, les Tregs sont encore clairement identifiable comme Tregs. Cependant, ils perdent une grande partie de leur identité cellulaire. Ils perdent aussi leur capacité spéciale de supprimer les réactions immunitaires excessives», explique Christoph Vahl, auteur principal de l'étude. "Évidemment, les Tregs ont besoin d'un contact permanent avec leur environnement afin de fonctionner correctement. C'est sans doute la raison pour laquelle ils ont besoin d'un récepteur qui reconnaît les substances endogènes et envoie des signaux en permanence."

"Au cours de nos recherches, nous avons découvert un mécanisme très important pour supprimer les réponses excessives et des réponses ciblées contre le corps humain. Ces résultats pourraient être pertinentes pour les situations où il y aurait un bénéfique à affaiblir le contrôle des Tregs sur les réponses immunitaires, par exemple dans le traitement du cancer », conclut Schmidt-Supprian.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16325
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Comment le système immunitaire est désactivé   Lun 17 Mar 2014 - 15:26

A key discovery explaining how components of the immune system determine whether to activate or to suppress the immune system, made by Kelvin Lee, MD, Professor of Oncology and Co-Leader of the Tumor Immunology and Immunotherapy Program at Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI), and colleagues led to published findings being selected as the “Paper of the Week” by the Journal of Biological Chemistry (JBC). The honor places his work among the top 2 percent — in terms of significance and overall importance — of the year’s manuscripts reviewed by the journal.

This research focused on the immune system’s dendritic cells (DCs), crucial cells that initiate and regulate immune responses. For example, the dendritic cells activate T lymphocytes to fight an infection or cancer. Curiously, they are also known to suppress the immune response. Determining when DCs turn the immune response “on” or “off” is a major question in immunology.

For this project, Dr. Lee’s team explored two receptors (called CD80 and CD86) expressed on the surface of dendritic cells that trigger the cells to make either immune-stimulating factors (interleukin-6) or immune-suppressive factors (indolemine 2, 3 dioxygenase, IDO). They defined the intracellular pathways by which the receptors triggered each response and also uncovered a previously unrecognized interaction with another receptor called Notch-1.

Understanding how these pathways are put together opens the door to targeting components of the pathway so physicians can manipulate the dendritic cells to either activate or suppress the immune system in a way that’s therapeutically beneficial.

“Activating the immune response would enhance a patient’s response to a vaccine designed to prevent a cancer from growing or recurring,” explains Dr. Lee. “Suppressing or blocking an unwanted immune response would be helpful in organ-transplant cases, to prevent rejection, or in autoimmune diseases like lupus and rheumatoid arthritis.”

With regard to cancer, Dr. Lee explains how manipulating the CD80/CD86 pathway could impact treatment for multiple myeloma, a cancer of a type of white blood cell in the bone marrow.

“Myeloma cells use this pathway to survive and grow by inducing the DC to make IL-6 — which promotes the cancer cells’ survival — and IDO, which blocks anti-cancer responses,” he says. “Targeting this pathway would be a novel treatment strategy for multiple myeloma.”

Une découverte clé qui explique comment les composantes du système immunitaire déterminent s'il faut activer ou de supprimer le système immunitaire, faite par Kelvin Lee a mené à des résultats publiés et sélectionnés comme " Article de la semaine » par le Journal of Biological Chemistry ( JBC ). L'honneur met son travail parmi le top 2 pour cent - en termes de signification et l'importance globale - des manuscrits de l'année par la revue.

Cette recherche a porté sur les cellules dendritiques du système immunitaire (DC), ce sont des cellules essentielles qui déclenchent et régulent les réponses immunitaires. Par exemple, les cellules dendritiques activent les lymphocytes T pour combattre une infection ou d'un cancer. Curieusement, ils sont également connus pour supprimer la réponse immunitaire. Déterminer quand les DCs tournent la réponse immunitaire "on" ou "off" est une question majeure en immunologie .

Pour ce projet, l'équipe du Dr Lee a exploré deux récepteurs (appelés CD80 et CD86 ) exprimés à la surface des cellules dendritiques qui déclenchent les cellules pour faire soit des facteurs immuno- stimulant ( interleukine - 6 ) ou des facteurs immunosuppresseurs ( indolemine 2 , 3 dioxygénase , IDO ) . Ils ont défini les voies intracellulaires par lesquels les récepteurs déclenchent chaque réponse et a également découvert une interaction non comptabilisé antérieurement avec un autre récepteur appelé Notch - 1 .

La compréhension de la manière dont ces voies sont mises ensemble ouvre la porte à cibler les composants de la voie afin que les médecins puissent manipuler les cellules dendritiques à activer ou supprimer le système immunitaire d'une manière qui soit thérapeutiquement bénéfique.

«L'activation de la réponse immunitaire améliorerait la réponse d'un patient à un vaccin destiné à prévenir un cancer de se développer ou récurrent », explique le Dr Lee . " La suppression ou blocage d'une réponse immunitaire indésirable serait utile dans les cas de transplantations d'organes, pour prévenir le rejet, ou dans les maladies auto-immunes comme le lupus et l'arthrite rhumatoïde . "

En ce qui concerne le cancer , le Dr Lee explique comment manipuler la voie CD80/CD86 pourrait avoir une incidence traitement pour le myélome multiple , un cancer d'un type de globules blancs dans la moelle osseuse .

" Les cellules myélomateuses utilisent cette voie pour survivre et croître en induisant la DC à faire de l'IL- 6 - qui favorise la survie des cellules cancéreuses - et IDO , qui bloque les réponses anti- cancer», dit-il. «Cibler cette voie serait une nouvelle stratégie de traitement pour le myélome multiple."

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16325
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Comment le système immunitaire est désactivé   Lun 19 Aoû 2013 - 11:00

La découverte n'est encore qu'un espoir de plus dans la lutte contre le cancer, mais elle semble prometteuse. Des chercheurs américains du Children's Hospital de Philadelphie viennent de tester avec succès un nouveau traitement visant à booster le système immunitaire pour mieux combattre le cancer.

Leurs travaux viennent d'être publiés dans la revue Nature Medicine. Travaillant sur des populations de souris, les scientifiques ont mis au point un traitement permettant de bloquer certaines fonctions de leurs lymphocytes T régulateurs (Tregs). En temps normal, ceux-ci empêchent le système immunitaire de se retourner contre les tissus du corps, et ne lui permettent donc pas de s'attaquer aux cellules cancéreuses. Leurs expériences ont démontré que le traitement permettait aux souris de réagir plus efficacement contre les tumeurs sans provoquer de réactions auto-immunes.

De quoi s'attendre à de potentielles grandes avancées dans la lutte contre le cancer, affirme l'un des chercheurs, le Dr Wayne Hancock. Même si de nouvelles expériences devront déterminer si le traitement est aussi efficace sur l'homme qu'il l'est sur la souris..

Read more at http://www.atlantico.fr/pepites/cancer-chercheurs-ont-ralenti-en-boostant-systeme-immunitaire-819162.html#eVC0KrXQ0J221C6s.99

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16325
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Comment le système immunitaire est désactivé   Ven 24 Mai 2013 - 14:44

May 24, 2013 — Cancer cells spread and grow by avoiding detection and destruction by the immune system. Stimulation of the immune system can help to eliminate cancer cells; however, there are many factors that cause the immune system to ignore cancer cells. Regulatory T cells are immune cells that function to suppress the immune system response.

In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, researchers led by Ronald Levy at Stanford University found that regulatory T cells that infiltrate tumors express proteins that can be targeted with therapeutic antibodies.

Mice injected with antibodies targeting the proteins CTLA-4 and OX-40 had smaller tumors and improved survival. Moreover, treatment with these antibodies cleared both tumors at the primary site and distant metastases, including brain metastases that are usually difficult to treat. These findings suggest that therapies targeting regulatory T cells could be a promising approach in cancer treatment.

In an accompanying commentary, Cristina Ghirelli and Thorsten Hagemann emphasize that in order for this approach to be clinically relevant, it will be important to show that targeting regulatory T cells in metastatic tumors also blocks growth.





24 mai 2013 - Les cellules cancéreuses se propagent et se développent en évitant la détection et la destruction par le système immunitaire. La stimulation du système immunitaire peut aider à éliminer les cellules cancéreuses, mais il y a beaucoup de facteurs qui font que le système immunitaire ignorent les cellules cancéreuses. Les cellules T régulatrices sont des cellules immunitaires qui fonctionnent pour supprimer la réponse du système immunitaire.


Dans ce numéro du Journal of Clinical Investigation, les chercheurs dirigés par Ronald Levy de l'Université de Stanford ont découvert que les cellules T régulatrices qui infiltrent les tumeurs expriment des protéines qui peuvent être ciblées avec des anticorps thérapeutiques.

Les souris injectées avec des anticorps dirigés contre les protéines CTLA-4 et OX-40 avaient des tumeurs plus petites et une amélioration de la survie. En outre, le traitement par ces anticorps ont effacé les tumeurs au site primaire et les métastases à distance, y compris les métastases cérébrales qui sont habituellement difficiles à traiter. Ces résultats suggèrent que les thérapies ciblant les cellules T régulatrices pourraient être une approche prometteuse dans le traitement du cancer.

Dans un commentaire accompagnant, Cristina Ghirelli et Thorsten Hagemann soulignent que, pour que cette approche soit cliniquement pertinente, il sera important de montrer que le ciblage des cellules T régulatrices dans les tumeurs métastatiques bloque également la croissance.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16325
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Comment le système immunitaire est désactivé   Mer 11 Juil 2012 - 9:42

(July 10, 2012) — Tiny vesicles released by tumors cells are taken up by healthy immune cells, causing the immune cells to discharge chemicals that foster cancer-cell growth and spread, according to a study by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center -- Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC -- James) and at Children's Hospital in Los Angeles.

De petites vésicules relâchées par les cellules cancéreuses sont reprises par les cellules saines du système immunitaires ce qui fait que ces cellules du système immunitaires relâchent à leur tour des produits chimiques qui aident les cellules cancéreuses à croitre et se répandre.

The study uses lung cancer cells to show that the vesicles contain potent regulatory molecules called microRNA, and that the uptake of these molecules by immune cells alters their behavior. The process in humans involves a fundamental receptor of the immune system called Toll-like receptor 8 (TLR8).

L'étude a utilisé des cellules cancéreuses du poumon qui montre que les vésicules comprennent de puissantes molécules appelées microARN et que l'incorporation de ces molécules par les cellules du système immunitaire change leur comportement. Le processus chez les humains implique un récepteur fondamental du système immunitaire qui s'appelle "toll-like recpetor 8 (TLR8).

The findings, published in the early edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggest a new strategy for treating cancer and diseases of the immune system, the researchers say, and a new role for microRNA in the body.

Ces découvertes suggèrent une nouvelle stratégie pour traiter le cancer et les maladies du système immunitaire et un nouveau rôle pour les microARN dans le corps.

"This study reveals a new function of microRNA, which we show binds to a protein receptor," says principal investigator Dr. Carlo Croce, director of Ohio State's Human Cancer Genetics program and a member of the OSUCCC -- James Molecular Biology and Cancer Genetics program. "This tells us that some cancer-released microRNAs can bind and activate a receptor in a hormone-like fashion, and this has not been seen before."

"Cette découverte révèle une nouvelle fonction du microARN qui se lie à un récepteur de protéine. Ceci nous dit que quelques micro-ARNs reliés au cancer peuvent se lier avec un récepteur dans la série des récepteurs de similis hormones (?) et cela n'avait pas été vu avant."

MicroRNAs help control the type and amount of proteins that cells make, and they typically do this by binding with the messenger-RNA that encodes a protein.

Les microARNs aide à contrôler le type et le nombre de protéines que les cellules prennent et ils (elles ?) font ça en se liant avec l'ARN-messager qui encode la protéine.

"In this study we discovered a completely new mechanism used by cancer to grow and spread, therefore we can develop new drugs that fight tumors by entering this newly identified breach in cancer's fortress," says co-corresponding author and first author Dr. Muller Fabbri, assistant professor of Pediatrics and Molecular Biology and Immunology at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California.

"Dans cette étude, nous avons découvert un tout nouveau mécanisme utilisé par le cancer pour croitre et se répandre, dès lors nous pouvons développé de nouveaux médicaments pour combattre les tumeurs en entrant dans cette nouvelle brèche dans la forteresse du cancer"

"Equally exciting, we show that this mechanism involves a fundamental receptor of the immune system, TLR8, suggesting that the implications of this discovery may extend to other diseases such as autoimmune and inflammatory diseases," Fabbri says.

"Ce qui est excitant aussi c'est que nous avons montré que ce mécanisme implique un récepteur fondamental du système immunitaire, le TLR8, ce qui suggère des implications dans d'autres maladies comme les maladies auto-immunes ou inflammatoires."

Key findings of the study include the following:

Les découvertes-clés dans l'étude inclus :

Lung tumor cells secrete microRNA-21 and microRNA-29a in vesicles called exosomes, and these exosomes are taken up by immune cells called macrophages located where tumor tissue abuts normal tissue.

Les cellules de cancer du sécrètent des microARN-21 et des microARN-29a appelés exosomes, et ces exosomes sont avalés par les cellules immunitaires appelés macrophages.

In human macrophages, microRNA-29a and microRNA-21 bind with TLR8, causing the macrophages to secrete tumor-necrosis-factor alpha and interleukin-6, two cytokines that promote inflammation.

Ces macrophages chez l'humain se lient avec TLR8 et sécrètent le "facteur alpha tuméfiant" et l'interleukin-6, deux cytokines qui promeuvent l'inflammation.

Increased levels of the two cytokines were associated with an increase in the number of tumors per lung in an animal model, while a drop in those levels led to a drop in the number per lung, suggesting that they also play a role in metastasis.

Des niveaux élevés de ces deux cytokines ont été associés avec un nombre de tumeurs plus élevés par poumon dans les modèles animaux alors quy'une baisse de ces niveaux correspond à une baisse dans le nombre de tumeurs par poumon et cela joue aussi un rôle dans le phénomène des métastaases.



_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16325
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Comment le système immunitaire est désactivé   Mer 20 Juil 2011 - 12:43

Thérapie contre le cancer: le moins pour le plus

Recherche
Un groupe de recherche formé autour de Carole Bourquin, professeure à la Chaire de pharmacologie, a découvert que le timing de l'administration des principes actifs joue un rôle décisif dans la thérapie des maladies cancéreuses. Ces résultats de recherche devraient permettre de développer de nouvelles stratégies plus efficaces pour le traitement des tumeurs.

Carole Bourquin travaille depuis mai 2011 en tant que professeure ordinaire en pharmacologie au Département de médecine de l'Université de Fribourg. Ces nouvelles connaissances dans la recherche sur le cancer sont le résultat de travaux, débutés à l'Hôpital Universitaire Ludwig-Maximilian de Munich, qu'elle poursuit aujourd'hui à Fribourg. Le Dr Christian Hotz, coauteur de l'étude et nouvellement actif à l'Université de Fribourg, a également pris part à cette collaboration. Ces résultats seront publiés dans l'édition d'août de la revue scientifique renommée Cancer Research.

Cette étude montre, pour la première fois, comment la stimulation répétée de récepteurs du système immunitaire inné peut conduire à une «neutralisation» du système immunitaire par la thérapie. Suite à l'analyse de cette défaillance, un schéma thérapeutique alternatif, capable de lutter de manière efficace contre une tumeur expérimentale avec une dose totale de principe actif plus faible que dans les méthodes conventionnelles, a été mis au point.

(20.07.2011

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16325
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Comment le système immunitaire est désactivé   Mar 21 Aoû 2007 - 12:13

The immune system does not destroy tumors even though they express molecules that should activate immune cells.

Le système immunitaire ne détruit pas les tumeurs même si celles-ci expriment des molécules qui devraient l'activer.

The immune system is therefore said to be tolerant of the tumors. Several molecules and cell types have been implicated in the induction of immune system tolerance to tumors, including, in mice, a small population of immune cells known as plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) that produce the enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and that are isolated from the lymph nodes that drain the site of the tumor.

Le système immunitaire est donc tolérant aux tumeurs. Pusieurs molécules et types de cellules ont été impliqués dans l'induction de la tolérance du système immunitaire, incluant, chez les souris, une petite population de celllules immunitaires connues comme des cellulles plasmacytoïde dendritiques qui produisent l'enzyme indomeamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO) et qui sont isolés par rapoport aux nodules lymphatiques qui drainent le site de la tumeur.

Now, researchers from the Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, have identified how these mouse IDO-expressing pDCs induce tumor-specific immune tolerance.

Les chercheurs viennent de trouver comment les souris exprimant IDO induisent la tolérance aux tumeurs

In the study, which appears online on August 16 in advance of publication in the September print issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, David Munn and colleagues found that mouse IDO-expressing pDCs from tumor-draining lymph nodes directly activate the suppressive function of a population of regulatory immune cells characterized as CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ and known as Tregs.

Dans l'étude qui a paru le 16 aout, David Munn et ses collègues ont trouvé que les souris exprimant le IDO venant des cellules dendritiques pDCs ont activé la fonction suppressive de CD4 + CD25 + Foxp3 connues sous le nom de Treg.

Suppression by Tregs activated by IDO-expressing pDCs was mediated by interactions between programmed cell death 1 (PD1) and its ligands. This mechanism of suppression is distinct from that used by Tregs activated by other stimuli. Importantly, immune suppression in tumor-draining lymph nodes was abrogated by treating mice with both a chemotherapeutic drug and a chemical inhibitor of IDO, but not either agent alone, leading the authors to suggest that combining IDO inhibitors with chemotherapeutic agents might improve the efficacy of chemotherapeutics in individuals with cancer.

Article: Plasmacytoid dendritic cells from mouse tumor-draining lymph nodes directly activate mature Tregs via indoleamine 2,3,-dioxygenase


Dernière édition par Denis le Sam 20 Mai 2017 - 12:51, édité 7 fois
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: Comment le système immunitaire est désactivé   

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
Comment le système immunitaire est désactivé
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 1
 Sujets similaires
-
» Comment le système immunitaire est désactivé
» le système immunitaire des astronautes est affaibli
» Découverte : nouvelle molécule dans le système immunitaire.
» Système immunitaire des martiens
» Nouvelle technique pour renforcer le système immunitaire.

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
ESPOIRS :: Cancer :: recherche-
Sauter vers: