AccueilCalendrierFAQRechercherS'enregistrerMembresGroupesConnexion

Partagez | 
 

 Le cancer du pancréas (2)

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
Aller à la page : Précédent  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
AuteurMessage
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15761
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le cancer du pancréas (2)   Ven 20 Déc 2013 - 18:11

Dec. 20, 2013 — Scientists from The University of Manchester -- part of Manchester Cancer Research Centre believe they have discovered a new way to make chemotherapy treatment more effective for pancreatic cancer patients.
Share This:

Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive cancer with poor prognosis and limited treatment options and is highly resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

But researchers believe they have found an effective strategy for selectively killing pancreatic cancer while sparing healthy cells which could make treatment more effective.

Dr Jason Bruce, from the Physiological Systems and Disease Research Group, who led the research, said: "Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive and deadly cancers. Most patients develop symptoms after the tumour has spread to other organs. To make things worse, pancreatic cancer is highly resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Clearly a radical new approach to treatment is urgently required. We wanted to understand how the switch in energy supply in cancer cells might help them survive."

The research, published in The Journal of Biological Chemistry this month, found pancreatic cancer cells may have their own specialised energy supply that maintains calcium levels and keeps cancer cells alive.

Maintaining a low concentration of calcium within cells is vital to their survival and this is achieved by calcium pumps on the plasma membrane.

This calcium pump, known as PMCA, is fuelled using ATP -- the key energy currency for many cellular processes.

All cells generate energy from nutrients using two major biochemical energy "factories," mitochondria and glycolysis. Mitochondria generate approximately 90% of the cells' energy in normal healthy cells. However, in pancreatic cancer cells there is a shift towards glycolysis as the major energy source. It is thought that the calcium pump may have its own supply of glycolytic ATP, and it is this fuel supply that gives cancer cells a survival advantage over normal cells.

Scientists used cells taken from human tumours and looked at the effect of blocking each of these two energy sources in turn.

Their study, funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC), National Institute of Health Research (NIHR) Biomedical Research Centre and AstraZeneca, shows that blocking mitochondrial metabolism had no effect. However, when they blocked glycolysis, they saw a reduced supply of ATP which inhibited the calcium pump, resulting in a toxic calcium overload and ultimately cell death.

Dr Bruce added: "It looks like glycolysis is the key process in providing ATP fuel for the calcium pump in pancreatic cancer cells. Although an important strategy for cell survival, it may also be their major weakness.

"Designing drugs to cut off this supply to the calcium pumps might be an effective strategy for selectively killing cancer cells while sparing normal cells within the pancreas."

Maggie Blanks, CEO of the national charity, the Pancreatic Cancer Research Fund said: "These findings will certainly of great interest to the pancreatic cancer research community and we'd be keen to see how this approach progresses. Finding weaknesses that can be exploited in this highly aggressive cancer is paramount, so we want to congratulate the Manchester team for their discovery."


20 décembre 2013 - Des scientifiques de l'Université de Manchester - QUI fait partie du Centre de recherche du cancer Manchester - croient qu'ils ont découvert une nouvelle façon de faire de la chimiothérapie plus efficace pour les patients atteints de cancer du pancréas.

Les chercheurs croient qu'ils ont trouvé une stratégie efficace pour tuer sélectivement le cancer du pancréas , tout en épargnant les cellules saines, qui pourraient rendre le traitement plus efficace .

Le Dr Jason Bruce , des systèmes physiologiques et recherche sur les maladies du Groupe , qui a dirigé la recherche , a déclaré: « De toute évidence une approche radicalement nouvelle du traitement est urgente.Nous voulions comprendre comment l'interrupteur de l'approvisionnement en énergie dans les cellules cancéreuses pouvait les aider à survivre " .

La recherche, publiée dans le Journal of Biological Chemistry ce mois-ci, a trouvé que des cellules cancéreuses pancréatiques peuvent avoir leur propre approvisionnement énergétique spécialisée qui maintient les niveaux de calcium et maintient les cellules cancéreuses en vie.

Le maintien d'une faible concentration de calcium dans les cellules est essentiel pour leur survie et ceci est réalisé au moyen de pompes de calcium sur la membrane plasmique .

Cette pompe à calcium , connu comme PMCA, est alimentée à l'aide de l'ATP - la clé pour l'approvisionnement en énergie  pour de nombreux processus cellulaires .

Toutes les cellules produisent de l'énergie à partir de nutriments à l'aide de deux grandes énergie biochimique que sont les mitochondries et la glycolyse. Les mitochondries produisent environ 90% de l'énergie des cellules dans les cellules saines normales. Cependant, dans les cellules du cancer du pancréas, il y a un déplacement vers la glycolyse comme source d'énergie principale. On pense que la pompe à calcium peut avoir sa propre alimentation d'ATP glycolytique , et c'est cette alimentation en carburant qui donne des cellules cancéreuses un avantage de survie sur les cellules normales.

Les scientifiques ont utilisé des cellules prélevées sur des tumeurs humaines et ont étudié l'effet de blocage de chacun de ces deux sources d'énergie, tour à tour.

Leur étude montre que le blocage du métabolisme mitochondrial n'a eu aucun effet. Cependant, quand ils bloquent glycolyse, ils ont vu une offre réduite d'ATP qui inhibe la pompe à calcium, ce qui entraîne une surcharge calcique toxique et finalement la mort cellulaire.

Dr Bruce a ajouté: "Il semble que la glycolyse est le processus clé dans la fourniture de l'ATP carburant de la pompe à calcium dans les cellules cancéreuses pancréatiques Bien qu'une stratégie importante pour la survie des cellules, elle peut aussi être leur faiblesse majeure .

" Concevoir des médicaments pour couper cet approvisionnement pour les pompes de calcium peut être une stratégie efficace pour tuer sélectivement les cellules cancéreuses tout en épargnant les cellules normales dans le pancréas . "

Maggie Blanks , chef de la direction de l'organisme de bienfaisance national , le Fonds de recherche en cancer du pancréas a déclaré: "Ces résultats seront certainement d'un grand intérêt pour la communauté de recherche sur le cancer du pancréas et nous serions désireux de voir comment cette approche progresse Trouver les faiblesses qui peuvent être exploitées dans  ce cancer très agressif est primordiale.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur En ligne
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15761
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le cancer du pancréas (2)   Jeu 19 Déc 2013 - 21:04

Proteins called fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) have been implicated in the development of pancreatic cancer, which remains difficult to treat. Researchers at Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI) have now confirmed that FGFRs can be used as treatment targets in preclinical studies, and have identified certain molecular characteristics that could be useful in developing personalized treatments for patients with pancreatic cancer. Study results have been published online first in the British Journal of Cancer.

"The FGFR signaling pathway is a valid target in pancreatic cancer, and this study may have revealed a tool that we can use to personalize the treatment of pancreatic cancer in the future," said Wen Wee Ma, MBBS, assistant professor in the Department of Medicine at RPCI.

Ma and colleagues evaluated whether the FGFR signaling pathway could be interrupted or targeted to slow or halt the progression of pancreatic cancer. They also determined whether certain molecular characteristics of the cancer make it more vulnerable to the effects of treatment with an FGFR-targeting drug, such as dovitinib. FGFR signaling was shown to be a valid therapeutic target using complementary cancer models from cell lines and pancreatic tumors.

"The tumors derived from patients mirror the heterogeneous biological and molecular characteristics of the donor patients and provide a more accurate reflection than cell lines of the effects of treatment in human patients," Ma said.

Inhibiting FGFR signaling using dovitinib achieved significant anticancer effects. The effect was more pronounced in pancreatic cancers that expressed a specific subtype of FGFR called FGFR2 IIIb. Eventually, that information could help clinicians identify patients who would be more likely to benefit from treatment with dovitinib.

Two clinical trials evaluating dovitinib are currently underway at RPCI, and researchers hope to incorporate the findings from this study in the ongoing development of the treatment. The first trial, Phase I Study of Dovitinib (TKI258) in Combination With Gemcitabine and Capecitabine in Advanced Solid Tumors, Pancreatic Cancer and Biliary Cancers, is still accruing patients and can be found at ClinicalTrials.gov (search for Study NCT01497392). The second trial evaluates dovitinib with gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel and is planned to be available to pancreatic cancer patients in early 2014.

---

Les protéines appelées récepteurs de fibroblastes de facteurs de croissance (les FGFR ) ont été impliquées dans le développement du cancer du pancréas , qui reste difficile à traiter. Des chercheurs de Roswell Park Cancer Institute ( RPCI ) ont maintenant confirmé que les FGFR peuvent être utilisés comme cibles thérapeutiques dans des études précliniques , et ont identifié certaines caractéristiques moléculaires qui pourraient être utiles dans le développement de traitements personnalisés pour les patients atteints de cancer du pancréas. Les résultats de l'étude ont été publiés en ligne d'abord dans le British Journal of Cancer.

" La voie de signalisation de FGFR est une cible valide dans le cancer du pancréas , et cette étude aurait pu révéler un outil que nous pouvons utiliser pour personnaliser le traitement du cancer du pancréas à l'avenir ", a déclaré Wen Wee Ma, MBBS , professeur adjoint au Département de médecine de RPCI .

Ma et ses collègues ont évalué si la voie de signalisation de FGFR pouvait être interrompue ou ciblée pour ralentir ou arrêter la progression du cancer du pancréas. Ils ont également déterminé si certaines caractéristiques moléculaires du cancer rendent plus vulnérables aux effets du traitement avec un médicament de ciblage du FGFR, comme dovitinib. La Signalisation FGFR s'est révélée être une cible thérapeutique valide à l'aide des modèles de cancer complémentaires à partir des lignées de cellules et les tumeurs pancréatiques.

"Les tumeurs dérivées de patients reflètent les caractéristiques biologiques et moléculaires hétérogènes des patients de donateurs et de fournir une réflexion plus précise que les lignées cellulaires des effets du traitement chez les patients humains », a déclaré Ma .

L'inhibition de la signalisation en utilisant dovitinib atteint des effets anticancéreux significatifs. L'effet était plus prononcé dans les cancers pancréatiques qui ont exprimé un sous-type spécifique de FGFR appelé FGFR2 IIIb . Finalement , cette information pourrait aider les médecins à identifier les patients qui seraient plus susceptibles de bénéficier d'un traitement avec dovitinib .

Deux essais cliniques évaluant dovitinib sont actuellement en cours à RPCI , et les chercheurs espèrent intégrer les résultats de cette étude dans le développement continu du traitement . Le premier essai de phase I, de Dovitinib ( TKI258 ) en association avec la gemcitabine et capécitabine dans des tumeurs solides avancées pour le cancer du pancréas et des voies biliaires, recrute toujours des patients et peut être trouvé à ClinicalTrials.gov (recherche pour l'étude NCT01497392 ) . Le deuxième essai évalue dovitinib avec la gemcitabine et nab - paclitaxel et est prévu pour être disponible aux patients atteints de cancer du pancréas au début de 2014.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur En ligne
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15761
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le cancer du pancréas (2)   Jeu 12 Déc 2013 - 13:35

Chinese researchers from Rui-Jin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao-Tong University School of Medicine, BGI and other institutes identified the recurrent T372R mutation in the transcription factor YY1 (Yin Yang 1) are related with insulinoma oncogenesis, implicating a potential marker for the diagnosis and treatment of functional pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs). The latest study was published online in Nature Communications.

Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors are classified into functional and nonfunctional tumors by hormone secretion and clinical symptoms. Functional PNETs are mainly represented by insulinoma, which secrete insulin independent of glucose and cause hypoglycemia. The major genetic alterations in insulinomas are still unknown.

In this study, researchers identified T372R mutation in YY1 by whole exome sequencing of 10 sporadic insulinomas samples. It is noteworthy that the T372R mutation was the first reported in public available databases such as 1,000 Genomes and dbSNP database. YY1 is a multifunctional protein, which takes part in regulating normal physiological progress such as development, differentiation, replication and cell proliferation. It also plays an important role in regulating insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling that is crucial for pancreatic β-cell survival and insulin secretion.   

Subsequently, researchers validated T372R mutation in 103 additional insulinomas samples. The results showed that 31 in 103 cases had the T372R mutation, providing evidence to support that T372R mutation is a pathogenic factor of insulinoma. In addition, they found T372R mutation could enhance the transcriptional activity of YY1. The mTOR inhibitor which has been approved to use for cancer treatment also can regulate the transcriptional activity of YY1.

Lin Li, Project Manager from BGI, said: "In this study, we conducted whole exome sequencing on sporadic insulinomas, and found the hotspot mutations of T372R in 30% insulinomas. The findings not only contribute new diagnostic and medical therapies of PNETs, but also provide new insights into diabetes studies."

----


Les chercheurs chinois ont identifié la mutation T372R récurrente dans le facteur de transcription YY1 ( Yin Yang 1 ) impliquant un marqueur potentiel pour le diagnostic et le traitement des tumeurs neuroendocrines pancréatiques fonctionnelles ( origine neuroectodermique ). La dernière étude a été publiée en ligne dans Nature Communications .

Les tumeurs neuroendocrines pancréatiques sont classés en tumeurs fonctionnelles et non fonctionnelles par la sécrétion d'hormone et les symptômes cliniques. les PNETs fonctionnels sont principalement représentés par les insulinomies, qui sécrètent l'insuline indépendamment du glucose et de provoquent une hypoglycémie. Les principales altérations génétiques dans les insulinomies sont encore inconnues.

Dans cette étude, les chercheurs ont identifié des mutations T372R dans YY1 par séquençage d' exome sur un ensemble de 10 échantillons d'insulinomies sporadiques. Il est à noter que la mutation T372R a été la première signalée dans les bases de données disponibles publics tels que les 1000 Génomes et base de données dbSNP. YY1 est une protéine multifonctionnelle, qui participe à la régulation de la physiologie normale, comme le développement, la différenciation, la réplication et la prolifération cellulaire. Elle joue également un rôle important dans la régulation de l'insuline et du facteur de croissance analogue à l'insuline ( IGF ) qui est crucial pour la survie de la cellule β pancréatique et la sécrétion d'insuline .

Par la suite, les chercheurs ont trouvé la mutation T372R dans 103 échantillons d'insulinomies supplémentaires. Les résultats ont montré que dans 31 cas sur 103 avaient la mutation T372R, et cela fournissait des preuves à l'appui que T372R mutation est un facteur pathogène de insulinomie. En outre , ils ont trouvé que la mutation T372R pourrait augmenter l'activité transcriptionnelle de YY1. L'inhibiteur de mTOR , qui a été approuvé pour l' utilisation pour le traitement du cancer peut également réguler l'activité transcriptionnelle de YY1.

Lin Li , gestionnaire de projet de BGI, a déclaré: «Dans cette étude , nous avons effectué le séquençage de l'exome sur les insulinomies sporadiques , et j'ai trouvé les mutations T372R dans 30 % des insulinomies. Les résultats contribuent non seulement à de nouvelles thérapies de diagnostic et médicaux de PNETs, mais fournissent également de nouvelles perspectives sur des études sur le diabète ".

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur En ligne
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15761
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le cancer du pancréas (2)   Mer 27 Nov 2013 - 15:44

"...Autre piste de réflexion : l’activité physique. « Dans les cancers du sein et du côlon, une activité encadrée et adaptée peut retarder la récidive ou la croissance des tumeurs, explique Pascal Hammel. Dès 2014, nous adapterons cette approche au cancer du pancréas. »

Des études prometteuses

Les résultats de ces études prometteuses devraient être disponibles à partir de 2017.

« J’ai l’espoir que, dans quelques années, les malades puissent vivre longtemps et dans de bonnes conditions avec un cancer du pancréas stabilisé, à défaut d’être guéri.

Un peu comme les malades atteints du sida, qui, il y a moins de vingt ans, étaient condamnés à court terme », confie Pascal Hammel."


_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur En ligne
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15761
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le cancer du pancréas (2)   Mer 27 Nov 2013 - 14:59

À cette adresse, c'est une émission de télé en France (Allô docteurs) ou plutôt un bout d'émission sur le cancer du pancréas et les nouveaux médicaments : (Ma connexion est mauvaise et je n'ai pas écouté ce qui se dit, j'espère que c'est encourageant.)


http://www.allodocteurs.fr/actualite-sante-quelles-sont-les-nouvelles-pistes-de-recherche-pour-traiter-le-cancer-du-pancreas--11873.asp?1=1

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur En ligne
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15761
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le cancer du pancréas (2)   Ven 22 Nov 2013 - 14:03

Des scientifiques ont réussi à faire un médicament pour se lier et donc contrer les effets du gène RAS qui est un gène qui est affecté par une mutation qui conduit au cancer dans entres autres le cancer du pancréas, c'est une bonne nouvelle puisque des scientifiques essayaient de faire un médicament contre ce gène depuis plus de 20 ans. J'ai mis l'article dans le fil dédié au gène Ras puisque ça concerne plusieurs cancers. Le gène RAS est muté dans + de 90% des cancers du pancréas.
http://espoirs.forumactif.com/t1082-le-gene-ras#32658

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur En ligne
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15761
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le cancer du pancréas (2)   Ven 15 Nov 2013 - 16:38




Here she comes. You want to go on a bike ride?
When you watch Diana Sokol Roth in action,it’s hard to imagine the 45-year-old was diagnosed with pancreatic
cancer two years ago. Diana Sokol Roth Pancreatic cancer survivor
It was devastating in that...When you meet with the doctors and they give you
the statistics that most people don’t live two years and at most may be you live five years.
Scott Roth Husband For the about a 72 hours it was just numbing. But when the shock wore off, Diana and
her husband Scott didn’t let those numbers get in the way of her fight. She wanted to be one of the under 10 percent who survives long term. My husband and I were like, ok, we will attack it head on. We’re very proactive
about everything. I’m healthy. Its early. Let’s just move on. But getting to where she is now wasn’t easy.
Kaye Reid Lombardo, M.D. Mayo Clinic Surgeon She ended up having a Whipple operation, as it's more commonly called, to remove the pancreas cancer and to remove a portion of vein that
was attached to the cancer as well. Dr. Kaye Reid Lombardo and her team performed Diana’s surgery. It’s a difficult operation because the pancreas is deep in the abdomen and hard to access.
First, Dr.Reid Lombardo removed much of the pancreas, a part of the intestine called the duodenum, the gall bladder, common bile duct,and a section ofportal vein.Then she recons tructed the area so Diana could digest food normally.This was followed by chemotherapy and radiation. Diana’s cancer was found fairly early, which increases her chance of survival.
Santhi Swaroop Vege, M.D. Mayo Clinic Gastroenterology
The problem with pancreatic cancer is it's diagnosed late, so much so when the patient presents with symptoms like jaundice or severe abdominal pain, the it's already late.
Dr. San thiS war oopVege is Diana’s pancreatologist. He says there’s lots of research going on now to figure out how to screen patients for pancreatic cancer.
So more people can fight this disease and live.
It’s been a struggle, but I’m grateful every day and I’m happy every day.
For Medical Edge I’m Vivien Williams

_________________


Dernière édition par Denis le Ven 22 Nov 2013 - 14:09, édité 1 fois
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur En ligne
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15761
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le cancer du pancréas (2)   Jeu 14 Nov 2013 - 16:30

A new method of microscopic drug delivery that could greatly improve the treatment of deadly pancreatic cancer has been proven to work in mice at UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center.

The research team led by Drs. Andre Nel, professor of nanomedicine and member of the California Nanosystems Institute (CNSI), and Huan Meng, adjunct assistant professor of nanomedicine, published the results of their study in the journal ACS Nano online ahead of print and featured in the November 2013 print issue.

Pancreatic cancer (pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma or PDAC) is a deadly disease that is nearly impossible to detect until it is in the advanced stage. Treatment options for it are very limited in number and suffer low success rates. The need for innovative and improved treatment of pancreatic cancer cannot be overstated, as its diagnosis over the years has often remained synonymous with a death sentence.

In the pancreas, PDAC tumors consist of cancer cells that are surrounded by other structural elements called stroma. The stroma can be made of many substances, such as connective tissue and pericytes, which block the access of standard chemotherapy in tumor blood vessels from efficiently reaching the cancer cells. These elements can reduce the effectiveness of the treatment.

The dual-wave nanotherapy method employed by Drs. Nel and Meng in their research uses two different kinds of microscopic particles (nanoparticles) intravenously injected in a rapid sequence into the vein of the tumor-bearing mouse. The first wave of nanoparticles carries a substance that removes the pericytes' vascular gates to access the pancreatic cancer cells and the second wave carries the chemotherapy drug that kills the cancer cells.

Drs. Nel and Meng and their colleagues Dr. Jeffrey Zink, UCLA professor of chemistry and biochemistry and Dr. Jeffrey Brinker, University of New Mexico professor of chemical and nuclear engineering, sought to contain chemotherapy in nanoparticles that could more directly target pancreatic cancer cells, but they needed to find a way for those nanoparticles to get through the sites of vascular obstruction caused by the pericytes, which restricts access to the cancer cells. Through experimentation they discovered they could interfere with a cellular signaling pathway (the communication mechanism between cells) that governs the pericyte attraction to the tumor blood vessels. By making nanoparticles that effectively bind a high load of the signaling pathway inhibitor, they developed a first wave of nanoparticles that separates the pericytes from the endothelial cells (on the blood vessel). This opens the vascular gate for the next wave of nanoparticles, which carry the chemotherapeutic agent to the cancer cells inside the tumor.

To test this two-wave nanotherapy, the researchers used immuno-compromised mice that were used to grow human pancreatic tumors (called xenografts) under the mouse skin. With the two-wave method, the xenograft tumors had a significantly higher rate of shrinkage compared to those exposed to chemotherapy given the standard way as a free drug or carried in nanoparticles without first wave treatment.

"This two-wave nanotherapy is an existing example of how we seek to improve the delivery of chemotherapy drugs to their intended targets using nanotechnology to provide an engineered approach," said Nel, chief of the division of nanomedicine. "It shows how the physical and chemical principles of nanotechnology can be integrated with the biological sciences to help cancer patients by increasing the effectiveness of chemotherapy while also reducing side effects and toxicity. This two-wave treatment approach can also address biological impediments in nanotherapies for other types of cancer."




Une nouvelle méthode de livraison de médicaments microscopiques qui pourrait grandement améliorer le traitement du cancer du pancréas a établi des preuves de fonctionnement chez la souris à l'UCLA .

L'équipe de recherche dirigée par les Drs André Nel et Huan Meng, professeur a publié les résultats de leur étude dans la revue ACS Nano en ligne avant impression et a été mise en vedette dans l'édition imprimée de Novembre 2013 .

Les options de traitement pour ce cancer sont en nombre très limité et souffrent de faibles taux de réussite. La nécessité d'un traitement innovant et amélioré du cancer du pancréas ne peut pas être surestimée.

Dans le pancréas, les tumeurs ACPE sont constitués de cellules cancéreuses qui sont entourés par d'autres éléments structuraux appelés stroma. Le stroma peut être faite de plusieurs substances , comme le tissu conjonctif et les péricytes , qui bloquent l'accès de la chimiothérapie standard dans les vaisseaux sanguins tumoraux qui ne peut atteindre efficacement les cellules cancéreuses. Ces éléments peuvent réduire l'efficacité du traitement.

La méthode de nanotherapy à double vague employée par les Drs Nel et Meng dans leur recherche utilise deux types différents de particules microscopiques (nanoparticules ) injectés par voie intraveineuse en une séquence rapide dans la veine de la souris porteuses de tumeurs . La première vague de nanoparticules porte une substance qui élimine les empêchements vasculaires péricytes pour accéder aux cellules de cancer du pancréas et de la deuxième vague transporte le médicament de chimiothérapie qui tue les cellules cancéreuses.

Les docteurs Nel et Meng et leurs collègue, le Dr Jeffrey Zink, ont cherché à contenir la chimiothérapie dans des nanoparticules qui pourraient cibler plus directement les cellules cancéreuses pancréatiques , mais ils avaient besoin de trouver un moyen pour que ces nanoparticules puissent passer à travers les sites de l'obstruction vasculaire causée par les péricytes , ce qui restreint l'accès aux cellules cancéreuses. Par l'expérimentation, ils ont découvert qu'ils pouvaient interférer avec une voie de signalisation cellulaire ( le mécanisme de communication entre les cellules ) qui régit l' attraction pericyte les vaisseaux sanguins tumoraux. En faisant des nanoparticules qui se lient effectivement une charge élevée de l'inhibiteur de la voie de signalisation, ils ont développé une première onde de nanoparticules qui sépare les péricytes à partir des cellules endothéliales( sur le vaisseau sanguin ). Cela ouvre la porte vasculaire pour la prochaine onde de nanoparticules , qui portent l'agent chimiothérapeutique pour les cellules cancéreuses à l'intérieur de la tumeur.

Pour tester cette nanotherapy à deux ondes, les chercheurs ont utilisé des souris immuno- compromises qui ont été utilisées pour développer des tumeurs pancréatiques humaines (appelées xénogreffes ) sous la peau de souris . Avec la méthode en deux vagues , les tumeurs de xénogreffe avaient un taux significativement plus élevé de retrait par rapport à ceux qui sont exposés à la chimiothérapie de la façon standard comme un médicament libre ou transporté dans des nanoparticules sans traitement de première vague .

La nanotherapy à deux ondes est un exemple actuel de la façon dont nous cherchons à améliorer la livraison de médicaments de chimiothérapie à leurs cibles en utilisant la nanotechnologie pour fournir une approche technique », a déclaré Nel , chef de la division de la nanomédecine . " Il montre comment les principes physiques et chimiques de la nanotechnologie peuvent être intégrés avec les sciences biologiques pour aider les patients atteints de cancer en augmentant l'efficacité de la chimiothérapie tout en réduisant les effets secondaires et de toxicité . Cette méthode de traitement à deux ondes peut également s'attaquer aux obstacles biologiques dans des nanotherapies pour d'autres types de cancer. "

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur En ligne
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15761
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le cancer du pancréas (2)   Ven 25 Oct 2013 - 13:12

Oct. 24, 2013 — An investigational drug that disrupts tumor blood vessels shows promise against a rare type of pancreatic cancer, scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have found. Their results were presented October 20 during a poster session at an international cancer conference.
Share This:

The drug Zybrestat selectively targets and collapses tumor blood vessels, depriving the tumor of oxygen and making its cells die. In experiments involving a mouse model of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, Einstein scientists found that infusing mice with Zybrestat three times per week for four weeks resulted in significant antitumor activity compared with control mice given a placebo.

The findings were presented in Boston at the American Association for Cancer Research-National Cancer Institute-European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer International Conference on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics. Presenting for Einstein was ZiQiang Yuan, M.D., research assistant professor of surgery at Einstein. The senior author is Steven K. Libutti, M.D., professor of genetics at Einstein and professor and vice chair of surgery at Einstein and Montefiore Medical Center, the University Hospital and academic medical center for Einstein.

Pancreatic cancer is the fourth-leading cause of cancer death in the U.S. According to the National Cancer Institute, more than 45,000 Americans will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in 2013 and more than 38,000 will die of the disease. Exocrine pancreatic cancer, the more common and usually fatal type, begins in the ducts that carry pancreatic juices. The Einstein study involved endocrine pancreatic cancer -- the much less common and more curable form of the disease that originates in pancreatic cells that make hormones (and that caused the death of Apple co-founder Steve Jobs).

All the mice in the study had insulinomas -- endocrine tumors that form in pancreatic cells that make insulin, the hormone that controls glucose levels in the blood. This type of tumor can make the pancreas over-secrete insulin. The Einstein researchers found that treating the mice with Zybrestat caused a significant and sustained decrease in circulating insulin and also significantly reduced tumor size.

--------------

24 octobre 2013 - Un médicament expérimental qui perturbe les vaisseaux sanguins tumoraux est prometteur contre une forme rare de cancer du pancréas , c'est ce que des chercheurs de l'Albert Einstein College of Medicine de l'Université Yeshiva ont trouvé. Leurs résultats ont été présentés 20 Les Octobre lors d'une séance d'affiche à une conférence internationale sur le cancer.


Le médicament ZYBRESTAT cible sélectivement les vaisseaux sanguins tumoraux , ce qui prive la tumeur d'oxygène et fait mourir les cellules cancéreuses. Dans les expériences impliquant un modèle de souris de tumeurs neuroendocrines pancréatiques , les scientifiques ont constaté qu'en infusant les souris avec ZYBRESTAT trois fois par semaine pendant quatre semaines, cela a donné lieu à une activité antitumorale significative par rapport aux souris témoins ayant reçu un placebo.

Les résultats ont été présentés à Boston à l'American Association for Cancer Cancer Research par l'organisation européenne pour la recherche et le traitement du cancer et la Conférence internationale sur les cibles moléculaires et thérapeutiques du cancer.

L'étude a impliqué le cancer du pancréas endocrine - la forme beaucoup moins fréquente et plus curable de la maladie qui prend naissance dans les cellules du pancréas qui produisent des hormones (et qui a causé la mort de cofondateur d'Apple Steve Jobs) .

Toutes les souris à l'étude avaient l'insulinome  Les chercheurs d'Einstein ont constaté que le traitement des souris avec ZYBRESTAT a entraîné une diminution significative et durable insuline circulante et également considérablement réduit la taille de la tumeur.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur En ligne
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15761
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le cancer du pancréas (2)   Mar 22 Oct 2013 - 16:27

Il y a des essais sur un nouvel inhibiteur de parp qui s'applique au cancer du pancréas avec le gène BRCA muté :

"Parmi les trois patients atteints de cancer du pancréas , deux ont eu une stabilisation de la maladie."

J'ai mis l'article au complet dans le sujet sur les inhibiteurs de parp, parce que ça concernent d'Autres cancers aussi.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur En ligne
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15761
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le cancer du pancréas (2)   Lun 21 Oct 2013 - 17:35

Oct. 21, 2013 — Patients with pancreatic cancer may benefit from an investigational member of an emerging class of anticancer drugs called antibody-drug conjugates, according to preclinical results presented here at the AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics, held Oct. 19-23.

Antibody-drug conjugates are a new type of targeted anticancer therapy, which use an antibody to deliver an attached drug directly to those cells that display the antibody's target on their surfaces. This precision reduces the side effects of the attached drug compared with conventional systemic administration. Currently, there are two U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved antibody-drug conjugates used for the treatment of certain cancers.

"Our investigational antibody-drug conjugate, MLN0264, is designed to selectively bring a highly potent cytotoxic payload to tumors that express guanyl cyclase C (GCC)," said Petter Veiby, global head of BioTherapeutics, Oncology DDU at Takeda Pharmaceuticals International Co. in Boston, Mass. "Our findings in preclinical pancreatic tumor models support the testing of MLN0264 in combination with gemcitabine in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer."

MLN0264 consists of the highly toxic agent monomethyl auristatin E (MMAE) attached to an antibody that recognizes GCC via a cleavable linker. When the antibody portion of the drug recognizes the protein GCC on tumor cells, the entire drug is taken up by the cells. Once inside the tumor cells, the linker that attaches MMAE to the antibody is severed, allowing the tumor cells to be exposed to the cytotoxic activity of MMAE.

According to Veiby, at least 50 percent of the pancreatic tumors he and his colleagues have examined express some level of GCC. They, therefore, investigated the activity of MLN0264 in preclinical models of pancreatic cancer that mimicked the various patterns of GCC expression observed in patient biopsies.

They found that MLN0264 markedly inhibited the growth of five of seven different human pancreatic tumors transplanted into mice.

Further analysis in two of the preclinical models, one in which MLN0264 had significantly inhibited tumor growth and one in which it had little effect, showed that a combination of MLN0264 and the traditional chemotherapy agent gemcitabine caused greater tumor shrinkage than either drug alone.

Based on their preclinical data, the researchers plan to investigate the activity of the combination of MLN0264 and gemcitabine in patients with GCC-expressing pancreatic cancer in a phase II study, which they hope will begin sometime in 2014. They are also evaluating the activity of MLN0264 in preclinical models of two other cancers known to frequently express GCC, metastatic colorectal cancer and gastric cancer.

---


21 octobre 2013 - Les patients atteints de cancer du :pancreas:peuvent bénéficier d'un membre expérimental d'une nouvelle classe de médicaments anticancéreux appelés conjugaison anticorps-médicaments, selon les résultats précliniques présentées ici à la Conférence internationale AACR -NCI- EORTC sur les cibles moléculaires du cancer et thérapeutique , qui s'est tenue 19 au 23 oct .


la Conjuguaison anticorps - médicaments est un nouveau type de thérapie anticancéreuse ciblée , qui utilise un anticorps pour livrer un médicament joint directement à ces cellules qui affichent la cible de l'anticorps sur leurs surfaces. Cette précision permet de réduire les effets secondaires du médicament-joint par rapport à l'administration systémique classique. Actuellement, il ya deux de ces médicaments approuvés par la FDA utilisés pour le traitement de certains cancers aux États-Unis.

«Notre conjugué anticorps- médicament expérimental, MLN0264 , est conçu pour apporter sélectivement une charge utile cytotoxique très puissant pour les tumeurs qui expriment guanyl cyclase C ( GCC ) ", a déclaré Petter Veiby , responsable mondial de la Biotherapeutics, oncologie DDU à Takeda Pharmaceuticals International Co. en Boston , Massachusetts "Nos résultats dans des modèles de tumeurs pancréatiques précliniques appui l'expérimentation de MLN0264 en combinaison avec la gemcitabine chez des patients atteints de cancer du pancréas avancé . "

MLN0264 se compose de l'agent hautement toxique monométhylique auristatine E ( MDAR ) fixé à un anticorps qui reconnaît GCC via un lieur clivable . Lorsque la partie de l'anticorps de la drogue reconnaît la protéine GCC sur les cellules tumorales , tout le médicament est absorbé par les cellules. Une fois à l'intérieur des cellules tumorales , l'agent de liaison qui se fixe à l'anticorps MDAR est sectionné , ce qui permet aux cellules tumorales d'être exposés à l'activité cytotoxique de MDAR .

Selon Veiby , au moins 50 pour cent des tumeurs pancréatiques que lui et ses collègues ont examiné expriment un certain niveau de GCC . Par conséquent, ils ont étudié l' activité de MLN0264 dans des modèles précliniques de cancer du pancréas qui imitaient les différents modes d'expression GCC observé dans les biopsies des patients.

Ils ont constaté que MLN0264 a nettement inhibé la croissance de cinq des sept différentes tumeurs pancréatiques humaines transplantées chez des souris .

Une analyse plus approfondie dans deux des modèles précliniques , celui dans lequel MLN0264 a inhibé significativement la croissance tumorale et celui dans lequel il a eu peu d' effet , a montré qu'une combinaison de MLN0264 et l'agent de chimiothérapie gemcitabine traditionnel a provoqué une plus grande réduction de la tumeur de chaque médicament pris individuellement .

Basé sur les données précliniques, les chercheurs envisagent d' étudier l'activité de la combinaison de MLN0264 et gemcitabine chez des patients atteints GCC exprimant un cancer du pancréas dans une étude de phase II, qui , espèrent-ils commencera en 2014. Ils évaluent également l'activité de MLN0264 dans des modèles précliniques de deux autres cancers connus pour exprimer fréquemment CCG, le cancer colorectal métastatique et le cancer gastrique.

_________________


Dernière édition par Denis le Sam 26 Oct 2013 - 9:12, édité 1 fois
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur En ligne
Poupe



Nombre de messages : 157
Date d'inscription : 28/07/2013

MessageSujet: Re: Le cancer du pancréas (2)   Sam 19 Oct 2013 - 15:16

Merci Denis pour ces différents articles bec 

Eric et mon ami suivent ce nouveau protocole ( gemzar / Abraxane).

J'espère pouvoir donner des nouvelles encourageantes dans quelques temps. :doigts: :doigts: 
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15761
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le cancer du pancréas (2)   Ven 18 Oct 2013 - 18:38

« Dans le cancer du pancréas, il y a rarement de bonnes nouvelles, pour une fois c’est vraiment le cas », racontait en janvier le Pr Emmanuel Mitry, oncologue digestif à l’Institut Curie, de retour du congrès américain de cancérologie digestive. Des résultats très prometteurs d’une combinaison de deux chimiothérapies contre les formes avancées du cancer du pancréas y avaient été dévoilés et sont aujourd’hui publiés dans le New England Journal of Medicine. Cet essai clinique a concerné 861 patients souffrant d’un cancer du pancréas avec des métastases. La moitié d’entre eux a reçu la chimiothérapie classique, la gemcitabine et l’autre groupe a reçu une combinaison de gemcitabine et de nab-paclitaxel. Cette deuxième molécule de chimiothérapie est accrochée à une nano-particule qui joue le rôle de transporteur et permet aux traitements de mieux pénétrer dans les celulles de la tumeur. Elle a permis aux patients traités de survivre en moyenne 8,5 mois contre 6,7 pour ceux qui n’ont reçu que la chimiothérapie standard.

Un document audio à cette adresse :

http://pourquoi-docteur.nouvelobs.com/Cancer-du-pancreas---un-nouvel-espoir-4010.html

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur En ligne
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15761
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le cancer du pancréas (2)   Ven 18 Oct 2013 - 11:52

Oct. 15, 2013 — Parvoviruses cause no harm in humans, but they can attack and kill cancer cells. Since 1992, scientists at the German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, DKFZ) have been studying these viruses with the aim of developing a viral therapy to treat glioblastomas, a type of aggressively growing brain cancer. A clinical trial has been conducted since 2011 at the Heidelberg University Neurosurgery Hospital to test the safety of treating cancer patients with the parvovirus H-1.
Share This:

"We obtained impressive results in preclinical trials with parvovirus H-1 in brain tumors," says Dr. Antonio Marchini, a virologist at DKFZ. "However, the oncolytic effect of the viruses is weaker in other cancers. Therefore, we are searching for ways to increase the therapeutic potential of the viruses."

In doing so, the virologists also tested valproic acid, a drug belonging to a group of drugs called HDAC inhibitors. The effect of these inhibitors is to raise the transcription of many genes that have been chemically silenced. Valproic acid is commonly used to treat epilepsy and has also proven effective in treating specific types of cancer.

The researchers initially used a combination of parvoviruses and valproic acid to treat tumor cells that had been obtained from cervical and pancreatic carcinomas and raised in the culture dish. In both types of cancer, the drug raised the rate of virus-induced cell death; in some cases, the cancer cells were even completely eliminated.

The encouraging results obtained in cultured cells were confirmed in cervical and pancreatic tumors that had been transplanted to rats. After the animals were treated with a combination of parvoviruses and valproic acid, in some cases the tumors regressed completely and animals remained free of recurrences over a one-year period. In contrast, animals treated with the same virus dose without the drug displayed no regression, not even when a 20-times higher dose of viruses was administered.

The virologists were also able to unravel the molecular mechanism by which valproic acid assists parvoviruses in fighting cancer: Treatment with the drug activates a viral protein called NS1, which is toxic. This helps the viruses replicate more rapidly and kill cancer cells more effectively.

"The synergistic effect of a combination of parvoviruses and valproic acid enables us to deliver both the viruses and the drug at low doses, which prevents severe side effects," Marchini explains. "The results are encouraging us to carry out further tests of this combination therapy. We believe it has the potential to arrest tumor growth in severe cases of cancer."
----

15 octobre 2013 - Les parvovirus ne font pas de mal à l'homme , mais ils ne peuvent attaquer et tuer les cellules cancéreuses . Depuis 1992 , les scientifiques du Centre de recherche allemand contre le cancer (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum , DKFZ ) ont étudié ces virus dans le but de développer une thérapie antirétrovirale pour traiter les glioblastomes , un type de cancer du de croissance dynamique . Un essai clinique a été menée depuis 2011 à l'hôpital de neurochirurgie Université de Heidelberg pour tester la sécurité du traitement des patients atteints de cancer avec le parvovirus H-1 .

" Nous avons obtenu des résultats impressionnants lors des essais précliniques avec le parvovirus H-1 dans les tumeurs du cerveau », explique le Dr Antonio Marchini , virologue à DKFZ . " Cependant, l'effet oncolytique des virus est plus faible dans d'autres cancers. Par conséquent, nous cherchons des façons d'augmenter le potentiel thérapeutique des virus . "

Ce faisant, les virologues ont également testé l'acide valproïque, un médicament appartenant à un groupe de médicaments appelés inhibiteurs d'HDAC . L'effet de ces inhibiteurs est d'augmenter la transcription de nombreux gènes qui ont été réduits au silence chimiquement . L'acide valproïque est couramment utilisé pour traiter l'épilepsie et s'est également avéré efficace dans le traitement de certains types de cancer.

Les chercheurs ont d'abord utilisé une combinaison des parvovirus et l'acide valproïque pour traiter des cellules tumorales qui ont été obtenues à partir du col utérin et de carcinomes pancréatiques et ont grandies dans la boîte de culture . Dans les deux types de cancer, le médicament a relevé le taux de mort cellulaire induite par le virus, dans certains cas, les cellules cancéreuses ont même été complètement éliminées.

Les résultats encourageants obtenus dans des cellules cultivées ont été confirmés dans les tumeurs du col utérin et du pancréas qui avaient été transplantés à des rats . Après que les animaux ont été traités avec une combinaison de parvovirus et d'acide valproïque, dans certains cas, les tumeurs ont régressé complètement et les animaux sont restés indemnes de récidive sur une période d'un an. En revanche, les animaux traités avec la même dose de virus sans le médicament n'affichent pas de régression, même quand une dose plus élevée de 20 fois de virus a été administré .

Les virologues ont également pu démêler le mécanisme moléculaire par lequel l'acide valproïque aide le parvovirus dans la lutte contre le cancer : le traitement avec le médicament active une protéine virale appelée NS1, qui est toxique . Cela aide les virus à se reproduire plus rapidement et tuer les cellules cancéreuses plus efficacement .

"L'effet synergique de la combinaison des parvovirus et l'acide valproïque nous permettent d'offrir à la fois des virus et des médicaments à faible dose, ce qui empêche de graves effets secondaires », explique Marchini . " Les résultats sont encourageants nous pouvons procéder à d'autres tests de cette thérapie de combinaison. Nous pensons qu'il a le potentiel d'arrêter la croissance des tumeurs dans les cas graves de cancer."

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur En ligne
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15761
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le cancer du pancréas (2)   Lun 14 Oct 2013 - 10:26

University of Cincinnati (UC) researchers have discovered a biomarker, known as phosphatidylserine (PS), for pancreatic cancer that could be effectively targeted, creating a potential therapy for a condition that has a small survival rate.

These findings, published in the online edition of PLOS ONE, also show that the use of a biotherapy consisting of a lysosomal protein, known as saposin C (SapC), and a phospholipid, known as dioleoylphosphatidylserine (DOPS), can be combined into tiny cavities, or nanovesicles, to target and kill pancreatic cancer cells.

Lysosomes are membrane-enclosed organelles that contain enzymes capable of breaking down all types of biological components; phospholipids are a major components of all cell membranes and form lipid bilayers - or cell membranes.

"Only a small number of promising drugs target pancreatic cancer, which is the fourth-leading cause of cancer deaths, with a five-year survival of less than 5 percent," says Xiaoyang Qi, PhD, associate professor of hematology oncology at UC and lead researcher on the study.

"Pancreatic cancer is usually asymptomatic in the early stages, while frequently invading lymph nodes and the liver, and less often the lungs and visceral organs. Current treatments, including surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy, have failed to improve long-term survival."

Qi says his lab and collaborators previously found that the combination of two natural cellular components, called SapC-DOPS, which were assembled and delivered using cancer-selective nanovesicles, caused cell death in other cancer cell types, including brain, lung, skin, prostate, blood and breast cancer, while sparing normal cells and tissues.

"We also investigated the efficacy and systemic biodistribution of SapC-DOPS nanovesicles in animal models and found that it targeted and halted growth of certain cancer cells and showed no toxic effects in non-tumor tissues. In this study, we selectively targeted the cell membrane of pancreatic tumors to see if we could destroy malignant pancreatic cells without harming normal tissues and cells."

Qi says a distinguishing feature of SapC-DOPS is its ability to bind to phosphatidylseriine (PS), a lipid, which is found on the membrane surfaces of pancreatic tumor cells.

"To evaluate the role of external cell PS, we used PS exposure in human tumor and non-tumor cells via culture," he says. "We also introduced these cells into animal models and then injected the SapC-DOPS vesicles to see if changes were observed. "

In some portions of the experiment, the SapC-DOPS nanovesicles were fluorescently labeled with a dye which could be followed using an imaging device.

To track tumor cells, human pancreatic tumor cells were illuminated with dye as well, and the same imaging device was used to identify and monitor them.

"We observed that the nanovesicles selectively killed human pancreatic cancer cells, and the noncancerous, or untransformed cells, remained unaffected," he says. "This toxic effect correlated to the surface exposure level of PS on the tumor cells."

Qi adds that animals treated with SapC-DOPS showed clear survival benefits and their tumors shrank or disappeared.

"Furthermore, using a double-tracking method in live models, we showed that the nanovesicles were specifically targeted to the tumors," he says. "These data suggest that the acidic phospholipid PS is a biomarker for pancreatic cancer that can be effectively targeted for therapy using cancer-selective SapC-DOPS nanovesicles.

"This study provides convincing evidence in support of developing a new therapeutic approach to pancreatic cancer. This technology is now being licensed and will hopefully be available in clinical trials soon."

"Dr. Qi 's discovery has great potential to be developed into diagnostics and therapies for pancreatic cancer," says Shuk-mei Ho, PhD, director of the Cincinnati Cancer Center and Jacob G. Schmidlapp Professor and Chair of Environmental Health. "This type of research helps fulfill the mission of the National Cancer Institute to promote translation of research from the bench to the bedside."

---


Université de Cincinnati (UC ) des chercheurs ont découvert un biomarqueur , connu comme la phosphatidylsérine ( PS) , du cancer du pancréas qui pourraient être efficacement ciblé.

Ces résultats, publiés dans l'édition en ligne de PLoS ONE, montrent également que l'utilisation d'une biothérapie constitué d'une protéine lysosomale , connu sous le nom saposine C ( SAPC ) , et un phospholipide, connu sous le nom dioléoylphosphatidylsérine ( DOPS ) , peuvent être combinées en minuscule cavités ou nanovésicules , pour cibler et tuer les cellules cancéreuses pancréatiques.

Les lysosomes sont des organites membraneux qui contiennent des enzymes capables de dégrader tous les types de composants biologiques ; les phospholipides en sont l'une des principales composantes de toutes les membranes cellulaires et forment des couches lipidiques - ou des membranes cellulaires .

Qi explique son laboratoire et ses collaborateurs ont déjà constaté que la combinaison de deux composants cellulaires naturels , appelés SAPC et DOPS , qui ont été assemblés et livrés en utilisant des nanovésicules sélectifs , a causé la mort de cellules dans d'autres types de cellules cancéreuses , y compris le cerveau , les poumons , la peau , de la prostate , le sang et le cancer du sein , tout en épargnant les cellules et les tissus normaux .

" Nous avons également étudié l'efficacité et la biodistribution systémique de nanovésicules SAPC - DOPS dans des modèles animaux et j'ai trouvé qu'elles ciblent et arrêtent la croissance de certaines cellules cancéreuses et n'ont montré aucun effet toxique dans les tissus non tumoraux. Dans cette étude, nous avons sélectivement ciblé la membrane cellulaire des tumeurs pancréatiques pour voir si nous pourrions détruire les cellules pancréatiques cancéreuses sans endommager les tissus normaux et les cellules. "

Qi dit une caractéristique distinctive de SAPC - DOPS est sa capacité à se lier à phosphatidylseriine ( PS) , un lipide, qui se trouve à la surface des membranes des cellules tumorales du pancréas.

" Pour évaluer le rôle de la cellule avec PS , nous avons utilisé l'exposition PS dans les cellules tumorales et non tumorales humaines par la culture», dit-il. " Nous avons également introduit ces cellules dans des modèles animaux et ensuite injecté les vésicules SAPC - DOPS pour voir si des changements ont été observés. "

Dans certaines parties de l'expérience, les nanovésicules SAPC - DOPS ont été marquées par fluorescence avec un colorant qui peut être suivie à l'aide d'un dispositif d'imagerie .

Pour suivre les cellules tumorales , les cellules tumorales pancréatiques humaines ont été illuminées avec des colorants ainsi , et même dispositif d'imagerie ont été utilisés pour identifier et surveiller.

«Nous avons observé que les nanovésicules tuent sélectivement les cellules cancéreuses pancréatiques humaines , et les cellules non cancéreuses ou non transformée , sont demeurée inchangée , " dit-il. " L'effet toxique en corrélation avec le niveau d'exposition de la surface de la PS sur les cellules tumorales . "

Qi ajoute que les animaux traités avec SAPC - DOPS ont montré les avantages de survie clairs et leurs tumeurs ont diminué ou disparu.

" En outre , en utilisant un procédé de double - tracking dans des modèles vivants , nous avons montré que les nanovésicules ont été spécifiquement ciblées sur les tumeurs », dit -il. " Ces données suggèrent que le phospholipide acide PS est un biomarqueur du cancer du pancréas qui peut être efficacement ciblées pour le traitement du cancer en utilisant sélectifs nanovésicules SAPC - DOPS .

«Cette étude fournit des preuves convaincantes à l'appui de l'élaboration d'une nouvelle approche thérapeutique pour le cancer du pancréas . Cette technologie est actuellement autorisé et devrait être disponible dans les essais cliniques sous peu. "

" Découverte du Dr Qi a un grand potentiel à développer dans le diagnostic et les thérapies pour le cancer du pancréas », dit Shuk -mei Ho, Ph.D., directeur du Centre de cancérologie Cincinnati et Jacob G. Professeur Schmidlapp et président de l'hygiène du milieu . «Ce type de recherche permet de remplir la mission de l'Institut national du cancer pour promouvoir la traduction de la recherche du laboratoire au chevet du patient. "

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur En ligne
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15761
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le cancer du pancréas (2)   Mer 18 Sep 2013 - 18:31

Jakafi (ruxolitinib) improves advanced pancreas cancer outcomes in mid-stage trial

Jakafi améliore les résultats du cancer du pancréas avancé dans un essai ciinique de stage II.

AUGUST 21, 2013

(Reuters) - Incyte Corp has reported an improved survival rate in a mid-stage trial in patients with refractory metastatic pancreas cancer who took its oral JAK1 and JAK2 inhibitor, called Jakafi (ruxolitinib).

Incyte corporation a rapporté un taux de survie amélioré dans un essai de stage II chez les patients avec des cancers du pancréas qui prennent des inhibiteurs de JAK1 et JAK2 appelé Jakafi (ruxolitinib.

In a randomized trial of capecitabine with or without Jakafi, the hazard ratio (HR) for overall survival (OS) in the intent to treat population was 0.79 (one-sided p=0.12), and in a pre-specified subgroup analysis conducted in patients identified prospectively as most likely to benefit from JAK pathway inhibition, the HR for OS was 0.47 (one-sided p=0.005), the company said in a statement.

"Within this subgroup of patients," the statement continued, "which represented 50% of the randomized population, six-month survival in the ruxolitinib arm was 42% vs. 11% for placebo."

Also, Incyte said, "Durable tumor responses were only observed in patients receiving ruxolitinib, and ruxolitinib treated patients achieved a significant improvement in body weight relative to placebo."

The combination of Jakafi and capecitabine was generally well tolerated in the study.

Among the patients receiving the combination therapy, 12% discontinued treatment for an adverse event, compared with a 20% rate among patients who received capecitabine alone.

"Results of the RECAP trial provide the first evidence that JAK inhibition is active in this disease and suggest a demonstrable survival benefit in a well-defined group of patients with refractory metastatic pancreatic cancer who can be identified without the development of a companion diagnostic test," stated Paul A. Friedman, M.D., Incyte's President and Chief Executive Officer.

Les résultats démontrent que l'inhibition de JAK fait effet dans cette maladie et suggère un bénifice démontrable dans un groupe bien défini avec le cancer du pancréas qui peut être identifié avec un test compagnon.

Jakafi is already approved in the United States to treat intermediate or high-risk myelofibrosis.

Swiss drugmaker Novartis AG markets the drug outside the U.S. as Jakavi.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur En ligne
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15761
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le cancer du pancréas (2)   Mar 17 Sep 2013 - 12:19

Sep. 16, 2013 — Australian researchers have identified a potentially treatable subtype of pancreatic cancer, which accounts for about 2% of new cases. This subtype expresses high levels of the HER2 gene. HER2-amplified breast and gastric cancers are currently treated with Herceptin.

Les chercheurs australiens ont identifié un sous-type du cancer du pancréas potentiellement traitable, ce sous-type compte pour 2% des nouveaux cas de cancer du et exprime de hauts niveaux du gène HER2 amplifié, les cancers de ce type du ou du sont couramment traités avec Herceptin.

Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cause of cancer death in Western societies, with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. It is a molecularly diverse disease, meaning that each tumour will respond only to specific treatments that target its unique molecular make-up.

A new study, published in Genome Medicine, used a combination of modern genetics and traditional pat
hology to estimate the prevalence of HER2-amplified pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic surgeon Professor Andrew Biankin, from Sydney's Garvan Institute of Medical Research and the Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre at the University of Glasgow, worked with pathologist Dr Angela Chou and bioinformatician Dr Mark Cowley from Garvan, as well as cancer genomics specialist Dr Nicola Waddell from the Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics at the University of Queensland.

Using data sourced from the Australian Pancreatic Cancer Genome Initiative1 (APGI), the team identified a patient with high-level HER2 amplification. Using whole genome DNA sequencing of the tumour, Dr Nicola Waddell pinpointed the specific region of the genome that contains HER2.

Le docteur Nicolas Waddell a identifié précisément la régio spécifique du génome qui contient HER2.

Dr Angela Chou then performed detailed histopathological characterisation of HER2 protein in tissue samples taken in the past from 469 pancreatic cancer patients. This produced a set of standardised laboratory testing guidelines for testing HER2 in pancreatic cancer, and showed the frequency of HER2 amplified pancreatic cancer of 2.1%.

Dr Chou also found that -- like HER2-amplified breast cancer patients -- the cancers of those with HER2-amplification in the pancreas tended to spread to the brain and lung, rather than the norm, which is the liver.

Les cancers du pancréas qui ont ce gène HER2 amplifié tendent à métastaser au cerveau et au poumon plutôt qu'au foie.

Dr Mark Cowley analysed all the data generated by the project and compared it to other sequences from many cancer types produced by the International Cancer Genome Consortium and The Cancer Genome Atlas project. "HER2 amplification was prevalent at just over 2% frequency in 11 different cancers," he observed.

"We make the case that if HER2 is such a strong molecular feature of several cancers, then perhaps recruiting patients to clinical trials on the basis of the molecular features rather than the anatomical region of their cancer could have a significant impact on patient outcomes, and still make economic sense for pharmaceutical companies."

"Such 'Basket trials' as they are sometimes called, may advance treatment options for those with less common cancer types."

In Australia, 2,000 people are diagnosed with pancreatic cancer each year, and so 40 are likely to have the HER2 amplified form.

While Herceptin is available through the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme for treating breast and gastric cancer, it is not available for treating HER2-amplified pancreatic cancer as no clinical trial has yet been conducted to determine the drug's efficacy in that case.

Herceptin était disponible pour traiter les cancers du sein et gastrique mais ne l'était pas pour traiter cette forme de cancer du pancréas et aucun essai clinique n'Avait été fait pour tester l'efficacité du médicament sur ce cas.

The Garvan Institute in collaboration with the Australasian Gastro-Intestinal Trials Group, is recruiting pancreatic cancer patients through the APGI for a pilot clinical trial, known as 'IMPaCT'2, to test personalised medicine strategies.

Potential patients will be screened for specific genetic characteristics, including high levels of HER2, based on their biological material sequenced as part of the APGI study. Once these characteristics are confirmed, patients will be randomised to receive standard therapy or a personalised therapy based on their unique genetic make-up.

Des patients potentiels seront sélectionnés sur des caractéristiques génétiques spécifiques pour participer à une étude.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur En ligne
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15761
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le cancer du pancréas (2)   Mar 17 Sep 2013 - 8:28

Sep. 16, 2013 — A "vicious cycle" produces mucus that protects uterine and pancreatic cancer cells and promotes their proliferation, according to researchers at Rice University. The researchers offer hope for a therapeutic solution.


They found that protein receptors on the surface of cancer cells go into overdrive to stimulate the production of MUC1, a glycoprotein that forms mucin, aka mucus. It covers the exposed tips of the elongated epithelial cells that coat internal organs like lungs, stomachs and intestines to protect them from infection.

But when associated with cancer cells, these slippery agents do their jobs too well. They cover the cells completely, help them metastasize and protect them from attack by chemotherapy and the immune system.

Details of the new work led by biochemist Daniel Carson, dean of Rice's Wiess School of Natural Sciences, appear in the Journal of Cellular Biochemistry.

In the paper, Carson, lead author Neeraja Dharmaraj, a postdoctoral researcher, and graduate student Brian Engel described MUC1 overexpression as particularly insidious not only for the way it protects tumor cells and promotes metastasis, but also because the cells create a feedback loop in which epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) and MUC1 interact to promote each other.

Carson described EGFR as a powerful transmembrane protein that stimulates normal cell growth, proliferation and differentiation. "What hadn't been considered is whether this activated receptor might actually promote the expression of MUC1, which would then further elevate the levels of EGFR and create this vicious cycle.

"That's the question we asked, and the answer is 'yes,'" he said.

Carson compared mucus to Teflon. "Things don't stick to it easily, which is normally what you want. It's a primary barrier that keeps nasty stuff like pathogenic bacteria and viruses from getting into your cells," he said.

But cancer cells "subvert systems and find ways to get out of control," he said. "They auto-activate EGFR by making their own growth factor ligands, for example, or mutating the receptor so it doesn't require the ligand anymore. It's always on."

Mucin proteins can then cover entire surface of a cell. "That lets (the cell) detach and move away from the site of a primary tumor," while still preventing contact with immune system cells and cytotoxins that could otherwise kill cancer cells, Carson said.

Hope comes in the form of a controversial drug, rosiglitazone, in the thiazolidinedione class of medications used in diabetes treatment, he said. The drug is suspected of causing heart problems over long-term use by diabetes patients. But tests on cancer cell lines at Rice found that it effectively attenuates the activation of EGFR and reduces MUC1 expression. That could provide a way to weaken the mucus shield.

"Chronic use of rosiglitazone can produce heart problems in a subset of patients, but if you're dying of pancreatic cancer, you're not worried about the long term," Carson said. "If you can reduce mucin levels in just a few days by using these drugs, they might make cancer cells easier to kill by established methods."

He said more work is required to see if rosiglitazone or some variant is suitable for trials. "We think it's best to understand all the effects," he said. "That might give us a rational way to modify these compounds, to avoid unwanted side effects and focus on what we want them to do."



16 septembre 2013 - Un «cercle vicieux» produit le mucus qui protège l'utérus et des cellules du cancer du pancréas et favorise leur prolifération , selon des chercheurs de l'Université Rice. Les chercheurs offrent l'espoir d'une solution thérapeutique .

Ils ont découvert que les récepteurs de protéines à la surface des cellules cancéreuses deviennent hyperactives pour stimuler la production de MUC1 , une glycoprotéine qui forme la mucine. Elle couvre les bouts exposés des cellules épithéliales allongées qui couvre les organes internes comme les poumons, l'estomac et les intestins pour les protéger de l'infection.

Mais lorsque associés à des cellules cancéreuses , ces agents glissants font leur travail également. Ils couvrent les cellules complètement, les aider à se métastaser et les protégent contre les attaques de la chimiothérapie et du système immunitaire.

Les détails du nouveau travail dirigé par le biochimiste Daniel Carson , doyen de l'École Wiess de Rice des sciences naturelles , apparaissent dans le Journal of Cellular Biochemistry .

Dans le document, Carson, l'auteur principal, décrit la surexpression de MUC1 comme particulièrement insidieuse , non seulement pour la façon dont il protège les cellules tumorales et favorise les métastases, mais aussi parce que les cellules créent une boucle de rétroaction dans laquelle les récepteurs de facteur de croissance épidermique (EGFR ) et MUC1 interagissent pour se promouvoir l'un l'autre .

Carson décrit EGFR comme une protéine transmembranaire puissante qui stimule la croissance normale des cellules, la prolifération et la différenciation. " Ce qui n'avait pas été considéré est de savoir si ce récepteur activé pourrait effectivement favoriser l'expression de MUC1 , qui serait élevé alors encore le niveau de l'EGFR et créer ce cercle vicieux.

» C'est la question que nous avons demandé , et la réponse est ' oui '", at-il dit .

Carson compare le mucus au Teflon . «Les choses ne collent pas facilement, ce qui est normalement ce que vous voulez . C'est une première barrière qui empêche les choses désagréables comme les bactéries et virus pathogènes de pénétrer dans vos cellules", at-il dit .

Mais les cellules cancéreuses subvertissent le système et trouvent des moyens d' échapper à tout contrôle ", a-t-il dit . «Ils auto- activent EGFR en faisant leurs propres ligands au facteur de croissance.

Les Protéines mucines peuvent alors couvrir toute la surface d'une cellule. " Cela permet à la cellule de se détacher et de s'éloigner de l'emplacement d'une tumeur primaire », tout en évitant le contact avec les cellules et les cytotoxines qui auraient pu tuer les cellules cancéreuses par le système immunitaire, a dit M. Carson .

L'espoir vient sous la forme d'un médicament controversé , la rosiglitazone , de la classe des thiazolidinediones, des médicaments utilisés dans le traitement du diabète , at-il dit . Le médicament est soupçonné de causer des problèmes cardiaques sur l'utilisation à long terme par les patients diabétiques. Mais par des tests sur des lignées cellulaires de cancer, des chercheurs ont constaté qu'il atténue efficacement l'activation de l'EGFR et réduit expression de MUC1 . Cela pourrait fournir un moyen d'affaiblir le bouclier de mucus.

" L'utilisation chronique de rosiglitazone peut produire des problèmes cardiaques dans un sous-ensemble de patients , mais si vous êtes mourir d'un cancer du pancréas, vous n'êtes pas inquiet sur le long terme", a dit Carson. «Si vous pouvez réduire les niveaux de mucine pour quelques jours par l'utilisation de ces médicaments , ils pourraient faciliter de tuer les cellules cancéreuses par des méthodes établies. "

Plus de travail est nécessaire pour voir si la rosiglitazone ou une variante est appropriée pour les essais . " Nous pensons qu'il est préférable de comprendre tous les effets ", at-il dit . " Cela pourrait nous donner un moyen rationnel de modifier ces molécules, afin d'éviter des effets secondaires indésirables et de se concentrer sur ce que nous voulons qu'ils fassent. "

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur En ligne
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15761
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le cancer du pancréas (2)   Mar 27 Aoû 2013 - 14:14

Des chirurgiens belges ont comparé deux techniques pour opérer certains cancers du pancréas et ont démontré que l’une donnait moins de complications que l’autre.

Sources : The Lancet Oncology, Volume 14, Issue 7, Pages 655 - 662, June 2013; Belga, 31-07-13
Commentaire de la Fondation contre le Cancer
Relier à l’estomac plutôt qu’à l’intestin grêle

La technique opératoire classiquement utilisée dans le traitement du cancer de la tête du pancréas (appelée opération de Whipple) consiste à enlever la tête du pancréas, le duodénum, les voies biliaires ainsi que la vésicule biliaire, et parfois aussi une partie de l’estomac. La partie restante du pancréas, du foie, et de l’estomac est ensuite reliée à l’intestin grêle. Cette opération très lourde peut s’accompagner de complications gravissimes (fistules pancréatiques) qui sont une cause majeure de décès dans les suites opératoires. Une approche chirurgicale alternative a été développée il y a une dizaine d’années dans l’espoir de diminuer le taux de complications postopératoires. Elle consiste à relier directement la partie résiduelle du pancréas à l’estomac, et non plus à l’intestin grêle. Cette technique offre de meilleures perspectives de survie et de qualité de vie, mais cela n’avait jamais été prouvé, chiffres à l’appui. Le mérite de la présente étude est d’avoir pour la première fois comparé les deux techniques.
Un risque de complications deux fois moins élevé

Les équipes chirurgicales de quatre centres universitaires (UZ Leuven, Cliniques universitaires Saint-Luc de Bruxelles, UZ Antwerpen, Hôpital Erasme de Bruxelles) et quatre centres non-universitaires belges (Cliniques Saint-Joseph de Liège, AZ Sint-Jan de Brugge, Hôpital de Jolimont à La Louvière, ZNA Jan Palfijn à Merksem) ont activement contribué à cette étude. Entre 2009 et 2012, chaque fois qu’un patient devait subir une ablation de la tête du pancréas pour un cancer, il lui a été proposé de participer à l’étude comparative, en étant opéré selon l’une ou l’autre des techniques. Etant donné que ni l’une ni l’autre des opérations n’était considérée comme meilleure que l’autre, cette façon de faire était la seule susceptible d’apporter la preuve de la suprématie de l’une sur l’autre, en toute honnêteté et dans le respect de l’éthique.

Ils ont ainsi pu démontrer, après avoir opéré 162 patients selon la technique classique et 167 selon la nouvelle technique, que cette dernière permettait de diminuer nettement le nombre de complications (20% contre 8%).
La recherche en chirurgie aussi

On a souvent tendance à oublier que la recherche en cancérologie concerne également la chirurgie. Et pourtant, dans les salles d’opération aussi, on tente jour après jour d’améliorer l’efficacité des traitements du cancer et la qualité de vie après les opérations.
La chirurgie oncologique est un domaine très pointu qui exige des chirurgiens qui la pratiquent une extrême rigueur et une longue expérience. Mais pour que la qualité des soins soit au rendez vous, il faut aussi une mise au point préopératoire minutieuse et un suivi postopératoire attentif. C’est donc l’implication de toute une équipe multidisciplinaire qui est nécessaire pour remplir les critères d’un traitement de qualité. C’est pour cette raison que des interventions comme celles dont il est question ici ne sont pratiquées que dans des centres hospitaliers qui ont développé une expertise spécifique.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur En ligne
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15761
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le cancer du pancréas (2)   Lun 26 Aoû 2013 - 13:06

New research led by scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) and Baylor College of Medicine could aid efforts to diagnose and treat one of the most lethal and hard-to-treat types of cancer.

In the EMBO Molecular Medicine journal, the investigators report that they have identified a new molecular mechanism that contributes to the spread of malignant tumors in the pancreas. The hope is that drugs could one day be developed to block this pathway.

Most people with pancreatic cancer die within one to two years of diagnosis and it is expected to claim 38,460 lives in the United States in 2013. There are currently no effective tests for early detection and no effective therapies for the fast-spreading form.

The study focused on the previously established link between zinc and pancreatic cancer and sought to identify a molecular mechanism responsible for the elevated levels found in human and animal cells. Zinc is an essential trace element and small amounts are important for human health.

"We were the first to show that zinc transporter ZIP4 was a marker for pancreatic cancer," said Min Li, Ph.D., the study's senior author and associate professor and director of the Cancer Research Program in the Vivian L. Smith Department of Neurosurgery at the UTHealth Medical School. "We knew there was a link but we didn't know what it was."

Li is on the faculty of The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, which is a joint venture of UTHealth and The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Zinc levels are regulated by ZIP4, which acts as a master switch, and the researchers designed experiments to determine what happens when the switch is flipped on, Li said.

In an animal model of pancreatic cancer, the scientists observed how the initiation of ZIP4 triggered the activation of two downstream genes, which in turn accounts for the increased tumor growth. Scientists describe this as a signaling cascade.

"Pancreatic cancer is among the worst of all cancers. It is imperative to define the mechanism of this deadly disease. We have recently demonstrated a novel biological role for the zinc transporter ZIP4 in pancreatic cancer; however, the molecular pathway controlling this phenomenon remains elusive. This study provides a comprehensive mechanism for ZIP4-mediated pancreatic cancer growth involving the activation of a transcription factor CREB and an oncogenic miR-373, and reduction in key tumor suppressor genes," said Yuqing Zhang, Ph.D., co-first author of the study.

Jingxuan Yang, Ph.D., co-first author and research scientist at the UTHealth Medical School, said, "Our findings in this study define a novel signaling axis promoting pancreatic cancer growth, providing potential mechanistic insights on how a zinc transporter functions in cancer cells and may have broader implications as abnormal zinc concentration in the cells plays an important role in many other diseases."

"The results we reported in this study may help the design of future therapeutic strategies targeting the zinc transporter and microRNA pathways to treat pancreatic cancer," said Xiaobo Cui, M.D., Ph.D., study co-first author and postdoctoral research fellow at the UTHealth Medical School.

---


Une nouvelle recherche menée par des scientifiques de l'Université du Texas Health Science Center à Houston (UTHealth) et au Baylor College of Medicine pourraient contribuer aux efforts pour diagnostiquer et traiter l'un des types de cancer les plus difficiles à traiter.

Dans l'EMBO Molecular Medicine Journal, les chercheurs rapportent qu'ils ont identifié un nouveau mécanisme moléculaire qui contribue à la propagation des tumeurs malignes du pancréas. L'espoir est que les médicaments pourraient un jour être développés pour bloquer cette voie.

L'étude a porté sur le lien déjà établi entre le zinc et le cancer du pancréas et a cherché à identifier un mécanisme moléculaire responsable des niveaux élevés trouvés dans les cellules humaines et animales. Le zinc est un oligo-élément essentiel et de petites quantités sont importantes pour la santé humaine.

"Nous avons été les premiers à montrer que ZIP4 transporteur de zinc était un marqueur du cancer du pancréas", a déclaré Min Li, Ph.D., auteur principal de l'étude et professeur agrégé et directeur du programme de recherche sur le cancer dans le Vivian L. Smith Département de neurochirurgie à l'école de médecine de UT Health. «Nous savions qu'il y avait un lien, mais nous ne savions pas ce que c'était."

Li est membre du corps professoral de l'Université du Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences à Houston, qui est une coentreprise de UTHealth et l'Université du Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Les niveaux de zinc sont régies par ZIP4, qui agit comme un interrupteur principal, et les chercheurs ont conçu des expériences pour déterminer ce qui se passe lorsque l'interrupteur est gardé à "On", Li a dit.

Dans un modèle animal de cancer du pancréas, les scientifiques ont observé comment l'ouverture de ZIP4 déclenche l'activation de deux gènes en aval, qui à leur tour augmentent la croissance de la tumeur. Les scientifiques décrivent cela comme une cascade de signalisation.

"Il est impératif de définir le mécanisme de cette maladie mortelle Nous avons récemment démontré un rôle biologique nouveau pour la transporteur de zinc zip4 dans le cancer du pancréas.

Toutefois, la voie moléculaire qui contrôle ce phénomène reste difficile à trouver. Cette étude fournit un mécanisme global pour la croissance du cancer du pancréas par la médiation de ZIP4 impliquant l'activation d'un facteur de transcription CREB, un oncogène miR-373 et la réduction des gènes suppresseurs de tumeur clés ", a déclaré Zhang Yuqing, Ph.D., co-premier auteur de l'étude.

Jingxuan Yang, Ph.D., co-premier auteur et chercheur à l'École de médecine UT Health, a déclaré: «Nos résultats dans cette étude définissent une nouvelle signalisation comme axe de promotion de la croissance du cancer du pancréas, offrant un potentiel mécanisme de la façon dont un transporteur de zinc fontionne dans les cellules cancéreuses et peuvent avoir des implications plus larges que la concentration en zinc anormale dans les cellules et jouer un rôle important dans de nombreuses autres maladies ".

«Les résultats que nous avons présentés dans cette étude peuvent aider à la conception de futures stratégies thérapeutiques ciblant le transporteur de zinc et de voies de microARN pour traiter le cancer du pancréas", a déclaré Cui Xiaobo, MD, Ph.D., co-premier auteur de l'étude et chercheur post-doctoral à l'École de médecine UTHealth.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur En ligne
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15761
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le cancer du pancréas (2)   Dim 25 Aoû 2013 - 17:16

Pancreatic cancer is one of the most deadly and intractable forms of cancer, with a 5-year survival rate of only 6%. Novel therapies are urgently needed, as conventional and targeted approaches have not been successful and drug resistance is an increasing problem.

Previously it had been thought that poor penetration of the drugs into pancreas tumors was the main reason for treatment failure. But now a team of scientists led by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) Professor David Tuveson M.D., Ph.D., shows there are other factors at work, too.

In a paper published online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Dr. Tuveson's group shows that there are survival cues inside the pancreatic tumor mass. Molecules in the milieu around the cancer cells, such as Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF), provide "pro-life" signals that overcome the killing power of chemotherapeutic drugs.

"In addition to drug delivery being a problem, there is also this nurturing aspect that prevents cancer cells responding to the drugs," says Tuveson.

But he and his colleagues may have found a way to prevent this. The antibody FG-3019, a molecule that is now in phase 1/2 clinical investigation as a treatment option for pancreatic cancer, binds to CTGF and prevents it from providing cells with survival cues. Those cues seem to be mediated, at least in part, through a molecule within the cell called XIAP (X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis). XIAP derives its name from its function - an ability to help keep the cell alive by preventing a process called apoptosis, a form of cellular suicide.

The Tuveson lab used a novel mouse model for pancreatic cancer to test FG-3019. Tumors in mice treated with FG-3019 in combination with the chemotherapeutic drug gemcitabine stopped growing. Inside the tumor there was an increase in the amount of cancer cells dying through apoptosis, which was associated with a decrease in levels of XIAP. Importantly, mice treated with both FG-3019 and gemcitabine also had an increased lifespan.

This suggests that overcoming resistance to medicines in cancer may be possible using combination therapy - co-administering molecules that help open up the tumor to drugs as well as other molecules that prevent cancer cell survival signals alongside the chemotherapeutics. Both CTGF and XIAP have been shown to be present in human pancreatic cancer tumors so combination therapy using antagonists of either molecule could be a feasible approach, says Tuveson.

There are other compounds that sensitize cancer cells to die, for example, antagonists of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, cellular proteins that prevent apoptosis. "These are pro-apoptosis medicines, so it's not impossible to imagine that one could target these types of pathways in cancer cells with drugs. We haven't done those studies yet but that would be the logical progression," says Tuveson, who is the Director of the Lustgarten Foundation Pancreatic Research Laboratory at CSHL and Director of Research for the Lustgarten Foundation.


Auparavant, on avait pensé que la faible pénétration des médicaments dans les tumeurs du pancréas était la principale raison de l'échec du traitement. Mais maintenant, une équipe de scientifiques dirigée par le Professeur David Tuveson MD, Ph.D., montre qu'il ya d'autres facteurs à l'œuvre, aussi.

Dans un article publié en ligne dans les Proceedings de la National Academy of Sciences, le groupe du Dr Tuveson montre qu'il existe des indices de survie à l'intérieur de la masse de la tumeur du pancréas. Les molécules dans le milieu autour des cellules cancéreuses, comme le facteur de croissance du tissu conjonctif (CTGF), fournissent des signaux «pro-vie» qui surmontent le pouvoir de tuer des médicaments chimiothérapeutiques.

«En plus de la livraison du médicament qui est un problème, il y a aussi cet aspect qui empêche les cellules cancéreuses de répondre aux médicaments», dit Tuveson.

Mais lui et ses collègues ont peut-être trouvé un moyen d'empêcher cela. L'anticorps FG-3019, une molécule qui est maintenant en phase 1/2 de recherche clinique comme option de traitement pour le cancer du pancréas, il se lie à CTGF et l'empêche de fournir des cellules avec des indices de survie. Ces indices semblent être médiés, au moins en partie, par l'intermédiaire d'une molécule à l'intérieur de la cellule appelée XIAP (inhibiteur lié à l'empêchement de l'apoptose). XIAP tire son nom de sa fonction - une capacité à aider à maintenir la cellule en vie en empêchant un processus appelé apoptose, une forme de suicide cellulaire.

Le laboratoire Tuveson utilisé un nouveau modèle de souris pour le cancer du pancréas pour tester FG-3019. Les tumeurs chez les souris traitées avec FG-3019 en combinaison avec la gemcitabine médicament chimiothérapeutique ont cessé de croître. A l'intérieur de la tumeur il y a eu une augmentation de la quantité de cellules cancéreuses qui meurent par apoptose, qui a été associée à une diminution des niveaux de protéine XIAP. Surtout, les souris traitées avec du FG-3019 et de la gemcitabine ont également eu une augmentation de la durée de vie.

Ceci suggère que surmonter la résistance aux médicaments dans le cancer peut être possible en utilisant la thérapie de combinaison - des molécules de co-administration qui aident à ouvrir la tumeur aux médicaments ainsi que d'autres molécules qui empêchent les signaux de survie de cellules cancéreuses aux côtés de la chimiothérapie. Les deux CTGF et XIAP sont présentes dans les tumeurs cancéreuses pancréatiques humaines. La thérapie de combinaison utilisant des antagonistes des deux molécule pourrait être une approche réaliste, explique Tuveson.

Il y a d'autres composés qui sensibilisent les cellules cancéreuses de mourir, par exemple, les antagonistes de Bcl-2 et Bcl-XL, des protéines cellulaires qui empêchent l'apoptose. «Il y a des médicaments pro-apoptose, de sorte qu'il n'est pas impossible d'imaginer que l'on pourrait cibler ces types de voies dans les cellules cancéreuses par des médicaments. Nous n'avons pas encore fait ces études mais ce serait la progression logique», explique Tuveson, qui est le directeur de la Fondation Laboratoire de recherche du pancréas Lustgarten à CSHL et directeur de recherche à la Fondation Lustgarten.



_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur En ligne
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15761
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le cancer du pancréas (2)   Sam 24 Aoû 2013 - 19:24

Juillet 2013

Une forme récemment découvert de la protéine qui déclenche la coagulation du sang joue un rôle essentiel dans la promotion de la croissance du cancer du pancréas métastatique et le cancer primitif du sein, selon les résultats cumulatifs de deux nouveaux écrits scientifiques publiés en ligne avant impression dans l'International Journal of Cancer et PNAS (Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences).

La protéine, appelée «facteur tissulaire» est présente dans divers tissus - par exemple, des parois des vaisseaux sanguins. Des études antérieures ont suggéré que le facteur tissulaire épissage alternatif (ASTF) peut contribuer à la croissance du cancer, mais les événements moléculaires conduisant à cette croissance étaient jusque-là inconnue.

De nouvelles recherches menées par le biais d'une collaboration internationale entre les laboratoires de Vladimir Bogdanov, PhD, de l'Université de Cincinnati Cancer Institute, et Henri Versteeg, Ph.D., du Laboratoire de médecine vasculaire Einthoven expérimentale à l'University Medical Center Leiden à Leiden, aux Pays-Bas, articule comment ASTF alimente la croissance et la métastase des tumeurs solides.

En utilisant des modèles animaux précliniques, les équipes de Bogdanov et Versteeg a obtenu la première preuve scientifiquement validée que ASTF favorise la propagation du cancer du pancréas et favorise la croissance des tumeurs primaires du cancer du sein.

«Nous avons démontré que le ciblage ASTF avec un nouvel anticorps monoclonal - développé sur la base de nos 10 années d'études ASTF - arrête également la croissance du cancer du sein dans un modèle animal, nous donnant une nouvelle cible prometteuse pour lutter contre certaines formes de cancer du sein», dit Bogdanov, qui a initialement décrit comment TF en 2003. UC a déposé un brevet pour cette technologie en Janvier 2013.

Bogdanov et Versteeg ont présenté leurs conclusions au XXIV Congrès de la Société internationale de thrombose et d'hémostase à Amsterdam, aux Pays-Bas (tenue le 29-Juillet Juin 4 2013).

"Beaucoup de molécules sur la surface des cellules - y compris les intégrines - sont importantes pour le fonctionnement des cellules normales et cancéreuses, donc cibler les intégrines pour arrêter la croissance du cancer n'est pas une stratégie prometteuse Ce qui est unique avec ASTF est qu'elle se lie aux intégrines. . sur les cellules en formation de vaisseaux sanguins, en les activant Nous avons montré que certaines cellules cancéreuses partagent ces mêmes qualités, donc si vous ciblez ASTF - qui est élevée dans le cancer - il existe un potentiel important d'épargner les «bons» éléments du système cellulaire tout enlever de la partie la «mauvaise» protéine spécifique au cancer », explique Bogdanov.

"De nombreux traitements de routine comme la chimiothérapie ou la radiothérapie ne sont pas toujours efficaces. le ciblage d'ASTF dans les tumeurs à l'aide de notre anticorps monoclonal peut constituer une stratégie supplémentaire anticancéreuse puissante en combinaison avec des avenues conventionnelles», explique Versteeg.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur En ligne
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15761
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le cancer du pancréas (2)   Sam 24 Aoû 2013 - 16:58

Mai 2013

Dans le cancer du , une percée dans la compréhension du fonctionnement des cellules cancéreuses.

Dans une étude sur le cancer publiée en ligne dans Nature, les chercheurs de NYU School of Medicine ont élucidé un mystère de longue date sur la façon dont les cellules tumorales du pancréas se nourrissent, ouvrant de nouvelles possibilités thérapeutiques pour une maladie mortelle avec notoirement peu d'options de traitement. Le cancer du pancréas tue près de 38.000 Américains chaque année, ce qui en fait une des principales causes de décès par cancer.

Maintenant la nouvelle recherche révèle une faille possible dans l'armure de cette maladie récalcitrante. De nombreux cancers, notamment du pancréas, du poumon et le cancer du côlon, disposent d'une protéine mutée connu sous le nom de Ras qui joue un rôle central dans une chaîne moléculaire complexe d'événements qui stimule la croissance des cellules cancéreuses et la prolifération. Il est bien connu que les cellules cancéreuses RAS ont des besoins nutritionnels spéciaux pour croître et survivre. Mais comment les cellules Ras s'y prennent pour répondre réellement à leurs besoins nutritionnels extraordinaire a été mal compris jusqu'à maintenant.

Dans l'étude, dirigée par Cosimo Commisso, un stagiaire postdoctoral au département de pharmacologie moléculaire et de biochimie à NYU School of Medicine, montrent pour la première fois comment les cellules cancéreuses Ras exploitent un processus appelé macropinocytose pour engloutir l'albumine, les cellules puis récolte pour les acides aminés essentiels pour la croissance.

"Un grand mystère était de savoir comment certaines tumeurs répondent à leurs besoins en nutriments excessifs», dit M. Commisso, dont les travaux sont financés en partie par le Réseau d'action contre le cancer du pancréas. "Nous pensons qu'ils font cela en macropinocytose."

Les résultats suggèrent que les cellules cancéreuses Ras sont particulièrement dépendants de la macropinocytose pour la croissance et la survie. Lorsque les chercheurs ont utilisé un produit chimique pour bloquer l'absorption d'albumine via macropinocytose chez des souris présentant des tumeurs du pancréas, les tumeurs ont cessé de croître et, dans certains cas, même diminué. En outre, les cellules cancéreuses pancréatiques chez des souris montrent plus de macropinosomes - des vésicules qui transportent les éléments nutritifs en profondeur dans une cellule - que les cellules normales de souris.

La découverte d'un mécanisme unique de certaines cellules cancéreuses ouvre la voie à des médicaments qui pourraient bloquer le processus d'avalement sans causer de dommages collatéraux aux cellules saines et suggère de nouvelles façons de transporter ;a chimiothérapeutique dans le coeur des cellules cancéreuses.

«Ce travail propose une manière complètement différente de cibler le métabolisme du cancer», dit le chercheur principal de l'étude Dafna Bar-Sagi, PhD, vice-président et vice-doyen des sciences, directeur scientifique et professeur au Département de biochimie et de pharmacologie moléculaire , NYU Langone Medical Center, qui a le premier identifié la macropinocytose dans les cellules cancéreuses transformées de Ras. "C'est excitant de penser que nous pouvons provoquer la disparition de certaines cellules cancéreuses tout simplement en bloquant le processus de livraison des éléments nutritifs."

Crucial pour les résultats de l'équipe est l'œuvre de Matthew G. Vander Heiden, professeur adjoint de biologie à l'Institut David H. Koch pour la recherche intégrative sur le cancer au MIT et Christian Metallo, professeur adjoint de bio-ingénierie à l'Université de Californie à San Diego, qui montre comment les cellules Ras tire de l'énergie à partir des acides aminés constitutifs libérés après immersion dans les protéines.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur En ligne
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15761
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Le cancer du pancréas (2)   Lun 21 Jan 2008 - 11:38

(Jan. 21, 2008) — The discovery that a molecule drives local tumor growth, as well as its ability to flourish and spread, opens a new window for understanding and treating cancer by taking aim at both cancer cells and their surrounding environment.

La découverte qu'une molécule qui conduit une tumeur locale pour grossir aussi bien que pour progresser et se répandre ouvre une nouvelle fenêtre pour comprendre et traiter le cancer en prenant pour but à la fois les cellules canécreuses et son environnement.

A Dartmouth Medical School team led by Dr. Murray Korc found that a member of a common molecular family plays a role in the progress of a particularly resilient and aggressive pancreatic cancer, and that its influence is not restricted to that cancer.

Les scientifiques ont trouvé qu'une molécule, membre d'une famille de molécule,  joue un rôle dans du progrès d'un cancer du pancréas particulièrement résilient et agressif et son ifluence ne se résume pas à ce cancer.

The work builds on studies by Korc, professor and chair of medicine at DMS, and colleagues at University of California, Irvine on glypican molecules, which interact with many growth factors implicated in cancer. A receptor called glypican-1 (GPC1) is abnormally abundant in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, the most common and deadliest form of pancreatic cancer, often diagnosed after it has spread or metastasized.

Un récepteur appelé glypican-1 (GPC1) est anormalement abondant dans le cancer ductal pancréatique, le plus commun et mortel des cancers pancréatiques.

Human pancreatic cells deprived of their own GPC1 had reduced growth in culture, as well as when they were transplanted into immunocompromised mice (known as athymic for the lack of a thymus gland) that don't reject human cancer cells, the researchers demonstrated.

Les cellules privées de leur GPC1 en culture de laboratoire aussi bien que transplantées chez des souris ont réduit leur croissance

"Tumors grow more slowly and are smaller. Interestingly, they also have less angiogenesis (blood vessel growth) and less metastasis," said Korc, also a professor pharmacology and toxicology and member of the Norris Cotton Cancer Center.

Les tumeurs croissent plus lentement et sont plus petites, elles ont moins de vaisseaux sanguins pour les alimenter et moins de métatstases.

Since GPC1 is common in many tissues, the researchers wanted to determine its role in the host environment, or how it functions in a patient. Knocking out the gene for GPC1 in mice, they created an athymic mouse population that lacked GPC1; then they introduced cancer cells.

Parce que le GPC1 est commun à plusieurs tissus, les chercheurs veulent déterminer son rôle dans l'environnement d'acceuil de la ttumeur ou comment le tout fonctionne chez un patient. Ils ont créer une souris qui manque de GPC1 et leurs introduisent des cellules canécreuses.

Host mice devoid of GPC1 had smaller pancreatic tumors that were less angiogenic and less metastatic when exposed to tumor cell lines with normal levels of GPC1. The metastatic potential of mouse melanoma (skin cancer) cells injected into mice with no GPC1 was also greatly decreased, the researchers found.


Dernière édition par Denis le Mer 30 Sep 2015 - 18:36, édité 3 fois
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur En ligne
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: Le cancer du pancréas (2)   Aujourd'hui à 22:20

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
Le cancer du pancréas (2)
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 6 sur 6Aller à la page : Précédent  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
ESPOIRS :: Cancer :: recherche-
Sauter vers: