AccueilCalendrierFAQRechercherS'enregistrerMembresGroupesConnexion

Partagez | 
 

 Les métaux et le cancer.

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
AuteurMessage
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16600
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Les métaux et le cancer.   Hier à 1:52

Killing malignant mitochondria is one of the most promising approaches in the development of new anticancer drugs. Scientists from the UK have now synthesized a copper-containing peptide that is readily taken up by mitochondria in breast cancer stem cells, where it effectively induces apoptosis. The study, which has been published in the journal Angewandte Chemie, also highlights the powerful therapeutic potential of the metallopeptides.

Mitochondria are the power factories of the cells and the central "node" of cell death induction. If their mitochondria are taken off, cells will die through apoptosis. Cancer cells, which have an increased metabolism, not only contain more mitochondria than healthy cells, but also different ones, structurally and functionally. The distinctive features and their decisive role in cell metabolism have made malignant mitochondria a prominent target for new therapeutic compounds. Bio-inorganic chemist Kogularamanan Suntharalingam and his group at King's College, London, UK, explore how mitochondria killing agents can be inserted into the organelles and what damage can be achieved.

Killing mitochondria could be accomplished, for example, by introducing agents to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). These reactive compounds interfere with several pathways of the mitochondrial metabolism, having maximal impact on the organelle's function. Suntharalingam's group recently proposed the organometallic compound copper(II) phenanthroline as a potent ROS generator with an especially deadly potential for cancer stem cells. However, this special agent must be delivered to its address and shuffled over the outer mitochondrial membrane. A solution would be to make a parcel, for example, by tethering it to a membrane-soluble peptide specific for mitochondria. "Attachment of mitochondrial-penetrating peptides also enables selective and efficient delivery to mitochondria," the authors proposed.

The scientists, including Nicola O'Reilly's peptide chemistry group at The Francis Crick Institute, prepared the deadly parcel made of a copper-containing metallopeptide by covalently linking the phenanthroline copper(II) complex to an established mitochondria-penetrating peptide. The tests were performed with two breast cancer cell lines, one the bulk cancer cell line and the other one a cell line enriched with cancer stem cells, which constitute the heart of the cancer and often dodge conventional therapies. The results were impressive: The authors observed a dose-dependent viability loss of up to 100 percent of the cells, mitochondrial membrane disintegration, drug intake into the mitochondria, ROS generation, and impairment of the mitochondrial metabolism. The drug also affected the cancer stem cells more than the normal cell line, which was explained by their higher content of mitochondria.

This study highlights the potential of the metallopeptides as both delivery and killing agents, especially for cancer stem cells.

---

Tuer des mitochondries malignes est l'une des approches les plus prometteuses dans le développement de nouveaux médicaments anticancéreux. Des scientifiques du Royaume-Uni ont maintenant synthétisé un peptide contenant du cuivre qui est facilement absorbé par les mitochondries dans les cellules souches du cancer du sein, où il induit efficacement l'apoptose. L'étude, qui a été publiée dans la revue Angewandte Chemie, souligne également le puissant potentiel thérapeutique des métallopeptides.

Les mitochondries sont les centrales électriques des cellules et le «nœud» central de l'induction de la mort cellulaire. Si leurs mitochondries sont enlevées, les cellules mourront par apoptose. Les cellules cancéreuses, qui ont un métabolisme accru, contiennent non seulement plus de mitochondries que de cellules saines, mais aussi des mitochondries différentes, structurellement et fonctionnellement. Les caractéristiques distinctives et leur rôle décisif dans le métabolisme cellulaire ont fait des mitochondries malignes une cible importante pour de nouveaux composés thérapeutiques. Le chimiste bio-inorganique Kogularamanan Suntharalingam et son groupe du King's College, à Londres, au Royaume-Uni, explorent comment les agents tuant les mitochondries peuvent être insérés dans les organites et quels dommages peuvent être causés.

Tuer les mitochondries pourrait être accompli, par exemple, en introduisant des agents pour générer des espèces réactives de l'oxygène (ROS). Ces composés réactifs interfèrent avec plusieurs voies du métabolisme mitochondrial, ayant un impact maximal sur la fonction de l'organite. Le groupe de Suntharalingam a récemment proposé le composé organométallique cuivre (II) phénanthroline comme un puissant générateur de ROS avec un potentiel particulièrement mortel pour les cellules souches cancéreuses. Cependant, cet agent spécial doit être livré au bon endroit et mélangé sur la membrane mitochondriale externe. Une solution consisterait à fabriquer une parcelle, par exemple, en l'attachant à un peptide soluble dans la membrane, spécifique des mitochondries. "L'attachement des peptides pénétrants mitochondriaux permet également une administration sélective et efficace aux mitochondries", proposent les auteurs.

Les scientifiques, dont le groupe de chimie peptidique de Nicola O'Reilly à l'Institut Francis Crick, ont préparé la parcelle mortelle faite d'un métallopeptide contenant du cuivre en liant par covalence le complexe phénanthroline cuivre (II) à un peptide pénétrant la mitochondrie. Les tests ont été effectués avec deux lignées cellulaires de cancer du , l'une de la lignée cellulaire cancéreuse en vrac et l'autre d'une lignée cellulaire enrichie en cellules souches cancéreuses, qui constituent le coeur du cancer et évitent souvent les thérapies conventionnelles. Les résultats ont été impressionnants: les auteurs ont observé une perte de viabilité dose-dépendante allant jusqu'à 100% des cellules, une désintégration de la membrane mitochondriale, un apport de médicament dans les mitochondries, une génération de ROS et une altération du métabolisme mitochondrial. Le médicament a également affecté les cellules souches cancéreuses plus que la lignée cellulaire normale, ce qui a été expliqué par leur teneur plus élevée en mitochondries.

Cette étude met en évidence le potentiel des métallopeptides en tant qu'agents d'administration et de destruction, en particulier pour les cellules souches cancéreuses.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16600
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Les métaux et le cancer.   Jeu 2 Nov 2017 - 14:22

Cancer cells can be targeted and destroyed with the metal from the asteroid that caused the extinction of the dinosaurs, according to new research by an international collaboration between the University of Warwick and Sun Yat-Sen University in China.

Researchers from the Professor Sadler and Professor O'Connor groups in Warwick's Department of Chemistry and Professor Hui Chao's group at Sun Yat-Sen have demonstrated that iridium -- the world's second densest metal -- can be used to kill cancer cells by filling them with deadly version of oxygen, without harming healthy tissue.

The researchers created a compound of iridium and organic material, which can be directly targeted towards cancerous cells, transferring energy to the cells to turn the oxygen (O2) inside them into singlet oxygen, which is poisonous and kills the cell -- without harming any healthy tissue.

The process is triggered by shining visible laser light through the skin onto the cancerous area -- this reaches the light-reactive coating of the compound, and activates the metal to start filling the cancer with singlet oxygen.

The researchers found that after attacking a model tumour of lung cancer cells, grown by the researchers in the laboratory to form a tumour-like sphere, with red laser light (which can penetrate deeply through the skin), the activated organic-iridium compound had penetrated and infused into every layer of the tumour to kill it -- demonstrating how effective and far-reaching this treatment is.

They also proved that the method is safe to healthy cells by conducting the treatment on non-cancerous tissue and finding it had no effect.

Furthermore, the researchers used state-of-the-art ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry to gain an unprecedented view of the individual proteins within the cancer cells -- allowing them to determine precisely which proteins are attacked by the organic-iridium compound.

After vigorously analysing huge amounts of data -- thousands of proteins from the model cancer cells, they concluded that the iridium compound had damaged the proteins for heat shock stress, and glucose metabolism, both known as key molecules in cancer.

The University of Warwick has the UK's most advanced laboratory for this type of highly advanced mass spectrometry, and is a world-class centre of analytical science.

Co-author Cookson Chiu is a postgraduate researcher in Warwick's Department of Chemistry, funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council and Bruker. He commented:

"This project is a leap forward in understanding how these new iridium-based anti-cancer compounds are attacking cancer cells, introducing different mechanisms of action, to get around the resistance issue and tackle cancer from a different angle."

Dr Pingyu Zhang and Dr Huaiyi Huang are Royal Society Newton International Fellows in Warwick's Department of Chemistry. Dr Zhang added:

"Our innovative approach to tackle cancer involving targeting important cellular proteins can lead to novel drugs with new mechanisms of action. These are urgently needed. In addition, research links between UK and Chinese academics will not only lead to lasting collaborations, but also have potential to open up the translation of new drugs into the clinic as a UK-China joint development"

Peter O'Connor, Professor of Analytical Chemistry at Warwick, noted:

"Remarkable advances in modern mass spectrometry now allow us to analyse complex mixtures of proteins in cancer cells and pinpoint drug targets, on instruments that are sensitive enough to weigh even a single electron!"

Professor Peter Sadler is excited about where this work can lead. He said:

"The precious metal platinum is already used in more than 50% of cancer chemotherapies. The potential of other precious metals such as iridium to provide new targeted drugs which attack cancer cells in completely new ways and combat resistance, and which can be used safely with the minimum of side-effects, is now being explored.

"International collaborations can greatly hasten progress. It's certainly now time to try to make good medical use of the iridium delivered to us by an asteroid 66 million years ago!"

Photochemotherapy -- using laser light to target cancer -- is fast emerging as a viable, effective and non-invasive treatment. Patients are becoming increasingly resistant to traditional therapies, so it is vital to establish new pathways like this for fighting the disease.

Iridium was first discovered in 1803, and its name comes from the Latin for 'rainbow'. From the same family as platinum, it is hard, brittle, and is the world's most corrosion-resistant metal. Yellow in colour, its melting point is more than 2400° Celsius.

The metal is rare on Earth, but is abundant in meteoroids -- and large amounts of iridium have been discovered in the Earth's crust from around 66 million years ago, leading to the theory that it came to this planet with an asteroid which caused the extinction of the dinosaurs.

---

Les cellules cancéreuses peuvent être ciblées et détruites avec le métal de l'astéroïde qui a causé l'extinction des dinosaures, selon une nouvelle étude réalisée par une collaboration internationale entre l'Université de Warwick et l'Université Sun Yat-Sen en Chine.

Des chercheurs des groupes Professor Sadler et Professor O'Connor du département de chimie de Warwick et du groupe du Professeur Hui Chao à Sun Yat-Sen ont démontré que l'iridium - le deuxième métal le plus dense du monde - peut être utilisé pour tuer les cellules cancéreuses en les remplissant avec une version mortelle de l'oxygène, sans nuire aux tissus sains.

Les chercheurs ont créé un composé d'iridium et de matière organique, qui peut être directement dirigé vers les cellules cancéreuses, transférant l'énergie aux cellules pour transformer l'oxygène (O2) en oxygène singulet, qui est toxique et tue la cellule - sans nuire à tissu sain.

Le processus est déclenché en faisant briller une lumière laser visible à travers la peau sur la zone cancéreuse - cela atteint le revêtement réactif à la lumière du composé, et active le métal pour commencer à remplir le cancer avec de l'oxygène singulet.

Les chercheurs ont découvert qu'après avoir attaqué une tumeur modèle de cellules cancéreuses du poumon, cultivées par les chercheurs en laboratoire pour former une sphère ressemblant à une tumeur, avec une lumière laser rouge (qui peut pénétrer profondément dans la peau), le composé organique iridium activé avait pénétré et infusé dans chaque couche de la tumeur pour le tuer - démontrant à quel point ce traitement est efficace et de grande envergure.

Ils ont également prouvé que la méthode est sans danger pour les cellules saines en conduisant le traitement sur des tissus non cancéreux et en constatant qu'il n'avait aucun effet.

De plus, les chercheurs ont utilisé la spectrométrie de masse à ultra-haute résolution pour obtenir une vision sans précédent des protéines individuelles dans les cellules cancéreuses, ce qui leur permet de déterminer avec précision quelles protéines sont attaquées par le composé organique-iridium.

Après avoir analysé vigoureusement d'énormes quantités de données - des milliers de protéines des cellules cancéreuses modèles, ils ont conclu que le composé d'iridium avait endommagé les protéines pour le stress de choc thermique, et le métabolisme du glucose, deux molécules clés dans le cancer.

L'Université de Warwick possède le laboratoire le plus avancé du Royaume-Uni pour ce type de spectrométrie de masse très avancée, et est un centre de science analytique de classe mondiale.

Le co-auteur Cookson Chiu est un chercheur de troisième cycle dans le département de chimie de Warwick, financé par le Conseil de recherche en sciences physiques et génie et Bruker. Il a commenté:

"Ce projet est un pas en avant pour comprendre comment ces nouveaux composés anticancéreux à base d'iridium attaquent les cellules cancéreuses, introduisant différents mécanismes d'action, pour contourner le problème de la résistance et s'attaquer au cancer sous un angle différent."

Le Dr Pingyu Zhang et le Dr Huaiyi Huang sont des membres de la Royal Society Newton International Fellows du département de chimie de Warwick. Le Dr Zhang a ajouté:

«Notre approche innovante pour lutter contre le cancer impliquant des protéines cellulaires importantes peut conduire à de nouveaux médicaments avec de nouveaux mécanismes d'action, qui sont urgemment nécessaires.En outre, des liens de recherche entre universitaires britanniques et chinois mèneront non seulement à des collaborations durables, mais auront aussi un potentiel. d'ouvrir la traduction de nouveaux médicaments à la clinique en tant que développement conjoint UK-Chine "

Peter O'Connor, professeur de chimie analytique à Warwick, a noté:

"Des progrès remarquables dans la spectrométrie de masse moderne nous permettent maintenant d'analyser des mélanges complexes de protéines dans les cellules cancéreuses et d'identifier des cibles de médicaments, sur des instruments qui sont suffisamment sensibles pour peser même un seul électron!"

Le professeur Peter Sadler est enthousiasmé par l'endroit où ce travail peut mener. Il a dit:

"Le métal précieux platine est déjà utilisé dans plus de 50% des chimiothérapies anticancéreuses: Il y a un potentiel d'autres métaux précieux tels que l'iridium pour fournir de nouveaux médicaments ciblés qui attaquent les cellules cancéreuses de manière totalement nouvelle , qui combattent la résistance, et qui peuvent être utilisés sans danger avec le minimum d'effets secondaires, et c'est en cours d'exploration.

"Les collaborations internationales peuvent grandement accélérer les progrès, il est certainement temps d'essayer de faire un bon usage médical de l'iridium qui nous a été livré par un astéroïde il y a 66 millions d'années!"

La photochimiothérapie - utilisant la lumière laser pour cibler le cancer - apparaît rapidement comme un traitement viable, efficace et non invasif. Les patients deviennent de plus en plus résistants aux thérapies traditionnelles, il est donc vital d'établir de nouvelles voies comme celle-ci pour lutter contre la maladie.

L'iridium a été découvert en 1803, et son nom vient du latin «arc-en-ciel». De la même famille que le platine, il est dur, fragile et est le métal le plus résistant à la corrosion du monde. De couleur jaune, son point de fusion est supérieur à 2400 ° Celsius.

Ce métal est rare sur Terre, mais il est abondant dans les météorites - et de grandes quantités d'iridium ont été découvertes dans la croûte terrestre il y a environ 66 millions d'années, menant à la théorie selon laquelle il est arrivé sur cette planète avec un astéroïde qui a causé l'extinction du dinosaure.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16600
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Les métaux et le cancer.   Mar 24 Oct 2017 - 18:06

Scientists from the University of Surrey have developed 'intelligent' nanoparticles which heat up to a temperature high enough to kill cancerous cells -- but which then self-regulate and lose heat before they get hot enough to harm healthy tissue.

The self-stopping nanoparticles could soon be used as part of hyperthermic-thermotherapy to treat patients with cancer, according to an exciting new study reported in Nanoscale.

Thermotherapy has long been used as a treatment method for cancer, but it is difficult to treat patients without damaging healthy cells. However, tumour cells can be weakened or killed without affecting normal tissue if temperatures can be controlled accurately within a range of 42°C to 45°C.

Scientists from Surrey's Advanced Technology Institute have worked with colleagues from the Dalian University of Technology in China to create nanoparticles which, when implanted and used in a thermotherapy session, can induce temperatures of up to 45°C.

The Zn-Co-Cr ferrite nanoparticles produced for this study are self-regulating, meaning that they self-stop heating when they reach temperatures over 45°C. Importantly, the nanoparticles are also low in toxicity and are unlikely to cause permanent damage to the body.

Professor Ravi Silva, Head of the Advanced Technology Institute at the University of Surrey, said: "This could potentially be a game changer in the way we treat people who have cancer . If we can keep cancer treatment sat at a temperature level high enough to kill the cancer, while low enough to stop harming healthy tissue, it will prevent some of the serious side effects of vital treatment.

"It's a very exciting development which, once again, shows that the University of Surrey research is at the forefront of nanotechnologies -- whether in the field of energy materials or, in this case, healthcare."

Dr. Wei Zhang, Associate Professor from Dalian University of Technology said: "Magnetic induced hyperthermia is a traditional route of treating malignant tumours. However, the difficulties in temperature control has significantly restricted its usage If we can modulate the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles, the therapeutic temperature can be self-regulated, eliminating the use of clumsy temperature monitoring and controlling systems.

"By making magnetic materials with the Curie temperature falling in the range of hyperthermia temperatures, the self-regulation of therapeutics can be achieved. For the most magnetic materials, however, the Curie temperature is much higher than the human body can endure. By adjusting the components as we have, we have synthesized the nanoparticles with the Curie temperature as low as 34oC. This is a major nanomaterials breakthrough."

---

Des scientifiques de l'Université de Surrey ont mis au point des nanoparticules «intelligentes» qui chauffent à une température suffisamment élevée pour tuer les cellules cancéreuses - mais qui s'auto-régulent et perdent de la chaleur avant de devenir suffisamment chaudes pour endommager les tissus sains.

Les nanoparticules auto-stoppantes pourraient bientôt être utilisées dans le cadre de la thermothérapie hyperthermique pour traiter les patients atteints de cancer, selon une nouvelle étude passionnante rapportée dans Nanoscale.

La thermothérapie a longtemps été utilisée comme méthode de traitement du cancer, mais il est difficile de traiter les patients sans endommager les cellules saines. Cependant, les cellules tumorales peuvent être affaiblies ou détruites sans affecter le tissu normal si les températures peuvent être contrôlées avec précision dans une plage de 42 ° C à 45 ° C.

Des scientifiques de l'Advanced Technology Institute de Surrey ont travaillé avec des collègues de l'Université de Technologie de Dalian en Chine pour créer des nanoparticules qui, lorsqu'elles sont implantées et utilisées dans une séance de thermothérapie, peuvent induire des températures allant jusqu'à 45 ° C.

Les nanoparticules de ferrite de Zn-Co-Cr produites pour cette étude sont auto-régulatrices, ce qui signifie qu'elles s'arrêtent automatiquement lorsqu'elles atteignent des températures supérieures à 45 ° C. Fait important, les nanoparticules ont également une faible toxicité et sont peu susceptibles de causer des dommages permanents à l'organisme.

Le professeur Ravi Silva, directeur de l'Advanced Technology Institute de l'Université de Surrey, a déclaré: "Cela pourrait changer la donne dans la façon dont nous traitons les personnes atteintes d'un cancer. tuer le cancer, tout en étant assez bas en température pour éviter de nuire aux tissus sains, permettra d'éviter certains des effets secondaires graves du traitement vital.

"C'est un développement très excitant qui montre, encore une fois, que la recherche de l'Université de Surrey est à la pointe des nanotechnologies - que ce soit dans le domaine des matériaux énergétiques ou, dans ce cas, des soins de santé."

Le Dr Wei Zhang, professeur associé à l'Université de Technologie de Dalian, a déclaré: "L'hyperthermie magnétique induite est une voie traditionnelle de traitement des tumeurs malignes, mais les difficultés de contrôle de la température limitent considérablement son utilisation. la température thérapeutique peut être auto-régulée, ce qui élimine l'utilisation de systèmes de surveillance et de contrôle de la température maladroits.

«En faisant des matériaux magnétiques avec la température de Curie tombant dans la gamme des températures d'hyperthermie, l'autorégulation des thérapeutiques peut être réalisée.Pour les matériaux les plus magnétiques, cependant, la température de Curie est beaucoup plus élevée que le corps humain peut supporter. les composants que nous avons, nous avons synthétisé les nanoparticules avec la température de Curie aussi basse que 34oC.Ceci est une percée majeure des nanomatériaux. "

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16600
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Les métaux et le cancer.   Ven 8 Sep 2017 - 15:43

When trace elements rise to toxic levels, bad things happen.

Patients suffering from Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease harbor significantly higher levels of zinc and iron in their brains than healthy patients. Those with pancreatic cancer have an unusually high amount of a specific zinc transporter. So, controlling those levels could be an effective plan of attack against these diseases and others, said Jian Hu, Michigan State University biochemist.

Hu and a team of MSU scientists have revealed a key structure of a molecular machine, a ZIP zinc transporter. Mapping the core of a bacterial ZIP -- another celebrated first by Hu's lab -- exposes its framework and mechanisms that are common in the ZIP family consisting, which comprises thousands of metal transporters.

The human genome encodes a total of fourteen ZIPs, and many of them are associated with diseases. The discovery, published in the current issue of Science Advances, gives pharmaceutical companies targets to test new drugs.

"ZIP4 is aberrantly overexpressed in pancreatic cancer cells, but it's not present in normal pancreatic tissue," Hu said. "This, and knowing that ZIP4 mutations also lead to a lethal genetic disorder, makes ZIP4 a prime drug target that could possibly help patients suffering from many diseases."

The genetic disorder, Acrodermatitis Enteropathica, is a rare but lethal condition caused by severe zinc deficiency. An earlier discovery by Hu's lab revealed the exterior of ZIP4's structure, or its extracellular domain, which functions as an accessory that makes the machinery more efficient.

"But without knowing the structural information of the core, we don't exactly know how the accessory works," Hu said. "We now see that the transmembrane domain is the core of the machine conducting zinc transport."

The team's structure reveals an unprecedented fold for membrane transporters, implying a unique transport mechanism.

"This distinguishes the ZIP family from any other known transporter family," Hu said.

Solving the crystal structure also led to a surprise finding. Examining the molecular architecture revealed two metal ions trapped halfway through the membrane, forming a binuclear metal center.

"It is quite unusual because it resembles the catalytic centers of some metalloenzymes, but apparently the ZIPs are not enzymes," Hu said. "Clarifying the function of the binuclear metal center is one of our primary goals in future studies."

Hu has dedicated much of his career studying zinc and other trace elements, as they are essential for life. Zinc is the second most-common trace element behind iron. By deciphering how the body maintains proper levels and exploring the effects when those elements go awry, he's hoping to unlock the mechanisms of human ZIP's secrets in their many critical roles.

"In the long run, we hope our study will contribute to the discovery of the ZIP inhibitors for pancreatic cancer and other devastating diseases," Hu said.

---

Lorsque les oligo-éléments augmentent à des niveaux toxiques, de mauvaises choses se produisent.

Les patients souffrant de la maladie d'Alzheimer et de la maladie de Parkinson portent des niveaux significativement plus élevés de zinc et de fer dans leur cerveau que les patients en bonne santé. Ceux qui ont un cancer du :pancréas: ont une quantité exceptionnellement élevée d'un transporteur de zinc spécifique. Ainsi, le contrôle de ces niveaux pourrait être un plan d'attaque efficace contre ces maladies et d'autres, a déclaré Jian Hu, biochimiste de l'Université d'État de Michigan.

Hu et une équipe de scientifiques de MSU ont révélé une structure clé d'une machine moléculaire, un transporteur de zinc ZIP. Cartographier le noyau d'un ZIP bactérien - un autre célébré en premier par le laboratoire de Hu - expose son cadre et ses mécanismes communs dans la famille ZIP, qui comprend des milliers de transporteurs de métaux.

Le génome humain encode au total quatorze ZIP, et beaucoup d'entre eux sont associés à des maladies. La découverte, publiée dans le numéro actuel de Science Advances, donne aux entreprises pharmaceutiques des cibles pour tester de nouveaux médicaments.

"ZIP4 est surexprimé dans les cellules de cancer du pancréas, mais il n'est pas présent dans le tissu pancréatique normal", a déclaré Hu. "Ceci, et en sachant que les mutations ZIP4 entraînent également un trouble génétique létal, rend ZIP4 une cible de médicament qui pourrait aider les patients souffrant de nombreuses maladies".

Le trouble génétique, Acrodermatitis Enteropathica, est un état rare mais létal causé par une déficience en zinc sévère. Une découverte antérieure par le laboratoire de Hu a révélé l'extérieur de la structure de ZIP4, ou son domaine extracellulaire, qui fonctionne comme un accessoire qui rend la machinerie plus efficace.

"Mais sans connaître l'information structurelle du noyau, nous ne savons pas exactement comment fonctionne cet accessoire", a déclaré Hu. "Nous voyons maintenant que le domaine transmembranaire est le noyau de la machine qui effectue le transport du zinc".

La structure de l'équipe révèle un pli sans précédent pour les transporteurs à membrane, ce qui implique un mécanisme de transport unique.

"Cela distingue la famille ZIP de toute autre famille de transporteurs connue", a déclaré Hu.

La résolution de la structure cristalline a également conduit à une découverte surprise. L'examen de l'architecture moléculaire a révélé deux ions métalliques piégés à mi-chemin de la membrane, formant un centre de métal binucléaire.

"Il est assez inhabituel car il ressemble aux centres catalytiques de certaines métallo-enzymes, mais apparemment les ZIP ne sont pas des enzymes", a déclaré Hu. "Clarifier la fonction du centre du métal binucléaire est l'un de nos principaux objectifs dans les études futures".

Hu a consacré une grande partie de sa carrière à étudier le zinc et d'autres oligo-éléments, car ils sont essentiels à la vie. Le zinc est le deuxième élément de traces le plus courant derrière le fer. En déchiffrant la façon dont le corps maintient les niveaux appropriés et en explorant les effets lorsque ces éléments disparaissent, il espère débloquer les mécanismes des secrets de la ZIP humaine dans leurs nombreux rôles critiques.

"À long terme, nous espérons que notre étude contribuera à la découverte des inhibiteurs ZIP pour le cancer du :pancréas: et d'autres maladies dévastatrices", a déclaré Hu.


_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16600
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Les métaux et le cancer.   Mar 4 Avr 2017 - 14:54

Scientists at EPFL and NTU have discovered that combining an anticancer drug with an antirheumatic produces improved effects against tumors. The discovery opens a new path for drug-drug synergy.

One of the goals in pharmacology is to increase the efficiency of drugs by minimizing their side effects. Recently, this effort has led to combining unrelated drugs to exploit their synergistic effects. This "drug-drug synergy" relies on interactions between the individual biological pathways on which each drug acts. Scientists at EPFL and Nanyang Technological University (NTU) have now discovered a synergistic effect between an anticancer and an antirheumatic drug, improving the former's ability to kill off cancer cells. The work is published in Nature Communications.

The labs of Paul Dyson and Ursula Röthlisberger at EPFL, together with the lab of Curtis Davey at NTU, explored the synergistic effects of two unrelated drugs: auranofin (Ridaura), a gold-containing drug that is used to alleviate the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, and RAPTA-T, a ruthenium-containing anticancer drug that disrupts both tumor growth and metastasis, while also reducing the side effects of chemotherapy due to its low toxicity.

Although the two drugs are used for different conditions, auranofin has recently been discovered to also act against cancer. The reason is that, often, drugs do not only bind a single site on a specific molecule, but can also bind and affect other, unrelated sites -- either on the same molecule or on a different one. For example, a drug that is meant to bind and activate a receptor could also bind and block an enzyme. This off-site activity frequently gives rise to drug side effects, but separate drug-binding sites can also work together synergistically in a productive fashion.

The researchers looked at the synergistic effects of the two drugs on packaged DNA inside cancer cells. Despite popular depictions, the long strands of DNA in the cell spend most of their time tightly wound around specialized proteins called histones. Whenever a particular sequence, e.g. a gene, is needed, that section of DNA is unwound and read by the appropriate biological machinery.

The study found that combining the two drugs had an increased effect of killing of cancer cells, while individually, the drugs have considerably less impact on cell viability. When RAPTA-T is given, it forms what are known as "adducts" with the histone proteins that package DNA. These adducts disrupt the normal function of DNA and cause the cell to die. In contrast, auranofin is much less prone to form adducts with the histone proteins, unless the two drugs are used together.

The researchers found that the binding of auranofin takes place through an allosteric, "action-over-a-distance" mechanism within the nucleosome, which is the component that contains the cell's packaged DNA. Here, the researchers discovered that RAPTA-T helps the other drug's ability to form histone adducts by binding on distant histone sites.

The authors conclude that this newly discovered allosteric mechanism "suggests that allosteric modulation in nucleosomes may have biological relevance and potential for therapeutic interventions."

---

Les scientifiques de l'EPFL et de la NTU ont découvert que combiner un médicament anticancéreux avec un antirhématologique produit des effets améliorés contre les tumeurs. La découverte ouvre un nouveau chemin pour la synergie entre deux médicaments.

L'un des objectifs de la pharmacologie est d'augmenter l'efficacité des médicaments en minimisant leurs effets secondaires. Récemment, cet effort a conduit à combiner des médicaments non liés pour exploiter leurs effets synergiques. Cette synergie repose sur les interactions entre les voies biologiques individuelles sur lesquelles chaque médicament  agit. Les scientifiques de l'EPFL et de l'Université technologique de Nanyang (NTU) ont maintenant découvert un effet synergique entre un anticancéreux et un médicament antirhumatique, améliorant la capacité de l'ancien à tuer les cellules cancéreuses. Le travail est publié dans Nature Communications.

Les laboratoires de Paul Dyson et Ursula Röthlisberger à l'EPFL, ainsi que le laboratoire de Curtis Davey à NTU, ont exploré les effets synergiques de deux médicaments non apparentés: l'auranofin (Ridaura), un médicament contenant de l'or qui sert à atténuer les symptômes de la polyarthrite rhumatoïde , Et RAPTA-T, un médicament anticancéreux contenant du ruthénium qui perturbe à la fois la croissance tumorale et la métastase, tout en réduisant les effets secondaires de la chimiothérapie en raison de sa faible toxicité.

Bien que les deux médicaments soient utilisés pour différentes conditions, l'auranofin a récemment été découverte pour lutter contre le cancer. La raison en est que, souvent, les médicaments ne lient pas seulement un seul site sur une molécule spécifique, mais peuvent également lier et affecter d'autres sites non apparentés, soit sur la même molécule, soit sur une autre. Par exemple, un médicament destiné à se lier et à activer un récepteur pourrait également lier et bloquer une enzyme. Cette activité hors site entraîne fréquemment des effets secondaires du médicament, mais des sites distincts de liaison aux médicaments peuvent également travailler de manière synergique et de manière productive.

Les chercheurs ont examiné les effets synergiques des deux médicaments sur l'ADN emballé dans les cellules cancéreuses. Malgré les représentations populaires, les longs brins de l'ADN dans la cellule passent la plupart de leur temps étroitement enroulés autour des protéines spécialisées appelées histones. Chaque fois qu'une séquence particulière, par exemple Un gène, est nécessaire, cette partie de l'ADN est déroulée et lue par les mécanismes biologiques appropriés.

L'étude a révélé que la combinaison des deux médicaments avait un effet accru sur le tuer des cellules cancéreuses, tandis que, individuellement, les médicaments ont beaucoup moins d'impact sur la viabilité cellulaire. Lorsque RAPTA-T est donné, il se forme ce qu'on appelle les «produits d'addition» avec les protéines d'histone qui forment l'ADN. Ces adduits perturbent la fonction normale de l'ADN et provoquent la mort de la cellule. En revanche, l'auranofin est beaucoup moins enclin à former des adduits avec les protéines histoniques, à moins que les deux médicaments ne soient utilisés ensemble.

Les chercheurs ont constaté que la liaison de l'auranofin s'effectue à l'aide d'un mécanisme allostérique «action-sur-distance» dans le nucléosome, qui est le composant qui contient l'ADN emballé de la cellule. Ici, les chercheurs ont découvert que RAPTA-T aide la faculté de l'autre médicament à former des adducts d'histones en se liant à des sites d'histones lointains.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16600
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Les métaux et le cancer.   Mer 22 Mar 2017 - 18:32

To fight cancer, every year thousands of chemical substances are screened for their potential effects on tumor cells. Once a compound able to inhibit cancer cell growth is found, it still takes several years of research until the drug gets approved and can be applied to patients. The elucidation of the different pathways that a drug takes within human cells, in order to predict possible adverse effects, usually requires elaborate and time-consuming experiments.

The teams of Leticia González from the Faculty of Chemistry of the University of Vienna and Jacinto Sá from Uppsala University have developed a protocol that is able to detect with high precision how, where, and why a drug interacts with the biomolecules of an organism. "In a first step, using high-energy X-ray radiation from the Swiss Light Source third-generation-synchrotron, the favorite binding location of the drug inside the cell is determined," González explains. In a second step, advanced theoretical simulations, partially done on the supercomputer "Vienna Scientific Cluster," rationalize the preference of the potential medicament for that particular location.

The scientists have applied this protocol to the drug Pt103, which is known to have cytotoxic properties but an unknown mechanism of action. The compound Pt103, which belongs to the family of the so-called platinum-based drugs, showed promising antitumor activity in previous studies. Until recently, scientists could only speculate on the action of the compound with the DNA found inside a human or cancer cell. "We could show that the drug binds to a specific site of DNA, which was not expected based on previous research. And we could also explain why the drug attacks this particular site." says Juan J. Nogueira, a postdoctoral researcher in the group of González and co-author of the study. Using this newly gained knowledge one can better understand the functionality of the corresponding chemotherapeutic agent, which might lead to the development of new and more efficient drugs.

---

Pour lutter contre le cancer, chaque année des milliers de substances chimiques sont analysés pour leurs effets potentiels sur les cellules tumorales. Une fois un composé capable d'inhiber la croissance des cellules cancéreuses est trouvé, il faut encore plusieurs années de recherche jusqu'à ce que le médicament soit approuvé et puisse être appliqué aux patients. L'élucidation des différentes voies qu'un médicament prend au sein des cellules humaines, afin de prédire les effets indésirables possibles, nécessite habituellement des expériences élaborées et longues.

Les équipes de Leticia González de la Faculté de chimie de l'Université de Vienne et Jacinto Sá de l'Université d'Uppsala ont développé un protocole qui permet de détecter avec une grande précision comment, où et pourquoi un médicament interagit avec les biomolécules d'un organisme. "Dans un premier temps, en utilisant le rayonnement X à haute énergie provenant du synchrotron de troisième génération de Swiss Light Source, le lieu de fixation préféré du médicament à l'intérieur de la cellule est déterminé", explique González. Dans une deuxième étape, des simulations théoriques avancées, partiellement réalisées sur le supercalculateur «Vienna Scientific Cluster», rationalisent la préférence du médicament potentiel pour cet endroit particulier.

Les scientifiques ont appliqué ce protocole au médicament Pt103, qui est connu pour avoir des propriétés cytotoxic mais un mécanisme d'action inconnu. Le composé Pt103, qui appartient à la famille des médicaments dits à base de platine, a montré une activité antitumorale prometteuse dans des études antérieures. Jusqu'à récemment, les scientifiques pouvaient seulement spéculer sur l'action du composé avec l'ADN trouvé à l'intérieur d'une cellule humaine ou cancéreuse. "Nous pourrions montrer que le médicament se lie à un site spécifique de l'ADN, ce qui n'était pas prévu sur la base de recherches antérieures. Et nous pourrions aussi expliquer pourquoi le médicament attaque ce site particulier." Dit Juan J. Nogueira, un chercheur postdoctoral dans le groupe de González et co-auteur de l'étude. En utilisant cette nouvelle connaissance acquise, on peut mieux comprendre la fonctionnalité de l'agent chimiothérapeutique correspondant, ce qui pourrait conduire au développement de nouveaux médicaments plus efficaces.


_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16600
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Les métaux et le cancer.   Lun 13 Fév 2017 - 14:37

Researchers have witnessed -- for the first time -- cancer cells being targeted and destroyed from the inside, by an organo-metal compound discovered by the University of Warwick.

Professor Peter J. Sadler, and his group in the Department of Chemistry, have demonstrated that Organo-Osmium FY26 -- which was first discovered at Warwick -- kills cancer cells by locating and attacking their weakest part.

This is the first time that an Osmium-based compound -- which is fifty times more active than the current cancer drug cisplatin -- has been seen to target the disease.

Using the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), researchers analysed the effects of Organo-Osmium FY26 in ovarian cancer cells -- detecting emissions of X-ray fluorescent light to track the activity of the compound inside the cells.

Looking at sections of cancer cells under nano-focus, it was possible to see an unprecedented level of minute detail. Organelles like mitochondria, which are the 'powerhouses' of cells and generate their energy, were detectable.

In cancer cells, there are errors and mutations in the DNA of mitochondria, making them very weak and susceptible to attack.

FY26 was found to have positioned itself in the mitochondria -- attacking and destroying the vital functions of cancer cells from within, at their weakest point.

Researchers were also able to see natural metals which are produced by the body -- such as zinc and calcium -- moving around the cells. Calcium in particular is known to affect the function of cells, and it is thought that this naturally-produced metal helps FY26 to achieve an optimal position for attacking cancer.

More than half of all cancer chemotherapy treatments currently use platinum compounds, which were introduced nearly 40 years ago, so there is a need to explore the benefits which other precious metals could bring.

Although this research was conducted on ovarian cancer cells, the ground-breaking results are applicable to a wider range of cancers.

FY26 has been shown to be more selective between normal cells and cancer cells than cisplatin -- having a greater effect on cancer cells than on healthy ones.

Professor Sadler comments that this research could lead to new cancer treatments: "Cancer drugs with new mechanisms of actions which can combat resistance and have fewer side-effects are urgently needed.

"The advanced nano-focussed x-ray beam at ESRF has not only allowed us to locate the site of action of our novel Organo-Osmium FY26 candidate drug in cancer cells at unprecedented resolution, but also study the movement of natural metals such as zinc and calcium in cells. Such studies open up totally new approaches to drug discovery and treatment"

Professor Sadler's group, including research fellows Dr Carlos Sanchez and Dr Isolda Romero Canelon, gained their results with Dr Peter Cloetens and colleagues at the ESRF in Grenoble, France -- a powerful synchrotron source which emits extremely powerful X-ray beams.

Dr Peter Cloetens comments on the process: "These kinds of experiments are normally performed using bigger doses than what would be done in real life or on a coarse scale that does not provide a clear picture of the processes that take place. On the new nano-imaging ID16A beamline, however, by combining a very tight focus and high flux, we could get a real picture of where the drug goes in a single cell using real-life pharmacological doses."

---

Les chercheurs ont été témoins - pour la première fois - des cellules cancéreuses ciblées et détruites de l'intérieur, par un composé organo-métallique découvert par l'Université de Warwick.

Le professeur Peter J. Sadler et son groupe au département de chimie ont démontré que l'Osmium organique FY26 - qui a été découvert à Warwick - tue les cellules cancéreuses en localisant et en attaquant leur partie la plus faible.

C'est la première fois qu'un composé à base d'osmium - qui est cinquante fois plus actif que l'actuel médicament contre le cancer cisplatine - a été vu pour cibler la maladie.

À l'aide de l'European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), les chercheurs ont analysé les effets de l'organo-osmium FY26 dans les cellules cancéreuses de l' avec la détection des émissions de rayons X de la lumière fluorescente pour suivre l'activité du composé à l'intérieur des cellules.

En regardant les sections de cellules cancéreuses sous nano-focus, il était possible de voir un niveau sans précédent de détail minutieux. Les organelles comme les mitochondries, qui sont les «puissances» des cellules et génèrent leur énergie, étaient détectables.

Dans les cellules cancéreuses, il y a des erreurs et des mutations dans l'ADN des mitochondries, ce qui les rend très faibles et sensibles à l'attaque.

Le FY26 a été trouvé pour se positionner dans les mitochondries - attaquer et détruire les fonctions vitales des cellules cancéreuses de l'intérieur, à leur point le plus faible.

Les chercheurs ont également pu voir les métaux naturels qui sont produites par le corps - comme le zinc et le calcium - se déplaçant autour des cellules. Le calcium en particulier est connu pour affecter la fonction des cellules, et on pense que ce métal produit naturellement aide FY26 pour atteindre une position optimale pour attaquer le cancer.

Plus de la moitié de tous les traitements de chimiothérapie contre le cancer utilisent actuellement des composés de platine, qui ont été introduits il y a près de 40 ans, il est donc nécessaire d'explorer les avantages que d'autres métaux précieux pourraient apporter.

Bien que cette recherche a été menée sur les cellules cancéreuses de l'ovaire, les résultats révolutionnaires sont applicables à une plus large gamme de cancers.

FY26 a été montré pour être plus sélectif entre les cellules normales et les cellules cancéreuses que le cisplatine - ayant un effet plus important sur les cellules cancéreuses que sur celles en bonne santé.

Professeur Sadler commente que cette recherche pourrait conduire à de nouveaux traitements contre le cancer: «Les médicaments contre le cancer avec de nouveaux mécanismes d'actions qui peuvent combattre la résistance et ont moins d'effets secondaires sont nécessaires de toute urgence.

«Le faisceau de rayons X nano-focalisé avancé à l'ESRF nous a permis non seulement de localiser le site d'action de notre nouveau médicament candidat FY26 Organo-Osmium dans les cellules cancéreuses à une résolution sans précédent, mais aussi d'étudier le mouvement des métaux naturels tels que le zinc Et le calcium dans les cellules.Ces études ouvrent des approches totalement nouvelles pour la découverte et le traitement des médicaments "

Le groupe du professeur Sadler, dont les chercheurs Carlos Sanchez et Isolda Romero Canelon, a obtenu les résultats avec le Dr Peter Cloetens et ses collègues de l'ESRF à Grenoble, une puissante source synchrotron qui émet des rayons X extrêmement puissants.

Le Dr Peter Cloetens commente le processus: «Ces types d'expériences sont normalement effectués en utilisant des doses plus importantes que ce qui serait fait dans la vie réelle ou à une échelle grossière qui ne donne pas une image claire des processus qui ont lieu. Mais en combinant une focalisation très serrée et un flux élevé, nous pourrions obtenir une image réelle de l'endroit où le médicament passe dans une seule cellule en utilisant des doses pharmacologiques réelles.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16600
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Les métaux et le cancer.   Mar 1 Déc 2015 - 17:29

Mis à jour, l'article date de 2015.


The discovery of cis-platin in the treatment of cancer there has been a considerable exploration on the antitumoral activity of other transition metal complexes. One of the main problems about the application of transition metal complexes for chemotherapy is their potential toxicity. Recently the attention has been focused on titanium based complexes, which could have significant potential effect against solid tumor. The advantage of Ti (IV) complexes is their relative biological compatibility, which mostly leads to mild and revisable side effects. However, the hydrolytic instability of known Ti(IV) complexes and formation of different species upon water addition makes their therapeutic application problematic, and raises a strong interest in the development of relatively stable Ti(IV) complexes with well defined hydrolytic behavior that demonstrate appreciable cytotoxic activity. Strong ligand binding is also of interest to avoid complete ligand stripping by transferrin, so that the ligand may be used as a target for structure–activity relationship investigations. Titanocene dichloride (Cp2TiCl2) shows an average antiproliferative activity in vitro and promising result in vivo. Recent work has been performed in developing therapeutic analogues of Cp2TiCl2 by varying the central metal, the labile ligands (Cl) and the biscyclopentadienyl moiety. In particular, small changes to the Cp ligand can strongly affect the hydrolytic stability and water solubility properties of the metallocenes and have an impact on the cytotoxic activity. In this review we want summarize the importance of different organo-mettalic compounds in cancer therapy with focus on possible structure modification.



---


Avec la découverte du cisplatine dans le traitement du cancer, il y a eu une exploration considérable sur l'activité antitumorale d'autres complexes de métaux de transition. L'un des principaux problèmes quant à l'application des complexes de métaux de transition pour la chimiothérapie est leur toxicité potentielle. Récemment, l'attention a été concentrée sur les complexes à base de titane qui pourrait avoir un effet important potentiel contre la tumeur solide. L'avantage des complexes de titane Ti (IV) est leur compatibilité biologique relative, ce qui conduit la plupart du temps à des effets secondaires légers et envisageables. Cependant, l'instabilité de l'hydrolyse des complexes Ti (IV) et la formation d'espèces différentes connues lors de l'addition d'eau rend leur application thérapeutique problématique, et soulève un vif intérêt dans le développement des relativement stables complexes de Ti (IV) avec le comportement hydrolytique bien définie qui démontrent une appréciable activité cytotoxique. La forte liaison au ligand est également intéressante pour éviter le décapage complet du ligand par la transferrine, de sorte que le ligand peut être utilisé comme cible pour la relation structure-activité des enquêtes. Le Dichlorure de titanocène (Cp2TiCl2) présente une activité antiproliférative in vitro et moyenne résultat prometteur in vivo. Des travaux récents ont été effectués pour élaborer des analogues thérapeutiques de Cp2TiCl2 en faisant varier le métal central, les ligands labiles (CL) et le fragment biscyclopentadiényle. En particulier, les petites modifications apportées au ligand Cp peuvent fortement affecter la stabilité et la solubilité dans l'eau des propriétés hydrolytiques des métallocènes et avoir un impact sur l'activité cytotoxique. Dans cette revue, nous voulons résumer l'importance de différents composés organo-mettalic dans la thérapie du cancer en mettant l'accent sur une éventuelle modification de la structure.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16600
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Les métaux et le cancer.   Dim 10 Fév 2008 - 12:51

(Feb. 10, 2008) — Dr Matthias Tacke and his research team at the Centre for Synthesis and Chemical Biology and the School of Chemistry and Chemical Biology at University College Dublin have recently published highly significant preclinical results on the anti-tumour activity of Titanocene Y on human breast tumours and in a mouse model.
In the mouse model, a decrease not only in tumour growth but also a reduction in tumour volume to around one-third was observed for the first time. In the human breast cancer, Titanocene Y showed cell death induction comparable to the widely-used chemotherapy drug Cisplatin.

Le docteur Mathias Tacke et son équipe de recherche ont publié récemment des résultats pré-cliniques hautement significatifs au sujet de l'activité anti-tumeur de Titanocene Y sur les tumeurs du cancer du dans une souris.

Chez la souris, une décroissance non seulement de la croissance de la tumeur mais de la tumeur elle-même a été observée pour environ 1/3 . Pour le cancer du , le titanocene Y a montré une induction de la mort de cellules cancéreuses comparable à la Cisplatine.



Dr Tacke's group has been working on anti-cancer drugs belonging to the titanocene family for five years. 25 novel compounds were initially synthesised in the lab, and were structurally identified and then biologically evaluated.
The most successful analogues so far, Titanocene X and Titanocene Y, have been shown in early in-vitro and ex-vitro experiments to target prostrate, cervix and renal cell cancers, as well as breast cancer cell lines. The researchers believe that titanocenes represent a novel series of promising antitumour agents.

Le groupe du docteur Tacke a travaillé sur les médicaments anti-cancer pour 25 ans. 25 nouvelles molécules ont été initié en laboratoire et furent structurées et évaluées. Les meilleures furent Titanocene X et titanocene Y et ont montré de l'efficacité a ciblé les cellules cancéreuses de la et du Les chercheurs croient que la famille des titanocene représente une nouvelle série d'agents anti-cancer promettteurs.  


According to Dr Tacke: "The successor molecule has been synthesised and has been shown to be 13 times more cytotoxic in vitro. Investigations of this candidate in the next mouse model are currently underway."

Selon Tacke : "La prochaine molécule a été synthétisé et s'est montré 13 fois plus efficace in vtro. Les recherches sur les souris de laboratoire sont déja en marche.


Dernière édition par Denis le Jeu 14 Déc 2017 - 1:53, édité 8 fois
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: Les métaux et le cancer.   

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
Les métaux et le cancer.
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 1
 Sujets similaires
-
» Les machines à laits végétaux crus
» Taux vibratoire et élevation
» Appareil à faire les laits végétaux
» Les minéraux, les végétaux, les animaux sont nos frères
» Taux de variation, regréssion de poisson

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
ESPOIRS :: Cancer :: recherche-
Sauter vers: