AccueilCalendrierFAQRechercherS'enregistrerMembresGroupesConnexion

Partagez | 
 

 Le Keytruda, on étudie les cas de résistances.

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
AuteurMessage
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le Keytruda, on étudie les cas de résistances.   Dim 17 Juil 2016 - 16:08

A research paper published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases reported that the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is safe and efficacious across a wide age range of women. The international study found that it protects against HPV infection in women older than 26 years. Vaccination programs worldwide currently target routine vaccination of women 26 years and younger.

The study recruited women in 12 countries across four continents. Cosette Wheeler, PhD, at The University of New Mexico Comprehensive Cancer Center, was the lead author of the report.

The human papillomaviruses cause cancer of the cervix, anus, and middle throat. Five types of HPV account for about 85 percent of all invasive cervical cancer cases. HPV vaccines are expected to prevent most of these cancer cases.

Many countries routinely vaccinate girls and boys 25 years and younger, although vaccination rates in the United States remain low. In the US, only about 40 percent of girls and 21 percent of boys receive the three-dose vaccination series. The earlier the vaccine is given, the more efficacious it can be.

This study focused on the benefit of vaccinating women 26 years and older. Infection with HPV can take place at any time throughout adulthood and women in this age group may have already been exposed to HPV. The study showed that women in this age group were still protected from HPV infections.

The scientists followed each woman for four to seven years. They found that the vaccine protected the women against HPV infections during the follow-up period and that the women were protected from many types of HPV across a broad age range. These study results are essential to new approaches in cancer prevention, particularly those that are investigating combined approaches of cervical screening and vaccination in adult women.

Cosette Wheeler, PhD is a UNM Regents Professor in the Departments of Pathology and Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center. She holds the Victor and Ruby Hansen Surface Endowed Chair in Translational Medicine and Public Health. Her New Mexico research group has contributed for over 20 years to understanding the molecular epidemiology of human papillomaviruses (HPV) in cervical precancer and cancer among Native American, Hispanic and non-Hispanic women of the southwest and on a global basis. She has overseen a number of large-scale multidisciplinary population-based projects that have ultimately enabled advances in primary (HPV vaccines) and secondary cervical cancer prevention (Pap and HPV tests).


---

Un document de recherche publié dans The Lancet Infectious Diseases a rapporté que le vaccin contre le virus du papillome humain (VPH) est sûr et efficace dans une large plage d'âge des femmes. L'étude internationale a constaté qu'il protège contre l'infection par le VPH chez les femmes âgées de 26 ans. Les programmes de vaccination dans le monde entier ciblent actuellement la vaccination systématique des femmes de 26 ans et moins.

L'étude a recruté des femmes dans 12 pays sur quatre continents. Cosette Wheeler, Ph.D., à l'Université du Nouveau-Mexique Comprehensive Cancer Center, a été l'auteur principal du rapport.

Les papillomavirus humains causent le cancer du col de l'utérus, de l'anus et la gorge du milieu. Cinq types de VPH représentent environ 85 pour cent de tous les cas de cancer du col invasifs. Les vaccins anti-HPV sont censés empêcher la plupart des cas de cancer.

De nombreux pays vaccinent systématiquement les filles et les garçons 25 ans et moins, même si les taux de vaccination dans les Etats-Unis restent faibles. Aux Etats-Unis, seulement environ 40 pour cent des filles et 21 pour cent des garçons reçoivent la série de vaccination à trois doses. Le plus tôt le vaccin est donné, le plus efficace il est.

Cette étude a porté sur le bénéfice de la vaccination des femmes de 26 ans et plus. L'infection par le VPH peut avoir lieu à tout moment à l'âge adulte et les femmes dans ce groupe d'âge peuvent avoir déjà été exposées au VPH. L'étude a montré que les femmes de ce groupe d'âge étaient encore protégés contre les infections par le VPH.

Les scientifiques ont suivi chaque femme pendant quatre à sept ans. Ils ont constaté que le vaccin protégeait les femmes contre les infections au VPH au cours de la période de suivi et que les femmes étaient protégées contre de nombreux types de HPV dans un large éventail d'âge. Ces résultats de l'étude sont essentiels à de nouvelles approches dans la prévention du cancer, en particulier ceux qui étudient des approches combinées de dépistage du col utérin et de la vaccination chez les femmes adultes.

Cosette Wheeler, Ph.D., est professeur Regents UNM dans les départements de pathologie, d'obstétrique et de gynécologie à l'Université du Nouveau-Mexique Health Sciences Center. Elle détient la surface Victor et Ruby Hansen Doué Chaire en médecine translationnelle et de la santé publique. Son groupe de recherche du Nouveau-Mexique a contribué pour plus de 20 ans à la compréhension de l'épidémiologie moléculaire des virus du papillome humain (VPH) dans lésions précancéreuses du col et le cancer chez les femmes amérindiennes, hispaniques et non-hispaniques du sud-ouest et sur une base mondiale. Elle a supervisé un certain nombre de projets multidisciplinaires basées sur la population à grande échelle qui ont finalement permis des avancées en primaires (vaccins contre le VPH) et la prévention du cancer du col secondaire (tests de Pap et HPV).

---


UCLA researchers have for the first time identified mechanisms that determine how advanced melanoma can become resistant to immune checkpoint inhibitors, a discovery that could lead to the development of new and improved treatments for the deadliest type of skin cancer.

Immunotherapy using the anti-PD-1 antibody pembrolizumab (brand name Keytruda) has revolutionized the treatment of advanced melanoma. But a minority of patients who respond to treatment still experience reappearance and progression of their tumors, said Dr. Antoni Ribas, a professor of hematology and oncology, and director of the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center Tumor Immunology Program.

"The tremendous promise of immunotherapy is to engage our body's immune defenses to fight cancer, but the results must be long-lasting," Ribas said. "We have now identified for the first time mechanisms that cancer cells can use to avoid recognition by the immune system's T cells and decrease sensitivity to their attack."

The study will be published online in the New England Journal of Medicine on July 13, 2016.

Led by Ribas and Jesse Zaretsky, the study's first author and a doctoral student in Ribas' lab, the researchers analyzed biopsies of melanoma tumors from patients that received pembrolizumab. The team compared pairs of tumors, both before the patients started treatment and after relapse, which occurred several months to years later.

Among the four pairs of biopsies studied, the team found one tumor lost a gene called B2M, resulting in a change in how the cancer is recognized by the immune system. Two additional tumors developed defects that disrupted the function of genes JAK1 or JAK2, which limited the effectiveness of the immune system to kill cancer cells.

"We discovered that while the immune system's T cells remained active, new alterations in JAK1 and JAK2 caused the tumor to become selectively deaf to the signals they were sending that normally tell the cancer cells to stop growing, while genetic changes in B2M decreased the ability of the immune system to recognize the cancer in the first place," Zaretsky said. "These findings can help open up a whole new potential area of research and allow us to better understand acquired resistance to these promising treatments."

The team also found a fourth pair of biopsies that did not have either of these genetic variations, which indicates that other mechanisms to escape immunotherapies may be discovered in the future, said Zaretsky, who is currently enrolled in the UCLA-Caltech Medical Scientist Training Program.

Ribas' team next plans to develop pre-clinical models to further examine these genetic alterations. As scientists learn what these mechanisms of tumor resistance are, they can combine inhibitor drugs that block multiple resistance routes and eventually make the tumors shrink for much longer, or go away completely, Ribas said.

---

Les chercheurs de UCLA ont pour la première fois identifié des mécanismes qui déterminent comment le mélanome avancé peut devenir résistants aux inhibiteurs de point de contrôle immunitaire, une découverte qui pourrait conduire à la mise au point de traitements nouveaux et améliorés pour le type plus mortel de cancer de la peau.

L'Immunothérapie utilisant l'anticorps anti-PD-1, l'anticorps lambrolizumab (nom de marque Keytruda) a révolutionné le traitement du mélanome avancé. Mais une minorité de patients qui répondent au traitement encore rencontre la réapparition et la progression de leurs tumeurs, a déclaré le Dr Antoni Ribas, professeur d'hématologie et de l'oncologie, et directeur du programme d'immunologie tumorale UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center.

"L'immense promesse de l'immunothérapie est d'engager les défenses immunitaires de notre corps à lutter contre le cancer, mais les résultats doivent être de longue durée», a déclaré Ribas. «Nous avons maintenant identifié pour la première fois des mécanismes  que les cellules cancéreuses peuvent utiliser pour éviter la reconnaissance par les cellules T du système immunitaire et diminuer la sensibilité à leurs attaques."

L'étude sera publiée en ligne dans le New England Journal of Medicine le 13 Juillet, ici 2016.

Dirigé par Ribas et Jesse Zaretsky, premier auteur de l'étude et un étudiant au doctorat dans le laboratoire de Ribas, les chercheurs ont analysé des biopsies de tumeurs de mélanome chez les patients qui ont reçu lambrolizumab. L'équipe a comparé les paires de tumeurs, aussi bien avant que les patients aient commencé le traitement et après une rechute, qui a eu lieu de plusieurs mois à quelques années plus tard.

Parmi les quatre paires de biopsies étudiées, l'équipe a trouvé une tumeur qui a perdu un gène appelé B2M, entraînant un changement dans la façon dont le cancer est reconnu par le système immunitaire. Deux autres tumeurs ont développé des défauts qui ont perturbé la fonction des gènes JAK1 ou JAK2, qui limitaientt l'efficacité du système immunitaire pour tuer les cellules cancéreuses.

"Nous avons découvert que, bien que les cellules T du système immunitaire soient restés actives, de nouvelles modifications dans JAK1 et JAK2 ont fait que la tumeur devenienne sélectivement sourde aux signaux qu'ils envoyaient qui indiquent normalement aux cellules cancéreuses de cesser de croître, alors que les changements génétiques dans B2M ont diminué la capacité du système immunitaire pour reconnaître le cancer en premier lieu », a déclaré Zaretsky. «Ces résultats peuvent aider à ouvrir un tout nouveau domaine potentiel de la recherche et nous permettre de mieux comprendre la résistance acquise à ces traitements prometteurs."

L'équipe a également trouvé une quatrième paire de biopsies qui ne possèdent pas l'une de ces variations génétiques, ce qui indique que d'autres mécanismes pour échapper aux immunothérapies peuvent être découverts à l'avenir, a déclaré Zaretsky, qui est actuellement inscrit au programme de formation scientifique médicale UCLA-Caltech .

L'équipe de Ribas prévoit de développer prochainement des modèles pré-cliniques pour examiner davantage ces altérations génétiques. À mesure que les scientifiques apprennent ce que ces mécanismes de résistance de la tumeur sont, ils peuvent combiner des inhibiteurs qui bloquent les routes de résistance multiples et, éventuellement, faire que les tumeurs rétrécissent beaucoup plus longtemps, ou disparaissent complètement, dit Ribas.


_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le Keytruda, on étudie les cas de résistances.   Jeu 16 Juin 2016 - 10:33

Sylvain Gagnon n’avait plus que deux ans à vivre lorsque son médecin lui a proposé un traitement expérimental, appelé Keytruda, pour combattre son cancer de la peau. Deux ans plus tard, la maladie n’a connu aucune récidive et il participera à un Ironman cet été.

«Ça relève du miracle, estime M. Gagnon, qui reçoit ses traitements à l’Hôpital Juif. Ma situation est stable et je n’ai aucun effet secondaire majeur. Je ne sais pas si les résultats sont positifs pour tout le monde, mais pour moi, le Keytruda fonctionne. Ma seule autre explication serait le thé vert», ironise-t-il.

Le Keytruda est une molécule développée en laboratoire et injectée par intraveineuse. «La molécule localise la tumeur et agit au niveau des globules blancs  afin de les stimuler à combattre le cancer, de la même façon qu’ils sont appelés à combattre lorsque nous avons une infection ou un virus,» explique le Dr Joël Claveau, dermato-oncologue à l’Hôtel-Dieu de Québec.

Quelques mois après que M. Gagnon ait reçu son premier diagnostic de mélanome, en 2010, et malgré les traitements de chimiothérapie et de radiothérapie, les taches cancéreuses se sont multipliées.

Le médecin de profession a dû subir neuf interventions chirurgicales. En 2013, il a été placé en arrêt forcé par le Collège des médecins. Son cerveau était atteint.  Il commence alors le Keytruda. Depuis, il reçoit une injection intraveineuse de 30 minutes toutes les trois semaines, et aucune nouvelle cellule cancéreuse n’a été découverte.

«Je profite de la vie au maximum, se réjouit M. Gagnon. Je passe plus de temps avec ma famille, et je me suis mis à m’entraîner sérieusement.  Cette année, je participerai à une course Ironman, soit 3,8 km de natation, 180 km de vélo et 42 km de course à Tremblant afin de recueillir des fonds.»

Traitement de première ligne

Le 31 mai, Keytruda a officiellement été reconnu comme un traitement de première intention du mélanome métastatique au Canada. Auparavant, il n’était disponible qu’en dernier recours.

«C’est une très bonne nouvelle, soutient Dr Claveau. Le mélanome avancé est, depuis des années, un type de cancer difficile à traiter et contre lequel la plupart des traitements ont été peu efficaces et toxiques dans certains cas. Nous pouvons maintenant espérer que les statistiques de survie vont changer.»

Lors du congrès de l’American Society of Clinical Oncology présenté à Chicago le 4 juin, des chercheurs ont démontré que 40% des patients qui prennent du Keytruda sont en rémission après trois ans de traitement.

Les scientifiques ne connaissent pas encore les effets lors de l’arrêt complet du traitement. Des études sont en cours afin d’arrêter celui-ci après une période de deux ans.

Deux cent soixante-dix essais cliniques sont en cours afin de voir s’ils sont efficaces pour 30 autres types de tumeur.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le Keytruda, on étudie les cas de résistances.   Mer 27 Avr 2016 - 20:58

TUESDAY, April 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A newer drug that boosts the immune system's ability to kill tumor cells may help people with a rare, aggressive form of skin cancer, a preliminary study suggests.

The intravenous drug, marketed as Keytruda, is already used to treat some advanced cases of melanoma, another dangerous form of skin cancer. The new study tested it against a skin tumor called Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC).

Most people have probably never heard of the cancer, but MCC is deadlier than melanoma, said Dr. Paul Nghiem, a professor of medicine at the University of Washington, who led the new study.

When the disease reaches an advanced stage, chemotherapy is an option -- but not a good one, Nghiem said.

"Chemotherapy will often shrink the cancer," he said. "But it comes back quickly, and even angrier."

Plus, chemo can take a toll on the immune system. "And that's a very bad idea in these patients," Nghiem said.

Keytruda (pembrolizumab) is one of a new class of drugs that block a "pathway" called PD-1. That frees up the immune system to attack cancer cells. In the United States, the drug is approved for treating certain cases of lung cancer and advanced melanoma that no longer respond to other drugs.

In the new study, Nghiem's team gave the drug to 26 patients with advanced MCC. Most had metastatic cancer, meaning it had spread beyond lymph nodes near the original skin tumor.

Overall, out of 25 people who were evaluated, 14 patients -- or 56 percent -- saw their cancer shrink at least partially. In four patients, all signs of the cancer disappeared.

And after more than six months of follow-up, the cancer remained under good control in 12 of the 14, Nghiem said.

The findings were scheduled for release Tuesday at the annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research in New Orleans, and published online in the New England Journal of Medicine.

An oncologist who was not involved in the study called the results "impressive."

"For these patients, the response to chemotherapy typically lasts two to four months at best," said Dr. Nikhil Khushalani, of the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Fla. "And metastatic MCC is invariably fatal."

Given the results so far, Khushalani said, it's "likely" the treatment could extend patients' lives.

Each year, about 1,500 Americans are diagnosed with MCC, according to the American Cancer Society. It mainly strikes older adults, and sometimes people with a compromised immune system -- such as organ transplant patients and people with HIV.

But most people who develop MCC do not have a suppressed immune system, Nghiem said.

In recent years, researchers have discovered a virus, dubbed Merkel cell polyomavirus, which seems to contribute to many cases of MCC.

Researchers believe that most people are infected with the virus, but the immune system keeps it in check. It's not clear why or how it feeds MCC development.

Other cases of MCC are tied to excessive ultraviolet exposure from the sun, Nghiem said.

Of the 26 patients in this study, 17 had tumors that carried the Merkel polyomavirus. All patients received Keytruda every three weeks -- for between four and 49 weeks.

A higher percentage of patients with virus-positive tumors responded to the drug. But Nghiem said the difference was not significant in statistical terms, so the treatment seems to work whether the virus is present or not.

There were side effects, with fatigue a common one, Nghiem said.

In general, a danger with Keytruda is that it can damage healthy body tissue. In this study, two patients developed signs of inflammation in the liver or heart muscle and had to discontinue the drug after only one or two doses.

Yet, both patients still showed a response to the drug months after stopping it, Nghiem said.

That touches on a key question: How long do patients need to stay on the drug? One reason that's important, Nghiem noted, is cost. The drug's manufacturer, Merck, priced it at about $12,500 per month.

Nghiem said he suspects patients will vary in how long they need to take the drug.

Keytruda is not yet approved for treating MCC. One way for patients to get the drug would be to enroll in a clinical trial like the current one, Nghiem said.

Merck and the U.S. National Cancer Institute are funding Nghiem's trial.


---


MARDI, 19 Avril 2016 (HealthDay Nouvelles) - Un nouveau médicament qui stimule la capacité du système immunitaire à tuer les cellules tumorales peuvent aider les personnes atteintes d'une forme rare et agressive de cancer de la , selon ce qu'une étude préliminaire suggère.

Le médicament par voie intraveineuse, est commercialisé sous le nom de Keytruda et est déjà utilisé pour traiter certains cas avancés de mélanome, une autre forme dangereuse de cancer de la peau. La nouvelle étude a testé contre le carcinome à cellules de Merkel de la peau (MCC).

La plupart des gens ont probablement jamais entendu parler de ce cancer, mais MCC est plus mortelle que le mélanome, a déclaré le Dr Paul Nghiem, professeur de médecine à l'Université de Washington, qui a dirigé la nouvelle étude.

Lorsque la maladie atteint un stade avancé, la chimiothérapie est une option - mais pas une bonne , dit Nghiem.

«La chimiothérapie va souvent réduire le cancer," at-il dit. "Mais il revient rapidement, et il encore plus en colère."

De plus, la chimiothérapie peut prendre un péage sur le système immunitaire. "Et c'est une très mauvaise idée chez ces patients», a déclaré Nghiem.

Le Keytruda (lambrolizumab) fait partie d'une nouvelle classe de médicaments qui bloquent une «voie» appelée PD-1. Qui libère le système immunitaire pour attaquer les cellules cancéreuses. Aux Etats-Unis, le médicament est approuvé pour le traitement de certains cas de cancer du poumon et le mélanome avancé qui ne répondent plus aux autres médicaments.

Dans la nouvelle étude, l'équipe de Nghiem a donné le médicament à 26 patients à un stade avancé MCC. La plupart avaient un cancer métastatique, ce qui signifie qu'il avait propagé au-delà des ganglions lymphatiques près de la tumeur d'origine de la peau.

Dans l'ensemble, des 25 personnes qui ont été évalués, 14 patients - ou 56 pour cent - ont vu leur cancer se rétrécir au moins partiellement. Chez quatre patients, tous les signes du cancer ont disparu.

Et après plus de six mois de suivi, le cancer est resté sous bon contrôle dans 12 des 14, dit Nghiem.

Les résultats ont été prévus pour être révélés mardi à la réunion annuelle de l'American Association for Cancer Research à la Nouvelle Orléans, et publiés en ligne dans le New England Journal of Medicine.

Un oncologue qui n'a pas participé à l'étude a qualifié les résultats d' «impressionnants».

«Pour ces patients, la réponse à la chimiothérapie dure généralement deux à quatre mois, au mieux», a déclaré le Dr Nikhil Khushalani, du Moffitt Cancer Center à Tampa, en Floride. "Et le MCC métastatique est invariablement fatale."

Compte tenu des résultats obtenus jusqu'à présent, Khushalani dit, il est «probable» le traitement pourrait prolonger la vie des patients.

Chaque année, environ 1.500 Américains sont diagnostiqués avec le MCC, selon l'American Cancer Society. Elle frappe principalement les personnes âgées, et parfois les personnes ayant un système immunitaire affaibli - comme les patients transplantés d'organes et des personnes vivant avec le VIH.

Mais la plupart des gens qui développent MCC ne disposent pas d'un système immunitaire affaibli, selon Nghiem.

Au cours des dernières années, les chercheurs ont découvert un virus, appelé Polyomavirus à cellules de Merkel, qui semble contribuer à de nombreux cas de CMC.

Les chercheurs croient que la plupart des personnes sont infectées par le virus, mais que le système immunitaire garde en échec. On ne sait pas pourquoi ni comment il nourrit le développement MCC.

D'autres cas de MCC sont liés à une exposition excessive aux ultraviolets du soleil, dit Nghiem.

Sur les 26 patients dans cette étude, 17 avaient des tumeurs qui ont porté le polyomavirus Merkel. Tous les patients ont reçu Keytruda toutes les trois semaines - entre quatre et 49 semaines.

Un pourcentage plus élevé de patients avec des tumeurs de virus positifs a répondu au médicament. Mais Nghiem dit que la différence n'a pas été significative en termes statistiques, de sorte que le traitement semble fonctionner si le virus soit présent ou non.

Il y avait des effets secondaires, de fatigue dit Nghiem.

En général, un danger de Keytruda est qu'il peut endommager le tissu sain. Dans cette étude, deux patients ont développé des signes d'inflammation dans le foie ou le muscle cardiaque et a dû arrêter le médicament après seulement une ou deux doses.

Pourtant, les deux patients ont montré encore une réponse au médicaments des mois après l'avoir arrêter, dit Nghiem.

Cela touche à une question clé: Combien de temps les patients ont besoin de rester sur le médicament? C'est une question importante, note Nghiem à cause du coût. Le prix est  à environ 12.500 $ par mois.

Nghiem a dit qu'il soupçonne que le temps dont les gens ont besoin de prendre le médicament varie.

Keytruda n'a pas encore été approuvé pour le traitement de la MCC. Une façon pour les patients d'obtenir le médicament serait d'inscrire à un essai clinique comme l'actuel, Nghiem dit.

Merck et l'Institut national du cancer des Etats-Unis financent les tests de Nghiem.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le Keytruda, on étudie les cas de résistances.   Lun 2 Juin 2008 - 9:52

(Jun. 2, 2008) — Disabling a protein frequently found in melanoma tumors may make the cancer more vulnerable to chemotherapy, according to a pilot study led by researchers in the Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Rendre inéoprante une protéine trouvée fréquemment dans le mélanome peut rendre le cancer plus vulnérable au chimiothérapie selon une ètude pilote.

"We tested a compound that can weaken the tumor by targeting a protein found on the surface of a melanoma cell," said Douglas Tyler, M.D., a surgeon at Duke and the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and senior investigator on this study. "When chemotherapy was applied to the tumor in this weakened state it was much more effective compared to conventional therapy alone.,"

The researchers presented their findings June 1 in a poster discussion session at the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting in Chicago. The study was funded by Adherex Technologies, the company developing the compound that was tested in combination with chemotherapy.

Sixteen patients received the therapy as part of this study. All had been diagnosed with regionally advanced, in-transit melanoma, characterized by cancerous growths that appear and spread mainly on the limbs. This type of melanoma is often treated with regional chemotherapy, where veins and arteries are accessed in the affected area and large doses of chemotherapy are pumped directly into the body. The patients on this study received a drug known as ADH-1 both before and after chemotherapy; ADH-1 makes it difficult for cells to properly bind to one another.

Les patients de cette étude ont reçu un médicament connu sous le nom de ADH-1 avant et après la chimio, l'ADH-1 rend difficlle pour les cellules de se lier efficacement à une autre.

"Eight of the patients on the study had complete responses to therapy, meaning their tumors completely disappeared," said Georgia Beasley, M.D., a medical student at Duke and lead investigator on the study. "This is very encouraging and we look forward to continuing this study and then eventually moving on to a Phase III trial."

8 des 16 patient s ont eu des réponses complètes (= complètement guéris) ce qui veut dire que leurs tumeurs a complètement disparus" C'est très encourageant et nous voulons aller en phase III.
Regional infusion of chemotherapy for melanoma is given under surgical conditions. Without ADH-1, patients generally have complete responses about 25 to 35 percent of the time.

"Compared to some previous data, we have been able to double the number of complete responders to therapy by adding the ADH-1, so that's extremely promising," Beasley said.

Melanoma often affects people on their extremities, with a common scenario being a mole that appears on the foot and then spreads up the leg.

"These early results really speak to the importance of developing combination therapies," Beasley said. "Earlier animal results showed that using ADH-1 alone was not an effective treatment, but in combination with chemotherapy the results, both pre-clinically and clinically, have been very exciting."

The incidence of malignant melanoma is increasing at a rate faster than any other cancer, with 60,000 new cases expected to be diagnosed this year in the United States. Melanoma that has spread beyond the primary site is rarely curable, and treatment options are limited; even when it is treated, the response rates are typically poor and most people die within six to nine months.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Le Keytruda, on étudie les cas de résistances.   Ven 16 Mai 2008 - 9:55

(May 16, 2008) — By targeting and disabling a protein frequently found in melanoma tumors, doctors may be able to make the cancer more vulnerable to chemotherapy, according to a new study by researchers in the Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center.

En ciblant et désactivant une protéine fréquemment trouvée sur les tumeurs du mélanome, les docteurs peuvent rendre ce cancer plus vulnérable à la chimio thérapie, selon une étude de chercheurs du centre de recherche sur le Cancer Duke.

"We tested a compound that can weaken the tumor by targeting a protein expressed on the surface of a melanoma cell. When chemotherapy was applied to the tumor in this weakened state it was much more effective compared to conventional therapy alone," said Douglas Tyler, M.D., a surgeon at Duke and the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and senior investigator on this study. "These results are extremely significant because they may help us better treat patients with this deadly condition."

"Nous avons testé une molécule qui peut affaiblir la tumeur en ciblant une protéine exprimée sur la cellule affectée par le mélanome. Quand la chimio fut appliqué à la tumeur dans son état affaibli, celle-ci était beaucoup plus eficace comparée à la chimio conventionnelle. Ces résultats sont extrêmement significatifs parce qu'ils peuvent aider à mieux soigner les patients."

Although this study was done in laboratory rats, a clinical trial applying the same concept to humans has already begun at four comprehensive cancer centers nationwide, including Duke.

Même si cette étude a été faite sur des rats, des essais cliniques sont en cours.

The researchers published their findings from the animal study in the May 15, 2008 issue of the journal Cancer Research. Funding for this study came from the United States Department of Veterans Affairs, the Duke Institute for Genome Sciences & Policy, the Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center and Adherex Technologies, the company developing the compound that was tested in combination with chemotherapy.

After being implanted with melanoma tumors, rats were given a drug known as ADH-1, which makes it difficult for cells to bind properly to one another. The animals were then given one of two types of common chemotherapy drugs, melphalan and temozolomide.

"We found that the response to ADH-1 in combination with melphalan was more dramatic than the response to the drug in combination with temozolomide," Tyler said. "The reason may be that the melphalan was infused directly into the affected area while temozolomide is given systemically."

"Nous avons trouvé que la réponse à l'ADH-1 en combinaison avec le melphalan était plus forte que la réponse du médicament en combinaison avec le temozolomide" "La raison peut être que le melphalan a été envoyé directemetn dans la région concernée tandis que le temozolomide a été donné au  système en général."

The researchers saw a 30-fold reduction in tumor size following treatment with ADH-1 and melphalan chemotherapy compared to chemotherapy alone. Tumor size shrunk about twofold in response to ADH-1 and temozolomide, Tyler said.

Des chercheurs ont vu une réduction par 30 d'une tumeur après le traitement avec le ADH-1 et le melphalan.

"We saw a complete regression of the tumors in the animal model when we used the regional melphalan chemotherapy in combination with ADH-1, which is far better than anything we have seen before with the chemotherapy alone," Tyler said. "Furthermore, the addition of ADH-1 produced no additional side effects, which is an important consideration in cancer treatment."

Regional infusion of chemotherapy for melanoma is given under surgical conditions, through the artery and vein in the affected limbs. Melanoma often affects people on their extremities, with a common scenario being a mole that appears on the foot and then spreads up the leg.

"These results clearly demonstrate the effectiveness of combination therapies," said Christina Augustine, Ph.D., a researcher in Duke's Department of Surgery and lead investigator on the study. "Used alone the ADH-1 really didn't confer any significant benefit but in combination with the melphalan chemotherapy, we saw a powerful one-two-punch effect."

The incidence of malignant melanoma is increasing at a rate faster than any other cancer, with 60,000 new cases expected to be diagnosed this year in the United States. Melanoma that has spread beyond the primary site is rarely curable, and treatment options are limited; even when it is treated, the response rates are typically poor and most people die within six to nine months.


Dernière édition par Denis le Dim 17 Juil 2016 - 16:10, édité 4 fois
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: Le Keytruda, on étudie les cas de résistances.   Aujourd'hui à 22:12

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
Le Keytruda, on étudie les cas de résistances.
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 1
 Sujets similaires
-
» Sondage; la ou j'étudie
» Intégrer l'étude dans sa pratique
» Lockheed Martin étudie un "Orion Astéroïde"
» Moi, ma vie, mon histoire
» La Nasa étudie 28 missions potentielles en quête de vie extra-terrestre.

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
ESPOIRS :: Cancer :: recherche-
Sauter vers: