AccueilCalendrierFAQRechercherS'enregistrerMembresGroupesConnexion

Partagez | 
 

 Des nanotechnologies.

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
AuteurMessage
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Des nanotechnologies.   Ven 26 Aoû 2016 - 17:49

NIBIB researchers have created a nanovaccine that could make a current approach to cancer immunotherapy more effective while also reducing side effects. The nanovaccine helps to efficiently deliver a unique DNA sequence to immune cells -- a sequence derived from bacterial DNA and used to trigger an immune reaction. The nanovaccine also protects the DNA from being destroyed inside the body, where DNA-cutting enzymes are pervasive, as well as outside of the body when exposed to warm temperatures while being stored or transported. The researchers successfully tested the nanovaccine in mice and detailed their work in the March 2016 issue of the journal Nanoscale.

Tumors evade the immune system by suppressing its ability to recognize and kill cancer cells. The goal of immunotherapy is to normalize and harness the body's immune system so that it can more effectively fight the tumors.

One approach to immunotherapy has been to introduce a foreign substance into the body called unmethylated cytosine-guanine oligodeoxynucleotides (or CpG). CpGs are distinct patterns of DNA sequences that occur in bacteria but are rare in mammals. When injected into humans, CpGs act as a danger signal that triggers an immune response. Recently, a number of clinical trials have experimented with injecting CpGs directly into a tumor as a way to activate nearby immune cells so that they attack it.

In addition to inducing an immune response at the tumor site, CpGs are also thought to stimulate immune cells responsible for initiating the body's systemic adaptive immune response. This may help the immune system remember specific proteins associated with cancer cells so that it can identify and destroy the cancer cells if they spread.

Yet, despite its potential, CpG-based immunotherapy has been hampered by a number of challenges. Most notably is that CpG doesn't spend much time inside a tumor once injected into it. This is because CpGs are relatively small molecules and have a negative charge, two primary characteristics that cause them to be rapidly cleared by the body. CpGs are also susceptible to degradation by DNA-targeting enzymes. As a result, there are not often enough CpGs available to stimulate immune cells in order to generate a sufficient immune response.

Researchers at the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, part of the NIH, are working to solve these challenges by creating DNA-inorganic hybrid nanovaccines (hNVs). The hNVs get their name because they combine multiple strands of CpG DNA with an inorganic substance -- magnesium pyrophosphate -- in order to form extremely small, flower-like complexes that are taken up by immune cells. The complexes protect the CpG DNA from degradation and their size is easily manipulated so that they aren't quickly cleared by the body. In addition, multiple copies of CpG DNA can be incorporated into each complex, further contributing to a robust immune response.

To determine the behavior of hNVs in mouse immune cells, the researchers incorporated fluorescent molecules into them so that they could be visualized. They found that the hNVs were efficiently taken up by two different types of mouse immune cells, and they induced activation of the immune cells as evidenced by their secretion of proteins involved in inflammation.

Next, in mice that had been given melanoma, the researchers injected either hNVs or just the CpG molecules alone. The hNVs remained in the tumor environment longer than the CpG molecules, and after two injections spaced six days apart, the hNVs had a greater inhibitory effect on the growth of the mice's tumors. As a result, two of the five mice who received hNVs were still alive after 37 days of treatment (at which point the study ended), whereas no mice receiving CpG alone survived past day 30.

In addition to boosting the immune response induced by CpGs, the hNVs also reduced side effects associated with administration of CpG by decreasing the amount of CpG that leaked out of the tumor and into the bloodstream. One indication of the side effects of CpG immunotherapy is an enlarged spleen. The researchers showed that mice injected with hNVs had spleens that weighed nearly half as much as mice injected with CpG molecules.

According to the researchers, an additional benefit of the hNVs is that they stabilize the CpGs so that they don't need to be refrigerated while stored or being transported. This is important because refrigeration requirements can significantly increase the price of vaccines and limit who has access to them.

"What's exciting about these nanovaccine complexes is that they are easy to make, yet they have many capabilities," said Guizhi Zhu, Ph.D., the paper's lead author. "They enable a large number of CpG molecules to be delivered to immune cells, they prevent CpG from leaking into the bloodstream and, in doing so, reduce side effects; they can accommodate fluorescent molecules so that CpG behavior can be studied, and they enable CpG to be stored in non-refrigerated conditions."

Going forward, the researchers plan to investigate the effects of combining the hNVs with tumor-specific antigens, which are proteins found only in tumor cells. By adding these proteins, they hope to further instruct the immune system as to which cells are cancerous and should be killed. They are also interested in combining the hNVs with chemotherapy as well as radiation therapy. DNA-inorganic hybrid nanovaccine for cancer immunotherapy.

---

Les chercheurs NIBIB ont créé un nanovaccin qui pourrait rendre l'approche actuelle de l'immunothérapie du cancer plus efficace tout en réduisant les effets secondaires. Le nanovaccin aide à fournir efficacement une séquence unique d'ADN à des cellules immunitaires - une séquence dérivée de l'ADN bactérien et utilisé pour déclencher une réaction immunitaire. Le nanovaccin protège également l'ADN d'être détruite à l'intérieur du corps, où les enzymes qui coupent l'adn sont très répandues, comme il aide aussi à le préserver à l'extérieur du corps lorsqu'il est exposé à des températures élevées tout en étant stockée ou transportée. Les chercheurs ont testé avec succès le nanovaccin chez la souris et en détail rapporter leurs travaux dans le numéro de Mars 2016 la revue nanométrique.

Les tumeurs échapper au système immunitaire en supprimant sa capacité à reconnaître et tuer les cellules cancéreuses. Le but de l'immunothérapie est de normaliser et d'exploiter le système immunitaire du corps afin qu'il puisse lutter plus efficacement contre les tumeurs.

Une approche de l'immunothérapie a été d'introduire une substance étrangère dans le corps appelé oligodésoxynucléotides cytosine-guanine non méthylés (ou CpG). Les CpG sont différents motifs de séquences d'ADN qui se produisent dans les bactéries, mais qui sont rares chez les mammifères. Lorsqu'ils sont injectés dans les humains, les CpG agissent comme un signal d'alarme qui déclenche une réponse immunitaire. Récemment, un certain nombre d'essais cliniques ont expérimenté l'injection de CpG directement dans une tumeur comme un moyen d'activer les cellules immunitaires à proximité afin qu'elles attaquent la tumeur.

En plus d'induire une réponse immunitaire au niveau du site de la tumeur, les CpG sont également vus comme pouvant stimuler les cellules immunitaires responsables de l'initiation systémique de la réponse immunitaire adaptative du corps. Cela peut aider le système immunitaire à se rappeler des protéines spécifiques associés à des cellules cancéreuses afin qu'il puisse identifier et détruire les cellules cancéreuses si elles se propagent.

Pourtant, en dépit de son potentiel, l'immunothérapie à base de CpG a été entravée par un certain nombre de défis. La plus notable est que CpG ne passe pas beaucoup de temps à l'intérieur d'une tumeur une fois injecté en elle. En effet, les CpG sont de relativement petites molécules et ont une charge négative, deux caractéristiques principales qui les amènent à être rapidement éliminés par l'organisme. Les CpG sont également sensibles à la dégradation par les enzymes de l'ADN de ciblage. Par conséquent, il n'y a pas assez souvent de CpG disponibles pour stimuler les cellules immunitaires afin de générer une réponse immunitaire suffisante.

Des chercheurs de l'Institut national d'imagerie biomédicale et Bioengineering, une partie du NIH, travaillent pour résoudre ces problèmes en créant des nanovaccins hybrides d'ADN inorganique (hNVS). Les hNVS tirent leur nom du fait qu'ils combinent plusieurs brins d'ADN de CpG avec une substance inorganique - le pyrophosphate de magnésium - pour former des complexes extrêmement petits, ressemblant à des fleurs qui sont avalés par les cellules immunitaires. Les complexes protègent l'ADN du CpG de la dégradation et leur taille est facile à manipuler de sorte qu'ils ne sont pas rapidement éliminés par l'organisme. De plus, des copies multiples de l'ADN à CpG peuvent être incorporés dans chaque complexe, ce qui contribue à une réponse immunitaire vigoureuse.

Pour déterminer le comportement des hNVS dans des cellules de souris immunitaire, les chercheurs ont incorporé des molécules fluorescentes en eux afin qu'ils puissent être visualisées. Ils ont constaté que les hNVS ont été efficacement absorbés par les deux types de cellules immunitaires de souris différents, et ils ont induit l'activation des cellules immunitaires comme le montre la sécrétion de protéines impliquées dans l'inflammation.

Ensuite, chez les souris qui avaient reçu le mélanome, les chercheurs ont injecté soit hNVS ou simplement les molécules CpG seul. Le hNVS est resté dans l'environnement tumoral plus longuement que les molécules CpG, et après deux injections espacées de six jours d'intervalle, les hNVS a eu un effet inhibiteur plus important sur la croissance des tumeurs des souris. En conséquence, deux des cinq souris qui ont reçu hNVS étaient encore en vie après 37 jours de traitement (à ce point l'étude est terminée), alors qu'aucune souris recevant CpG n'a survécu un seul jour passé le 30ième.

En plus de stimuler la réponse immunitaire induite par les CpG, les hNVS a également réduit les effets secondaires associés à l'administration de CpG en diminuant la quantité de CpG qui a fui hors de la tumeur et dans la circulation sanguine. Une indication des effets secondaires de  immunothérapie CpG est une hypertrophie de la rate. Les chercheurs ont montré que les souris injectées avec hNVS avaient des rates qui pesaient presque autant que 1 fois et 1/2 les rates des souris injectées avec des molécules CpG.

Selon les chercheurs, un avantage supplémentaire de la hNVS est qu'ils stabilisent le CpG de sorte qu'ils ne nécessitent pas d'être réfrigéré pendant le stockage ou le transport. Ceci est important parce que les exigences de réfrigération peuvent augmenter de manière significative le prix des vaccins et limiter ceux qui y ont accès.

"Ce qui est excitant à propos de ces complexes de nanovaccin est qu'ils sont faciles à faire, mais qu'ils ont beaucoup de capacités», a déclaré Guizhi Zhu, Ph.D., auteur principal du document. «Ils permettent à un grand nombre de molécules CpG d'être livrées aux cellules immunitaires, ils empêchent les CpG de fuir dans la circulation sanguine et, ce faisant, ils réduisent les effets secondaires, ils peuvent accueillir des molécules fluorescentes de sorte que le comportement CpG peut être étudié, et ils permettent que les CpG soient stockés dans des conditions non réfrigérées ".

À l'avenir, les chercheurs envisagent d'étudier les effets de la combinaison des hNVS avec des antigènes spécifiques de tumeurs, qui sont des protéines présentes uniquement dans les cellules tumorales. En ajoutant ces protéines, ils espèrent instruire davantage le système immunitaire au sujets des cellules cancéreuses qui doivent être tuées. Ils sont également intéressés à combiner les hNVS avec la chimiothérapie et la radiothérapie. L' ADN-inorganique hybride le nanovaccin pour l'immunothérapie du cancer.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Des nanotechnologies.   Ven 20 Déc 2013 - 18:38


Dans le cadre d'un projet de recherche international, une équipe de chercheurs a mis au point une pince d'ADN qui permet de détecter les mutations au niveau de l'ADN avec beaucoup plus d'efficacité que les méthodes actuellement en usage.

Leurs travaux pourraient grandement faciliter le dépistage rapide de plusieurs maladies ayant une base génétique, comme le cancer, et fournir de nouveaux outils permettant plusieurs avancées en nanotechnologies. Les résultats de ce projet de recherche ont été publiés ce mois-ci dans le journal ACS Nano.

Vers une nouvelle génération de tests de dépistage
Un nombre croissant de mutations génétiques sont identifiées comme étant des facteurs de risques pour le développement de cancers ainsi que de nombreuses autres maladies. Plusieurs groupes de recherches tentent ainsi de mettre au point des méthodes de dépistage rapides et peu dispendieuses pour la détection de ces mutations. " Les résultats de notre étude ont une très grande implication dans le domaine diagnostique et thérapeutique, souligne de prime abord le professeur Francesco Ricci, car ces pinces d'ADN peuvent être adaptées pour fournir un signal fluorescent en présence d'une séquence d'ADN possédant une mutation à haut risque pour un type de cancer par exemple.

L'avantage de notre pince fluorescence, par rapport aux autres méthodes de détection, est qu'elle permet de distinguer entre l'ADN mutant ou non mutant avec beaucoup plus d'efficacité. Cette information est déterminante car elle permet d'informer un patient de quel(s) cancer(s) il est menacé ou atteint."

"La nature est sans cesse une source d'inspiration pour le développement de technologies, ajoute le professeur Alexis Vallée-Bélisle . Par exemple, en plus d'avoir révolutionné notre compréhension du vivant, la découverte en 1953 de la double hélice d'ADN par Watson, Crick et Franklin a également inspiré le développement de nombreux tests diagnostiques qui utilisent la forte affinité entre deux brins d'ADN complémentaires pour détecter des mutations."

"Toutefois, il est aussi connu que l'ADN peut adopter de nombreuses autres architectures, comme une triple hélice qui est obtenue pour des séquences d'ADN riches en résidus purines (A, G) ou pyrimidines (T,C), poursuit le chercheur Andrea Idili, premier auteur de cette étude. Inspiré par ces triples hélices naturelles, nous avons ainsi mis au point une pince à base d'ADN qui permet de former une triple hélice avec une spécificité qui est dix fois plus grande que ce que permet la double hélice. "

"Outre les applications évidentes en diagnostique de maladies génétiques, je crois que ces travaux ouvriront la voie à d'importantes applications liées à la conception de nanostructures et de nanomachines à base d'ADN, résume le professeur Kevin Plaxco de l'Université de Californie à Santa Barbara. Ces nanomachines d'ADN laissent entrevoir des méthodes révolutionnaires pour administrer des médicaments ciblés contre le cancer. Cela aura sans doute un impact majeur sur la santé mondiale dans un futur prochain. "

"La prochaine étape est de tester la pince sur des échantillons humains et, si c'est concluant, le processus de commercialisation pourra être enclenché", de conclure le professeur Vallée-Bélisle.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Des nanotechnologies.   Mar 1 Mar 2011 - 13:39

Une technologie innovante pour combattre le cancer
[Date: 2011-02-28]

Des chercheurs financés par l'UE poursuivent leur combat contre le cancer. Une équipe néerlandaise a réussi à stimuler le dosage de la chimiothérapie sur les tumeurs avec la possibilité d'apaiser les effets secondaires nuisibles grâce à l'association de l'imagerie par résonance magnétique (IRM) et les ultrasons. Leur recherche est en partie financée par le projet SONODRUGS («Image-controlled ultrasound-induced drug delivery»), qui est soutenu par presque 10,8 millions d'euros au titre du thème Nanosciences, Nanotechnologies, Matériaux et Technologies de la production (NMP) du septième programme-cadre (7e PC).

L'Université de technologie d'Eindhoven a collaboré avec Philips Electronics pour créer une technologie sophistiquée pouvant aider les patients dans le besoin. L'équipe a effectué une démonstration de cette technique pour la toute première fois dans le cadre d'une étude préclinique de validation de principe.

Près de la moitié des patients atteints d'un cancer sont soumis à une chimiothérapie pour traiter leur maladie. Les médicaments de chimiothérapie traversent la circulation sanguine, en détruisant rapidement les cellules en mitose telles que les cellules cancéreuses. Mais dans leur quête de la lutte de la maladie, les médicaments de chimiothérapie ne connaissent pas de limites et finissent par attaquer les cellules en mitose saines et normales dans diverses parties du corps dont la moelle osseuse, les poils et cheveux et les muqueuses. Les patients sont donc confrontés à de nombreux effets secondaires, tels que la neutropénie, un taux de leucocytes plus faible, de l'anémie, un taux d'érythrocytes plus faible, ainsi que des hémorragies.

Certains chercheurs affirment que la chimiothérapie est complexe car les médicaments sont dispersés dans le corps entier et ne sont pas absorbés de façon proportionnelle; certaines régions n'absorbent pas le dosage nécessaire.

Sous la direction de Holger Grüll, l'équipe a créé une méthode de livraison pour pallier le problème. Un balayage IRM est d'abord effectué sur des patients atteints de cancer; cela permet aux médecins de localiser et d'évaluer la taille de la tumeur.
Les liposomes, de petites particules sensibles à la température contenant un agent de contraste IRM et un médicament de chimiothérapie, sont injectés dans les patients et traversent le sang jusqu'à ce qu'ils atteignent leur cible, autrement dit la tumeur. Le produit de contraste circule avec le médicament en lui permettant de suivre la voie du médicament à l'intérieur du corps et de le localiser lorsqu'il atteint la tumeur et les tissus environnants. À ce moment, un faisceau à ultrasons focalisés de haute énergie est utilisé pour anéantir les liposomes et libérer le médicament à l'endroit de la tumeur.

Dans le cadre de leur étude, les chercheurs ont évalué l'absorption du produit anticancéreux appelé doxorubicine chez les rats. Ils ont ainsi découvert que l'absorption était deux et cinq fois plus élevée dans les tumeurs induites par rapport à la livraison de chimiothérapie classique.

«Dans certaines tumeurs, vous avez une partie centrale qui n'est plus approvisionnée en sang, et la chimiothérapie ne peut donc plus atteindre cette partie et la tuer», affirmait Matthew Harris de Philips Research.

L'équipe déclarait que le système prototype est fondé sur le scanneur Sonalleve 3-Tesla MRI-HIFU, qui est utilisé pour traiter les fibroïdes utérins - des tumeurs bénignes douloureuses formées à partir de la couche musculaire dans l'utérus de la femme. Le scanneur IRM associé à des ultrasons d'intensité élevée localise et ôte les fibroïdes par ablation, la suppression des cellules non souhaitées.

Cette validation de concept est apparue dans la revue the Journal of Controlled Release en février 2011.

Pour de plus amples informations, consulter:
Université de technologie d'Eindhoven
http://w3.tue.nl/en/

SONODRUGS:
http://www.sonodrugs.eu/
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Des nanotechnologies.   Jeu 11 Nov 2010 - 13:40

Cancer: marquage des cellules par des nanoparticules Marquage des cellules par des nanoparticules: un nouvel élan pour les thérapies cellulaires anti-cancéreuses par imagerie médicale.

Pour la première fois, l'efficacité du marquage de cellules humaines du système immunitaire par des nanoparticules à base de gadolinium, atome largement utilisé en IRM, a été démontrée in vivo, chez des souris humanisées. Il s'appuie sur une méthode simple applicable en routine clinique et s'inscrit dans le cadre de projets de vaccination anti-tumorale dans le domaine du cancer. En permettant de suivre les cellules par imagerie (IRM) jusqu'à leur destruction, cette avancée donne un nouveau souffle au progrès de la thérapie cellulaire -utilisation de cellules humaines à visée thérapeutique- qui jusqu'ici n'a pu apporter l'efficacité attendue. Financé par le CLARA, Cancéropôle Lyon Auvergne Rhône-Alpes, ce projet (Un projet est - dans un contexte professionnel - une aventure temporaire entreprise dans le but de créer un produit ou...) baptisé "Nanosondes Hybrides pour une imagerie multimodale du suivi cellulaire en cancérologie", associe des chercheurs de nombreuses spécialités et un industriel qui s'est positionné sur le marché du marquage cellulaire. La prochaine étape du projet est la poursuite des développements chez l'homme avec la collaboration de l'unité INSERM U851 (F. Bérard).

Thérapie cellulaire: espoirs et réalités

La thérapie cellulaire consiste à utiliser des cellules humaines à visée thérapeutique. Elle est envisagée dans le traitement de pathologies cancéreuses depuis plusieurs années. Elle a suscité des espoirs énormes mais les tests effectués en laboratoire ont pour l'instant rarement été confirmés chez l'homme. C'est notamment le cas des traitements (on parle alors de "vaccinothérapie anti-tumorale") entrepris avec des cellules spécifiques du système immunitaire, les cellules dendritiques, chez des patients atteints de cancers de la peau (mélanomes) ou de la prostate. Ils se sont révélés très peu efficaces. Une des hypothèses de l'échec de ces thérapies, est que les cellules dendritiques n'atteignent pas le lieu où elles peuvent être actives (les ganglions), notamment parce que la voie d'injection (Le mot injection peut avoir plusieurs significations Smile choisie n'est pas optimale. D'où, l'idée d'utiliser l'imagerie médicale comme un outil (Un outil est un objet finalisé utilisé par un être vivant dans le but d'augmenter son efficacité naturelle dans...) de suivi des cellules injectées dans l'organisme et d'évaluation des stratégies de vaccinothérapie anti-tumorale. Dans cette perspective, il était nécessaire de rendre repérables par imagerie les cellules à l'intérieur du corps humain. Ce "tatouage" préalable des cellules est appelé marquage cellulaire. Le développement des nanotechnologies a permis de développer différentes particules dans ce but.

Des chercheurs de l'Etablissement Français du Sang de Grenoble et de l'Institut Albert Bonniot (équipe de Joël Plumas), de l'Université Joseph Fourrier et de l'INSERM U823 ont mis au point (Graphie) une stratégie (La stratégie - du grec stratos qui signifie « armée » et ageîn qui signifie « conduire » -...) d'immunothérapie du mélanome appelée "GENiusVAC", basée sur des cellules immunitaires dendritiques humaines (pDC). Ces cellules jouent un rôle crucial dans les réponses immunes anti-tumorales et anti-virales. L'imagerie constituerait un outil de suivi de ces cellules après leur administration chez l'homme.

Marquage cellulaire: de l'hypothèse à la démonstration

Le projet "Nanosondes Hybrides pour une imagerie multimodale du suivi cellulaire en cancérologie" a permis de démontrer pour la première fois qu'il était possible de marquer des cellules dendritiques plasmocytoïdes humaines (pDC), à l'aide de particules hybrides paramagnétiques. Proposées comme vaccin anti-tumoral, ces cellules peuvent être ainsi suivies par imagerie non-invasive par résonnance magnétique (IRM), depuis le moment de leur injection jusqu'à leur destruction, avec une méthode simple applicable en routine clinique.

Financé dans le cadre du dispositif preuve du concept du CLARA, Cancéropôle Lyon Auvergne Rhône-Alpes, ce projet associe aux équipes académique et clinique, un industriel. Le projet a permis à ce dernier, la société NANO-H de valider les matériaux hybrides, leur production et leur commercialisation en conditions biologiques. La société s'est ainsi positionnée depuis 2008 sur le marché du marquage cellulaire (kit NSH-CellLab) pour aider à la mise au point et l'évaluation des thérapies cellulaires.

La démonstration de l'efficacité du marquage cellulaire par nanoparticules a été réalisée chez la souris et devrait faire l'objet de développements chez l'homme avec la collaboration de l'unité INSERM U851 (Fréderic Bérard).


Des résultats fondés sur la conjugaison originale de compétences variées

Le projet "Nanosondes Hybrides pour une imagerie multimodale du suivi cellulaire en cancérologie" est un projet issu du dispositif "Preuve du Concept" du Cancéropole Lyon - Rhône-Alpes - Auvergne. Financé par ce dernier et la Start-Up NANO-H S.A.S, le projet est coordonné par Claire Billotey. Il mutualise des compétences variées dont la conjugaison a permis d'aboutir à ce résultat:

- des spécialistes du marquage cellulaire et d'imagerie médicale (Laboratoire CREATIS-LRMN, équipe IMTHERNAT, Claire Billotey et Marc Janier) qui ont mis au point et défini les paramètres du marquage et de la détection par IRM des cellules, et réalisé les études d'imagerie,

- des chercheurs de l'Etablissement Français du Sang à Grenoble (Caroline Aspord, David Laurin - équipe de Joël Plumas) ont mis au point le marquage de ces cellules et le modèle animal et effectué tous les tests fonctionnels in vitro et in vivo,

- de chimistes de l'université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 (Laboratoire LPCML, équipe FENNEC, Olivier Tillement), qui ont mis au point et développé la synthèse de particules nanométriques à cœur de gadolinium, en association avec une équipe de physiciens de l'INSA de Lyon (Laboratoire MATEIS, Pascal Perriat),

- et une start-up de la région Rhône-Alpes (NANO-H S.A.S., Cédric Louis) qui développe, élabore et commercialise ces marqueurs hybrides.

L'ensemble de ces travaux n'aurait pas vu le jour (Le jour ou la journée est l'intervalle qui sépare le lever du coucher du Soleil ; c'est la période entre deux...) sans les collaborations plus fondamentales développées avec les équipes INSERM U870 (Charles Thivolet) et U823 (Christian Villiers).
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Des nanotechnologies.   Lun 19 Oct 2009 - 19:38

Que ce soit pour traiter ou diagnostiquer, l'«onconano» est l'arme du futur.

Des marqueurs fluorescents qui aident le chirurgien à repérer en temps réel les contours de la tumeur maligne qu'il opère. Des médicaments «intelligents» capables d'être activés à distance dès qu'ils ont atteint leur cible… Comme d'autres domaines de la médecine, la cancérologie se met à l'heure des nanotechnologies. La plupart de ces minuscules outils, dont la taille est de l'ordre du milliardième («nano» en grec) de mètre, n'en sont qu'au stade de la recherche. Mais ils ouvrent, à moyen terme, des perspectives passionnantes tant pour diagnostiquer que pour soigner les cancers. Un symposium international, récemment organisé à Paris par l'Institut national du cancer (Inca) et l'Inserm, a fait le point sur ces recherches en «onconano».


Illuminer le système lymphatique

Côté diagnostic, l'un des défis majeurs consiste à mettre au point des nanosondes capables de se fixer sur les cellules cancéreuses. Injectées dans l'organisme, elles peuvent ainsi révéler la présence d'une tumeur en émettant un signal, radioactif ou optique par exemple. «Le traceur idéal, qui marque à 100 % les cellules cancéreuses, et uniquement celles-ci, est sans doute un mythe», note d'emblée Philippe Rizo, directeur scientifique de Fluoptics, une start-up du Commissariat à l'énergie atomique (CEA) qui travaille sur deux pistes prometteuses dont l'une, la nanoémulsion de fluorophore, permet d'illuminer le système lymphatique.

Ce traceur, à l'essai chez l'animal, repère les ganglions drainant une tumeur, c'est-à-dire les voies par lesquelles les cellules cancéreuses se disséminent dans le corps du patient. «En protégeant le fluorophore, notre nanémulsion permet d'obtenir une brillance très importante et une très grande stabilité, ce qui permettra d'appliquer cette technique à de nombreux types de cancer», poursuit M. Rizo.

Plus spectaculaire encore, Fluoptics développe un marqueur de la néoangiogénèse, autrement dit la formation de nouveaux vaisseaux sanguins qui accompagne la croissance des tumeurs cancéreuses. Chez un malade sur quatre, ce traceur fluorescent se fixe aussi sur la tumeur elle-même. Couplé au système optique développé par Fluoptics, «cela aidera le chirurgien à visualiser directement les cellules potentiellement cancéreuses et les limites de la tumeur pendant l'intervention», prédit M. Rizo en précisant que les cancers de la cavité abdominale devraient être les premiers concernés. Actuellement à l'étude chez de petits animaux, ce marqueur devra cependant passer par le même circuit de validation qu'un médicament. Selon le directeur scientifique de Fluo­ptics, les premiers essais cliniques sont prévus vers 2011.

«Les techniques de diagnostic par imagerie moléculaire sont prometteuses à assez court terme», confirme le Pr Jean-Yves Blay, cancérologue au centre Léon-Bérard, à Lyon. Mais pour ce praticien, les nanotechnologies auront bien d'autres applications dans le dépistage des cancers. «À l'avenir, ces outils permettront de réaliser de minuscules prélèvements, beaucoup moins traumatisants pour les malades que les biopsies d'aujourd'hui. Les laboratoires sur puce seront aussi très utiles pour étudier de façon très fine les caractéristiques des tumeurs, avec une série de biomarqueurs.» Un profilage indispensable en vue de traitements personnalisés.

Le versant thérapeutique des nanotechnologies est également en pleine ébullition. Le principe est séduisant : en plaçant les substances médicamenteuses dans des nanoenveloppes, on modifie profondément leur diffusion dans l'organisme. Soixante-dix fois plus petits qu'un globule rouge, les «nanovecteurs» franchissent aisément les barrières biologiques, à commencer par les membranes cellulaires. Au final, l'efficacité est augmentée, et la toxicité du traitement réduite. Plusieurs nanomédicaments (notamment à base de liposomes et de protéines pegylées) sont déjà commercialisés. L'équipe du Pr Patrick Couvreur de la faculté de Chatenay-Malabry (Hauts-de-Seine) développe de nouvelles générations de nanovecteurs. Un composé à base de gemcitabine - une chimiothérapie déjà ancienne - et de squalène (le cholestérol du requin) est ainsi à l'étude. L'association de ces deux substances, qui entraîne la formation spontanée de nanoparticules, a déjà obtenu des résultats spectaculaires dans plusieurs types de cancers chez l'animal. Des travaux consistant à envelopper le duo gemcitabine-squalène dans des particules d'oxyde de fer sont également en cours. Objectif : activer le médicament à distance par un aimant quand il a atteint sa cible tumorale.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Des nanotechnologies.   Mer 23 Sep 2009 - 15:19


An iron-centered nanoparticle (left) analyzed at NIST’s Center for Neutron Research has a coating of the sugar dextran, whose tendrils prevent groups of the particles from clumping. When tumor cells ingest them (right), the particles still congregate closely enough to share heat when stimulated by a magnetic field, killing the cells. White arrow indicates a red blood cell.
Des nanoparticules faites de fer ont un revêtement de sucre dextran se tiennent à distance
l'une de l'autre et tue les cellules cancéreuses lorsque stimulées par un champs magnétique


(Sep. 23, 2009) — A research team at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) studying sugar-coated nanoparticles for use as a possible cancer therapy has uncovered a delicate balancing act that makes the particles more effective than conventional thinking says they should be. Just like individuals in a crowd respecting other people's personal space, the particles work because they get close together, but not too close.

Les particule de fer avec un revêtement de sucre dextran tue les cellules en se tenant à distance l'une de l'autre pour ne pas s'agglomérer.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Des nanotechnologies.   Lun 2 Mar 2009 - 10:19

Small is promising when it comes to illuminating tiny tumors or precisely delivering drugs, but many worry about the safety of nano-scale materials. Now a team of scientists has created minuscule flakes of silicon that glow brightly, last long enough to slowly release cancer drugs, then break down into harmless by-products.

La petitesse est prometteuse quand vient le temps de mettre la lumière sur des petites tumeurs ou de livrer précisément des médicaments, sauf que plusieurs se préoccupent de la sécurité des matériau à l'échelle nanoscopiques. Les scientifiques ont créé de minuscules flocons de silicon qui luisent qui durent assez longtemps pour livrer des médicaments et qui se défont par la suite en produits secondaires inofensifs.

"It is the first luminescent nanoparticle that was purposely designed to minimize toxic side effects," said Michael Sailor, a chemistry professor at the University of California, San Diego who led the study.

Many nanoparticles tested in research labs are too poisonous for use in humans.

Plusieurs nanoparticules qui servent dans les recherches sont trop empoisonnées pour être utilisées chez les humains.

"This new design meets a growing need for non-toxic alternatives that have a chance to make it into the clinic to treat human patients," Sailor said.

The particles inherently glow, a useful property that is most commonly achieved by including toxic organic chemicals or tiny structures called quantum dots, which can leave potentially harmful heavy metals in their wake.

When the researchers tested their safer nanoparticles in mice, they saw tumors glow for several hours, then dim as the particles broke down. Levels dropped noticeably in a week and were undetectable after four weeks, they report in Nature Materials February 22.

This is the first sudy to image tumors and organs using biodegradable silicon nanoparticles in live animals, the authors say.

C'est la première expérience pour faire l'image d'une tumeur à partir de nanoparticules biodégradables chez des animaux vivants.

The particles begin as thin wafers made porous with an electrical current then smashed to bits with ultrasound. Additional treatment alters the physical structure of the flakes to make them glow red when illuminated with ultraviolet light.

Luminescent particles can reveal tumors too tiny to detect by other means or allow a surgeon to be sure all of a cancerous growth has been removed.

These nanoparticles could also help deliver drugs safely, the researchers report. The cancer drug doxorubicin will stick to the pores and slowly escape as the silicon dissolves.

"The goal is to use the nanoparticles to chaperone the drug directly to the tumor, to release it into the tumor rather than other parts of the body," Sailor said.

Targeted delivery would allow doctors to use smaller doses of the drug. At doses high enough to be effective, when delivered to the whole body, doxorubicin often has toxic side effects.

At about 100 nanometers, these particles are bigger than many designed to deliver drugs, which can be just a few nanometers across – a thousand times smaller than the diameter of a human hair.

Their larger size contributes to both their effectiveness and their safety. Large particles can hold more of a drug. Yet they self-destruct, and the remnants can be filtered away by the kidneys.

Close examination of vulnerable organs like liver, spleen and kidney, which help to remove toxins, revealed no lasting changes in mice treated with the new nanoparticles.

Graduate students Ji-Ho Park and Luo Gu in Sailor's lab; Sangeeta Bhatia, bioengineering professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and graduate student Geoffrey von Malzahn in Bhatia's lab; and Erkki Ruoslahti, professor at the University of California, Santa Barbara all contributed to this work.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Des nanotechnologies.   Dim 8 Fév 2009 - 14:00

(Feb. 8, 2009) — Hollow gold nanospheres equipped with a targeting peptide find melanoma cells, penetrate them deeply, and then cook the tumor when bathed with near-infrared light, a research team led by scientists at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center reported in the Feb. 1 issue of Clinical Cancer Research.

Des nanophères creuses en or avec un peptide qui est capable de trouvé des cellules de mélanome, les pénétrer profondément et à ce moment les cuire en réfléchissant une lumière infra-rouge (ou près de l'infra-rouge).


"Active targeting of nanoparticles to tumors is the holy grail of therapeutic nanotechnology for cancer. We're getting closer to that goal," said senior author Chun Li, Ph.D., professor in M. D. Anderson's Department of Experimental Diagnostic Imaging. When heated with lasers, the actively targeted hollow gold nanospheres did eight times more damage to melanoma tumors in mice than did the same nanospheres that gathered less directly in the tumors.

"Des nanoparticules qui recherchent activement les tumeurs sont le saint Graal de la nanotechnologie dans le domaine du cancer. Quand elles sont chauffées par les lasers, les nanoparticules creuses et en or font 8 fois plus de dommages aux tumeurs du mélanome qu'on fait les mêmes nanophères moins directement situé dans les tumeurs."

Lab and mouse model experiments demonstrated the first in vivo active targeting of gold nanostructures to tumors in conjunction with photothermal ablation - a minimally invasive treatment that uses heat generated through absorption of light to destroy target tissue. Tumors are burned with near-infrared light, which penetrates deeper into tissue than visible or ultraviolet light.

Photothermal ablation is used to treat some cancers by embedding optical fibers inside tumors to deliver near-infrared light. Its efficiency can be greatly improved when a light-absorbing material is applied to the tumor, Li said. Photothermal ablation has been explored for melanoma, but because it also hits healthy tissue, dose duration and volume have been limited.

Lower light dose, great damage

With hollow gold nanospheres inside melanoma cells, photothermal ablation destroyed tumors in mice with a laser light dose that was 12 percent of the dose required when the nanospheres aren't applied, Li and colleagues report. Such a low dose is more likely to spare surrounding tissue.

Injected, untargeted nanoparticles accumulate in tumors because they are so small that they fit through the larger pores of abnormal blood vessels that nourish cancer, Li said. This "passive targeting" delivers a low dose of nanoparticles and concentrates them near the cell's vasculature.

The researchers packaged hollow, spherical gold nanospheres with a peptide - a small compound composed of amino acids - that binds to the melanocortin type 1 receptor, which is overly abundant in melanoma cells. They first treated melanoma cells in culture and later injected both targeted and untargeted nanospheres into mice with melanoma, then applied near-infrared light.

Fluorescent tagging of the targeted nanospheres showed that they were embedded in cultured melanoma cells, while hollow gold nanospheres without the targeting peptide were not. The targeted nanospheres were actively drawn into the cells through the cell membrane.

When the researchers beamed near-infrared light onto treated cultures, most cells with targeted nanospheres died, and almost all of those left were irreparably damaged. Only a small fraction of cells treated with untargeted nanospheres died. Cells treated only with near-infrared light or only with the nanospheres were undamaged.

An 8-fold increase in tumor destruction

In the mouse model, fluorescent tagging showed that the plain hollow gold nanospheres only accumulated near the tumor's blood vessels, while the targeted nanospheres were found throughout the tumor.

"There are many biological barriers to effective use of nanoparticles, with the liver and spleen being the most important," Li said. The body directs foreign particles and defective cells to those organs for destruction.

Most of the targeted nanospheres in the treated mice gathered in the tumor, with smaller amounts found in the liver and spleen. Most of the untargeted nanospheres gathered in the spleen, then in the liver and then the tumor, demonstrating the selectivity and importance of targeting.

In another group of mice, near-infrared light beamed into tumors with targeted nanospheres destroyed 66 percent of the tumors, but only destroyed 7.9 percent of tumors treated with untargeted nanospheres.

The researchers used F-18-labeled glucose to monitor tumor activity by observing how much glucose it metabolized. This action "lights up" the tumor for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Tumors treated with targeted shells largely went dark.

"Clinical implications of this approach are not limited to melanoma," Li said. "It's also a proof of principle that receptors common to other cancers can also be targeted by a peptide-guided hollow gold nanosphere. We've also shown that non-invasive PET can monitor early response to treatment."

The targeted nanospheres have a number of advantages, said Jin Zhang, Ph.D., professor in the University of California-Santa Cruz Department of Chemistry and developer of the hollow nanospheres. Their size - small even for nanoparticles at 40-50 nanometers in diameter - and spherical shape allow for greater uptake and cellular penetration. They have strong, but narrow and tunable ability to absorb light across the visible and near-infrared spectrum, making them unique from other metal nanoparticles.

The hollow spheres are pure gold, which has a long history of safe medical use with few side-effects, Li said.

This research was funded by grants from the National Cancer Institute Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer and the John S. Dunn Foundation to Li, and a U.S. Department of Defense grant to Zhang.

Co-authors with Zhang, and Li are: first author Wei Lu, Ph.D., Chiyi Xiong, Ph.D. Guodong Zhang, Qian Huang and Rui Zhang, all of M. D. Anderson's Department of Experimental Diagnostic Imaging. Rui Zhang is a graduate student in The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, which is jointly operated by M. D. Anderson and The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Des nanotechnologies.   Dim 31 Aoû 2008 - 14:46

même chose...


UNE PERCEE MEDICALE CONTRE LE CANCER…
Le professeur Alexandre Carpentier, jeune praticien de l’hôpital la pitié Salpêtrière de Paris, vient de réaliser une première mondiale. Il vient de remporter une victoire marquante contre les métastases cancéreuses dans le cerveau humain.
Le jeune médecin a expliqué qu’à l’aide d’une sonde et de laser, il pratiquait un très fin orifice de quelques millimètres seulement dans le cerveau, sans ouvrir la boîte crânienne.
Le malade arrive, dit-il, avec sa métastase dans le cerveau et quelques heures plus tard il repart sans elle, car elle a été détruite grâce au laser. Pas d’anesthésie générale mais juste locale, le patient est conscient et ne sent rien… Il repart chez lui quelques heures après l’intervention et ne revient que quelques jours plus tard pour contrôle…
Le professeur précise que sa technique ne s’applique pas au cancer lui-même mais à ses métastases dans le cerveau. Pour ce qui est d’autres organes, la recherche se poursuit. C’est un très grand espoir pour les malades et une grande victoire pour la lutte contre les cancers.
Il faut féliciter la médecine française et espérer que le pays aura de plus en plus de crédits pour de telles recherches…
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Des nanotechnologies.   Sam 30 Aoû 2008 - 21:03

Cancer, quand le laser détruit des tumeurs du cerveau. Le professeur Alexandre Carpentier a réussi à détruire des tumeurs métastasées au niveau du cerveau avec un laser. Des tumeurs du cerveau ont pu être traitées au laser sans ouvrir la boite crânienne de plusieurs patients atteints de ce type de cancer.


Des tumeurs du cerveau ont pu être traitées au laser sans ouvrir la boite crânienne de plusieurs patients atteints de ce type de cancer. Il s’agit d’une première mondiale, pour une équipe de Paris dirigée par le professeur Alexandre Carpentier, neurochirurgien à la Pitié-Salpêtrière.



Une équipe de spécialistes français a annoncé dans la revue Neurosurgery avoir réussi à détruire des tumeurs métastasées au niveau du cerveau à l'aide d'un laser contrôlé par imagerie à résonance magnétique (IRM).
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Des nanotechnologies.   Mer 6 Aoû 2008 - 10:11

Aug. 6, 2008) — Most cancer tumors that have clear borders and are well defined have traditionally been treated successfully by surgical removal. But not all cancers respond to conventional surgery. More importantly, conventional surgery brings risks of complications and long recovery periods that can negatively impact a person's quality of life.

La plupart des tumeurs cancéreuses ont des limites bien définies et la chirurgie se charge très bien de ces cas mais qu'en est-il des tumeurs aux limites moins bien définies ?

To overcome these treatment limits, a group of researchers based at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, turned to lasers and nanotechnology. They explored an emerging minimally-invasive approach to treating tumors that delivers a lethal dose of laser-generated heat to tumors, known as thermal ablation. To improve thermal ablation, they added a nano-twist that precisely guides and concentrates heat in targeted tumors.

Pour dépasser les limites de la chirurgie un groupe de recherches s'est tourné vers la nanotechnologie et le laser. Ils explorent une approche non-invasive de traiter les tumeurs avec une chaleur généré par des particules d'or. Ils ont un truc pour bien cibler et concentrer la chaleur sur la tumeur.

Working with Nanospectra Biosciences, Inc., researchers injected nanoshells made of gold silica into canine models of brain cancer. The nanoshells homed in on the target tumors, where they were taken in by the tumor cells. Next, researchers irradiated the nanoparticle-filled tumor with low-power laser light to selectively heat the tumor-but not the surrounding, healthy tissue. M.D. Anderson researchers added iron-oxide cores to the nanoshells to make them visible by magnetic resonance imaging so researchers could observe the process.

Results from these experiments were supported by numerical modeling studies, and by scanning electron microscope data showing destructive thermal increases near the tumors' blood supplies. "Based on these encouraging early results, we conclude that the use of magnetic resonance temperature imaging and gold nanoshells hold the very real possibility of meeting the long-sought goal of improving the precision of thermal ablation, while sparing healthy tissue," explains M.D. Anderson Cancer Center's R.J. Stafford, Ph.D. "Temperature imaging and guidance is an invaluable tool furthering this approach as it moves from feasibility studies to future use in human clinical trials."

Des particules oxydantes sont dans l'enveloppe faite de silice d'or pour suivre l'action du médicament.

La technique pourrait être bientôt employé sur des humains.

The research was described in the talk, "Characterization of Gold Nanoshells for Thermal Therapy Using MRI," presented July 30, 2008 at the 50th meeting of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine.


Dernière édition par Denis le Ven 26 Aoû 2016 - 17:50, édité 3 fois
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: Des nanotechnologies.   Aujourd'hui à 22:07

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
Des nanotechnologies.
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 1
 Sujets similaires
-
» Les nanotechnologies
» Des découvertes archéologiques "Improbables" pour l'époque?
» La NASA se tourne aussi vers les nanotechnologies
» Des nanotechnologies.
» NANOTECHNOLOGIES

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
ESPOIRS :: Cancer :: recherche-
Sauter vers: