AccueilCalendrierFAQRechercherS'enregistrerMembresGroupesConnexion

Partagez | 
 

 Un mécanisme bio-électrique

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
AuteurMessage
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15763
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Un mécanisme bio-électrique   Jeu 11 Aoû 2016 - 18:06

Most cells in the body carry on their surface tiny pores through which potassium ions travel. In controlling the flow of these positively charged ions, the channel helps the cell maintain its electrical balance.

One particular type of potassium channel, called Eag1, has been found in a number of cell types: in the neurons of the brain, in embryonic cells that generate muscle fiber, and in some tumors cells, where it's thought to have a cancer-promoting effect. But it's not yet clear how Eag1 differs from other potassium channels, or exactly how it works.

A duo of researchers at The Rockefeller University has taken an early step toward an answer. Using Rockefeller's new facility for cryo-electron microscopy, an advanced imaging technique in which samples are frozen then bombarded with electrons, they determined the structure of Eag1. Their results, the first structure to be published from Rockefeller's facility, appear August 11 in Science.

Like some other potassium channels, Eag1 opens when it senses a change in electrical potential, as happens when neurons send signals. In the video above, the part of the channel that most interested the researchers -- the section that spans the cell membrane -- appears in yellow and green.

It includes the sensors responsible for detecting electrical changes (yellow), and the segments that form the pore through which potassium passes (green). The rest of the channel is located inside the cell. The researchers also determined the structure of another molecule called calmodulin (purple), which binds to Eag1 and holds it in a closed position.

"Within the structure, we see some important differences between Eag1 and other potassium channels in the section that spans the cellular membrane," says first author Jonathan Whicher, a postdoc in Roderick MacKinnon's lab. "This gives us a better idea of how the channel's components work on a molecular level, and its role within a cell, either a normal one or a cancerous one."

This research is an early step toward finding molecules that could inhibit or control the channel. These, in turn, could provide valuable tools for further exploring the role of Eag1 in cancer, or for developing new therapeutics.

The study also begins to fill an important gap in understanding the inner workings of potassium channels, which are the primary focus of MacKinnon's Laboratory of Molecular Neurobiology. In 2003, MacKinnon, who is also the John D. Rockefeller Jr. Professor and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator, won the Nobel Prize for capturing the three-dimensional structure of a potassium channel for the first time.

---

La plupart des cellules dans le corps portent sur leur surface des pores minuscules à travers lesquels se déplacent les ions de potassium. En contrôlant le flux de ces ions chargés positivement, le canal de la cellule permet de maintenir son équilibre électrique.

Un type particulier de canal potassique, appelé Eag1, a été trouvée dans un certain nombre de types de cellules: les cellules nerveuses du cerveau, dans des cellules embryonnaires qui génèrent des fibres musculaires et, dans certaines cellules tumorales, où l'on pense qu'ils ont un effet favorisant le cancer. Mais on ne sait pas encore comment Eag1 diffère des autres canaux potassiques, ou exactement comment cela fonctionne.

Un duo de chercheurs de l'Université Rockefeller a pris une première étape vers une réponse. Utilisation de nouvelles installations de Rockefeller pour cryo-microscopie électronique, une technique d'imagerie avancée dans laquelle les échantillons sont congelés puis bombardés avec des électrons, ils ont déterminé la structure de Eag1. Leurs résultats, la première structure à publier à partir des installations de Rockefeller, comparution 11 Août dans Science.

Comme d'autres canaux potassiques, Eag1 ouvre quand il détecte un changement de potentiel électrique, comme cela se produit lorsque les neurones envoient des signaux. Dans la vidéo ci-dessus, la partie du canal qui intéresse le plus les chercheurs - la section qui traverse la membrane cellulaire - apparaît en jaune et vert.

Il inclut les capteurs chargés de détecter des variations électriques (jaune) et les segments qui forment les pores à travers lesquels passe le potassium (vert). Le reste du canal est situé à l'intérieur de la cellule. Les chercheurs ont également déterminé la structure d'une autre molécule appelée calmoduline (violet), qui se lie à Eag1 et le maintient dans une position fermée.

"Dans la structure, nous voyons des différences importantes entre Eag1 et d'autres canaux de potassium dans la section qui traverse la membrane cellulaire», dit premier auteur Jonathan Whicher, un postdoc dans le laboratoire de Roderick MacKinnon. «Cela nous donne une meilleure idée de la façon dont les composants de la chaîne fonctionnent à un niveau moléculaire, et son rôle dans une cellule, soit une normale une ou cancéreuse."

Cette recherche est une première étape en vue de trouver des molécules qui pourraient inhiber ou contrôler le canal. Ceux-ci, à leur tour, pourraient fournir des outils précieux pour explorer davantage le rôle de Eag1 dans le cancer, ou pour le développement de nouveaux produits thérapeutiques.

L'étude commence également à combler une lacune importante dans la compréhension du fonctionnement interne des canaux potassiques, qui sont l'objectif principal du Laboratoire de MacKinnon de neurobiologie moléculaire. En 2003, MacKinnon, qui est aussi le professeur John D. Rockefeller Jr. et chercheur Howard Hughes Medical Institute, a remporté le prix Nobel de la capture de la structure tridimensionnelle d'un canal de potassium pour la première fois.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15763
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Un mécanisme bio-électrique   Lun 21 Mar 2016 - 10:56

Johns Hopkins scientists report they have developed an antibody against a specific cellular gateway that suppresses lung tumor cell growth and breast cancer metastasis in transplanted tumor experiments in mice, according to a new study published in the February issue of Nature Communications.

The antibody, which they dubbed Y4, targets a potassium channel called KCNK9. Most commonly found in brain tissue and overabundant in lung, breast and other tumor cells, KCNK9 is among many gate like proteins that work to establish an electrical gradient that controls the flow of essential chemical ions, such as potassium in and out of cells that need them to function. KCNK9's exact role in cancer is unclear, but scientists believe it helps tumor cells survive, grow and invade normal tissue.

"Our experiments do not predict how well the antibody would perform in cancer patients," says John Laterra, M.D., Ph.D., co-director of the Brain Cancer Program at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center and professor of neurology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. "But," he added, "the study points the way toward targeting this key channel in human cancers, particularly since KCNK9 is overexpressed in about 40 percent of breast and lung cancers."

Y4 was developed in the laboratory by Min Li, Ph.D., a study co-author formerly of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and now at GlaxoSmithKline, by injecting mice with a human version of the KCNK9 protein to generate specialized cells that produce the KCNK9-specific antibodies. The antibody's ability to target KCNK9 attracted the attention of Laterra, who worked on the study with Li's doctoral student Han Sun, Ph.D.

When the researchers added Y4 to KCNK9-expressing human breast and lung cancer cells grown in the laboratory, the antibody reduced the cells' growth by between 25 to 65 percent, and triggered cell death in three of the cancer cell lines by between 5 and 30 percent. In further tests of the antibody, the scientists found that Y4 could slow the growth of human lung cancer cells transplanted into mice by up to 70 percent. The antibody did not shrink the lung cancer tumors or completely halt their growth. The drug also decreased the number of lung metastases in mice injected with mouse breast cancer cells, from an average of 30 metastases to an average of five after 25 days of treatment.

Laterra and colleagues also say they observed that the more KCNK9 is expressed in a tumor, the poorer the survival rates for lung and breast cancer patients. They found that two-year survival rates for 35 people with squamous cell lung cancer with low levels of KCNK9 were 58 percent higher than 18 people with high levels. Ten-year survival rates for people with breast cancer were 10 percent higher in 175 patients with low KCNK9 levels, compared with 116 people with high levels of the channel.

Laterra says KCNK9 expression is not routinely measured in cancer patients, but if his study results are confirmed, he believes such testing should be considered. "We've generated a fair amount of evidence that targeting this channel alone can have antitumor effects," says Laterra. "We are now establishing more data on other common tumor types to find out what percentage are expressing this channel at levels that we feel would be sufficient to propose blocking the channel therapeutically one day."

Because ion channels control so many cellular activities, they often are targeted in other disorders by drug companies, such as the common topical anesthetic lidocaine and epilepsy drug phenytoin. But their similarities make them difficult to find drugs or small molecules that can strongly aim at and block a single channel such as KCNK9. "There have been drugs developed to inhibit these channels, but they've been inherently nonspecific," says Sun, the study's first author, who is now at City of Hope in California.

The researchers say Y4's antitumor potential will most likely be due to its ability to block the potassium channel, but there were also intriguing hints in their experiments with metastatic breast cancer in mice bred with normal immune systems that the antibody can also boost immune response against the tumors. It is possible, Laterra says, "that if you decorate cells that express this channel with our antibody, it may help activate immune T cells to kill the tumor cells."

Laterra says it might also be possible in the future to modify the antibody to improve its apparent antitumor immune response or to deliver the antibody in combination with other immune-stimulating drugs, such as checkpoint inhibitors that block proteins that shield cancer cells from immune system attacks.

Other scientists who contributed to the study include Johns Hopkins researchers Bachchu Lal, Christine L. Hann and Daniel J. Leahy; Liqun Luo of Fujian Medical University; Xinrong Ma and Amy M. Fulton of University of Maryland; and Lieping Chen of Yale University School of Medicine.

Funding for the study was provided by the National Institutes of Health (GM078579, MH084691, NS073611 and NS050274) and the Veterans Administration Merit Award.


---


Les scientifiques de Johns Hopkins rapportent qu'ils ont développé un anticorps contre une passerelle cellulaire spécifique qui supprime la croissance des cellules tumorales du poumon et des métastases du cancer du sein dans des expériences de tumeurs transplantées chez des souris, selon une nouvelle étude publiée dans le numéro de Février de Nature Communications.

L'anticorps, qu'ils ont appelé Y4, cible un canal potassique appelé KCNK9. Le plus souvent trouvé dans le tissu cérébral et surabondants dans le cancer du poumon, celui du sein et dans d'autres cellules tumorales, KCNK9 est, parmi d'autres, comme une protéine qui fonctionne pour établir un gradient électrique qui contrôle le flux d'ions chimiques essentiels, tels que le potassium en dedans et en dehors des cellules qui en ont besoin pour fonctionner. Le rôle exact de KCNK9 dans le cancer est difficile à établir, mais les scientifiques croient qu'il aide les cellules tumorales à survivre, se développer et à envahir les tissus normaux.

"Nos expériences ne prédisent pas comment l'anticorps s'exécuterait chez les patients atteints de cancer», dit John Laterra, MD, Ph.D.,"Mais," at-il ajouté, "il indique un chemin vers le ciblage de ce canal clé dans les cancers humains, en particulier depuis KCNK9 surexprimé dans environ 40 pour cent des cancers du et du de l'étude."

Y4 a été développé dans le laboratoire par Min Li, Ph.D., une étude du co-auteur anciennement de l'École de médecine de l'Université Johns Hopkins et maintenant à GlaxoSmithKline, en injectant des souris avec une version humaine de la protéine KCNK9 pour générer des cellules spécialisées qui produisent les anticorps KCNK9 spécifiques. La capacité de l'anticorps pour cibler KCNK9 a attiré l'attention de Laterra, qui a travaillé sur l'étude avec l'étudiant de doctorat de Li Han Sun, Ph.D.

Lorsque les chercheurs ont ajouté Y4 au KCNK9 exprimant les cellules du sein et le cancer du poumon humain cultivés dans le laboratoire, l'anticorps a réduit la croissance des cellules de 25 à 65 pour cent, et a déclenché la mort cellulaire dans les trois lignées cellulaires du cancer de 5 à 30 pour cent. Dans d'autres essais de l'anticorps, les chercheurs ont découvert que Y4 pourrait ralentir la croissance des cellules de cancer du poumon humain greffées chez la souris jusqu'à 70 pour cent. L'anticorps ne rétrécit pas les tumeurs du cancer du poumon ou n'arrêtent pas complètement leur croissance. Mais le médicament a diminué également le nombre de métastases pulmonaires chez les souris injectées avec des cellules de cancer du sein de la souris, à partir d'une moyenne de 30 métastases à une moyenne de cinq après 25 jours de traitement.

Laterra et ses collègues disent aussi qu'ils ont observé que plus KCNK9 est exprimée dans une tumeur, moins les taux de survie des poumons et le cancer du sein patients sont élevés. Ils ont constaté que les taux de survie à deux ans pour 35 personnes atteintes d'un cancer du poumon à cellules squameuses avec de faibles niveaux de KCNK9 étaient de 58 % plus élevé que ceux de 18 personnes ayant des niveaux élevés. Les taux de survie à dix ans pour les personnes atteintes d'un cancer du sein ont été 10 % plus élevé dans 175 patients avec des niveaux de KCNK9 faibles, par rapport à 116 personnes ayant des niveaux élevés de la chaîne.

Laterra dit l'expression KCNK9 n'est pas systématiquement mesuré chez les patients cancéreux, mais si ses résultats de l'étude sont confirmées, il croit que ces tests devraient être envisagés. «Nous avons généré une bonne quantité de preuves que le ciblage de ce canal seul peut avoir des effets antitumoraux," dit Laterra. «Nous sommes en train d'établir davantage de données sur d'autres types de tumeurs commune pour savoir quel pourcentage expriment ce canal à des niveaux qui, nous le penseons, seraient suffisants pour proposer le blocage de la voie thérapeutique un jour."

Parce que les canaux ioniques contrôlent autant d'activités cellulaires, ils sont souvent ciblés dans d'autres troubles par les sociétés pharmaceutiques. Mais leurs similitudes rendent les médicaments ou de petites molécules qui peuvent fortement viser et de bloquer un canal unique comme KCNK9 difficiles à trouver. "Il y a eu des médicaments développés pour inhiber ces canaux, mais ils ont été intrinsèquement non spécifiques», dit Sun, premier auteur de l'étude, qui est maintenant à City of Hope en Californie.

Les chercheurs disent que le potentiel antitumoral de Y4 sera très probablement en raison de sa capacité à bloquer le canal de potassium, mais ils ont été aussi intrigués dans leurs expériences avec le cancer du sein métastatique chez la souris élevée avec un système immunitaire normal que l'anticorps peut aussi stimuler la réponse immunitaire contre le tumeurs. C'est possible, dit Laterra "que si vous décorez les cellules qui expriment ce canal avec notre anticorps, cela puisse aider à activer les cellules T immunitaires pour tuer les cellules tumorales."

Laterra dit qu'il pourrait également être possible dans l'avenir de modifier l'anticorps pour améliorer sa réponse immunitaire antitumorale ou apparent pour délivrer l'anticorps en association avec d'autres médicaments immunostimulants, tels que des inhibiteurs de point de contrôle qui bloquent les protéines qui protègent les cellules cancéreuses contre les attaques du système immunitaire, .


_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15763
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Un mécanisme bio-électrique   Sam 19 Mar 2016 - 15:21

Tufts University biologists using a frog model have demonstrated for the first time that it is possible to prevent tumors from forming and normalize tumors after they have formed by using light to control electrical signaling among cells. The work, which appears online in Oncotarget on March 16, 2016 is the first reported use of optogenetics to specifically manipulate bioelectrical signals to both prevent and cause regression of tumors induced by oncogenes.

Frogs are a good model for basic science research into cancer because tumors in frogs and mammals share many of the same characteristics. These include rapid cell division, tissue disorganization, increased vascular growth, invasiveness and cells that have an abnormally positive internal electric voltage.

Virtually all healthy cells maintain a more negative voltage in the cell interior compared with the cell exterior; the opening and closing of ion channels in the cell membrane can cause the voltage to become more positive (depolarizing the cell) or more negative (polarizing the cell). Tumors can be detected by their abnormal bioelectrical signature before they are otherwise apparent.

"These electrical properties are not merely byproducts of oncogenic processes. They actively regulate the deviations of cells from their normal anatomical roles towards tumor growth and metastatic spread," said senior and corresponding author Michael Levin, Ph.D., who holds the Vannevar Bush chair in biology and directs the Center for Regenerative and Developmental Biology at Tufts School of Arts and Sciences. "Discovering new ways to specifically control this bioelectrical signaling could be an important path towards new biomedical approaches to cancer."

Lead author Brook Chernet, Ph.D., former post-doctoral associate in the Levin laboratory, injected cells in Xenopus laevis embryos with RNA encoding a mutant RAS oncogene known to cause cancer-like growths. The researchers also expressed and activated either a blue light-activated, positively charged ion channel, ChR2D156A, or a green light-activated proton pump, Archaerhodopsin (Arch), both of which hyperpolarize frog embryonic cells, thereby inducing an electric current that caused the cells to go from a cancer-like depolarized state to a normal, more negative polarized state. Activation of both agents significantly lowered the incidence of tumor formation and also increased the frequency with which tumors regressed into normal tissue.

The use of light to control ion channels has been a ground-breaking tool in research on the nervous system and brain, but optogenetics had not yet been applied to cancer.

"This provides proof of principle for a novel class of therapies which use light to override the action of oncogenic mutations," said Levin. "Using light to specifically target tumors would avoid subjecting the whole body to toxic chemotherapy or similar reagents."


---


Les biologistes de l'université Tufts en utilisant un modèle de grenouille ont démontré pour la première fois qu'il est possible de prévenir les tumeurs de se former et de normaliser les tumeurs après qu'elles se soient formées en utilisant la lumière pour contrôler la signalisation électrique entre les cellules. Les travaux, qui apparaît en ligne dans Oncotarget le 16 Mars 2016 la première utilisation déclarée de l'optogénétique pour manipuler spécifiquement les signaux bioélectriques à la fois pour prévenir et provoquer la régression de tumeurs induites par des oncogènes.

Les grenouilles sont un bon modèle pour la recherche fondamentale sur le cancer parce que les tumeurs chez les grenouilles et les mammifères partagent plusieurs des mêmes caractéristiques. Ceux-ci comprennent une division cellulaire rapide, la désorganisation du tissu, l'augmentation de la croissance vasculaire, et l'invasivité de cellules qui ont une tension électrique interne anormalement positive.

Pratiquement toutes les cellules saines maintiennent une tension plus négative à l'intérieur de la cellule par rapport à l'extérieur de la cellule; l'ouverture et la fermeture des canaux ioniques dans la membrane cellulaire peut provoquer la tension à devenir plus positive (dépolarisation de la cellule) ou plus négatif (polarisation de la cellule). Les tumeurs peuvent être détectées par leur signature bioélectrique anormal avant qu'ils ne soient autrement apparents.

"Ces propriétés électriques ne sont pas seulement des sous-produits de processus oncogéniques. Ils régulent activement les écarts des cellules de leurs rôles anatomiques normales vers la croissance tumorale et la dissémination métastatique", a déclaré l'auteur principal, Michael Levin, Ph.D., qui dirige le Centre for Regenerative et biologie du développement à la Tufts School of Arts and Sciences. "A la découverte de nouvelles façons de contrôler spécifiquement cette signalisation bioélectrique qui pourrait être une voie importante vers de nouvelles approches biomédicales sur le cancer."

L'auteur principal Brook Chernet, Ph.D., ancien associé post-doctoral dans le laboratoire Levin, les cellules injectées dans des embryons de Xenopus laevis avec de l'ARN codant pour un mutant RAS oncogène connus pour provoquer une simili croissance cancéreuse. Les chercheurs ont également exprimé et activé soit une lumière bleue chargé positivement d'ions ChR2D156A, soit une pompe à proton activé par lumière verte, l'archaerhodopsin (Arch), et les deux hyperpolarisent les cellules embryonnaires des grenouilles, induisant ainsi un courant électrique qui a causé que les cellules passent d'un état dépolarisé semblable au cancer à un état polarisé normal, plus négatif. L'activation des deux agents réduit significativement l'incidence de la formation de tumeur et a également augmenté la fréquence avec laquelle les tumeurs ont régressé dans les tissus normaux.

L'utilisation de la lumière pour contrôler les canaux ioniques a été un outil révolutionnaire dans la recherche sur le système nerveux et le cerveau, mais l'optogénétique n'a pas encore été appliquée au cancer.

"Cela fournit la preuve de principe pour une nouvelle classe de thérapies qui utilisent la lumière pour remplacer l'action des mutations oncogéniques», a déclaré Levin. "En utilisant la lumière pour cibler spécifiquement les tumeurs permettrait d'éviter de soumettre l'ensemble du corps à la chimiothérapie toxiques ou à des réactifs similaires."

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15763
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Un mécanisme bio-électrique   Ven 28 Aoû 2015 - 18:21

The molecular switches regulating human cell growth do a great job of replacing cells that die during the course of a lifetime. But when they misfire, life-threatening cancers can occur. Research led by scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) has revealed a new electrical mechanism that can control these switches.

This information is seen as critical in developing treatments for some of the most lethal types of cancer including pancreatic, colon and lung, which are characterized by uncontrolled cell growth caused by breakdowns in cell signaling cascades.

The research focused on a molecular switch called K-Ras. Mutated versions of K-Ras are found in about 20 percent of all human cancers in the United States and these mutations lock the K-Ras switch in the on position.

"When K-Ras is locked in the on position, it drives cell division, which leads to the production of a cancer," said John Hancock, M.B., B.Chir, Ph.D., ScD, the study's senior author and chairman of the Department of Integrative Biology and Pharmacology at UTHealth Medical School. "We have identified a completely new molecular mechanism that further enhances the activity of K-Ras."

Findings appear in Science, a journal of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

The study focused on the tiny electrical charges that all cells carry across their limiting (plasma) membrane. "What we have shown is that the electrical potential (charge) that a cell carries is inversely proportional to the strength of a K-Ras signal," Hancock said.

With the aid of a high-powered electron microscope, the investigators observed that certain lipid molecules in the plasma membrane respond to an electrical charge, which in turn amplifies the output of the Ras signaling circuit. This is exactly like a transistor in an electronic circuit board.

Yong Zhou, Ph.D., first author and assistant professor of integrative biology and pharmacology at UTHealth Medical School, said, "Our results may finally account for a long-standing but unexplained observation that many cancer cells actively try to reduce their electrical charge."

Initial work was done with human and animal cells and findings were subsequently confirmed in a fruit fly model on membrane organization.

"This has huge implications for biology," Hancock said. "Beyond the immediate relevance to K-Ras in cancer, it is a completely new way that cells can use electrical charge to control a multitude of signaling pathways, which may be particularly relevant to the nervous system."

Hancock's co-authors at UTHealth include Ching-On Wong Ph.D., Kwang-Jin Cho, Ph.D., Dharini van der Hoeven, Ph.D., Hong Liang, M.D., Dhananjay Thakur, Jialie Luo, Ph.D., Michael Zhu, Ph.D., Hongzhen Hu, Ph.D., and Kartik Venkatachalam, Ph.D.

Co-authors from The University of Arizona include Milos Babic, Ph.D., and Konrad Zinsmaier Ph.D.

At UTHealth Medical School, Hancock is the vice dean for basic research, executive director of the Brown Foundation Institute of Molecular Medicine for the Prevention of Human Diseases and holder of the John S. Dunn Distinguished University Chair in Physiology and Medicine.

Hancock and Venkatachalam are on the faculty of The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston.



Les interrupteurs moléculaires qui régulent la croissance cellulaire humaine font un excellent travail pour remplacer les cellules qui meurent pendant le cours d'une vie. Mais quand ils ont des ratés, des cancers potentiellement mortelles peuvent se produire. Une recherche menée par des scientifiques de l'Université du Texas Health Science Center à Houston (UTHealth) a révélé un nouveau mécanisme électrique qui peut contrôler ces commutateurs.

Cette information est considérée comme critique dans le développement de traitements pour certains des types les plus mortelles de cancer y compris du , du et du , qui sont caractérisées par une croissance cellulaire incontrôlée causée par des pannes dans les cascades de signalisation cellulaire.

La recherche a porté sur un interrupteur moléculaire appelé K-Ras. des Versions mutées de K-Ras se trouvent dans environ 20 pour cent de tous les cancers humains aux Etats-Unis et ces mutations verrouillent l'interrupteur K-Ras en position "on".

"Lorsque K-Ras est verrouillé en position on, il entraîne la division cellulaire, ce qui conduit à la production d'un cancer", a déclaré John Hancock, MB, B.Chir, Ph.D., ScD, auteur et président principal de l'étude du Département de biologie intégrative et de pharmacologie à l'École de médecine UTHealth. «Nous avons identifié un tout nouveau mécanisme moléculaire qui améliore encore l'activité de K-Ras."

Les résultats apparaissent dans Science, une revue de l'Association américaine pour l'avancement des sciences.

L'étude a porté sur les charges électriques minuscules que toutes les cellules transportent sur leur membrane. "Ce que nous avons montré est que le potentiel électrique (de charge) qui porte une cellule est inversement proportionnelle à la force d'un signal K-Ras", a dit Hancock.

A l'aide d'un microscope électronique à haute puissance, les chercheurs ont observé que certaines molécules lipidiques dans la membrane plasmatique répondent à une charge électrique, qui à son tour amplifie le signal de sortie du circuit de signalisation Ras. Ceci est exactement comme un transistor dans un circuit électronique.

Yong Zhou, Ph.D., premier auteur et professeur adjoint de biologie intégrative et de pharmacologie à l'École de médecine UTHealth, a déclaré: «Nos résultats peuvent finalement prendre en compte une observation de longue date, mais encore inexpliquée, que de nombreuses cellules cancéreuses essaient activement de réduire leur charge électrique ».

Le travail initial a été fait avec des cellules et des résultats humains et animaux ont ensuite été confirmées dans un modèle de la mouche des fruits sur l'organisation de la membrane.

"Cela a des implications énormes pour la biologie», dit Hancock. "Au-delà de l'intérêt immédiat pour K-Ras dans le cancer, c'est une nouvelle façon que les cellules peuvent utiliser charge électrique pour contrôler une multitude de voies de signalisation, qui peuvent être particulièrement pertinents pour le système nerveux."


_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
titlene78



Nombre de messages : 110
Age : 62
Localisation : Aubergenville - Yvelines
Date d'inscription : 01/02/2013

MessageSujet: un mécanisme bio-électrique   Mer 13 Mar 2013 - 12:14

Bonjour à tous. Je vous propose une nouvelle version de la traduction de Denis mais cette fois-ci je n'ai que le mérite d'avoir trouvé cet article déjà traduit, mais attention la lecture n'en est pas moins ardue. Donc il vous faudra peut être googler un peu pour avoir quelques explications complémentaires sur certains termes utilisés.

Titlene

***************************

Feb. 1, 2013 — Biologists at Tufts University School of Arts and Sciences have discovered a bioelectric signal that can identify cells that are likely to develop into tumors. The researchers also found that they could lower the incidence of cancerous cells by manipulating the electrical charge across cells' membranes.



1er février 2013 — Des biologistes de Tufts University School of Arts and Sciences ont découvert un signal bioélectrique qui permet d'identifier les cellules qui sont susceptibles de développer des tumeurs. Les chercheurs ont également découvert qu'ils pouvaient réduire l'incidence des cellules cancéreuses par la manipulation d'une charge électrique à travers les membranes des cellules.



"The news here is that we've established a bioelectric basis for the early detection of cancer," says Brook Chernet, doctoral student and the first author of a newly published research paper co-authored with Michael Levin, Ph.D., professor of biology and director of the Center for Regenerative and Developmental Biology.



"Les nouvelles ici, c'est que nous avons établi une base bioélectrique pour la détection précoce du cancer", explique Brook Chernet, doctorant et le premier auteur d'un article de recherche publié récemment co-écrit avec Michael Levin, Ph.D., professeur de la biologie et directeur du Centre pour la biologie régénérative et du développement.


Levin notes, "We've shown that electric events tell the cells what to do. The voltage changes are not merely a sign of cancer. They control and direct whether the cancer occurs or not."


Levin note: "Nous avons montré que les événements électriques disent aux cellules ce qu'il faut faire. Les variations de tension ne sont pas seulement un signe de cancer. Ils contrôlent et dirigent si le cancer se produit ou pas."




Leur article, "Le potentiel de la tension transmembranaire est un paramètre essentiel cellulaire pour la détection et le contrôle du développement tumoral" qui sera publié dans le numéro de mai 2013 "Les modèles et mécanismes de la maladie" (disponible en ligne le 1 Février).


Bioelectric signals underlie an important set of control mechanisms that regulate how cells grow and multiply. Chernet and Levin investigated the bioelectric properties of cells that develop into tumors in Xenopus laevis frog embryos.



Les signaux bioélectriques sous-tendent un ensemble important de mécanismes de contrôle qui régissent de la façon dont les cellules croissent et se multiplient. Chernet et Levin a étudié les propriétés bioélectriques des cellules qui se développent dans des tumeurs dans des embryons de grenouille Xenopus laevis.


In previous research, Tufts scientists have shown how manipulating membrane voltage can influence or regulate cellular behavior such as cell proliferation, migration, and shape in vivo, and be used to induce the formation or regenerative repair of whole organs and appendages. In this study, the researchers hypothesized that cancer can occur when bioelectric signaling networks are perturbed and cells stop attending to the patterning cues that orchestrate their normal development.



Dans une étude précédente, les chercheurs du Tufts ont montré comment manipuler une tension de la membrane qui peuvent influencer ou réglementer le comportement cellulaire comme la prolifération cellulaire, la migration, et la forme in vivo, et être utilisé pour induire la formation ou la réparation de régénération des organes entiers et des appendices. Dans cette étude, les chercheurs ont émis l'hypothèse que le cancer peut se produire lorsque des réseaux bioélectriques de signalisation sont perturbées et des cellules cessant de fréquenter des indices de structuration qui orchestrent leur développement normal.


Tumor Cells Exhibit a Bioelectric Signature




Les cellules tumorales présentent une Signature bioélectrique






The researchers induced tumor growth in the frog embryos by injecting the samples with mRNAs (messenger RNA) encoding well-recognized human oncogenes Gli1, KrasG12D, and Xrel3. The embryos developed tumor-like growths that are associated with human cancers such as melanoma, leukemia, lung cancer, and rhabdomyosarcoma (a soft tissue cancer that most often affects children).

Les chercheurs ont induit la croissance tumorale chez les embryons de grenouille en injectant des échantillons avec des ARNm (messager ARN) codant des oncogènes humains bien reconnues comme Gli1, KrasG12D et Xrel3. Les embryons développant des tumeurs comme des excroissances qui sont associés à des cancers humains tels que le mélanome, la leucémie, le cancer du poumon, et le rhabdomyosarcome (cancer des tissus mous qui affecte le plus souvent les enfants).




When the researchers analyzed the tumor cells using a membrane voltage-sensitive dye and fluorescence microscopy, they made an exciting discovery. "The tumor sites had unique depolarized membrane voltage relative to surrounding tissue," says Chernet. "They could be recognized by this distinctive bioelectric signal.



Lorsque les chercheurs ont analysé les cellules tumorales en utilisant une membrane colorée sensible à la tension et la microscopie à fluorescence, ils ont fait une découverte passionnante. "Les sites tumoraux uniques ont dépolarisé la membrane de tension sur les tissus environnants", explique Chernet. "Ils pourraient être reconnus par ce signal distinctif bioélectrique."


Changing Electrical Properties Lowers Incidence of Tumors



Modification des propriétés électriques diminue l'incidence des tumeurs


The Tufts biologists were also able to show that changing the bioelectric code to hyperpolarize tumor cells suppressed abnormal cell growth. "We hypothesized that the appearance of oncogene-induced tumors can be inhibited by alteration of membrane voltage," says Levin, "and we were right."



Les biologistes de Tufts ont également pu montrer que la modification du code bioélectrique à hyperpolariser les cellules tumorales supprimant la croissance cellulaire anormale. "Nous avons émis l'hypothèse que l'apparition de tumeurs induites par l'oncogène peut être inhibée par la modification de la tension de la membrane", dit Levin, "et nous avions raison."


To counteract the tumor-inducing depolarization, they injected the cells with mRNA encoding carefully-chosen ion channels (proteins that control the passage of ions across cell membranes).



Pour lutter contre la tumeur induisant une dépolarisation, ils ont injecté des cellules avec l'ARNm soigneusement choisies avec des canaux ioniques (protéines qui contrôlent le passage des ions à travers les membranes cellulaires).


Using embryos injected with oncogenes such as Xrel3, the researchers introduced one of two ion channels (the glycine gated chloride channel GlyR-F99A or the potassium channel Kir4.1) known to hyperpolarize membrane voltage gradients in frog embryos. In both cases, the incidence of subsequent tumors was substantially lower than it was with embryos that received the oncogene but no hyperpolarizing channel treatment.



L'utilisation d'embryons injectés avec les oncogènes tels que Xrel3, les chercheurs ont introduit l'un des deux canaux ioniques (le canal de chlorure de glycine fermée GlyR-F99A ou le canal potassique Kir4.1) connus pour hyperpolariser les gradients de la tension membranaire dans des embryons de grenouille. Dans les deux cas, l'incidence des tumeurs ultérieures est nettement inférieur à ce qu'il était avec des embryons qui ont reçu l'oncogène mais pas avec un traitement hyperpolarisant.


Experiments to determine the cellular mechanism that allows hyperpolarization to inhibit tumor formation showed that transport of butyrate, a known tumor suppressor, was responsible



Des expériences visant à déterminer le mécanisme cellulaire qui permet une hyperpolarisation pour inhiber la formation de tumeurs a montré que le transport de butyrate, un suppresseur de tumeur connu, était responsable
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15763
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Un mécanisme bio-électrique   Ven 1 Fév 2013 - 15:39

Feb. 1, 2013 — Biologists at Tufts University School of Arts and Sciences have discovered a bioelectric signal that can identify cells that are likely to develop into tumors. The researchers also found that they could lower the incidence of cancerous cells by manipulating the electrical charge across cells' membranes.

"The news here is that we've established a bioelectric basis for the early detection of cancer," says Brook Chernet, doctoral student and the first author of a newly published research paper co-authored with Michael Levin, Ph.D., professor of biology and director of the Center for Regenerative and Developmental Biology.

Levin notes, "We've shown that electric events tell the cells what to do. The voltage changes are not merely a sign of cancer. They control and direct whether the cancer occurs or not."

Bioelectric signals underlie an important set of control mechanisms that regulate how cells grow and multiply. Chernet and Levin investigated the bioelectric properties of cells that develop into tumors in Xenopus laevis frog embryos.

In previous research, Tufts scientists have shown how manipulating membrane voltage can influence or regulate cellular behavior such as cell proliferation, migration, and shape in vivo, and be used to induce the formation or regenerative repair of whole organs and appendages. In this study, the researchers hypothesized that cancer can occur when bioelectric signaling networks are perturbed and cells stop attending to the patterning cues that orchestrate their normal development.

Tumor Cells Exhibit a Bioelectric Signature

The researchers induced tumor growth in the frog embryos by injecting the samples with mRNAs (messenger RNA) encoding well-recognized human oncogenes Gli1, KrasG12D, and Xrel3. The embryos developed tumor-like growths that are associated with human cancers such as melanoma, leukemia, lung cancer, and rhabdomyosarcoma (a soft tissue cancer that most often affects children).

When the researchers analyzed the tumor cells using a membrane voltage-sensitive dye and fluorescence microscopy, they made an exciting discovery. "The tumor sites had unique depolarized membrane voltage relative to surrounding tissue," says Chernet. "They could be recognized by this distinctive bioelectric signal.

Changing Electrical Properties Lowers Incidence of Tumors

The Tufts biologists were also able to show that changing the bioelectric code to hyperpolarize tumor cells suppressed abnormal cell growth. "We hypothesized that the appearance of oncogene-induced tumors can be inhibited by alteration of membrane voltage," says Levin, "and we were right."

To counteract the tumor-inducing depolarization, they injected the cells with mRNA encoding carefully-chosen ion channels (proteins that control the passage of ions across cell membranes).

Using embryos injected with oncogenes such as Xrel3, the researchers introduced one of two ion channels (the glycine gated chloride channel GlyR-F99A or the potassium channel Kir4.1) known to hyperpolarize membrane voltage gradients in frog embryos. In both cases, the incidence of subsequent tumors was substantially lower than it was with embryos that received the oncogene but no hyperpolarizing channel treatment.

Experiments to determine the cellular mechanism that allows hyperpolarization to inhibit tumor formation showed that transport of butyrate, a known tumor suppressor, was responsible

----------

Ouille j'aurais peut-être pas dû me lancer dans la traduction de ce texte, j'ai trouvé ça hyper compliqué mais maintenant que je suis passé au travers tant bien que mal, je le mets là quand même. Peut-être que je trouverai un texte en français ou que j'irai cherché la définition de certains mots parce que là à moins d'avoir un cours d'électricien ou de biologiste ou les deux....on comprend pas grand chose !

Des biologistes ont découvert un signal bioélectrique qui permet d'identifier les cellules qui sont susceptibles de développer des tumeurs. Les chercheurs ont également découvert qu'ils pouvaient réduire l'incidence des cellules cancéreuses par la manipulation de la charge électrique à travers les membranes des cellules.

"Les nouvelles ici, c'est que nous avons établi une base bioélectrique pour la détection précoce du cancer», explique Brook Chernet, doctorant et le premier auteur d'un article de recherche publié récemment co-écrit avec Michael Levin, Ph.D., professeur de la biologie et directeur du Centre pour la biologie régénérative.

Levin note: «Nous avons montré que les événements électriques dictent aux cellules ce qu'il faut faire. Les variations de tension ne sont pas seulement un signe de cancer. Ils contrôlent et dirigent si le cancer se produit ou non."

Les signaux bioélectriques sous-tendent un ensemble important de mécanismes de contrôle qui régissent la façon dont les cellules croissent et se multiplient. Chernet et Levin ont étudié les propriétés bioélectriques des cellules qui se développent dans des tumeurs dans des embryons de grenouilles.

Dans une étude précédente, les chercheurs ont montré comment manipuler la tension de la membrane peut influencer ou réglementer le comportement cellulaire aussi bien que la prolifération cellulaire, la migration, et la forme in vivo, et être utilisée pour induire la formation ou la réparation de régénération des organes entiers et des appendices. Dans cette étude, les chercheurs ont émis l'hypothèse que le cancer peut se produire lorsque les réseaux bioélectriques de signalisation sont perturbées et les cellules cessent de fréquenter les indices de structuration qui orchestrent leur développement normal.

Les cellules tumorales présentent une signature Bioelectric

Les chercheurs ont induit la croissance tumorale chez les embryons de grenouille en injectant les échantillons avec des ARNm (ARN messager) codant bien reconnues comme oncogènes humains Gli1, KrasG12D et Xrel3. Les embryons ont développé des tumeurs comme des excroissances qui sont associés à des cancers humains tels que le mélanome, la leucémie, le cancer du poumon, et le rhabdomyosarcome (cancer des tissus mous qui affecte le plus souvent les enfants).

Lorsque les chercheurs ont analysé les cellules tumorales en utilisant une membrane sensible à la tension et à la microscopie à fluorescence, ils ont fait une découverte passionnante. "Les sites tumoraux avaient une dépolarisation unique unique par rapport aux tissus environnants», explique Chernet. "Ils pouvaient être reconnus par ce signal distinctif bioélectrique.

Modification des propriétés électriques diminue l'incidence des tumeurs

Les biologistes ont également pu montrer que la modification du code bioélectrique pour hyperpolariser les cellules tumorales supprimait la croissance cellulaire anormale. «Nous avons émis l'hypothèse que l'apparition des tumeurs induites oncogène peut être inhibée par la modification de la tension de la membrane», dit Levin, "et nous avions raison."

Pour lutter contre la dépolarisation inductrice de tumeur, ils ont injecté des cellules avec l'ARNm codant soigneusement choisies canaux ioniques (protéines qui contrôlent le passage des ions à travers les membranes cellulaires).

Avec l'utilisation d'embryons injectés avec des oncogènes tels que Xrel3, les chercheurs ont introduit l'un des deux canaux ioniques (le canal de chlorure de glycine fermée GlyR-F99A ou le canal potassique Kir4.1) connus pour hyperpolariser les gradients de tension de membrane dans des embryons de grenouille. Dans les deux cas, l'incidence des tumeurs ultérieures est nettement inférieure à ce qu'il était avec des embryons qui ont reçu l'oncogène mais aucun traitement de canal par hyperpolarisation.

Des expériences visant à déterminer le mécanisme cellulaire qui permet une hyperpolarisation pour inhiber la formation de tumeurs a montré que le transport de butyrate, un suppresseur de tumeur connu, était responsable


------

Lexique :

-hyperpolarisation : Une légère augmentation du voltage à travers la membrane

-dépolarisation : une légère diminution du voltage à travers la membrane.

-butyrate :L'acide butanoïque, aussi appelé acide butyrique du grec βουτυρος (beurre), est un acide carboxylique saturé de formule CH3CH2CH2-COOH

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15763
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Un mécanisme bio-électrique   Mar 14 Oct 2008 - 13:05

(Oct. 14, 2008) — Scientists from The Forsyth Institute, working with collaborators at Tufts and Tuebingen Universities, have discovered a new control over embryonic stem cells' behavior. The researchers disrupted a natural bioelectrical mechanism within frog embryonic stem cells and trigged a cancer-like response, including increased cell growth, change in cell shape, and invasion of the major body organs. This research shows that electrical signals are a powerful control mechanism that can be used to modulate cell behavior.


Les scientifiques ont découvert unnouveau contrôle du comportement des cellules d'embryon. Les chercheurs ont interrompu un mécanisme bioélectrique des  cellules souches des grenouilles et ont obtenu une réponse ressemblant à un cancer : la croissance des cellules, des changements dans la forme des cellules et des invasions dans la plupart des organes du corps. La recherche montre que le signal électrique est un puissant signal pour moduler le comportement des cellules.


Dernière édition par Denis le Sam 13 Aoû 2016 - 12:50, édité 4 fois
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: Un mécanisme bio-électrique   Aujourd'hui à 8:11

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
Un mécanisme bio-électrique
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 1
 Sujets similaires
-
» Un mécanisme bio-électrique
» Chauffage électrique : sous la fenêtre ou à l'opposé
» Le grand Black-out du Nord-Est "l'énergie électrique coupée" (1965)
» Transport électrique
» Voiturette électrique

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
ESPOIRS :: Cancer :: recherche-
Sauter vers: