AccueilCalendrierFAQRechercherS'enregistrerMembresGroupesConnexion

Partagez | 
 

 Le gène Notch

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
AuteurMessage
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène Notch   Mer 15 Juin 2016 - 14:27

A recent study led by scientists at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, in collaboration with the Univerity of Maryland School of Pharmacy and StemSynergy Therapeutics, Inc., has identified a small-molecule inhibitor of the Notch pathway, paving the way for a potential new class of personalized cancer medicines. Aberrant activity in the Notch pathway contributes to the initiation and maintenance of cancer stem cells. The study was published online in the journal Cancer Research.

"The Notch pathway is an exceedingly attractive therapeutic target in cancer, but the full range of potential targets within the pathway has been underexplored," said Anthony J. Capobianco, Ph.D., director of the Molecular Oncology Research Program at Sylvester and corresponding author of the study. "To date, there are no small-molecule inhibitors that directly target the intracellular Notch pathway directly. We've been trying to target this pathway for more than15 years and this is the first example of a targeted therapeutic specific for Notch that has an effect on human-derived malignant tumors."

In this study, the team of scientists attacked the core of Notch activity -- a complex of three proteins that directs a specific program of transcription critical for the survival of the tumor. In collaboration with Alex MacKerell, Ph.D., director of the Computer-Aided Drug Design (CADD) Center at the Univerity of Maryland School of Pharmacy, the team used computational drug discovery to identify a small-molecule inhibitor, termed Inhibitor of Mastermind Recruitment 1 (IMR-1), that disrupted the recruitment of Mastermind-like protein 1 (Maml1) to the Notch transcription complex -- a function that in turn abrogates Notch target gene transcription. More important, IMR-1 inhibited the growth of Notch-dependent cell lines and significantly supressed the growth of patient-derived tumors in mouse xenograft studies.

"CADD offers the potential to identify therapeutic agents for challenging drug targets, including those involved in cancer," said MacKerell. "In this study, we were able to apply CADD to identify potential drug-binding sites on the previously uncharted Notch transcriptional complex and then screen more than one million drug-like compounds to identify those with a high probability of binding to the complex and blocking its function. The success of this approach in identifying the novel Notch inhibitor emphasizes the utility of CADD in jump-starting research efforts toward the development of novel therapeutic approaches to the treatment of cancer and other diseases."

"Our findings suggest that a novel class of Notch inhibitors targeting Maml1 may represent a new paradigm for Notch-based anticancer therapeutics," said Capobianco, who is also professor of surgery at the Miller School. "As a next step, we plan on moving this laboratory research from human-derived disease models to cancer patients over the next years."

---

Une étude récente menée par des scientifiques a identifié un inhibiteur de petite molécule de la voie Notch, ouvrant la voie à une nouvelle classe potentielle de médicaments anticancéreux personnalisés. Une activité aberrante de la voie Notch contribue à l'initiation et le maintien des cellules souches cancéreuses. L'étude a été publiée en ligne dans la revue Cancer Research.

"La voie Notch est une cible thérapeutique très attrayante dans le cancer, mais la gamme complète des cibles potentielles dans la voie a été inexploré», a déclaré Anthony J. Capobianco, Ph.D., directeur du Programme de recherche en oncologie moléculaire de Sylvester et correspondant auteur de l'étude. «À ce jour, il n'y a pas d'inhibiteurs de petites molécules qui ciblent directement la voie Notch intracellulaire directement. Nous avons essayé de cibler cette voie pour plus de15 ans et ceci est le premier exemple d'une  thérapeutique spécifique ciblée pour Notch qui a un effet sur les  tumeurs malignes origine humaine. "

Dans cette étude, l'équipe de scientifiques a attaqué le cœur de l'activité de Notch - un complexe de trois protéines qui dirige un programme spécifique de transcription critique pour la survie de la tumeur. En collaboration avec Alex mackerell, Ph.D., directeur de la Computer aid Drug Design (CADD), l'équipe a utilisé la découverte d'ordinateurs pour identifier un inhibiteur de petite molécule, appelée Inhibiteur de Mastermind recrutement 1 (IMR-1), qui a perturbé le recrutement de protéines Mastermind-like 1 (Maml1) du complexe de transcription Notch - une fonction qui à son tour abolit la trancription de la cible du gène Notch. Plus important encore, IMR-1 a inhibé la croissance de lignées cellulaires dépendant de Notch et significativement supressed la croissance des tumeurs provenant de patients dans les études de xénogreffe de souris.

"CADD offre la possibilité d'identifier des agents thérapeutiques pour contrer des cibles de médicaments, y compris celles qui sont impliqués dans le cancer», a déclaré mackerell. «Dans cette étude, nous avons été en mesure d'appliquer CADD pour identifier les sites potentiels de médicaments se liant sur le complexe transcriptionnel de Notch qui étaient précédemment inconnus, puis filtrer plus d'un million de composés médicamenteux comme pour identifier ceux qui ont une forte probabilité de se lier au complexe et de bloquer sa fonction. Le succès de cette approche pour identifier le nouvel inhibiteur de Notch souligne l'utilité de CADD dans les efforts d'avancement de la recherche pour partir vers le développement de nouvelles approches thérapeutiques pour le traitement du cancer et de d'autres maladies ".

"Nos résultats suggèrent qu'une nouvelle classe d'inhibiteurs Notch ciblant Maml1 peut représenter un nouveau paradigme pour la thérapeutique anticancer à base de Notch», a déclaré Capobianco, qui est également professeur de chirurgie à l'École Miller. "Dans une prochaine étape, nous prévoyons de déplacer cette recherche en laboratoire à partir de modèles de maladies humaines dérivées de patients atteints de cancer."



 

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène Notch   Jeu 19 Mai 2016 - 15:00

Two-way communication between cancer cells appears to be key to their becoming motile, clustering and spreading through metastasis, according to Rice University scientists.

Members of Rice's Center for Theoretical Biological Physics have developed a model of how cancer cells twist a complex system of signals and feedback loops to their advantage. These signals help the cells detach from primary tumors and form clusters that lead to often-fatal metastatic disease.

The Rice team reported in 2015 that the notch signaling pathway that involves proteins known as "notch," "jagged" and "delta" can be hijacked by cancerous cells. In normal operation, the mechanism is critical to embryonic development and wound healing and typically activates when a delta ligand of one cell interacts with the notch receptor of another. Their new paper in The Royal Society journal Interface advances the theory that cancer cells use these proteins, particularly jagged, to not only establish two-way signals that turn them into hybrid epithelial-mesenchymal cells but also to form mobile clusters.

"In general, our interest has been in the decision cells make by which they leave the primary tumor," said Rice theoretical biological physicist Herbert Levine. "The epithelial cells are in the primary tumor are aberrant. Still, they look like normal cells, even though they're growing where they shouldn't. But cancer only turns truly deadly when cells leave and start new growths elsewhere in the body."

Because notch signaling is such a common function, the researchers suspected it could be repurposed by rogue cells. "We've argued over the last couple of years that cells make active cell-fate decisions to become motile and leave the tumor. This paper addresses the extent to which cells coordinate their decisions with each other," he said.

The study led by Levine, Rice colleague José Onuchic and former Rice researcher Marcelo Boareto offers cancer researchers a new target to consider as they seek ways to disrupt the process of metastasis.

Notch signaling that starts in one cell triggers the transition of a neighboring cell, for instance, allowing a stem cell to reconfigure one of its neighbors for a specific function. "You have cells that are senders and cells that are receivers," Onuchic said. "By doing that, they can differentiate. They can make their partners to be different than they are."

But in cancer, cells can act both as receivers and senders, especially when they change the primary ligand to jagged. "It turns out jagged increase is the smoking gun," he said. Not only does the higher number of jagged proteins help create these motile hybrid cells, the increase also helps the hybrids exchange information to make sure that all the cells that are able will clump into a group, he said.

"Biologists usually don't think about the differences between the ligands," Boareto said. "But there's a large difference. The main message of the paper is simple: Notch-delta signaling leads to isolated cells undergoing the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) to motile individuals, and notch-jagged leads to groups of cells undergoing EMT to motile clusters."

The researchers suspected such transitions aren't random. "Now we know they aren't just reactions to the environment," Levine said. "They're often due to cells communicating and making collective decisions." To test these ideas, he said, co-author Sendurai Mani of the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center will use cancer tissue samples to quantify the presence of jagged and other related proteins over the next few years.

Onuchic said it was not surprising that cancer cells use notch pathways and probably other pathways as well. "Cancer never creates a complete new mechanism in biology," he said. "It uses existing mechanisms to fulfill its needs. Learning how that happens can provide new clues for preventing metastasis."

Even if the discovery doesn't immediately apply to therapies, it could help diagnose the severity of a tumor by quantifying its expression of notch, jagged and delta proteins. "It gives us something to measure to predict more accurately how dangerous a primary tumor is," Levine said.


---


Une communication à deux voies entre les cellules cancéreuses semble être la clé pour leur devenir motile, le regroupement et la diffusion par le biais des métastases, selon les scientifiques de l'Université Rice.

Les membres du Centre de Rice pour la physique théorique biologique ont développé un modèle de la façon dont les cellules cancéreuses tordent un système complexe de signaux et de boucles de rétroaction à leur avantage. Ces signaux aident les cellules à se détacher des tumeurs primaires et forment des amas qui conduisent à une maladie métastatique souvent mortelle.

L'équipe du Rice a rapporté en 2015 que la voie de signalisation Notch qui implique des protéines connues comme «cran»,(notch)  «en dents de scie" (jagged)  et "delta" peut être détourné par les cellules cancéreuses. En fonctionnement normal, le mécanisme est crucial pour le développement embryonnaire et la cicatrisation des plaies et active lorsqu'un ligand delta d'une cellule interagit avec le récepteur de Notch d'une autre. Leur nouvel article dans l'interface revue Royal Society avance la théorie que les cellules cancéreuses utilisent ces protéines, en particulier déchiquetées, à seulement établir des pas de signaux à deux voies qui les transforment en cellules épithéliales-mésenchymateuses hybrides, mais aussi pour former des grappes mobiles.

«En général, notre intérêt a été pour les décisions des cellules par lequel ils quittent la tumeur primaire," a déclaré le physicien biologique théorique Herbert Levine. "Les cellules épithéliales dans la tumeur primaire sont aberrantes. Pourtant, ils ressemblent à des cellules normales, même si elles sont de plus en plus là où elles ne devraient pas. Mais le cancer se transforme véritablement mortelle lorsque les cellules quittent et commencent de nouvelles pousses ailleurs dans le corps. "

Parce que la signalisation Notch est une fonction commune, les chercheurs ont soupçonné qu'il pourrait être réorientés par des cellules voyous. «Nous avons fait valoir au cours des deux dernières années que les cellules prennent des décisions de cellules sort actifs deviennent mobiles et quittent la tumeur. Ce document traite de la mesure dans laquelle les cellules coordonnent leurs décisions avec l'autre," at-il dit.

L'étude menée par Levine, un collègue de Rice José Onuchic et ancien chercheur riz Marcelo Boareto offre aux chercheurs du cancer une nouvelle cible à considérer comme ils cherchent des moyens de perturber le processus de métastase.

La signalisation Notch qui commence dans une cellule déclenche la transition d'une cellule voisine, par exemple, en permettant à une cellule souche de reconfigurer une de ses voisines pour une fonction spécifique. "Vous avez des cellules qui sont émettrices et des cellules qui sont réceptrices ", a déclaré Onuchic. "En faisant cela, elles peuvent se différencier. elles peuvent faire devenir leurs partenaires différentes de ce qu'elles sont."

Mais dans le cancer, les cellules peuvent servir à la fois de récepteurs et des émetteurs, en particulier quand ils changent de ligand primaire à ligand déchiquetée. "Il se trouve que l'augmentation déchiquetée est le pistolet fumant», dit-il. Non seulement le nombre plus élevé de protéines déchiquetées aide à créer ces cellules hybrides mobiles, mais l'augmentation aide également les informations d'échange des hybrides pour faire en sorte que toutes les cellules qui sont capables de s'agglutiner le feront dans un groupe, dit-il.

«Les biologistes habituellement ne pensent pas sur les différences entre les ligands", a déclaré Boareto. "Mais il y a une grande différence. Le message principal du document est simple:. La signalisation Notch-delta conduit à des cellules isolées subissant la transition épithéliale-mésenchymateuse (EMT) et à des individus mobiles, et les protéines notch dentelées conduisent à des groupes de cellules subissant une EMT à grappes mobiles ".

Les chercheurs ont soupçonnés que de telles transitions ne sont pas aléatoires. "Maintenant, nous savons qu'ils ne sont pas seulement des réactions  à l'environnement», a déclaré Levine. «Ils sont souvent dus à des cellules de communication et  prennent des décisions collectives." Pour tester ces idées, il a dit, co-auteur Sendurai Mani de l'Université du Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center utilisera des échantillons de tissus cancéreux pour quantifier la présence de protéines déchiquetées et d'autres apparentées au cours des prochaines années.

Onuchic a dit qu'il était pas surprenant que les cellules cancéreuses utilisent les voies Notch et probablement d'autres voies aussi. «Le cancer ne crée un nouveau mécanisme complet en biologie," at-il dit. "Il utilise les mécanismes existants pour répondre à ses besoins. Apprendre comment cela se produit peut fournir de nouveaux indices pour prévenir les métastases."

Même si la découverte ne s'applique pas immédiatement aux thérapies, il pourrait aider à diagnostiquer la gravité d'une tumeur en quantifiant l'expression de protéines notch, jagged (déchiquetées)  et delta. «Cela nous donne quelque chose à mesurer pour prédire avec plus de précision la dangerosité d'une tumeur primaire", a déclaré Levine.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène Notch   Mar 16 Oct 2012 - 10:46

Les chercheurs de l’Inserm et du CNRS ont découvert une nouvelle stratégie pour freiner le développement de nombreux cancers.

En identifiant des protéines dont l’activité semble indispensable à la prolifération de certaines cellules tumorales, des chercheurs de l'Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale (Inserm) et du Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS) ont découvert une nouvelle stratégie pouvant permettre de freiner le développement de nombreux cancers.

"Lorsqu’il s’agit de lutter contre les cancers, les chercheurs ont deux objectifs majeurs : parvenir à empêcher la prolifération des cellules cancéreuses et les détruire. Des travaux réalisés en collaboration par deux équipes françaises ouvrent aujourd’hui la voie vers de développement d’un traitement visant à atteindre le premier de ces objectifs", explique l'Inserm.

En effet, les équipes de Monsef Benkirane (Laboratoire de virologie moléculaire, Institut de Génétique Humaine, Montpellier - CNRS UPR1142) et de Yves Levy (Équipe "développement lymphoïde", Institut Mondor de recherche biomédicale, Créteil - INSERM U955)) ont découvert des protéines dont l’activité est indispensable à la prolifération des certaines cellules tumorales. Les chercheurs sont parvenus à empêcher la multiplication de cellules leucémiques humaines en bloquant l’activité de ces protéines dans un modèle expérimental préclinique.

Les équipes de Monsef Benkirane et Yves Levy se sont en effet intéressés à NOTCH-1, une protéine dont l’altération est connue pour jouer un rôle clé dans le développement de nombreux cancers : une mutation affectant le gène codant pour NOTCH1 est à l’origine de nombreux cancers, notamment des leucémies aigues lymphoblastiques T (LAL-T), des leucémies lymphoïdes chroniques ou encore des cancers du .

Les chercheurs se sont attachés à identifier les protéines avec lesquelles la version mutée de NOTCH1 interagit dans les cellules cancéreuses. Plusieurs enzymes et facteurs nucléaires ont pu être mis en évidence. Parmi eux, certains s’avèrent être indispensables à la multiplication des cellules cancéreuses porteuses d’une mutation du gène codant pour NOTCH-1.

"Cette découverte constitue un grand pas en avant, non seulement d’un point de vue thérapeutique en raison du nouvel espoir offert, mais aussi d’un point de vue scientifique car elle résulte de la compréhension de mécanismes moléculaires jouant un rôle clé dans le développement de nombreux cancers", se félicite l'équipe.

Sources: INSERM/ Yatim et coll. NOTCH1 Nuclear Interactome Reveals Key Regulators of Its Transcriptional Activity and Oncogenic Function. Molecular Cell, edition en ligne du 27 septembre 2012

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène Notch   Mar 14 Aoû 2012 - 0:05

(Aug. 13, 2012) — The discovery, which is already being tested in co-clinical trials, brings new clues for the treatment of this disease.

LA découverte qui est déjà testé en co-clinique apporte de nouvelles informations pour le traitement de la maladie.

Lung cancer is one of the most aggressive types of cancer and the most common cause of death from this disease worldwide. Despite the progress in the molecular biology of lung cancer achieved in recent years, the mechanisms used by tumor cells to grow and spread throughout the body are not yet completely understood. This lack of information is responsible for the limited range of available therapeutic possibilities and their undesirable side effects.

The Tumour Suppression Group of the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), led by Manuel Serrano, has deciphered one of the molecular pathways behind lung cancer. Using this information, the authors have identified an experimental drug, which blocks lung cancer growth in mice. This work is published August 13 in the scientific journal Cancer Cell.

Un groupe de chercheur a décrypté un chemin moléculaire derrière le cancer du et utiliser cette information pour identifier un médicament qui bloque la croissance du cancer du poumon chez la souris. Ce travail a été publié dans Cancer Cell.

Standing up to lung cancer

Notch was identified in 2004 as an important oncogene for the development of leukemias and, since then, intense efforts have been devoted to study the role of Notch in other cancers. At the end of the last decade it was found that Notch is also involved in the development of pancreatic and lung cancer.

In this study, Serrano's team has identified the molecular pathways by which Notch regulates cell proliferation in lung cancer. "We have found that this protein cooperates with the Ras oncogene, a key element in the formation of these tumors," states Serrano.

"Nous avons découverte que sa protéine (de Notch) coopère avec l'oncogène Ras pour réguler la prolifération des cellules dans le cancer du

Researchers have also discovered the therapeutic effect of a specific experimental drug which blocks Notch efficiently, named GSIs (Gamma-Secretase Inhibitors). To this end, scientists used genetically modified mice previously developed by Mariano Barbacid, head of the Experimental Oncoloy Group at the CNIO, that faithfully recapitulate human lung cancer. "After 15 days of treatment, lung tumors failed to grow without treatment-related side effects," says Antonio Maraver, the first author of the study.

Les chercheurs ont aussi découvert l'effet thérapeutique d'un médicament qui bloque l'efficacité de Notch nommé GSIs (inhibiteur de gamma secrétase) À cette fin, ils ont utilisé des souris modifiés "Après 15 jours de traitement, les tumeurs ne grossissaient plus et cela sans effets secondaires


Co-clinical trials both in humans and mice

GSIs were developed over 15 years ago to treat Alzheimer's disease. Although now it is well established that GSIs are not useful to stop this neurodegenerative disease, the discovery that these drugs block Notch has stirred the interest in their possible application for cancer. The accumulated knowledge acquired over the years on the pharmacological properties of GSIs has permitted their immediate use in clinical trials for cancer.

Le GSI a été développé voici 15 ans contre l'Alzheimer mais ça n'a pas fonctionné. Cependant avec l'accumulation de connaissance sur le médicament, les chercheurs ont pu l'utiliser immédiatement contre le cancer.

Mouse therapeutic trials performed in parallel with humans clinical trials are called coclinical trials, and are at the cutting edge of biomedical research. These trials allow the transference of information from mice to humans in a very short period of time. A clear example is this research, which is being accompanied by a human clinical trial led by Manuel Hidalgo, director of the Clinical Research Program at the CNIO.

Les essais co-clinique sont des essais ou l'ont traitent les souris et les humains en parallèle et c'est à la fine pointe de la recherche parce que ça permet d'appliquer les connaissance que l,on prend de la souris vers l'homme rapidement..

"The assays developed by Serrano led us to believe that blocking Notch could be beneficial for treating lung cancer. We have already treated a dozen patients with an agent directed at the blocking of this protein. We are expanding the study, but I can anticipate that the results are very promising," says Hidalgo.

Nous avons déjà traité une douzaine de patient en bloquant la protéine Notch. nous étendons notre étude mais déjà les résultats sont prometteurs.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène Notch   Lun 2 Juil 2012 - 14:34

Research suggests that patients with leukemia sometimes relapse because standard chemotherapy fails to kill the self-renewing leukemia initiating cells, often referred to as cancer stem cells. In such cancers, the cells lie dormant for a time, only to later begin cloning, resulting in a return and metastasis of the disease.

La recherche suggère que les patients avec leucémie aigue lymphoblastique rechute de la thérapie standard parce que la chimio ne réussis pas à tuer les cellules de la leucémie qui se renouvelle d'elles-mêmes auquelles on réferrent souvent en les appelant cellules souches cancéreuses. Dans un tel cancer, les cellules sont dormantes pour un temps pour revenir une fois cloné et résulté en un retour de l amaldie et des métastases.

One such type of cancer is called pediatric T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, or T-ALL, often found in children, who have few treatment options beyond chemotherapy.

A team of researchers -- led by Catriona H. M. Jamieson, MD, PhD, associate professor of medicine at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Director of Stem Cell Research at UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center -- studied these cells in mouse models that had been transplanted with human leukemia cells. They discovered that the leukemia initiating cells which clone, or replicate, themselves most robustly activate the NOTCH1 pathway, usually in the context of a mutation.

Les chercheurs ont découvert que les cellules initiatrices de la leucémie qui se clonaient ou se répliquaient elles-mêmes activaient plus fortement le chemin cellulaire NOTCH1 dans un contexte d'une mutation habituellement.

Earlier studies showed that as many as half of patients with T-ALL have mutations in the NOTCH1 pathway -- an evolutionarily conserved developmental pathway used during differentiation of many cell and tissue types. The new study shows that when NOTCH1 activation was inhibited in animal models using a monoclonal antibody, the leukemia initiating cells did not survive. In addition, the antibody treatment significantly reduced a subset of these cancer stem cells (identified by the presence of specific markers, CD2 and CD7, on the cell surface.)

Des études antérieures ont montré que jusqu'à la moitié des patients avec ce cancer du , la leucémie aigue lymphoblastique, avaient des mutations dans ce chemin cellulaire Notch1. LA nouvelle étude montre que lorsque ce chemin est inhibé par un anticorps monoclonal, les cellules initiatrices de la leucémie ne survivent pas. En plus, l'anticorps réduit significativement un sous-type de ces cellules (celles avec CD2 et CD7 sur leurs surfaces)

"We were able to substantially reduce the potential of these cancer stem cells to self-renew," said Jamieson. "So we're not just getting rid of cancerous cells: we're getting to the root of their resistance to treatment -- leukemic stem cells that lie dormant."

"Nous ne faisons pas seulement nous débarasser des cellules cancéreuses mais nous allons jusqu'à la racine de la résistance au traitement les cellules souches leucémiques dormantes."

The study results suggest that such therapy would also be effective in other types of cancer stem cells, such as those that cause breast cancer, that also rely on NOTCH1 for self-renewal.

Les résultats de l'étude suggèrent qu'une telle thérapie serait aussi efficace dans d'autres types de cancer avec des cellules souches comme les cancers du qui ont aussi cette forme de chemin cellulaire NOTCH1 pour le renouvellement de leur cellules souches cancéreuses.

"Therapies based on monoclonal antibodies that inhibit NOTCH 1 are much more selective than using gamma-secretase inhibitors, which also block other essential cellular functions in addition to the NOTCH1 signaling pathway," said contributor A. Thomas Look, MD of Dana-Farber/Children Hospital Cancer Center in Boston. "We are excited about the promise of NOTCH1-specific antibodies to counter resistance to therapy in T-ALL and possibly additional types of cancer."

In investigating the role of NOTCH1 activation in cancer cell cloning, the researchers showed that leukemia initiating cells possess enhanced survival and self-renewal potential in specific blood-cell, or hematopoietic, niches: the microenvironment of the body in which the cells live and self-renew.

The scientists studied the molecular characterization of CD34+ cells -- a protein that shows expression in early hematopoietic cells and that facilitates cell migration -- from a dozen T-ALL patient samples.

They found that mutations in NOTCH1 and other genes capable of promoting the survival of cancer stem cells co-existed in the CD34+ niche. Mice transplanted with CD34-enriched NOTCH1 mutated T-ALL cells demonstrated significantly greater leukemic cloning potential than did mice without the NOTCH1 mutation. The mutated cells were uniquely susceptible to targeted inhibition with a human monoclonal antibody, according to the scientists.


_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène Notch   Lun 7 Nov 2011 - 17:04

Within many hormone-receptor positive breast cancers lives a subpopulation of receptor-negative cells -- knock down the hormone-receptor positive cells with anti-estrogen drugs and you may inadvertently promote tumor takeover by more dangerous, receptor-negative cells. A study recently published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences describes how to switch these receptor-negative cells back to a state that can be targeted by existing hormone therapies.


Dans plusieurs cancer du avec des récepteurs d'hormones positifs vit aussi une sous-population de cellules avec des récepteurs négatifs. Si vous combattez et détruisez les cellules avec des récepteurs positifs aux hormones vous pouvez faire ressortir les cellules avec des récepteurs négatifs qui sont plus dangeureuses encore. Une récente étude montre comment faire que ces cellules avec des récepteurs négatifs reviennent à un état qui peut être controlé par les thérapies hormonales.

"We found that these estrogen-receptor negative cells express high levels of a Notch receptor protein," says James Haughian, PhD, investigator at the University of Colorado Cancer Center and instructor at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. "And when you blockade this Notch activity, you end up with a pure population of hormone-receptor positive cells."

Nous avons découvert que les cellules avec des récepteurs négatifs aux oestrogènes expriment des niveaux élevés de la protéine Notch et si vous bloquez cette activité de Notch vous finissez avec avec une population de cellules avec des récepteurs positifs à l'hormone.


Very basically, within a breast cancer, you frequently have different kinds of cells living together -- some that have estrogen receptors and thus need to "grab" estrogen in order to survive, grow and replicate. And, Haughian finds, some with similar Notch receptors that need to "grab" Notch proteins in order to survive, grow and replicate. On cells without estrogen receptors but with Notch receptors, they blockade this Notch pathway and the cell again becomes dependent on estrogen -- and thus likely treatable with anti-estrogen therapies.

Dans un cancer du sein vous avez différents groupe de cellules qui vivent ensemble quelques unes ont des récepteurs d'oestrogène et doivent attraper de l'oestrogène pour survivre, croitre et se multiplier. et quelques unes ont des récepteurs de Notch qui ont besoin d'attraper Notch pour le même but. Sur les cellules sans les récepteurs d'oestrogène mais avec les récepteurs de Notch, les scientifiques ont bloqué ce chemin cellulaire de Notch et la cellule est devenue dépendante de l'oestrogène et à aprtir de là traitable avec des thérapies anti-oestrogène.

"It's rare to get something that works so fantastically well as this," Haughian says.

"C'est rare de voir quelque chose qui marche aussi bien" de dire Haughian

Whether this switch from hormone-insensitive to hormone-sensitive is due to basic evolution -- killing the triple-negative cells leaves more resources for the growth of hormone-receptor positive cells -- or whether inhibiting Notch signaling, in fact, causes triple-negative cells to grow hormone receptors is still under investigation.

Whatever the precise mechanism, drugs that inhibit this Notch activity are already in clinical trials for breast cancer. However, Kathryn Horwitz, PhD, investigator at the CU Cancer Center and Distinguished Professor of Endocrinology at the CU School of Medicine theorizes that, "Monotherapy with a Notch inhibitor might not be enough on its own, but may convert the cancer into a hormone-therapy treatable state."

This finding that Notch inhibition converts a triple-negative cancer subpopulation to a hormone-receptor positive population implies the potential usefulness of combination therapy -- perhaps a Notch inhibitor to make all the cancer's cells hormone-sensitive, followed by an anti-estrogen to treat them.

"Theorizing that and proving it is another matter," Horwitz says. "But if a clinician came knocking on our door, we'd say hey, let's try it."

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène Notch   Mer 7 Sep 2011 - 14:06

C'est un article un peu long et un peu décevant dans le sens qu'on voudrait qu'il se termine en disant qu'il y a un médicament pour stopper l'activité du gène Notch ou qu'il va en trouver un plutôt que de nous dire qu'il va étudier des modèles mathématiques un peu inutiles (enfin me semble-t-il) mais enfin une fois que je l'ai traduit je le mets sur le forum quand même, peut-être qu'il y a aura une suite à ces recherches et que ça débouchera sur du concret. Je dis ça parce qu'on m'a reproché ce genre d'article long et qui n'apporte pas quelque chose de concret immédiatement. D'un autre coté, si je devais mettre juste ce qui apporte quelque chose de concret dans l'année disons et bien le forum sur les recherches serait mince...


(Sep. 6, 2011) — Cell communication is essential for the development of any organism. Scientists know that cells have the power to "talk" to one another, sending signals through their membranes in order to "discuss" what kind of cell they will ultimately become -- whether a neuron or a hair, bone, or muscle. And because cells continuously multiply, it's easy to imagine a cacophony of communication.

La communication cellulaire est essentiel pour le développement de tout organisme. Les scientifiques savent que les cellules ont le pouvoir de se parler entre elles, de s'envoyer des messages à travers leur membranes pour pouvoir discuter de leur devenir, si elles devenir un neurone, un cheveux, un os, un muscle etc. Et parce que ces cellules se multiplient il serait facile d'imaginer une cacophonie.

But according to Dr. David Sprinzak, a new faculty recruit of Tel Aviv University's Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the George S. Wise Faculty of Life Sciences, cells know when to transmit signals -- and they know when it's time to shut up and let other cells do the talking. In collaboration with a team of researchers at the California Institute of Technology, Dr. Sprinzak has discovered the mechanism that allows cells to switch from sender to receiver mode or vice versa, inhibiting their own signals while allowing them to receive information from other cells -- controlling their development like a well-run business meeting.


Mais selon le docteur David Sprinzak, les cellules savent quand transmettre leurs signaux et quand ne rien transmettre pour laisser les autres le faire. Le docteur sprinzak a découvert le mécanisme qui permet aux cellules de passer du mode "envoyeur de messages" au mode " écouteur de messages" et vice-versa.

Dr. Sprinzak's breakthrough can lead to the development of cancer drugs that specifically target these transactions as needed, further inhibiting or encouraging the flow of information between cells and potentially stopping the uncontrollable proliferation of cancer cells. Dr. Sprinzak's research appeared in the journal PLoS Computational Biology.


Cette découverte va permettre le développement de nouveaux médicaments contre le cancer qui vont cibler spécifiquement ces échanges de messages au besoin soit les inhiber ou les encourager et potentiellement arrêter la prolifération incontrolable des cellules cancéreuses.

Over and out

A cell's communications behavior is mediated by the "Notch signalling pathway," one of the major communication channels between neighboring cells. Information is transferred between cells when Notch receptors from one cell come into contact with Delta molecules, or signals, from another cell. But when the same Delta molecules interact with Notch receptors in the same cell, Dr. Sprinzak found, they shut down their activity and prevent reception of signals from the outside world.

Un comportement des communications cellulaires est géré par le chemin cellulaire Notch, un des canal majeur de communication entre les cellules voisines. L'information est transmis entre les cellules quand les récepteurs Notch d'une cellule entre en contact avec les molécules delta, ou molécules signalantesm d'une autre cellule. Mais quand les mêmes molécules delta enteragissent avec les récepteurs Notch de la même cellule, elles arrêtent leurs activités et stoppent les signaux qui viennent de l'extérieur.

The researchers set out to learn how. In the lab, Dr. Sprinzak and his team attached fluorescent proteins to both Notches and Deltas to track the flow of information. What they found was that the Notch receptors and the Delta signals are actually capable of binding to each other, effectively shutting down each other's activity and forcing the cells into either sender or receiver modes.

Les chercheurs ont voulu savoir comment. En laboratoire, les chercheurs ont attaché des protéines fluorescentes aux récepteurs Notch et aux Deltas pour suivre le flot d'informations. Ils ont découvert que les récepteurs Nortch et les signaux delta peuvent se lier pour arrêter les activités de l'un ou l'autre et forcer les cellules à entre dans un mode receveur ou "envoyeur".

"In one state, a cell can send a message and not receive, and in the other it receives and cannot send. They can talk or listen, but they cannot do both at the same time," says Dr. Sprinzak. He compares this communications system to a walkie talkie, in which only one user may be "on the air" at a time.

Dans un état, la cellule peut envoyer un message et non le recevoir et dans l'autre elle peut le recevoir et non l'envoyer.

This switch is crucial to helping the cells make yes-and-no decisions in which neighboring cells adopt distinct fates. Such "cell fate" decisions are responsible for formation of boundaries between developmental tissues, such as those between the vertebrae protecting our spine. They can also account for many patterns of differentiation in the body, such as the pattern of neurons in our brain, or sensory hairs in the inner ear.

Ce changement est crucial pour aider la cellule à faire des décisons "oui ou non" sur lesquelles le destin de la cellule se joue.

Far from enigmatic, this process can actually be seen in the lab. By measuring the fluorescence in real time, it is possible to watch how the levels of a cell's own Delta activity affect the ability of a cell to transfer messages to its neighbors.

Understanding biology through mathematical models

Sender and receiver behavior, says Dr. Sprinzak, not only determines how cells differentiate normally, but also how they differentiate in abnormal situations, such as when cancer cells are growing.

Le comportement de "d'envoyeur de message" ou de receveur de messages non seulement différencie ce que les cellules vont devenir mais aussi dans les situations anormales comme le cancer quand les cellules vont croitre.

A physicist-turned-biologist, Dr. Sprinzak will next apply mathematical models to analyze the dynamics between the cells and quantify the switch between sender and receiver. Part of an emerging field called Systems Biology, Dr. Sprinzak's work uses tools from mathematics and physics to understand biology on a systematic level. Mathematical equations can help us to better understand the interactions between the genes and proteins in our body which determine cellular behavior and differentiation, he says.

Le docteur Sprinzak appliquera des modèles mathématiques pour analyser les dynamiques entre les cellules et quantifier les rensersement entre "envoyeur" et "receveur".

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: LE gène notch stimule les cellules souches et le cancer   Jeu 4 Oct 2007 - 15:15



Dr Robert Clarke and his team at the University's Cancer Studies research group have been investigating human breast cancers for the presence of stem cells - cells that generate new tumours and can cause the cancer to recur - in a series of studies funded by the charity Breast Cancer Campaign.

Le docteur Robert Clarke et son équipe ont cherché des cellules souches dans le cancer du Ces cellules génèrent de nouvelles tumeurs et peuvent causer la récurence du cancer.

One third of women who are successfully treated for breast cancer find that the disease recurs some years later because some of these cancer cells survive the treatment and begin to grow again.

The team's research into these 'breast cancer stem cells' revealed that the cells are stimulated by the Notch gene. The team, who published the study in Journal of the National Cancer Institute, is now hoping to develop new drug therapies to target this gene and thus stop the growth of any surviving breast cancer stem cells.

L'équipe de recherche a révélé que ces cellules sont stimulées par le gène Notch. Léquipe veut maintenant développé un nouveau médicament pour cibler ce gène et arrêter la croissance de toutes les cellules souches cancéreuses survivantes dans le cancer du sein.

One drug that is known to attack Notch is already used for the treatment of Alzheimer's Disease so, having undergone health and safety checks, its clinical trial for use on breast cancer patients could be sped up and lead to a treatment in hospital clinics within a few years. Herceptin, by contrast, took more than 15 years to go from the discovery of its gene target to treatment.

Un médicament connu est déja en usage pour attaquer le gène Notch et sert dans la maladie d'alzeimer. Son essai clinique pour le cancer du sein pourrait prendre relativement peu de temps comparativement à d'autres médicaments comme le HErceptin qui a pris 15 ans. Le médicament en question pourrait être autorisé dans des essais cliniques en dedans de quelques années.

The team is also aiming to identify other new pathways of controlling breast cancer stem cells by using a genetic library to shut down other genes at random to see how it affects them, in a study with Rene Bernards at the Netherlands Cancer Institute.

L'équipe de recherche veut aussi identifier d'autres chemins cellulaires pour controler le cancer du en utilisant une librairie génétique pour "fermer" certains gènes de façcon alléatoire pour voir comment ça affecte le cancer du

The team, along with Professor Tony Whetton, are using a state-of-the-art mass-spectrometry based proteomics facility at the Paterson Institute of Cancer Research to identify proteins that control breast cancer stem cells. The facility - one of only a few in the UK - enables them to break up breast cancer stem cell proteins and analyse the sequence of amino acids to identify novel proteins that control the cells' growth.

Dr Clarke says: "Our work has revealed the importance of several pathways not previously known to regulate stem cell survival and self-renewal, which is tremendously exciting. Inhibitors of signalling pathways that regulate cancer stem cells could represent a new therapeutic modality in breast cancer, to be used in combination with current treatments in the near future."

This research is being presented at the National Cancer Research Institute conference in Birmingham October 1, 2007.


Dernière édition par Denis le Mer 7 Sep 2011 - 14:09, édité 1 fois
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène Notch   Ven 21 Oct 2005 - 11:35




Parallèlement un groupe néerlandais, avec lequel a collaboré l'équipe de Daniel Louvard, montre qu'en bloquant l'activité de Notch et donc en obligeant les cellules à se spécialiser, il est possible de faire régresser des polypes, précurseurs des tumeurs colo-rectales, chez la souris.

Ces découvertes ouvrent de nouvelles perspectives dans la compréhension du cancer colo-retale, notamment sur le rôle des cellules souches dans le développement tumoral, ainsi que des voies prometteuses dans le traitement d'une des tumeurs les plus fréquentes dans le monde.

Ces résultats sont publiés dans Nature du 16 juin 2005.

Le cancer résulte d'une série d'accidents génétiques qui se produisent par étapes : des anomalies s'accumulent sur des gènes qui régulent les processus vitaux (division, différenciation, réparation, apoptose)
La perte de contôle de la division cellulaire est l'une des caractéristiques essentielles des cellules cancéreuses. Le processus de cancérogenèse peut en effet se résumer comme une perte successive des propriétés des cellules qui vont jusqu'à oublier le "travail" spécialisé pour lequel elles ont été programmées.

Les cellules tumorales retournent à l'état relativement indifférencié et font en quelque sorte le chemin inverse de celui des cellules souches qui se diférencient au fil des divisions. L'étude de ce "miroir inversé" peut ainsi permettre d'améliorer la compréhension de la cancérogenèse.
Si cellule souche a longtemps rimé avec embryon, on sait maintenant que l'adulte en possède également une réserve. Elle participe au renouvellement quotidien des quelque centaines de milliards de cellules qui meurent dans notre organisme.

À ce titre les villosités intestinales constituent un modèle très intéressant pour les biologistes car, d'une part, au creux de ces villosités se trouvent des cellules souches et des cellules progénétrices, et d'autre part, le cancer du côlon est l'une des tumeurs les plus fréquentes dans le monde.


Dernière édition par le Lun 26 Nov 2007 - 18:49, édité 1 fois
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Le gène Notch   Ven 17 Juin 2005 - 7:21



article du 16 juin 2005

En apportant de nouvelles connaissances sur les mécanismes qui régulent la différenciation des cellules intestinales, deux études publiées aujourd’hui dans la revue Nature permettront peut-être de mieux lutter contre le cancer colorectal dans quelques années. Il s’agit du second type de cancer le plus fréquent en France.

Les villosités de l’intestin, ces multiples plis et replis, hébergent des cellules souches qui donnent naissance aux cellules progénitrices. Ces dernières se différencient ensuite pour former des cellules spécialisées de l’intestin. Le tissu intestinal se renouvelle ainsi en 3 à 5 jours. Mais ces cellules souches pourraient aussi jouer un rôle dans l’apparition de tumeurs cancéreuses. Les cellules tumorales présentent en effet plusieurs anomalies, notamment des troubles de la différenciation. Au lieu de devenir une cellule spécialisée, la cellule tumorale demeure indifférenciée et prolifère anormalement.


L’équipe dirigée par Spyros Artavanis-Tsakonas (Boston), à laquelle participe l’équipe de Daniel Louvard (CNRS/Institut Curie), a montré que l’activation permanente d’un gène, appelé Notch, empêchait la différenciation des cellules souches intestinales.

De son côté, l’équipe du Hollandais Hans Clevers, à laquelle était aussi associée le laboratoire de Louvard, a bloqué l’activation du gène Notch chez des souris porteuse d’un polype, le signe le plus fréquent du cancer colorectal. Les chercheurs ont observé que les cellules étaient forcées à la différenciation et que les polypes régressaient.

Ces travaux permettront de mieux comprendre les origines du cancer colorectal et d’imaginer de nouvelles voies thérapeutiques.


Dernière édition par Denis le Mer 15 Juin 2016 - 14:29, édité 8 fois
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: Le gène Notch   Aujourd'hui à 0:07

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
Le gène Notch
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 1
 Sujets similaires
-
» Le gène Notch
» Enigme posée par une petite fille qui ne grandit pas ou le gène de l'immortalité
» Le gène DAPK1
» Le gène BRAF
» Des moyens de bloquer le gène et la protéine p21.

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
ESPOIRS :: Cancer :: recherche-
Sauter vers: