AccueilCalendrierFAQRechercherS'enregistrerMembresGroupesConnexion

Partagez | 
 

 l'horloge biologique interne et le cancer

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
AuteurMessage
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16506
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: l'horloge biologique interne et le cancer   Mar 25 Avr 2017 - 17:14

Humans, like virtually all other complex organisms on Earth, have adapted to their planet's 24-hour cycle of sunlight and darkness. That circadian rhythm is reflected in human behavior, of course, but also in the molecular workings of our cells. Now scientists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have developed a powerful tool for detecting and characterizing those molecular rhythms -- a tool that could have many new medical applications, such as more accurate dosing for existing medications.

The tool is a machine learning-type algorithm called CYCLOPS that can sift through existing data on gene activity in human tissue samples to identify genes whose activity varies with a daily rhythm. (The acronym CYCLOPS stands for "CYCLic Ordering by Periodic Structure.")

"We can take advantage of that information potentially in many ways, for example to find times when it is easier to detect cancers and other diseases, and also to improve the dosing of many existing drugs by changing the time of day they are given," said lead author Ron C. Anafi, MD, PhD, an assistant professor of Sleep Medicine.

Described in this week's issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, CYCLOPS at least partly overcomes what has been one of the major obstacles to studying circadian rhythms in humans.

"It's just impractical and dangerous to take tissue samples from an individual around the clock to see how gene activity in a particular cell type varies," Anafi said.

CYCLOPS instead is meant to use the enormous amount of existing data on gene activity in different human tissues and cells -- data obtained from people at biopsies and autopsies, in scientific as well as medical settings.

Such data almost never includes the time of day when tissue samples were taken. But CYCLOPS doesn't need to know sampling times. If the dataset is large enough, it can detect any strong 24-hour pattern in the activity level of a given gene, and can then assign a likely clock time to each measurement in the dataset.

In an initial demonstration, Anafi and colleagues used CYCLOPS to analyze a dataset on gene activity levels in mouse liver cells -- a dataset for which sampling times were available. The algorithm was able to put data on cycling genes into the correct clock-time sequence even though it had no access to actual sampling times.

The algorithm performed best when restricting its analysis to genes whose activity is known to cycle in most mouse tissues -- and under this condition it was able to correctly order samples for all mouse tissues. Focusing on human genes that are related to strongly cycling mouse genes, CYCLOPS also was able to correctly order samples taken from human brains at autopsy. "It effectively provided an independent, accurate prediction of the time of death," Anafi said.

Next the researchers used CYCLOPS to generate new scientific data on human molecular rhythms. In a first-ever analysis of human lung and liver tissue, the algorithm revealed the strongly cyclic activity in thousands of lung-cell and liver-cell genes. These included hundreds of drug targets and disease genes.

"For many of these genes, the daily variability in activity turned out to be larger than the variability due to all other environmental and genetic factors," said study co-author John Hogenesch, a former professor of Pharmacology at Penn Medicine now at the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center.

Underscoring the potential medical relevance of this research, CYCLOPS found strong cycling in several genes whose protein products are targeted by common drugs. In one case, CYCLOPS detected a strong circadian-type rhythm in the activity of the gene for angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), a protein in lung vessels that is targeted by blood pressure-lowering drugs. Prior studies have found that ACE inhibitor drugs appear to work better at controlling blood pressure when given at night. "Our discovery of daily cycling in the ACE gene could explain those findings," Anafi said.

He and his colleagues applied CYCLOPS to liver cell gene activity data, and again found many genes with strong circadian rhythms. Comparing normal liver tissue samples with those from primary liver cancers, they found that about 15 percent of the normally cycling genes they identified lost their rhythmic activity in the cancerous cells -- which suggests that there are times of day when cancer cells can be more readily targeted while avoiding injury to normal tissue.

One of the strongly cycling genes CYCLOPS detected in liver cells was SLC2A2, which encodes a glucose transporting protein, GLUT2. The pancreatic cancer drug streptozocin interacts with GLUT2 in a way that tends to be toxic to cells that express it -- sometimes toxic enough to kill patients receiving the drug. Anafi and colleagues showed that by giving mice streptozocin at a time of day when liver GLUT2 levels are lowest, they were able to significantly reduce the drug's toxicity -- without impairing its ability to hit its intended targets.

Anafi and his colleagues are now using CYCLOPS to generate an atlas of cycling genes in different human tissues, in order to find other drugs whose dosing could be optimized by altering the time of day they are given.

The researchers also plan to use CYCLOPS to study gene activity cycling in cancerous cells -- which could one day enable doctors to detect cancers more sensitively as well as to optimize the dosing of cancer therapies.

---

Les humains, comme pratiquement tous les autres organismes complexes sur Terre, se sont adaptés au cycle de lumière et à l'obscurité de 24 heures de leur planète. Ce rythme circadien se reflète dans le comportement humain, bien sûr, mais aussi dans le fonctionnement moléculaire de nos cellules. Maintenant, les scientifiques de la Perelman School of Medicine à l'Université de Pennsylvanie ont développé un outil puissant pour détecter et caractériser ces rythmes moléculaires - un outil qui pourrait avoir de nombreuses nouvelles applications médicales, comme un dosage plus précis pour les médicaments existants.

L'outil est un algorithme de type apprentissage par machine appelé CYCLOPS qui peut parcourir les données existantes sur l'activité des gènes dans les échantillons de tissus humains afin d'identifier les gènes dont l'activité varie selon le rythme quotidien. (L'acronyme CYCLOPS signifie «Commande CYCLic par structure périodique»).

«Nous pouvons profiter de cette information potentiellement de plusieurs façons, par exemple pour trouver des moments où il est plus facile de détecter les cancers et d'autres maladies, et aussi d'améliorer le dosage de nombreux médicaments existants en modifiant l'heure du jour où ils sont donnés», A déclaré l'auteur principal Ron C. Anafi, MD, Ph.D., professeur adjoint de médecine du sommeil.

Décrit dans le numéro de cette semaine des Actes de l'Académie nationale des sciences, CYCLOPS surpasse au moins en partie ce qui a été l'un des principaux obstacles à l'étude des rythmes circadiens chez les humains.

"Il est juste impraticable et dangereux de prélever des échantillons de tissus à partir d'un individu en permanence pour voir comment l'activité des gènes dans un type de cellule particulier varie", a déclaré Anafi.

CYCLOPS est plutôt censé utiliser l'énorme quantité de données existantes sur l'activité des gènes dans différents tissus et cellules humains - données obtenues auprès de personnes lors de biopsies et autopsies, dans des contextes scientifiques et médicaux.

Ces données n'incluent presque jamais l'heure du prélèvement d'échantillons de tissus. Mais CYCLOPS n'a pas besoin de connaître les temps d'échantillonnage. Si l'ensemble de données est assez grand, il peut détecter tout motif 24 heures sur 24 dans le niveau d'activité d'un gène donné et peut alors affecter un temps d'horloge probable à chaque mesure dans l'ensemble de données.

Dans une première démonstration, Anafi et ses collègues ont utilisé CYCLOPS pour analyser un ensemble de données sur les niveaux d'activité génétique dans les cellules du foie de souris - un ensemble de données pour lequel les temps d'échantillonnage étaient disponibles. L'algorithme a été capable de mettre des données sur les gènes de cyclage dans la séquence d'horloge correcte même si elle n'avait pas accès aux temps d'échantillonnage réels.

L'algorithme a été le meilleur en limitant son analyse aux gènes dont l'activité connaît un cycle dans la plupart des tissus de souris - et, dans cette condition, il a réussi à ordonner correctement des échantillons pour tous les tissus de souris. En mettant l'accent sur les gènes humains qui sont liés à des gènes de souris fortement cyclables, CYCLOPS a également pu ordonner correctement des échantillons prélevés sur le cerveau humain lors de l'autopsie. "Il a effectivement fourni une prédiction indépendante et précise du moment du décès", a déclaré Anafi.

Ensuite, les chercheurs ont utilisé CYCLOPS pour générer de nouvelles données scientifiques sur les rythmes moléculaires humains. Dans une première analyse du tissu pulmonaire et hépatique humain, l'algorithme a révélé l'activité fortement cyclique dans des milliers de gènes de cellules pulmonaires et de cellules du foie. Celles-ci incluaient des centaines de cibles de médicaments et de gènes de maladie.

"Pour beaucoup de ces gènes, la variabilité quotidienne de l'activité s'est révélée plus grande que la variabilité due à tous les autres facteurs environnementaux et génétiques", a déclaré John Hogenesch, co-auteur de l'étude, ancien professeur de pharmacologie à Penn Medicine à Cincinnati Centre médical de l'hôpital pour enfants.

Soulignant la pertinence médicale potentielle de cette recherche, CYCLOPS a trouvé un cyclisme fort dans plusieurs gènes dont les produits protéiques sont ciblés par des médicaments courants. Dans un cas, CYCLOPS a détecté un fort rythme de type circadien dans l'activité du gène pour l'enzyme de conversion de l'angiotensine (ACE), une protéine dans les vaisseaux pulmonaires ciblée par des médicaments hypotension. Des études antérieures ont révélé que les médicaments inhibiteurs de l'ECA semblent fonctionner mieux pour contrôler la tension artérielle lorsqu'ils sont administrés la nuit. "Notre découverte du cyclisme quotidien dans le gène ACE pourrait expliquer ces résultats", a déclaré Anafi.

Lui et ses collègues ont appliqué les CYCLOPS aux données d'activité des gènes des cellules du foie et retrouvé de nombreux gènes avec de forts rythmes circadiens. En comparant les échantillons normaux de tissus hépatiques avec ceux des cancers primaires du foie, ils ont constaté qu'environ 15% des gènes normalement cyclistes qu'ils ont identifiés ont perdu leur activité rythmique dans les cellules cancéreuses - ce qui suggère qu'il y a des moments où les cellules cancéreuses peuvent être plus facilement Ciblée tout en évitant les blessures aux tissus normaux.

L'un des gènes fortement cyclables CYCLOPS détectés dans les cellules du foie était SLC2A2, qui code pour une protéine de transport de glucose, GLUT2. La streptozocine du cancer du   interagit avec le GLUT2 d'une manière qui tend à être toxique pour les cellules qui l'expriment - parfois assez toxique pour tuer les patients recevant le médicament. Anafi et ses collègues ont montré qu'en donnant à la souris la streptozocine à un moment de la journée, lorsque les niveaux de GLUT2 hépatique sont les plus faibles, ils ont réussi à réduire considérablement la toxicité du médicament sans nuire à sa capacité à atteindre ses objectifs.

Anafi et ses collègues utilisent maintenant CYCLOPS pour générer un atlas de gènes cyclistes dans différents tissus humains, afin de trouver d'autres médicaments dont le dosage pourrait être optimisé en modifiant l'heure de leur donner.

Les chercheurs ont également l'intention d'utiliser CYCLOPS pour étudier l'activité des gènes dans les cellules cancéreuses - ce qui pourrait permettre aux médecins de détecter les cancers de façon plus sensible et d'optimiser le dosage des traitements contre le cancer.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16506
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: l'horloge biologique interne et le cancer   Ven 17 Fév 2017 - 15:19

L'horloge biologique de la cellule cancéreuse a un effet sur la croissance de la tumeur, montre une étude québécoise. Une connaissance qui pourrait améliorer le traitement du cancer chez les humains. Explications.

Les travaux du Dr Nicolas Cermakian et de ses collègues du laboratoire de chronobiologie moléculaire de l’Institut universitaire en santé mentale Douglas montrent pour la première fois qu’agir directement sur l’horloge biologique d’une tumeur cancéreuse a un effet sur son développement.

La plupart des cellules du corps humain ont une horloge interne qui rythme les activités des organes selon l’heure du jour. Or, pour la plupart des cellules tumorales, cette horloge est déréglée.

De biologiste à horloger moléculaire

L’équipe montréalaise a réussi, grâce à un traitement particulier, à « remettre à l’heure » l’horloge de ces cellules et à lui faire retrouver un fonctionnement normal.

Elle a réussi à intervenir sur les engrenages des horloges biologiques de deux types de cellules cancéreuses (peau et colon) et à les faire fonctionner correctement.

Cette réparation a permis de ralentir la croissance de la tumeur cancéreuse. Après une semaine, la taille de la tumeur traitée était de deux tiers inférieure à celle de la tumeur témoin.

Le chercheur, qui est aussi professeur au département de psychiatrie à l’Université McGill, explique que son équipe a observé, dans ces conditions, que la croissance des tumeurs chute pratiquement de moitié.

Cette démonstration, qui est l’objet d’une étude publiée dans la revue BMC Biology, a été réalisée sur des souris, mais elle permet d’entrevoir de nouvelles façons de traiter le cancer chez l’humain.

Citation :
Activer l’horloge biologique des tumeurs pourrait devenir une approche novatrice pour ralentir la croissance d’un cancer ou de métastases. Cela permettrait de donner plus de temps aux gens de recourir à des interventions plus traditionnelles, comme la chirurgie ou la chimiothérapie.
Dr Nicolas Cermakian

Ces résultats restent à confirmer sur les horloges de tumeurs humaines. S’il est difficile de savoir quels types de cancer pourraient être ciblés par cette approche novatrice, le chercheur et le stagiaire postdoctoral Silke Kiessling pensent qu’elle pourrait, à terme, améliorer le traitement du cancer chez les humains.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16506
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: l'horloge biologique interne et le cancer   Jeu 25 Aoû 2016 - 12:08

Melatonin, a hormone produced in the human brain, appears to suppress the growth of breast cancer tumors.

Researchers at Michigan State University published this finding in the current issue of Genes and Cancer. While treatments based on this key discovery are still years away, the results give scientists a key foundation on which to build future research.

"You can watch bears in the zoo, but you only understand bear behavior by seeing them in the wild," said David Arnosti, MSU biochemistry professor, director of MSU's Gene Expression in Development and Disease Initiative and co-author of the study. "Similarly, understanding the expression of genes in their natural environment reveals how they interact in disease settings. That's what is so special about this work."

The brain manufactures melatonin only at night to regulate sleep cycles. Epidemiologists and experimentalists have speculated that the lack of melatonin, due in part to our sleep-deprived modern society, put women at higher risk for breast cancer. The latest MSU study showed that melatonin suppresses the growth of breast cancer stem cells, providing scientific proof to support the growing body of anecdotal evidence on sleep deprivation.

The research team was led by Juliana Lopes, a visiting researcher from Sao Paolo, Brazil. Before the team could test its theory, the scientists had to grow tumors from stem cells, known as "mammospheres," a method perfected in the laboratory of James Trosko at MSU.

The growth of these mammospheres was enhanced with chemicals known to fuel tumor growth, namely, the natural hormone estrogen, and estrogen-like chemical Bisphenol A, or BPA, found in many types of plastic food packages.

Melatonin treatment significantly decreased the number and size of mammospheres when compared with the control group. Furthermore, when the cells were stimulated by estrogen or BPA and treated with melatonin at the same time, there was a greater reduction in the number and size of mammospheres.

"This work establishes the principal by which cancer stem cell growth may be regulated by natural hormones, and provides an important new technique to screen chemicals for cancer-promoting effects, as well as identify potential new drugs for use in the clinic," Trosko said.


---


La mélatonine, une hormone produite dans le cerveau humain, semble inhiber la croissance des tumeurs cancéreuses du sein.

Des chercheurs de l'Université d'État du Michigan a publié cette découverte dans le numéro actuel de gènes et le cancer. Bien que les traitements à base de cette découverte clé sont encore loin, les résultats donnent aux scientifiques un fondement essentiel sur lequel construire la recherche future.

"Vous pouvez regarder les ours dans le zoo, mais vous ne comprendrez le comportement des ours qu'en les voyant à l'état sauvage", a déclaré David Arnosti, MSU professeur de biochimie, directeur de Gene Expression de MSU dans le développement et l'Initiative des maladies et co-auteur de l'étude. "De même, la compréhension de l'expression des gènes dans leur environnement naturel révèle la façon dont ils interagissent dans les milieux de la maladie. Voilà ce qui est si spécial au sujet de ce travail."

Le cerveau fabrique la mélatonine la nuit pour réguler les cycles du sommeil. Les épidémiologistes et les expérimentateurs ont spéculé que le manque de mélatonine, due en partie à notre société moderne privée de sommeil, mettait les femmes à risque élevé de cancer du sein. La dernière étude MSU a montré que la mélatonine supprime la croissance des cellules souches du cancer du sein, en fournissant la preuve scientifique pour soutenir le nombre croissant de preuves anecdotiques sur la privation de sommeil.

L'équipe de recherche était dirigée par Juliana Lopes, chercheur invité de Sao Paolo, au Brésil. Avant que l'équipe puisse tester sa théorie, les scientifiques ont dû développer des tumeurs de cellules souches, appelées «mammospheres», une méthode mise au point dans le laboratoire de James Trosko à MSU.

La croissance de ces mammospheres a été renforcée avec des produits chimiques connus pour alimenter la croissance de la tumeur, à savoir, l'hormone oestrogène naturel, et le produit chimique bisphénol A, ou BPA, trouvé dans de nombreux types d'emballages alimentaires en plastique.

Le traitement par mélatonine a diminué de manière significative le nombre et la taille des mammospheres en comparaison avec le groupe témoin. En outre, lorsque les cellules sont stimulées par les œstrogènes ou du BPA et traités avec de la mélatonine dans le même temps, il y avait une réduction plus importante du nombre et de la taille des mammospheres.

«Ce travail établit le principe par lequel la croissance des cellules souches du cancer peut être régulée par des hormones naturelles, et fournit une nouvelle technique important pour dépister les produits chimiques pour les effets favorisant le cancer, ainsi que d'identifier de nouveaux médicaments potentiels pour une utilisation dans la clinique," dit Trosko.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16506
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: l'horloge biologique interne et le cancer   Mar 19 Juin 2012 - 11:15

Considéré comme probable cancérogène en raison de son effet perturbant sur le rythme biologique, le travail de nuit entraîne chez les femmes un risque accru d'environ 30% de cancer du sein, selon une étude française publiée aujourd'hui.

Une augmentation de 30% du risque de cancer chez les femmes ayant travaillé la nuit peut être considérée comme "plutôt légère mais significative d'un point de vue statistique", indique M. Guénel, qui a dirigé l'étude publiée dans l'International Journal of Cancer.

Un tel accroissement signifie que le "risque relatif" est de 1,3 alors que "par comparaison le risque relatif de cancer du poumon chez les fumeurs est de dix", relativise-t-il. Mais le risque lié au travail de nuit est "du même ordre de grandeur" que d'autres risques connus de cancer du sein comme les mutations génétiques, l'âge tardif de la première grossesse ou les traitements hormonaux.

D'une manière générale, "toutes les études sur le travail de nuit partent de l'hypothèse d'une perturbation du rythme circadien qui entraîne une perturbation du cycle hormonal, suspectée d'entraîner un risque accru de cancer", indique-t-il. Désormais plusieurs études vont "globalement dans le sens d'une augmentation du risque de cancer liée au travail de nuit", souligne M. Guénel. "C'est un problème de santé publique qu'il faudra prendre en compte à un moment donné".

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16506
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: l'horloge biologique interne et le cancer   Mer 4 Fév 2009 - 13:25

Communiqué de presse commun CNRS/INSERM

L'horloge circadienne, propre à tout être vivant, régule nos systèmes physiologiques, son dérèglement peut entraîner chez l'être humain maladies ou syndromes, tels que les troubles du sommeil. L'affirmation de l’existence d'une horloge centrale, voire unique, étrangère à l'influence de la lumière a très longtemps prévalu. Mais les travaux de Paolo Sassone-Corsi et de son équipe (CNRS-INSERM-ULP ) bousculent cette théorie. Ceux-ci ont démontré en 1999, l'existence chez les vertébrés, d'horloges périphériques situées dans divers tissus et cellules indépendantes. Aujourd’hui ces travaux montrent que ces horloges périphériques semblent être sous le contrôle direct de la lumière. Les chercheurs s'orientent ainsi vers une quête des photorécepteurs responsables de l'activation de l'horloge biologique. Ces résultats de recherche sont publiés dans Nature (2 mars 2000).

Les premières recherches menées sur l'horloge moléculaire des animaux ont porté sur la drosophile, signifiant déjà que certains tissus pouvaient agir indépendamment de l’horloge centrale située dans le système nerveux, dans l’hypothalamus, contrairement à ce qui était admis. Auparavant, seule l’horloge centrale était considérée comme étant à l'origine des rythmes circadiens et des phénomènes rythmiques de l'organisme. Il a été montré désormais que des horloges autonomes pouvaient exister dans d'autres régions que le cerveau.

En 1999, l’équipe de Paolo Sassone-Corsi avait fait la démonstration, en menant des recherches sur le poisson-zèbre, de l’existence d’horloges périphériques chez les vertébrés. L'expression d’un gène impliqué dans le fonctionnement de l’horloge biologique, homologue au Clock de la souris, oscillait selon un rythme circadien dans presque tous les tissus du poisson, que ces tissus soient observés in vivo ou en culture. Cela constituait donc une preuve de l’existence d'horloges périphériques.

Aujourd’hui, les chercheurs montrent que ces horloges périphériques sont sensibles à la lumière. L'expérience menée sur des cellules de rein et de cœur en culture, selon un rythme jour/nuit, fait apparaître une oscillation renforcée de l’expression du gène. Lorsque cette rythmicité est inversée, l'oscillation est également inversée. La structure de ces horloges périphériques peut alors être qualifiée de photosensible. La lumière agit donc directement sur l'oscillateur circadien dans les tissus périphériques. Ces observations ramènent le concept même d'horloge au niveau cellulaire et suggèrent la présence de photorécepteurs à la surface des cellules du cœur et du rein. Ces photorécepteurs font partie de l’horloge circadienne.

Ce résultat est inattendu. On pensait que l'horloge circadienne reposait chez les vertébrés sur la présence de photorécepteurs circadiens dans l'œil ou sur la glande pinéale. Le système circadien chez les vertébrés existe bien de façon décentralisée. Quelques interrogations demeurent cependant : ces horloges périphériques indépendantes existent-elles chez les mammifères ? Quelle en est l’importance ? Jouent-elles un rôle sur l'organisme ou fonctionnent-elles comme de simples oscillateurs coordonnés et dirigés par l’horloge centrale ?

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16506
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: l'horloge biologique interne et le cancer   Mer 4 Fév 2009 - 13:08

(Feb. 3, 2009) — Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have shown that disruption of the circadian clock – the internal time-keeping mechanism that keeps the body running on a 24-hour cycle – can slow the progression of cancer.

Les chercheurs ont démontré qu'interrompre "l'horloge biologique journalière" peut ralentir la progression du cancer.

The study disputes some of the most recent research in the field indicating that alteration of this daily cycle predisposes humans and mice to cancer. The UNC researchers found that genetically altering one of four essential "clock" genes actually suppressed cancer growth in a mouse model commonly used to investigate cancer. The findings could enable clinicians to reset the internal clock of each cancer cell to render it more vulnerable to attack with chemotherapeutic drugs.

Une altération du cycle journalier prédisposent les humains et le souris au cancer. Les chercheurs en altérant un des 4 gènes de cette horloge biologique ont supprimé la progression du cancer chez une souris communément prise pour les recherches sur le cancer. Les découvertes pourraient permettre aux cliniciens de remettre à zéro les horloges internes de chaque cellule cancéreuse pour la rendre plus vulnérable aux attaques avec les médicaments chimiothérapeuthiques.

"Adjusting the clock in this way could certainly be a new target for cancer treatment," said senior study author Aziz Sancar, M.D., Ph.D., a member of the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center and Sarah Graham Kenan Professor of Biochemistry and Biophysics in the UNC School of Medicine. Sancar is also a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the Turkish Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

"C'est certainement une cible pour le traitement du cancer" dit l'auteur de l'étude

"Our study indicates that interfering with the function of these clock genes in cancer tissue may be an effective way to kill cancer cells and could be a way to improve upon traditional chemotherapy," Sancar said. His findings appear February 2, 2009 in the online early edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

"C'est un moyen qui peut être efficace pour tuer les cellules cancéreuses et qui pourrait améliorer les chimios traditionnelles" dit Sancar.

Previous research has shown that the disruption of the body's natural circadian rhythms affects people's health. One of the largest epidemiological studies ever performed, the Nurses' Health Study, found that nurses who worked the night shift had a higher incidence of breast cancer than those who worked days. Another study of flight attendants whose internal biological clocks had been wrecked by travel on transatlantic flights produced similar findings.

Les infirmières qui travaillent de nuit ont un taux de cancer du plus grand que celles qui travaillent de jour. une autre étude sur le personnel de bord des avions dont l'horloge interne a été mise à mal par les vols de nuit transatlantiques a fait des découvertes semblables.

Yet when scientists, including Sancar, began to tinker with the molecular mechanisms within the internal clocks of animal models, they did not always see such an effect. Circadian rhythms in humans and in mice are controlled by "clock genes," four of which are absolutely essential. In a study four years ago, Sancar found that deleting the clock gene cryptochrome in mice did not increase the incidence of cancer as had previously been expected.

While altering the clock gene did not cause cancer in otherwise normal mice, Sancar and his colleagues wanted to see if it would accelerate the development of tumors in a mouse model that is already predisposed to cancer. Therefore, in this study they modified the cryptochrome gene in mice that also had defects in a gene called P53, which is mutated in nearly half of human cancers. The researchers found that disturbing the internal clock in these mice did not speed up the onset of cancer, but instead had the opposite effect – it extended their lives by 50 percent.

Dans l'étude, ils ont modifié le gène cryptochrome chez les souris qui avaient aussi des défauts dans le gène p53 qui est muté chez presque 50% des cancers humains. Les chercheurs ont trouvés alors que de modifier le gène en question n'accélérait pas le cancer mais allongeait la vie des souris de 50%.

The researchers then wanted to know how interfering with the cryptochrome gene had reduced the incidence of cancer. By closely examining the series of biological events in the disease's development, they determined that the mutation of this clock gene reactivates the intracellular signals that can eliminate cancerous cells. Sancar said this tactic essentially makes cancer cells more likely to commit cell suicide – through a process known as apoptosis – in response to the stresses of UV radiation or chemotherapy.


Les chercheurs voulaient savoir le comment, ils ont déterminé que la mutation du gène a réactiver le signal intracellulaire qui élimine les cellules cancéreuses. Sankar a dit que cette tactique essentiellement rendaient les cellules cancéreuses plus disposées à se suicider (apoptose) en réponse à des radiationsUV ou à la chimio.

"These results suggest that altering the function of this clock gene, at least in the 50 percent of human cancers associated with p53 mutations, may slow the progression of cancer," Sancar said. "In combination with other approaches to cancer treatment, this method may one day be used to increase the success rate of remission."

Ces résultats suggèrent qu'altérer cette fonction pourraient ralentir la progression de 50% des cancers. En combinaison avec d'autres approches, cette méthodes pourraient augmenter le nombre de rémissions.

The research was supported by the National Institutes of Health. Study co-authors from Sancar's UNC laboratory include the lead author and postdoctoral fellow Nuri Ozturk, Ph.D.; Jin Hyup Lee, a graduate student; and postdoctoral fellow Shobhan Gaddemeedhi, Ph.D.

The study follows the recent publication earlier this month of another paper from Sancar's laboratory in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. It suggested that chemotherapy treatment for cancer is most effective at certain times of day because that is when a particular enzyme system – one that can reverse the actions of chemotherapeutic drugs – is at its lowest levels in the body.

Cela suggère aussi que les thérapies de chimio sont plus efficaces à certaines heures du jour, lorsque l'action de certaines enzymes est à son plus bas parce que celles-ci renversent les actions de chimio.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: l'horloge biologique interne et le cancer   

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
l'horloge biologique interne et le cancer
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 1
 Sujets similaires
-
» L'horloge biologique normalisée par la vie dans l'espace
» action du lithium sur l'horloge biologique
» L'horloge biologique selon la médecine chinoise
» Rythmes biologiques: un meilleur moment pour chaque chose dans la journée - circadien - horloge interne
» rétablir un horaire de sommeil (régler un retard de phase)

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
ESPOIRS :: Cancer :: recherche-
Sauter vers: