AccueilCalendrierFAQRechercherS'enregistrerMembresGroupesConnexion

Partagez | 
 

 Avancée dans la compréhension de la maladie de l'hôte du greffon.

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
AuteurMessage
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16213
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Avancée dans la compréhension de la maladie de l'hôte du greffon.   Mar 18 Avr 2017 - 17:00

Through experimental work, an international team of researchers led by City of Hope's Defu Zeng, professor of diabetes immunology and hematopoietic cell transplantation, believe they may have found a way to prevent graft-versus-host disease after stem cell transplants while retaining the transplants' positive effects on fighting leukemia and lymphoma. The preclinical study results were published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

Allogeneic (meaning from a donor) hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a curative therapy for cancers of the blood and lymph system, including leukemia and lymphoma. It works by introducing healthy immune cells, or T cells, that eliminate tumor cells and prevent the cancer from relapsing. Unfortunately, the same donor T cells can also attack the healthy tissue of the recipient's body such as gut, liver, lung, and skin, leading to induction of graft- (T cell) versus-host (recipient's body) disease, or GVHD. Symptoms can be mild to severe and often include mouth ulcers, gastrointestinal distress, and rashes.

"Currently, immunosuppressive drugs have been used to prevent GVHD, but immune-suppressants also subdue the anti-cancer effects of the donor T cells, potentially resulting in cancer relapse, in addition to other side effects such as an increased risk of infection," explains Zeng. "Therefore, prevention of GVHD while preserving anti-cancer effects remains the 'holy grail' of allogenic HCT."

According to the paper, titled "PD-L1 interacts with CD80 to regulate graft-versus-leukemia activity of donor CD8+ T cells," the research team, which included graduate students (first authors Qingxiao Song and Xiong Ni) and scientists from City of Hope, Mayo Clinic, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and three Chinese medical schools, observed that temporary in vivo depletion of a specific type of donor T cells (CD4+) soon after infusion of donor stem cell transplants prevented GVHD while preserving strong graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effects.

The depletion of CD4+ cells essentially caused another type of T cell (CD8+) to become exhausted in their quest to destroy normal tissue, but strengthened in their fight against cancer, meaning that the donor CD8+ T cells eliminated tumor cells without causing GVHD.

"If successfully translated into clinical application, this regimen may represent one of the novel approaches that allow strong GVL effects without causing GVHD," says Zeng. "This kind of regimen has the potential to promote wide-spread application of allogenic HCT as a curative therapy for hematological malignancies."

Going forward, Zeng plans to translate this novel regimen into clinical application at City of Hope by carrying out a clinical trial in collaboration with Ryotaro Nakamura, M.D., associate professor of hematology and hematopoietic cell transplantation, and Stephen J. Forman, M.D., F.A.C.P, the Francis & Kathleen McNamara Distinguished Chair in Hematology and Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation and leader of City of Hope's Hematologic Malignancies and Stem Cell Transplantation Institute, which is one of the world's largest and most successful bone marrow and blood stem cell transplant centers.

"If we see promising results, we will extend this trial by working with our collaborators from this current study," says Zeng.

---

Grâce à un travail expérimental, une équipe internationale de chercheurs dirigée par Defu Zeng de City of Hope, professeur d'immunologie du diabète et de transplantation de cellules hématopoïétiques, croit avoir trouvé un moyen de prévenir la maladie du greffon contre l'hôte après la transplantation de cellules souches tout en conservant les effets positifs  contre la leucémie et le lymphome. Les résultats de l'étude préclinique ont été publiés dans Journal of Clinical Investigation.

La transplantation de cellules hématopoïétiques (HCT) allogénique (à savoir provenant d'un donneur) est une thérapie curative pour les cancers du sang et du système lymphatique, y compris la leucémie et le lymphome. Cela fonctionne en introduisant des cellules immunitaires saines, ou des cellules T, qui éliminent les cellules tumorales et empêchent le cancer de se recharger. Malheureusement, les mêmes cellules T donneuses peuvent également attaquer les tissus sains du corps du receveur tels que l'intestin, le foie, les poumons et la peau, ce qui conduit à l'induction de la maladie du greffon (cellule T) versus hôte (maladie du corps du receveur) ou GVHD. Les symptômes peuvent être légers à graves et comportent souvent des ulcères de la bouche, une détresse gastro-intestinale et des éruptions cutanées.

"Actuellement, des médicaments immunosuppresseurs ont été utilisés pour prévenir la GVHD, mais les inhibiteurs de l'immunité subissent également les effets anticancéreux des cellules T donneuses, pouvant entraîner une rechute du cancer, en plus d'autres effets secondaires tels qu'un risque accru d'infection" Explique Zeng. "Par conséquent, la prévention de la GVHD tout en préservant les effets anticancéreux reste le« Saint Graal »de l'HCT allogénique.

Selon le document, intitulé «PD-L1 interagit avec CD80 pour réguler l'activité de greffe contre leucémie des cellules T CD8 + donneuses», l'équipe de recherche, qui comprenait les étudiants diplômés (premiers auteurs Qingxiao Song et Xiong Ni) et des scientifiques de City of Hope, la clinique Mayo, le Centre de recherche sur le cancer de Fred Hutchinson et trois écoles de médecine chinoises, ont observé que l'appauvrissement temporaire in vivo d'un type spécifique de cellules T donneuses (CD4 +) peu de temps après la perfusion de transplantation de cellules souches du donneur a empêché la GVHD tout en préservant une forte greffe versus- Effets de leucémie (GVL).

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16213
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Avancée dans la compréhension de la maladie de l'hôte du greffon.   Lun 27 Fév 2017 - 11:57

In a significant advance in improving the safety of donor stem cell transplants, a major clinical trial led by researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) has shown that a novel agent can protect against the most common viral infection that patients face after transplantation.

The results represent a breakthrough in a decade-long effort to identify an effective drug for the prevention of CMV infection in transplant patients that doesn't produce side effects that negate the benefit of the drug itself, the study authors said.

The findings, from an international phase 3 clinical trial of the drug letermovir for preventing cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in transplant patients, will be presented at the 2017 Bone Marrow Transplant Tandem Meetings of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (ASBMT) and the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) in Orlando, Florida, February 22, 2017.

The study, which involved 565 adult patients at 67 research centers in 20 countries, compared letermovir to placebo in preventing an active CMV infection following transplant with donor stem cells. The patients, who were undergoing transplant as treatment for blood-related cancers or other disorders, all carried a CMV infection from earlier in life that had been wrestled into dormancy by their immune system. Twenty-four weeks after completing up to 14 weeks of treatment, 61 percent of the patients receiving a placebo had developed a CMV infection serious enough to require treatment or had discontinued the trial. By contrast, only 38 percent of those treated with letermovir developed that level of CMV infection or did not complete the trial.

Unlike other drugs able to forestall active CMV infection in stem cell transplant patients, letermovir did so without producing unacceptable toxicities. Most of the side effects associated with letermovir were tolerable, including mild cases of nausea or vomiting, and some swelling, investigators found. Letermovir also conferred a survival benefit: at the 24-week mark, 15 percent of the placebo patients had died, compared to 10 percent of those receiving letermovir.

"For the first time, we seem to have a drug that is a true safe and effective preventive for CMV infection in stem cell transplant patients," said the study's lead author, Francisco Marty, MD, an infectious disease specialist at Dana-Farber and BWH. "Letermovir will allow many patients to avoid infection, usually with no or mild side effects, and seems to provide a survival benefit in the first six months post-transplant."

Transplantation of donor hematopoietic stem cells -- which give rise to all types of blood cells, including white blood cells of the immune system -- is used to treat blood-related cancers such as leukemia, lymphoma, and myeloma, as well as several types of non-cancerous blood disorders. Patients typically receive chemotherapy to wipe out or reduce the bone marrow, where blood cells are formed, followed by an infusion of donor stem cells to rebuild their blood supply and reconstitute their immune system.

While refinements in transplant techniques have sharply improved the safety of the procedure, the reactivation of CMV infection following a transplant has been a longstanding problem.

Infection with CMV, a type of herpes virus, is one of the most common viral infections in the world. In the United States, it's estimated that over 50 percent of people are infected before adulthood. In other parts of the world, infection rates can be significantly higher. The effects of CMV infection can range from no symptoms to a flu-like fever or mononucleosis ("mono") syndrome. Once the immune system has brought the infection under control, the virus persists unobtrusively in the body.

The jolt of a stem cell transplant -- the rapid erasure or diminishment of the immune system produced by pre-transplant chemotherapy, as well as measures to prevent graft-versus-host disease -- can give CMV a chance to reawaken and run amok before the newly reconstituted immune system takes hold. In the early years of bone marrow transplant therapy, 60 to 70 percent of transplant recipients developed CMV infection, Marty recounts. Of those, 20 to 30 percent contracted CMV pneumonia, and of those, 80 percent died of the disease.

In previous clinical trials, several drugs aimed at preventing CMV infection in stem cell transplant patients either were not effective or produced intolerable side effects. In the absence of safe preventive drugs, physicians worked out a "surveillance" approach in which they provide treatment only when patients develop CMV infection, and only for a short period of time. This strategy has largely been a success: patients now have just a 2 or 3 percent chance of getting CMV disease affecting the lungs or other organs. Still, the often harsh side effects of current drugs were reason to continue the search for a useful preventive agent.

Letermovir works by a different mechanism from previously tested agents, which block an enzyme known as DNA polymerase, which viruses use to duplicate their DNA. (Human cells use the same process to replicate their own DNA.) By contrast, letermovir blocks a process by which CMV is "packaged" inside infected cells -- a wrapping that allows it to go on and infect other cells. The fact that this process does not occur in human cells may explain in part why letermovir usually gives rise to only mild side effects, researchers say.

In the trial, patients received letermovir or a placebo beginning an average of nine days after transplant. "The goal was to suppress the virus before it has a chance to become active," Marty remarked. "The results of this trial offer encouragement that letermovir can offer a new strategy for donor stem cell transplant patients in preventing the emergence of CMV infection following transplant."

---

Un important essai clinique mené par des chercheurs du Dana-Farber Cancer Institute et du Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) a démontré qu'un nouvel agent peut protéger contre l'infection virale la plus courante des patients après la transplantation.

Les résultats représentent une percée dans les efforts d'une décennie pour identifier un médicament efficace pour la prévention de l'infection de CMV dans les patients de transplantation qui ne produit pas des effets secondaires qui nient le bénéfice du médicament lui-même, selon ce que les auteurs de l'étude ont dit.

Les résultats d'un essai clinique international de phase 3 sur le médicament letermovir visant à prévenir l'infection par le cytomégalovirus (CMV) chez les patients transplantés seront présentés lors des réunions en tandem de la Société américaine pour la transplantation de sang et de moelle osseuse (ASBMT) Centre international de recherche sur les greffes de sang et de moelle osseuse (CIBMTR) à Orlando, en Floride, le 22 février 2017.

L'étude, qui a impliqué 565 patients adultes dans 67 centres de recherche dans 20 pays, a comparé le letermovir au placebo dans la prévention d'une infection active de CMV après la transplantation avec des cellules souches de donneur. Les patients subissaient une transplantation comme traitement pour les cancers liés au sang ou d'autres troubles, et tous avaient eu une infection à CMV plus tôt dans la vie qui était en dormance par leur système immunitaire. Vingt-quatre semaines après avoir complété jusqu'à 14 semaines de traitement, 61% des patients recevant un placebo avaient développé une infection à CMV suffisamment grave pour nécessiter un traitement ou avaient interrompu l'essai. En revanche, seulement 38 pour cent des personnes traitées par letermovir ont développé ce niveau d'infection par le CMV ou n'ont pas achevé le test.

Contrairement à d'autres médicaments capables de prévenir que l'infection à CMV s'active chez les patients transplantés de cellules souches, letermovir l'a fait sans produire de toxicité inacceptable. La plupart des effets indésirables associés au letermovir étaient tolérables, y compris des cas légers de nausées ou de vomissements, et certains gonflements, ont révélé les chercheurs. Letermovir a également conféré un avantage de survie: à la marque de 24 semaines, 15 pour cent des patients placebo étaient morts, comparativement à 10 pour cent de ceux recevant letermovir.

"Pour la première fois, nous semblons avoir un médicament qui est un véritable préventif sûr et efficace pour l'infection par le CMV dans les patients atteints de greffe de cellules souches", a déclaré l'auteur principal de l'étude, Francisco Marty, MD, un spécialiste des maladies infectieuses à Dana-Farber et BWH. "Letermovir permettra à de nombreux patients d'éviter une infection, généralement sans effets secondaires ou avec de légers effets secondaires, et semble fournir un avantage de survie dans les six premiers mois après la transplantation.

La transplantation de cellules souches hématopoïétiques donneuses - qui donnent naissance à tous les types de cellules sanguines, y compris les globules blancs du système immunitaire - est utilisée pour traiter les cancers sanguins tels que la leucémie, le lymphome et le myélome, ainsi que plusieurs types Des troubles sanguins non cancéreux. Les patients reçoivent généralement une chimiothérapie pour éliminer ou réduire la moelle osseuse, où les cellules sanguines sont formées, suivie par une infusion de cellules souches de donneurs pour reconstruire leur approvisionnement en sang et de reconstituer leur système immunitaire.

Bien que les améliorations apportées aux techniques de transplantation aient nettement amélioré la sécurité de l'intervention, la réactivation de l'infection par le CMV à la suite d'une transplantation constitue un problème de longue date.

L'infection par le CMV, un type de virus de l'herpès, est l'une des infections virales les plus courantes dans le monde. Aux États-Unis, on estime que plus de 50 pour cent des personnes sont infectées avant l'âge adulte. Dans d'autres parties du monde, les taux d'infection peuvent être nettement plus élevés. Les effets de l'infection par le CMV peuvent aller d'aucun symptôme à une fièvre de type grippal ou à un syndrome de mononucléose («mono»). Une fois que le système immunitaire a mis l'infection sous contrôle, le virus persiste discrètement dans le corps.

La secousse d'une greffe de cellules souches - l'effacement ou la diminution rapide du système immunitaire produit par la chimiothérapie avant la transplantation, ainsi que des mesures pour prévenir la maladie du greffon contre l'hôte - peut donner au CMV une chance de réveiller et de courir avant Le système immunitaire nouvellement reconstitué prend place. Dans les premières années de la transplantation de moelle osseuse, 60 à 70 pour cent des receveurs de greffe ont développé une infection à CMV, Marty raconte. Parmi ceux-ci, 20 à 30 pour cent ont contracté la pneumonie à CMV, et de ceux, 80 pour cent sont morts de la maladie.

Dans des essais cliniques antérieurs, plusieurs médicaments visant à prévenir l'infection à CMV chez des patients transplantés de cellules souches n'étaient pas efficaces ou produisaient des effets secondaires intolérables. En l'absence de médicaments préventifs sûrs, les médecins ont mis au point une approche «de surveillance» dans laquelle ils fournissent le traitement seulement quand les patients qui développent l'infection de CMV, et seulement pendant une courte période de temps. Cette stratégie a largement été un succès: les patients ont maintenant juste 2 ou 3 pour cent de probabilité d'obtenir la maladie de CMV affectant les poumons ou d'autres organes. Néanmoins, les effets secondaires souvent durs des médicaments actuels étaient une raison de poursuivre la recherche

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16213
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Avancée dans la compréhension de la maladie de l'hôte du greffon.   Dim 12 Fév 2017 - 18:37

Researchers at Mount Sinai Health System have discovered a way to predict whether blood cancer patients who received a bone marrow transplant will develop graft-versus-host disease, a common and often lethal complication, according to a study published in JCI (The Journal of Clinical Investigation) Insight.

This international study at 11 cancer centers examined blood samples from almost 1,300 bone marrow transplant patients and found that two proteins present in blood drawn a week after a transplant can predict whether a patient will develop a lethal version of graft-versus-host disease, weeks before the disease's symptoms normally occur. Scientists at the Mount Sinai Acute GVHD International Consortium (MAGIC) created an algorithm, dubbed the "MAGIC algorithm," that determines a patient's risk of developing the disease by measuring concentrations of these proteins, ST2 and REG3a.

"The MAGIC algorithm gives doctors a roadmap to save many lives in the future. This simple blood test can determine which bone marrow transplant patients are at high risk for a lethal complication before it occurs," says James L.M. Ferrara, MD, Professor of Pediatrics, Oncological Sciences and Medicine, Hematology and Medical Oncology at The Tisch Cancer Institute at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and Co-director of MAGIC. "It will allow early intervention and potentially save many lives."

Doctors at Mount Sinai are now designing clinical trials to determine whether immunotherapy drugs, normally used during the onset of graft-versus-host disease, would benefit patients as soon as this new blood test determined they would be at high risk for severe onset of the disease. Researchers believe that if patients receive the drugs once the test is administered, which is well before symptoms develop, they would be spared the full force of the disease, and fewer of them would die.

"This test will make bone marrow transplant safer and more effective for patients because it will guide adjustment of medications to protect against graft-versus-host disease," says John Levine, MD, MS, Professor of Pediatrics and Medicine, Hematology and Medical Oncology at The Tisch Cancer Institute at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and Co-director of MAGIC. "If successful, the early use of the drugs would become a standard of care for bone marrow transplant patients."

Graft-versus-host disease occurs when the bone marrow donor's immune system sees the recipient's body as foreign and launches an immune response, attacking the recipient's tissue, primarily the skin, liver, and gastrointestinal tract. Between 40 and 60 percent of patients who receive bone marrow transplants later develop severe graft-versus-host disease, and about 40 percent of people who develop the disease die.

---
Les chercheurs du système de santé Mount Sinai ont découvert un moyen de prédire si les patients atteints d'un cancer du sang qui ont reçu une transplantation de moelle osseuse développera une maladie de greffe contre l'hôte, une complication commune et souvent mortelle, selon une étude publiée dans JCI (The Journal of Clinical Enquête) Insight.

Cette étude internationale menée dans 11 centres de cancérologie a examiné des échantillons de sang de près de 1 300 patients ayant subi une transplantation de moelle osseuse et a découvert que deux protéines présentes dans le sang prélevées une semaine après une transplantation peuvent prédire si un patient développera une version mortelle de greffon contre hôte, Avant que les symptômes de la maladie ne se produisent normalement. Les scientifiques du Consortium international aigu GVHD du mont Sinaï ont créé un algorithme, baptisé «algorithme MAGIC», qui détermine le risque de développer la maladie en mesurant les concentrations de ces protéines ST2 et REG3a.

«Ce test sanguin simple peut déterminer quels patients de transplantation de moelle osseuse sont à risque élevé d'une complication mortelle avant qu'il ne se produise», explique James LM Ferrara, MD, professeur de pédiatrie , Les sciences oncologiques et la médecine, l'hématologie et l'oncologie médicale au Tisch Cancer Institute à l'Icahn School of Medicine au mont Sinaï, et co-directeur de MAGIC. "Il permettra une intervention précoce et pourrait sauver beaucoup de vies."

Les médecins du Mont Sinaï sont en train de concevoir des essais cliniques pour déterminer si les médicaments immunothérapeutiques, normalement utilisés au cours de l'apparition de la maladie du greffon contre l'hôte, seraient bénéfiques pour les patients dès que ce nouveau test sanguin a déterminé qu'ils seraient à haut risque d'apparition grave du maladie. Les chercheurs croient que si les patients reçoivent les médicaments une fois que le test est administré, ce qui est bien avant que les symptômes se développent, ils seraient épargnés la pleine force de la maladie, et moins d'entre eux mourraient.

«Ce test rendra la transplantation de moelle osseuse plus sûre et plus efficace pour les patients, car elle guidera l'ajustement des médicaments afin de protéger contre la maladie du greffon contre l'hôte», déclare John Levine, MD, MS, professeur de pédiatrie et de médecine, d'hématologie et d'oncologie médicale Au Tisch Cancer Institute à l'Icahn School of Medicine au Mont Sinaï et co-directeur de MAGIC. "En cas de succès, l'utilisation précoce des médicaments deviendrait une norme de soins pour les patients transplantés de moelle osseuse."

La maladie du greffon contre l'hôte se produit lorsque le système immunitaire du donneur de la moelle osseuse voit le corps du receveur comme étranger et lance une réponse immunitaire, attaquant le tissu du receveur, principalement la peau, le foie et le tractus gastro-intestinal. Entre 40 et 60 pour cent des patients qui reçoivent des transplantations de moelle osseuse développent plus tard une grave maladie de greffe contre l'hôte, et environ 40 pour cent des personnes qui développent la maladie meurent.


_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16213
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Avancée dans la compréhension de la maladie de l'hôte du greffon.   Jeu 12 Jan 2017 - 18:22

Graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) is the leading cause of non-relapse associated death in patients who receive stem cell transplants. In a new study published as the cover story in Science Translational Medicine, Moffitt Cancer Center researchers show that a novel treatment can effectively inhibit the development of GVHD in mice and maintain the infection- and tumor-fighting capabilities of the immune system.

Stem cell transplants can be used to treat patients who have certain types of cancer, such as leukemia or lymphoma. Many patients who have stem cell transplants receive an allogeneic transplant -- stem cells donated by another person. One risk associated with allogeneic stem cell transplants is GVHD during which the donated immune cells fail to recognize the patient's own tissues and organs. The symptoms of GVHD vary and can be life-threatening. Common symptoms include rash, nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, and occasionally jaundice and liver failure.

In order to reduce the risk of GVHD, physicians try to match the recipient and donor tissue types as close as possible and prophylactic medicine is given throughout the transplant process. However, patients may still develop GVHD. The medications used to prevent GVHD are not very selective and suppress the activity of many different immune cell types; good and bad. As a result, GVHD prevention can increase the risk of serious infections and also inhibit the ability of donor immune cells from fighting against residual leukemia or lymphoma cells.

A team of Moffitt researchers led by Brian C. Betts, M.D., are trying to develop better, more effective treatments for preventing GVHD. Their goal is to develop drugs that can block those components of the immune system that contribute to GVHD, but do not affect the components of the immune system that are important for fighting infections and the tumor cells.

"It is known that Aurora kinase A and JAK2 pathway activation contributes to GVHD. However, drugs that inhibit either protein alone do not completely prevent GVHD," said Betts. "We hypothesized that co-treatment with drugs that target both Aurora kinase A and JAK2 could prevent GVHD better than either drug alone."

The researchers discovered that combined inhibition of Aurora kinase A and JAK2 promotes the differentiation of potent regulatory T cells, specialized immune cells that prevent GVHD. Aurora kinase A and JAK2 also significantly reduced GVHD in mice and allowed for the development of anti-cancer immune cells. This was best demonstrated by a drug developed at Moffitt that inhibits both Aurora kinase A and JAK2 simultaneously, eliminating the need to use two different medications.

"This novel prevention strategy warrants further investigation because of its potential to reduce the risk of GVHD and possibly be more effective and selective than commonly used GVHD treatments currently available today," added Betts.

---

La maladie du greffon contre l'hôte (GVHD) est la principale cause de décès associé à la rechute chez les patients recevant des greffes de cellules souches. Les chercheurs du Moffitt Cancer Center montrent qu'un nouveau traitement peut inhiber efficacement le développement de la GVHD chez la souris et maintenir les capacités de lutte contre l'infection et la tumeur du système immunitaire.

Les greffes de cellules souches peuvent être utilisées pour traiter les patients qui ont certains types de cancer, comme la leucémie ou le lymphome. Beaucoup de patients qui ont des greffes de cellules souches reçoivent une transplantation allogénique - les cellules souches donnés par une autre personne. Un risque associé aux transplantations de cellules souches allogéniques est la GVHD au cours de laquelle les cellules immunitaires données ne parviennent pas à reconnaître les tissus et les organes propres du patient. Les symptômes de la GVHD varient et peuvent mettre la vie en danger. Les symptômes courants comprennent éruption cutanée, nausées et vomissements, diarrhée et, occasionnellement, jaunisse et insuffisance hépatique.

Afin de réduire le risque de GVHD, les médecins essaient de faire correspondre les types de tissus du receveur et du donneur aussi près que possible et de la médecine prophylactique est donnée tout au long du processus de transplantation. Cependant, les patients peuvent encore développer GVHD. Les médicaments utilisés pour prévenir la GVHD ne sont pas très sélectifs et de suppriment l'activité de nombreux types de cellules immunitaires différentes; bonnes et mauvaises. En conséquence, la prévention de la GVHD peut augmenter le risque d'infections graves et également inhiber la capacité des cellules immunitaires du donneur de lutter contre les cellules résiduelles de leucémie ou de lymphome.

Une équipe de chercheurs Moffitt dirigée par Brian C. Betts, M.D., essayent de développer des traitements meilleurs et plus efficaces pour prévenir la GVHD. Leur but est de développer des médicaments qui peuvent bloquer les composants du système immunitaire qui contribuent à GVHD, mais n'affectent pas les composants du système immunitaire qui sont importants pour lutter contre les infections et les cellules tumorales.

"Il est connu que l'activation des voies Aurora kinase A et JAK2 contribue à la GVHD. Cependant, les médicaments qui inhibent l'une ou l'autre des protéines ne suffisent pas à prévenir complètement la GVHD", a déclaré M. Betts. «Nous avons émis l'hypothèse que le co-traitement avec des médicaments qui ciblent à la fois l'Aurora kinase A et JAK2 pourrait prévenir GVHD mieux que l'un ou l'autre des médicaments seuls.

Les chercheurs ont découvert que l'inhibition combinée de l'Aurora kinase A et JAK2 favorise la différenciation des cellules T régulatrices puissantes, des cellules immunitaires spécialisées qui empêchent la GVHD. Aurora kinase A et JAK2 ont également réduit de manière significative la GVHD chez la souris et ont permis le développement de cellules immunitaires anti-cancéreuses. Cela a été mieux démontré par un médicament développé à Moffitt qui inhibe à la fois l'Aurora kinase A et JAK2 simultanément, l'élimination de la nécessité d'utiliser deux médicaments différents.

"Cette nouvelle stratégie de prévention justifie une enquête plus approfondie en raison de son potentiel pour réduire le risque de GVHD et peut-être être plus efficace et sélective que communément les traitements utilisé actuellement disponible pour le GVHD", a ajouté Betts.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16213
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Avancée dans la compréhension de la maladie de l'hôte du greffon.   Lun 30 Nov 2015 - 18:17

A Seattle Children's Research Institute lab has discovered a genetic pathway that can be targeted with existing drugs to prevent graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), a common and deadly complication of bone marrow transplants. The results of their work were published in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

In patients with GVHD, newly transplanted T cells from the bone marrow graft attack the transplant recipient's body. Over 10,000 people in the United States receive bone marrow transplants each year for leukemia, other non-malignant blood conditions and autoimmune diseases. About 50-70 percent of bone marrow transplant patients will acquire GVHD. Of those who develop the most severe form, up to half will die.

"This is a mysterious disease that has perplexed doctors who treat bone marrow transplant patients for decades," said Dr. Leslie Kean, a pediatric cancer specialist at Seattle Children's Research Institute and lead study author. "We can cure patients of leukemia and other diseases with bone marrow transplants, but many of those patients get GVHD. In extreme cases, those patients end up with severe complications, chronic and painful side effects, and may even die of GVHD."

The disease can affect any part of the body, but the most common and severe damage is to liver, skin and gastrointestinal tissues.

"This condition is one of the main reasons that many bone marrow transplant patients endure long hospital stays after their diseases are cured," said Kean, who wears a bracelet around her badge from a pediatric patient cured of leukemia one year ago, but is still in the hospital due to complications from GVHD. "This finding is exciting because the drug we studied is in advanced clinical trials, so we are hopeful that bone marrow transplant recipients will benefit from this research in the near future."

The pathway Kean and her team studied is Aurora Kinase A, a well-known genetic target for cancer researchers. Aurora kinase A proteins are important for cell division and proliferation in human cells. Defects in the Aurora Kinase A gene can cause cells to over-proliferate and lead to cancers. The drug Kean's lab worked with is very similar to one that is produced by Takeda and is in phase III clinical trials for pediatric and adult cancers. The drug inhibits the Aurora Kinase A signaling pathway, causing cells to stop dividing.

"This study represents the very best of team science: hypothesis-driven, collaborative across multiple institutions, and immediately relevant to clinical patient care," said Dr. Ned Waller, Professor of Medicine, Pathology and Hematology/Oncology at Emory University and a collaborator on the study. "New approaches to understand the immunology of graft-versus-host disease and limit its impact are urgently needed to improve the quality of life for our patients and increase their long term cancer-free survival."

Kean and her lab are designing a clinical trial they hope to launch in 2016 to apply this new strategy so that patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation may have access to Aurora Kinase A inhibitors.

The study was led by Dr. Leslie Kean, Associate Director of the Ben Towne Center for Childhood Cancer Research at Seattle Children's Research Institute. In addition, Emory University and the University of Minnesota were collaborating institutions. The work was funded by grants from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute.


---

Un institut pour enfants de Seattle a découvert une voie génétique qui peut être ciblés avec des médicaments existants pour prévenir la maladie du greffon contre l'hôte (GVHD), une complication fréquente et mortelle des greffes de moelle osseuse. Les résultats de leurs travaux ont été publiés dans la revue Science Translational Medicine.

Chez les patients avec GVHD, nouvellement transplanté des cellules T de la moelle osseuse greffe attaque le corps de la greffe destinataire. Plus de 10 000 personnes aux Etats-Unis reçoivent une greffe de moelle osseuse chaque année pour une leucémie , d'autres conditions de sang non-malignes et les maladies auto-immunes. Environ 50-70 pour cent des patients de greffe de moelle osseuse acquerra la GVHD. De ceux qui développent la forme la plus sévère, jusqu'à la moitié mourront.

"Ceci est une maladie mystérieuse qui a embarrassé les médecins qui traitent des patients de greffe de moelle osseuse pour des décennies", a déclaré le Dr Leslie Kean, un spécialiste du cancer pédiatrique à l'Institut de recherche pour enfants de Seattle et le principal auteur de l'étude. "Nous pouvons guérir les patients de leucémie et d'autres maladies avec des greffes de moelle osseuse, mais beaucoup de ces patients attrape la GVHD. Dans les cas extrêmes, les patients se retrouvent avec des complications graves, chroniques et les effets secondaires douloureux, et peuvent même mourir de GVHD."

La maladie peut affecter toute partie du corps, mais les dégâts les plus fréquente et sévère est de foie, la peau et les tissus gastro-intestinaux.

"Cette condition est l'une des principales raisons pour laquelle nombre de patients transplantés endurent de longues hospitalisations après que leurs maladies soient guéries», a déclaré Kean "Cette découverte est passionnante parce que le médicament, que nous avons étudié est en essais cliniques avancés, de sorte que nous espérons que les receveurs de greffe de moelle osseuse bénéficieront de cette recherche dans un proche avenir."

La voie que Kean et son équipe ont étudié est la kinase Aurora A, une cible génétique bien connue pour chercheurs sur le cancer. Les protéines kinase Aurora A sont importantes pour la division et la prolifération cellulaire dans les cellules humaines. Des défauts dans le gène Aurora Kinase A peuvent causer une sur-prolifération aux cellules et conduire à des cancers. Le médicament du laboratoire avec lequel Kean a travaillé est très similaire à celui qui est produit par Takeda et est en troisième étape des essais cliniques pour les cancers pédiatriques et adultes. Le médicament inhibe la voie de signalisation de la kinase Aurora A, faisant que les cellules d'arrêter de se diviser.

«Cette étude représente le meilleur de la science de l'équipe: fondée sur une hypothèse, la collaboration entre plusieurs institutions, et l'apport immédiat aux soins cliniques des patients», a déclaré le Dr Ned Waller, professeur de médecine, de pathologie et d'hématologie / oncologie de l'Université Emory et un collaborateur de l'étude. "De nouvelles approches pour comprendre l'immunologie de la maladie du greffon contre l'hôte et de limiter son impact sont nécessaires d'urgence pour améliorer la qualité de vie de nos patients et d'augmenter leur taux de survie sans cancer long terme."

Kean et son laboratoire sont la conception d'un essai clinique, ils espèrent lancer en 2016 pour appliquer cette nouvelle stratégie afin que les patients subissant une transplantation de moelle osseuse puissent avoir accès à des inhibiteurs de la kinase Aurora A.

L'étude a été dirigée par le Dr Leslie Kean, Directeur adjoint du Centre Towne Ben pour la recherche contre le cancer infantile à l'Institut de recherche pour enfants de Seattle. En outre, l'Université Emory et l'Université du Minnesota ont été collaborent institutions. Le travail a été financé par des subventions de l'Institut national des allergies et des maladies infectieuses et le National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute.



_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16213
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Avancée dans la compréhension de la maladie de l'hôte du greffon.   Lun 2 Déc 2013 - 19:41

Dec. 2, 2013 — A new class of drugs reduced the risk of patients contracting a serious and often deadly side effect of lifesaving bone marrow transplant treatments, according to a study from researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Une nouvelle classe de médicaments réduit par 2 le risque des patients vis-à-vis une maladie sérieuse et souvent mortelle contractée lors de traitements comprenant la transplantation de moelle osseuse.

The study, the first to test this treatment in people, combined the drug vorinostat with standard medications given after transplant, resulting in 22 percent of patients developing graft-vs.-host disease compared to 42 percent of patients who typically develop this condition with standard medications alone. Results of the study appear in The Lancet Oncology.

Cette étude est la première à tester ce traitement chez les gens combinant vorinostat avec la médication donnée habituellement après la transplantation et cela résulte en 22% de patients développant la  maladie comparé à 42 % qui la développent avec  la médication standard.

"Graft-vs.-host disease is the most serious complication from transplant that limits our ability to offer it more broadly. Current prevention strategies have remained mostly unchanged over the past 20 years. This study has us cautiously excited that there may be a potential new way to prevent this condition," says lead study author Sung Choi, M.D., assistant professor of pediatrics at the U-M Medical School.

Vorinostat is currently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat certain types of cancer. But U-M researchers, led by senior study author Pavan Reddy, M.D., found in laboratory studies that the drug had anti-inflammatory effects as well -- which they hypothesized could be useful in preventing graft-vs.-host disease, or GVHD, a condition in which the new donor cells begin attacking other cells in the patient's body.

La maladie survient lorsque les cellules du donneur commencent à attaquer les autres cellules dans le corps du patient.

The study enrolled 61 older adults from the University of Michigan and Washington University in St. Louis who were undergoing a reduced-intensity bone marrow transplant with cells donated from a relative. Patients received standard medication used after a transplant to prevent GVHD. They also received vorinostat, which is given as a pill taken orally. Fifty of the 61 participants completed the full 21-day course of vorinostat.

61 patients ont complété les 21 jours de Vorinostat.

The researchers found vorinostat was safe and tolerable to give to this vulnerable population, with manageable side effects. In addition, rates of patient death and cancer relapse among the study participants were similar to historical averages.

The results mirror those found in the laboratory using mice. Reddy, the Moshe Talpaz Professor of Oncology and professor of internal medicine at the U-M Medical School, has been studying this approach in the lab for eight years.

"This is an entirely new approach to preventing graft-vs.-host disease," Reddy says. Specifically, vorinostat targets histone deacetylases, which are different from the usual molecules targeted by traditional treatments.


Vorinostat cible les histone deacetylases pour prévenir la maladie, ce qui est une nouvelle apprroche.

"Vorinostat has a dual effect as an anti-cancer and an anti-inflammatory agent. That's what's potentially great about using it to prevent graft-vs.-host, because it may also help prevent the leukemia from returning," says Reddy, who is also co-director of the hematologic malignancies and bone marrow transplant program at the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center.

"We are encouraged by our findings," Choi says. "Vorinostat combined with standard graft-vs.-host disease prophylaxis after related-donor transplant appears to be safe and associated with lower than expected incidence of acute GVHD. Future studies are needed to assess the effect of vorinostat in broader transplant settings. We are currently investigating vorinostat plus standard therapies to prevent GVHD in transplants with an unrelated donor."

D'autres études sont nécessaires, entre autres pour vérifier le résultat sur des patients recevant des dons de moelle par des personnes qui ne leur sont pas apparentées.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16213
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Avancée dans la compréhension de la maladie de l'hôte du greffon.   Jeu 8 Aoû 2013 - 15:16

Aug. 7, 2013 — Researchers from Indiana University, the University of Michigan, the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have identified and validated a biomarker accessible in blood tests that could be used to predict which stem cell transplant patients are at highest risk for a potentially fatal immune response called graft-versus-host disease.

Des chercheurs ont identifié et validé un biomarqueur accessible par des tests sanguins qui pourrait être utilisé pour prédire quels patients sont plus à risque de mourir de la maladie de l'hôte de greffe de moelle osseuse.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16213
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Avancée dans la compréhension de la maladie de l'hôte du greffon.   Mar 17 Fév 2009 - 19:32

(Feb. 17, 2009) — To prevent the rejection of newly transplanted organs and cells, patients must take medicines that weaken their entire immune systems. Such potentially life-saving treatments can, paradoxically, leave those receiving them susceptible to life-threatening infections.

Pour prévenir le rejet de cellules ou d'organes transplantées, les patients doivent prendre des médicaments qui affaiblissent leur système immunitaire. Un tel traitement peut paradoxalment les laisser fragiles aux infections.

Now researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine and the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center have discovered what seems to trigger the immune system to attack transplanted cells in the first place.

Maintenant les chercheurs ont découvert ce qui semble initier le système immunitaire à s'attaquer aux cellules tranplanter.


The finding could help chart a course to completely new therapies that may prevent graft-versus-host disease – the main cause of transplant failure – and its sometimes fatal complications.

La découverte pourrait aider à concevoir de nouvelles thérapies contre la maladie de l'hôte du greffon.

The UNC study has identified a subset of cells – named TH17 cells – that can bring about the condition. Until now, without a clear understanding of the disease, clinicians have had little choice but to treat transplant patients with toxic regimens of steroids and immunosuppressive drugs.

Les chercheurs ont identifié un sous-type de cellules nommées TH17 qui peut expliquer les choses. jusqu'à maintenant, sans compréhension de la maladie, les cliniciens n'Avaient d'autres chois que de transplanter et de donner des médicaments immunosuppresseur et des stéréoïdes.

"Our hope is that uncovering the mechanisms that cause graft-versus-host disease will allow for treatments that specifically target its causes and do not have the harmful side effects of traditional immunosuppressive therapy," said study lead author Jonathan S. Serody, M.D., a member of the Lineberger Center and the Elizabeth Thomas Professor of Medicine, Microbiology and Immunology at UNC. The results of the study appeared in the Feb. 5, 2009, issue of Blood.

Notre espoir est de découvrir les mécanismes qui causent la maladie de l'hôte du greffon et de concevoir des traitement qui ciblent directement ces causes

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16213
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: x   Jeu 12 Fév 2009 - 23:42

(Feb. 13, 2009) — Bone marrow transplant (BMT) researchers at The Medical College of Wisconsin Cancer Center in Milwaukee may have found a mechanism that could preserve the leukemia-killing effects of a transplant graft, while limiting the damage donor immune cells might do to the recipient host's vital organs.

Les chercheurs qui étudient la transplantation de moelle pourraient avoir trouvé un mécanisme qui pourrait préserver les effets tueurs de cellules leucémiques d'une greffe tout en limitant les dommages que pourraient faire les cellules du donneur à l'hôte.

"Our results suggest that targeting of interleukin 23, (IL-23), an immune substance secreted by donor marrow cells, may be a viable way to limit graft-versus-host-disease without limiting graft-versus-leukemia activity," says lead researcher Rupali Das, Ph.D.

"nos résultats suggèrent que cibler l'interleukin 23 (IL-23) une substance secrété par les cellules du donneupourrait être un moyen viable de limiter la maladie de l'hôte du greffon sans limiter les activités thérapeuthiques des cellules du donneur.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: Avancée dans la compréhension de la maladie de l'hôte du greffon.   

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
Avancée dans la compréhension de la maladie de l'hôte du greffon.
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 1
 Sujets similaires
-
» L'hypothèse de sens dans la compréhension de l'écrit
» DS la critique sociale compréhension de texte
» Apocalypse 20 selon la compréhension d'Emmanuel
» Compréhension d'un arrêt de la cour de Cassation
» Enseignements sur la Compréhension et l'Amitié

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
ESPOIRS :: Cancer :: recherche-
Sauter vers: