AccueilCalendrierFAQRechercherS'enregistrerMembresGroupesConnexion

Partagez | 
 

 V.E.G.F.

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
AuteurMessage
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16695
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: V.E.G.F.    Mer 20 Déc 2017 - 8:31

Blood vessels are the supply lines of the human body, bringing nutrients and oxygen to cells and carrying away waste. Controlling the growth of these supply lines can be an effective tactic to combat several different types of disorders, including cancer, stroke, and injury. A new study led by Assistant Professor of Bioengineering Princess Imoukhuede has added layer of nuance to our understanding of the signals that direct blood vessel growth.

The University of Illinois research team also included graduate students Spencer Mamer and Si (Stacie) Chen, as well as other members of Imoukhuede's laboratory group. Their work examined two distinct signaling systems within the body that influence blood vessel growth and discovered that molecules from one system were able to interact with molecules from the other. The work was published in Scientific Reports.

"If we learn how the proteins fit together and cause protein function, then you can imagine that drugs can be developed that block the way things fit together and other drugs can be developed that enhance how things fit together," said Imoukhuede, who is also a member of the Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology. "Unlocking this understanding would lead to better drug design for treating several diseases including cancers and even cardiovascular diseases."

Many aspects of development and growth are regulated by growth factors, molecules produced by the body that direct tissue growth and encourage cells to divide. Each type of growth factor plays a unique role in specific tissues and phases of development, and this individuality of function is reflected in individuality of form: the particular three-dimensional shape of each type of growth factor allows it to interact with a specific set of receptors, molecules that coat the surface of cells and translate external signals into internal ones. This interaction is called binding.

Two different growth factors, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), are known to play important roles in blood vessel growth. Drugs that influence the signaling activity of each of these molecules have been used to treat various disorders. In particular, drugs that influence VEGF signaling have been a major focus of cancer therapies.

"Many anti-VEGF drugs including Avastin [a drug used to treat a variety of cancers] have failed due to drug resistance, which makes treatment ineffective and difficult to manage," Chen said. "Our initial research question was to better understand how tumor microenvironment develops resistance towards anti-angiogenic drugs, and eventually build better models to predict drug efficacy."

The group realized that drug resistance, as well as lesser efficacy in some individuals, might be explained if the body were somehow able to compensate for the loss of one type of signal by replacing it with another, similar one. The researchers recalled a study showing that VEGF can sometimes interact with receptors for PDGF. What if PDGF did something similar, attaching to VEGF receptors and acting like a second-string football player, keeping the game going in the absence of the starting athlete?

Imoukhuede and her coauthors tested their idea by examining the strength of every combination of paired interactions between the two growth factors and their families of receptors. Because of indications from past research that the two growth factors might be flexible in their partnering with receptors, they were not surprised to see that PDGF could form a bond with one of the VEGF receptors. What did surprise them was the strength of that chemical attraction.

"Cross-family binding has kind of been observed, but it's seen as very weak, the molecule is not the same, it doesn't fit in well, so it's never a tight binding to that receptor," Mamer said. "We would have imagined it orders and orders of magnitude weaker, and some of the interactions that we did find were almost at the level of VEGF itself, which meant that they could be very clinically significant."

These findings are in part a reminder that molecules are in no way bound by the names we give them. Names for cellular products are often chosen based on the context in which they were first discovered; while this system has some advantages, it can also lead to unconscious bias in what hypotheses are developed around those molecules and their functions.

"While people can be flexible in their thinking, I think these names often cause people to not explore the possibility that these are all similar proteins," Mamer said. "If we weren't worrying about their names too much, maybe we would be looking more for these interactions across [different signaling systems]."

The group hopes that exploring these types of complexities in growth factor signaling will eventually contribute to the development of more effective therapies either to promote signaling to aid recovery from conditions such as injury or stroke, or to inhibit it to block tumor growth. The next step toward this goal is to discover the functional results of cross-binding between the VEGF and PDGF signaling systems.

"Just because two molecules interact doesn't mean this actually can induce the changes in structure that are necessary for all the signaling events that come out of it," Mamer said.

"The next goal is to determine if the binding leads to protein activity, and if so to measure how much activity we see and how that leads to cell growth and cell movement," Imoukhuede said. "We eventually want to determine if this 'second string' can perform as well as our starters, and to fundamentally determine whether they are playing the same game."

---

Les vaisseaux sanguins sont les lignes d'approvisionnement du corps humain, apportant des nutriments et de l'oxygène aux cellules et emportant les déchets. Contrôler la croissance de ces lignes d'approvisionnement peut être une tactique efficace pour lutter contre plusieurs types de troubles, y compris le cancer, les accidents vasculaires cérébraux et les blessures. Une nouvelle étude menée par le professeur adjoint de bioingénierie Princesse Imoukhuede a ajouté une couche de nuance à notre compréhension des signaux qui dirigent la croissance des vaisseaux sanguins.

L'équipe de recherche de l'Université de l'Illinois comprenait également des étudiants diplômés Spencer Mamer et Si (Stacie) Chen, ainsi que d'autres membres du groupe de laboratoire d'Imoukhuede. Leur travail a examiné deux systèmes de signalisation distincts dans le corps qui influencent la croissance des vaisseaux sanguins et a découvert que les molécules d'un système pouvaient interagir avec les molécules de l'autre. Le travail a été publié dans des rapports scientifiques.

"Si nous apprenons comment les protéines s'emboîtent et causent la fonction des protéines, alors vous pouvez imaginer que des médicaments peuvent bloquer la façon dont les choses s'imbriquent et que d'autres médicaments peuvent être développés pour améliorer la façon dont les choses s'emboîtent". un membre de l'Institut Carl R. Woese pour la biologie génomique. "Libérer cette compréhension conduirait à une meilleure conception de médicaments pour traiter plusieurs maladies, y compris les cancers et même les maladies cardiovasculaires."

De nombreux aspects du développement et de la croissance sont régulés par des facteurs de croissance, des molécules produites par l'organisme qui dirigent la croissance des tissus et encouragent la division des cellules. Chaque type de facteur de croissance joue un rôle unique dans des tissus et des phases de développement spécifiques, et cette individualité de fonction se reflète dans l'individualité de forme: la forme tridimensionnelle particulière de chaque type de facteur de croissance lui permet d'interagir avec un ensemble spécifique de les récepteurs, molécules qui recouvrent la surface des cellules et traduisent les signaux externes en signaux internes. Cette interaction est appelée liaison.

Deux facteurs de croissance différents, le facteur de croissance de l'endothélium vasculaire (VEGF) et le facteur de croissance dérivé des plaquettes (PDGF), sont connus pour jouer un rôle important dans la croissance des vaisseaux sanguins. Les médicaments qui influencent l'activité de signalisation de chacune de ces molécules ont été utilisés pour traiter divers troubles. En particulier, les médicaments qui influencent la signalisation du VEGF ont été un axe majeur des thérapies contre le cancer.

"De nombreux médicaments anti-VEGF, y compris Avastin [un médicament utilisé pour traiter une variété de cancers] ont échoué en raison de la résistance aux médicaments, ce qui rend le traitement inefficace et difficile à gérer", a déclaré Chen. "Notre première question de recherche était de mieux comprendre comment le microenvironnement tumoral développe une résistance aux médicaments anti-angiogéniques, et éventuellement construire de meilleurs modèles pour prédire l'efficacité des médicaments."

Le groupe s'est rendu compte que la résistance aux médicaments, ainsi qu'une moindre efficacité chez certains individus, pourraient être expliquées si le corps était en quelque sorte capable de compenser la perte d'un type de signal en le remplaçant par un autre, similaire. Les chercheurs ont rappelé une étude montrant que le VEGF peut parfois interagir avec les récepteurs du PDGF. Et si le PDGF faisait quelque chose de similaire, s'attachant aux récepteurs du VEGF et agissant comme un joueur de football de seconde chaîne, gardant le jeu en l'absence de l'athlète de départ?

Imoukhuede et ses coauteurs ont testé leur idée en examinant la force de chaque combinaison d'interactions appariées entre les deux facteurs de croissance et leurs familles de récepteurs. En raison des indications de recherches antérieures selon lesquelles les deux facteurs de croissance pourraient être flexibles dans leur partenariat avec les récepteurs, ils n'étaient pas surpris de voir que le PDGF pouvait former une liaison avec l'un des récepteurs du VEGF. Ce qui les surprenait était la force de cette attraction chimique.

"La liaison entre les familles a été observée, mais elle est considérée comme très faible, la molécule n'est pas la même, elle ne s'intègre pas bien, donc ce n'est jamais une liaison étroite à ce récepteur", a déclaré Mamer. "Nous aurions pu imaginer des ordres et des ordres de grandeur plus faibles, et certaines des interactions que nous avons trouvées étaient presque au niveau du VEGF lui-même, ce qui signifiait qu'elles pouvaient être très importantes sur le plan clinique."

Ces résultats sont en partie un rappel que les molécules ne sont en aucun cas liées par les noms que nous leur donnons. Les noms de produits cellulaires sont souvent choisis en fonction du contexte dans lequel ils ont été découverts. Bien que ce système présente certains avantages, il peut également conduire à un biais inconscient dans les hypothèses qui se développent autour de ces molécules et de leurs fonctions.

"Alors que les gens peuvent être flexibles dans leur pensée, je pense que ces noms font souvent que les gens n'explorent pas la possibilité que ce sont toutes des protéines similaires", a déclaré Mamer. "Si nous ne nous inquiétions pas trop de leurs noms, peut-être serions-nous plus intéressés par ces interactions à travers [différents systèmes de signalisation]."

Le groupe espère qu'explorer ces types de complexités dans la signalisation des facteurs de croissance contribuera éventuellement au développement de thérapies plus efficaces soit pour promouvoir la signalisation pour aider à la récupération de maladies telles que les blessures ou les accidents vasculaires cérébraux, soit pour l'inhiber.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16695
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: V.E.G.F.    Jeu 14 Juil 2016 - 17:33

One of the most exciting strategies researchers are pursuing for fighting cancer is to cut off the blood supply of cancerous cells. However, many initially-promising therapies have failed in part because tumor cells counteract these therapies by increasing their production of "pro-angiogenic" proteins that promote new blood vessel growth and boost tumor blood supply. In a new study, researchers have found a way to turn the tables on this process by disrupting the ability of vascular endothelial cells (blood vessel-forming cells) to respond to these pro-angiogenic signals from tumors. The findings could open the door to new cancer treatments with a lower risk of drug resistance.

The study was conducted by an international team of researchers from the National Institutes of Health, the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Shanghai Jiao Tong University, and the University of Missouri. Their innovative approach inhibits the replenishment of an intracellular substrate vascular endothelial cells need to respond to pro-angiogenic signals. As the substrate gets used up, this reduces the ability of endothelial cells to respond to a pro-angiogenic agent called vascular endothelial growth factor, or VEGF, thus limiting the growth of new blood vessels. What's more, when tumor cells attempt to overcome the therapy by increasing VEGF production, endothelial cells only consume the substrate faster, enhancing the effectiveness of the therapy and further reducing tumor blood supply. The approach has been successful in initial tests using mice, zebrafish and cell culture.

Brant Weinstein will present this research on Saturday, July 16 from 7:45-8:00 p.m. during the Haematopoisis and Vascular Biology session in Grand Ballroom 7B as part of The Allied Genetics Conference, Orlando World Center Marriott, Orlando, Florida

---

Des chercheurs poursuivent L'une des stratégies les plus excitantes pour la lutte contre le cancer qui est de couper l'approvisionnement en sang des cellules cancéreuses. Cependant, de nombreuses thérapies initialement prometteuses ont échoué en partie parce que les cellules tumorales contrecarrent ces thérapies en augmentant leur production de protéines "pro-angiogéniques» qui favorisent la croissance de nouveaux vaisseaux sanguins et stimuler la tumeur en approvisionnement en sang. Dans une nouvelle étude, les chercheurs ont trouvé un moyen de changer les choses quant à ce processus en perturbant la capacité des cellules endothéliales vasculaires (cellules formant des vaisseaux sanguins)  de répondre à ces signaux pro-angiogéniques des tumeurs. Les résultats pourraient ouvrir la porte à de nouveaux traitements contre le cancer avec un risque plus faible de résistance aux médicaments.

L'étude a été menée par une équipe internationale de chercheurs des National Institutes of Health, l'Académie chinoise des sciences et de Shanghai Jiao Tong University et l'Université du Missouri. Leur approche innovante a empêché le besoin des cellules endothéliales de répondre à des signaux pro-angiogéniques pour reconstituer un substrat intracellulaire. À mesure que le substart s'use, cela réduit la capacité des cellules endothéliales de répondre à un agent pro-angiogénique appelé facteur de croissance endothélial vasculaire, ou VEGF, limitant ainsi la croissance de nouveaux vaisseaux sanguins. Qui plus est, lorsque les cellules tumorales tentent de surmonter la thérapie en augmentant la production de VEGF, les cellules endothéliales consomment le substrat plus rapidement, améliorant l'efficacité de la thérapie et réduisant encore la tumeur en approvisionnement en sang. L'approche a été couronnée de succès dans les premiers tests sur des souris, poisson zèbre et de la culture cellulaire.

Brant Weinstein présentera cette recherche, le samedi 16 Juillet à partir de 7: 45-8: 12 heures au cours de la session de Biologie Haematopoisis et vasculaire à Grand Ballroom 7B dans le cadre de la Conférence de génétique alliée, Orlando World Center Marriott, Orlando, Floride

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16695
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: V.E.G.F.    Mer 23 Mar 2016 - 12:45

Cancer therapy is often hampered by the accumulation of fluids in and around the tumour, which is caused by leakage from the blood vessels in the tumour. Researchers at Uppsala University now show how leakage from blood vessels is regulated. They have identified a novel mechanism whereby leakage can be suppressed to improve the result of chemotherapy and reduce the spread of tumours in mice. The results have been published in the scientific journal Nature Communications.

When a tumour grows, new blood vessels are formed that supply the tumour with nutrients and oxygen. However, these vessels are often malfunctioning and fluids and other molecules leak out of the vessels. This results in edema in the tissues, which in turn makes it more difficult for drugs to reach into the tumour during cancer therapy. The malfunctioning vessels can also contribute to the spread of metastases from the tumour.

The leakage from the blood vessels is controlled by specific protein complexes that connect the cells in the blood vessel walls. By regulating these protein complexes, the cells are joined more or less tightly, which affects the leakage from the vessels.

Recent findings from Uppsala University show how a specific alteration of the protein complex in the vessel walls can reduce leakage, without affecting any other vessel functions.

'We have studied mice that have a mutation in a certain part of one of the proteins in the protein complex. The regular blood vessels in these mice function normally, but vessels in tumours showed less leakage, and there was a decrease in edema formation. In addition, the mutant mice responded better to treatment with chemotherapy', says Lena Claesson-Welsh, professor at the Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology,at Uppsala University and Science for Life Laboratory, who led the study.

The growth factor VEGFA functions as a signalling molecule, regulating the protein complexes in the blood vessel walls. One way of treating cancer is by inhibiting VEGFA, which decreases leakage and edema and improves the effects of chemo- and radiation therapy. However, VEGFA affects blood vessels in several ways and sustained anti-VEGFA therapy deteriorates vessel function and can cause increased metastasis.

'The specific mutation that we have studied allowed us to examine one of the signalling pathways in which VEGFA is involved. An important finding was that mice with the mutated protein complex also showed a reduced spread of metastases. We therefore believe that a targeted inhibition of this specific signalling pathway, which controls how the cells in the vessel walls are connected, might work better as a cancer therapy than the more general VEGFA inhibition that is used today,' says Lena Claesson-Welsh.

---

Le traitement du cancer est souvent entravée par l'accumulation de fluides dans et autour de la tumeur, qui est causée par une fuite des vaisseaux sanguins dans la tumeur. Des chercheurs de l'Université d'Uppsala montrent maintenant comment les fuites des vaisseaux sanguins est réglementée. Ils ont identifié un nouveau mécanisme par lequel la fuite peut être supprimée pour améliorer le résultat de la chimiothérapie et de réduire la propagation des tumeurs chez les souris. Les résultats ont été publiés dans la revue scientifique Nature Communications.

Lorsqu'une tumeur se développe, de nouveaux vaisseaux sanguins sont formés qui alimentent la tumeur en nutriments et en oxygène. Toutefois, ces navires sont souvent un mauvais fonctionnement et des fluides et d'autres molécules de fuite hors des vaisseaux. Cela se traduit par un œdème dans les tissus, ce qui rend à son tour plus difficile pour les médicaments d'atteindre dans la tumeur pendant le traitement du cancer. Les navires qui fonctionnent mal peuvent également contribuer à la propagation des métastases de la tumeur.

La fuite des vaisseaux sanguins est contrôlée par des complexes protéiques spécifiques qui relient les cellules dans les parois des vaisseaux sanguins. Par la régulation de ces complexes protéiques, les cellules sont assemblées plus ou moins fortement, ce qui affecte la fuite des vaisseaux.

Les résultats récents de l'Université d'Uppsala montrent comment une altération spécifique du complexe de protéines dans les parois des vaisseaux peut réduire les fuites, sans affecter les autres fonctions des vaisseaux.

Nous avons étudié des souris ayant une mutation dans une certaine partie de l'une des protéines du complexe protéique. Les vaisseaux sanguins réguliers chez ces souris fonctionnent normalement, mais les vaisseaux dans les tumeurs ont montré moins de fuites, et il y avait une diminution de la formation d'oedème. En outre, les souris mutantes mieux répondu au traitement par la chimiothérapie », explique Lena Claesson-Welsh, professeur au Département d'immunologie, génétique et pathologie à l'Université d'Uppsala et de la science de laboratoire Vie, qui a dirigé l'étude.

Le facteur de croissance des fonctions VEGFA comme une molécule de signalisation, de régulation des complexes de protéines dans les parois des vaisseaux sanguins. Un moyen de traitement du cancer par inhibition est VEGFA, ce qui diminue les fuites et l'oedème et améliore les effets de la chimiothérapie et la radiothérapie. Cependant, VEGFA affecte les vaisseaux sanguins de plusieurs façons et soutenue anti-VEGFA thérapie détériore la fonction des vaisseaux et peut entraîner une augmentation de la métastase.

«La mutation spécifique que nous avons étudié nous a permis d'examiner l'une des voies de signalisation dans lequel VEGFA est impliqué. Une découverte importante est que les souris avec le complexe de protéine mutée ont également montré une réduction de la propagation de métastases. Nous pensons donc que l'inhibition ciblée de cette voie de signalisation spécifique, qui contrôle la façon dont les cellules dans les parois des vaisseaux sont reliés, pourrait mieux fonctionner comme une thérapie de cancer que l'inhibition plus général VEGFA qui est utilisé aujourd'hui », dit Lena Claesson-Welsh.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16695
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: V.E.G.F.    Mer 5 Fév 2014 - 18:54

Among patients with advanced melanoma, presence of higher levels of the protein vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in blood was associated with poor response to treatment with the immunotherapy ipilimumab (Yervoy), according to a study by Yuan et al published in Cancer Immunology Research. The study suggests combining immunotherapy with VEGF inhibitors may be a potential option for these patients.

The immune-checkpoint inhibitor ipilimumab works by boosting the body’s immune system to combat melanoma. VEGF is a protein that promotes angiogenesis, thus providing nutrients to the growing tumor. The study found that among patients who had late-stage melanoma, those who had high levels of VEGF in their blood prior to treatment with ipilimumab had decreased clinical benefit, poor overall survival outcomes, and were 60% more likely to die of their disease, compared with those who had lower levels of VEGF.

“VEGF is known to suppress the maturation of immune cells and their antitumor responses, and evidence points toward an association between high serum VEGF levels and poor prognosis in melanoma patients,” said F. Stephen Hodi, MD, Director of the Melanoma Center at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. “VEGF has also been shown to be a potential biomarker for other immunotherapies; thus, it seemed logical to test the ability of VEGF to predict responses to ipilimumab.”

According to Dr. Hodi, VEGF may hinder some of the effects of the immune-checkpoint inhibitor. “We are beginning to better define predictive biomarkers for immune-checkpoint blockers, specifically ipilimumab. Our study further suggests that there is a potential interaction existing between the biology of angiogenesis and immune-checkpoint blockade,” he said.

Study Details

The investigators conducted retrospective analyses of blood samples collected from 176 patients with metastatic melanoma, before and after they were treated with ipilimumab, at Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Patients were 16 to 91 years old, and the majority of them had stage IV disease.

VEGF levels in patients’ blood ranged from 0.1 to 894.4 pg/mL. The investigators determined 43 pg/mL to be the cutoff value, and evaluated patient responses to treatment as those whose pretreatment VEGF levels were greater than (VEGF-high) or less than (VEGF-low) the cutoff value.

Outcomes

The investigators found that at 24 weeks after starting ipilimumab treatment, 41% of the VEGF-low patients experienced clinical benefit, including partial or complete treatment responses; only 23% of the VEGF-high patients experienced a clinical benefit.

The median overall survival for VEGF-low patients was 12.9 months, compared with 6.6 months for VEGF-high patients.

The researchers found that while pretreatment VEGF levels had the potential to predict treatment outcomes, changes in VEGF levels during treatment were not linked to treatment outcomes.

“It may be worthwhile to investigate combining immune-checkpoint inhibitors and angiogenesis inhibitors in advanced melanoma with high serum VEGF levels,” said Dr. Hodi. His team has initiated a randomized clinical trial to test ipilimumab in combination with bevacizumab (Avastin), an angiogenesis inhibitor, in patients with advanced melanoma.


----


Parmi les patients ayant un mélanome avancé, la présence de niveaux élevés de facteur de croissance endothéliale, la protéine vasculaire (VEGF ) dans le sang est associée à une faible réponse au traitement avec l'immunothérapie ipilimumab ( Yervoy ), selon une étude menée par Yuan et publié dans Cancer Immunology Research. L'étude suggère que combiner l'immunothérapie avec des inhibiteurs de VEGF pourrait être une option possible pour ces patients .

L'inhibiteur ipilimumab fonctionne en stimulant le système immunitaire de l'organisme à lutter contre le mélanome. Le VEGF est une protéine qui favorise l'angiogenèse , fournissant ainsi des nutriments à la tumeur croissante. L'étude a révélé que parmi les patients qui ont eu un mélanome à un stade avancé, ceux qui avaient des niveaux élevés de VEGF dans le sang avant le traitement avec l'ipilimumab ont diminué le bénéfice clinique, et ont eu de pauvres résultats de survie globale, ils étaient 60 % plus susceptibles de mourir de leur maladie, par rapport à ceux qui avaient des niveaux inférieurs de VEGF .

"Le VEGF est connu pour supprimer la maturation des cellules immunitaires et leurs réponses antitumorales, la preuve pointe vers une association entre les taux de VEGF sérique élevés et un mauvais pronostic chez les patients de mélanome », a déclaré F. Stephen Hodi , MD , directeur du Centre de mélanome au Dana-Farber Cancer Institute . "La VEGF a également été montré comme un biomarqueur potentiel pour d'autres immunothérapies : ainsi, il semble logique de tester la capacité du VEGF pour prédire des réponses à ipilimumab . "

Selon le Dr Hodi, le VEGF peut gêner certains des effets de l'inhibiteur." Nous commençons à mieux définir les biomarqueurs prédictifs pour bloquants immunitaire, en particulier l'ipilimumab . Notre étude suggère en outre qu'il existe un potentiel d'interaction existant entre la biologie de l'angiogenèse et immunitaire" , at-il dit .

Détails de l'étude

Les enquêteurs ont effectué des analyses rétrospectives d'échantillons de sang prélevés chez 176 patients atteints de mélanome métastatique, avant et après avoir été traitées avec l'ipilimumab, à Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center et le Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Les patients étaient âgés de 16 à 91 ans , et la majorité d'entre eux ont eu la maladie de stade IV .

Les taux de VEGF dans le sang de patients variaient de 0,1 à 894,4 pg / mL . Les enquêteurs ont déterminé 43 pg / mL à la valeur de coupure , et évaluées les réponses des patients au traitement que ceux dont VEGF prétraitement niveaux étaient supérieurs ( VEGF - haut ) ou inférieure à la valeur de coupure ( VEGF - bas ) .

Les résultats

Les chercheurs ont constaté que 24 semaines après le début du traitement de l'ipilimumab , 41 % des patients du VEGF - bas a connu un bénéfice clinique , y compris les réponses partielles ou complètes de traitement; seulement 23 % des patients du VEGF - haut a connu un bénéfice clinique .

La médiane de survie globale des patients atteints de VEGF - bas était de 12,9 mois, contre 6,6 mois pour les patients du VEGF - haut .

Les chercheurs ont constaté que si les niveaux de prétraitement VEGF avaient le potentiel pour prédire les résultats du traitement , les changements dans les taux de VEGF en cours de traitement ne sont pas liés à des résultats de traitement .

" Il peut être utile d'étudier la combinaison des inhibiteurs immunitaire des points de contrôle et des inhibiteurs de l'angiogenèse dans le mélanome avancé avec des niveaux de VEGF sérique élevés , " a déclaré le Dr Hodi . Son équipe a lancé un essai clinique randomisé pour tester l'ipilimumab en association avec le bevacizumab ( Avastin ) , un inhibiteur de l'angiogenèse , chez les patients atteints de mélanome avancé .



_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16695
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: V.E.G.F.    Mar 22 Nov 2011 - 13:30

Le point de départ d’une avancée thérapeutique dans le cancer colorectal vient d’être marqué par une équipe française, celle d’Annette K. Larsen, à l’hôpital Saint-Antoine, Paris (université Pierre-et-Marie-Curie-INSERM). Ces chercheurs ont testé chez des souris deux inhibiteurs de la tyrosine kinase (TKI), le vargatef et l’afatinib. Ils ont constaté une inhibition de la croissance tumorale et l’abolition du déclenchement de deux voies de signalisation, celles de l’EGFR (epidermal growth factor) et du VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor).

Le travail est parti d’un concept plus ancien. Dans les cancers colorectaux (ou d’autres tumeurs) divers traitements ont été proposés afin de bloquer deux facteurs de croissance l’EGFR et le VEGF. Leurs voies de signalisation, intimement liées, ont été visées par l’association de deux anticorps monoclonaux, le bevacizumab et le cetuximab. Les résultats ont été très décevants, que les molécules soient utilisées seules ou ensemble.

Les chercheurs français se sont orientés vers de petites molécules, les TKI. Leur travail, publié dans « Clinical Cancer Research » fournit les résultats de leur essai thérapeutique visant à tester l’efficacité du vargatef et de l’afatinib sur les deux voies de signalisation.

Pour y parvenir, ils ont greffé sur des souris des tumeurs colorectales humaines. Elles ont reçu soit l’un ou l’autre TKI, soit leur association. Si chaque molécule s’est montrée efficace en inhibant la croissance tumorale, l’association thérapeutique a multiplié par 5 le taux d’apoptose des cellules cancéreuses. La bithérapie s’est accompagnée d’une nette décroissance du phospho-VEGFR1 et du phospho-EGFR intracellulaires associés à la tumeur. Sur les mêmes rongeurs, les deux anticorps monoclonaux n’ont eu qu’une action cytostatique tant individuellement que combinés.

L’activité des deux inhibiteurs de la tyrosine kinase a été vérifiée sur huit lignées cellulaires de cancer du et ce quel qu’en soit le statut KRAS. Ce qui constitue une petite surprise dans la mesure où des essais cliniques antérieurs avaient entraîné une aggravation de l’état des patients porteurs d’un gène KRAS muté. Reste à confirmer ces données dans le cadre d’essais en clinique humaine.

› Dr GUY BENZADON


_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Optimiste
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 4838
Date d'inscription : 27/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: V.E.G.F.    Dim 10 Juil 2005 - 8:36

Mais oui mon ami , c'est bien une guerre qu'il faut mener contre la maladie !!! La seule qui soit utile , pas les autres , pas celles où l'on tue des humains !
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
frederic

avatar

Nombre de messages : 1088
Localisation : Canada/Mascouche
Date d'inscription : 08/04/2005

MessageSujet: Re: V.E.G.F.    Sam 9 Juil 2005 - 19:02

C'est le même principe que oxaliplatine. Ça arrête la croissance des cellules cancéreuses et on ajoute un autre médicament qui vient détruire ces mêmes cellules qui ne peuvent plus se reproduire. On arrive à éliminer les cellules cancéreuses du fait qu'elles se reproduisent moins vite qu'elles sont tuées.



PS Noter que j'emploie presqu'un vocabulaire de guerre.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.tousensemble.qc.ca
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16695
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: V.E.G.F.    Sam 9 Juil 2005 - 16:17

Celui pour le cancer du colon est sorti sur le marché (je ne sais pas trop de quel pays...) d'après l'article sur les médicaments qui visent les Vegf.

"En ce qui concerne les tumeurs du côlon, le bévacizumab a déjà fourni des résultats encourageants aboutissant à sa commercialisation récente dans cette indication. Pour les autres cancers, on n’a pas encore assez de recul pour se prononcer."

Le bévacizumab c'est un autre nom pour l'Avastine.

D'après ce que je comprend les cellules cancéreuses produisent une sorte de protéine la Vegf (gf pour growth factor) sans lequel les petites vaisseaux qui nourrissent les tumeurs ne peuvent croitre. Les médicaments dont ils est question arrêtent la production des Vegf dont plus de croissance de tumeur et plus de croissance de tumeur c'est presque synomine de plus de cancer entk d'après ce que j'imagine.

Denis
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
frederic

avatar

Nombre de messages : 1088
Localisation : Canada/Mascouche
Date d'inscription : 08/04/2005

MessageSujet: Re: V.E.G.F.    Sam 9 Juil 2005 - 14:22

Ya tellement de beaux espoirs dans la recherche mais il me semble que ça sort pas vite sur le marché.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.tousensemble.qc.ca
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16695
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: AG-013736   Sam 9 Juil 2005 - 13:45

dimanche 15 mai 2005, 12h04



Lutte contre le cancer: nouveaux médicaments multi-cibles prometteurs
Bombes intelligentes frappant plusieurs cibles simultanément, les traitements anti-cancéreux expérimentaux présentés ce weekend au congrès de l'American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) marquent le début d'une nouvelle génération de médicaments.
"La thérapie ciblée est vraiment une réalité clinique", a déclaré le Dr. Roy Herbst de l'Université du Texas lors d'une conférence de presse de présentation du congrès, qualifiant cette nouvelle catégorie de médicaments "de bombes intelligentes contre le cancer".
"Depuis environ un an, il y a beaucoup plus d'options de traitements ciblés mais aucun n'a encore été autorisé par la FDA (les autorités américaines de réglementation des médicaments)", a ajouté le Dr. Brian Rini, chercheur de l'université de Californie, en exprimant l'espoir que ces thérapies pourront bientôt être commercialisées.
Il a lui-même présenté les résultats d'une étude conduite sur 52 malades atteints d'un cancer avancé des reins avec un médicament expérimental "multi-cibles" des laboratoires Pfizer (NYSE: PFE - actualité) , baptisé AG-013736.
Environ 40% des patients de ce groupe ont enregistré une réduction de leur tumeur, contre un sur dix avec des traitements traditionnels.
Plusieurs des malades traités avec l'AG-013736 ont vu leur vie se prolonger au-delà d'un an, beaucoup plus que ce qu'ils pouvaient espérer.
Ce médicament bloque à la fois la formation des vaisseaux sanguins permettant aux cellules cancéreuses de recevoir de l'oxygène et de se nourrir ainsi que le mécanisme moléculaire indispensable à leur croissance et propagation.
Pfizer conduit aussi des essais cliniques avec un autre médicament de la même catégorie, le Sutent objet de dix études sur divers cancers et dont les résultats doivent être présentés à Orlando.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16695
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: V.E.G.F.    Ven 8 Juil 2005 - 22:37

Pris d'un article du 30 juin 2005 dans Paris-Match


En quoi consiste cette approche anti-angiogénique ?

Il s’agit d’un traitement ciblé qui détruit spécifiquement les vaisseaux sanguins qui alimentent les tumeurs. Il faut savoir que, pour se développer, une tumeur cancéreuse a besoin d’apports énergétiques, lesquels lui sont fournis par ses propres néovaisseaux : ceux-là mêmes qu’elle a créés. Ces dernières années, des chercheurs ont mis en évidence une substance particulière sécrétée par les cellules cancéreuses elles-mêmes, qui stimule la production de ces néovaisseaux : le V.e.g.f. C’est cette substance stimulatrice qui va être la cible des produits utilisés par ce nouveau traitement anti-angiogénique. Les premiers essais réalisés en Europe et aux Etats-Unis avec différentes drogues (bévacizumab (Avastin), S.u. 11248, A.g. 013736) se sont révélés extraordinairement positifs dans des cas de cancer du rein métastasé. Ainsi, par exemple, dans notre service de la Pitié-Salpêtrière, nous avons obtenu, sur 13 patients traités avec du A.g. 013736, des réponses rapides et importantes. Peu à peu, nous avons pu observer une diminution du réseau vasculaire nourricier des tumeurs. Aujourd’hui, avec un recul de seize à dix-huit mois, les scanners montrent que, chez les deux tiers des malades, les tumeurs (et les métastases) ont disparu, diminué de volume ou se sont nécrosées. Et cela avec peu d’effets secondaires et une amélioration très nette de l’état général.

Lors du congrès de l’Asco, quels autres résultats ont démontré une efficacité de ces produits anti-angiogéniques ?

Le Pr Moltzer, de New York, a confirmé avoir obtenu, avec le S.u. 11248, dans une série de 169 malades atteints de cancer du rein métastasé, un régression du volume tumoral ou une nécrose de la tumeur chez la moitié d’entre eux. Un autre cancérologue, le Pr Yang, de Bethesda, a présenté des résultats similaires chez 116 patients atteints également d’un cancer du rein métastasé mais, cette fois, avec le bévacizumab.

Quels sont les effets secondaires de ces produits anti-angiogéniques ?

Avec ces médicaments qui s’administrent à domicile par voie orale, on observe des effets très limités : une légère hypertension artérielle, parfaitement contrôlable, et une fatigue très modérée. Dans l’ensemble, tous ces traitements sont bien tolérés.

Quelle va être la prochaine étape de ces essais ?

Des études européenne et américaine sont actuellement conduites sur plusieurs centaines de patients atteints de cancer du rein métastasé, dans le but de confirmer ces bons résultats et de permettre une commercialisation accélérée des médicaments anti-angiogéniques. Nous espérons cette mise sur le marché pour fin 2005 ou début 2006.

Cette approche anti-angiogénique va-t-elle être aussi utilisée pour d’autres cancers que ceux du rein ?

Il est vrai que, pour certaines raisons biologiques, le cancer du est un modèle idéal pour ce type de traitement. Mais des recherches sont en cours ; ainsi ces nouveaux médicaments sont actuellement testés pour des cancers métastasés du , du , du , et de la . En ce qui concerne les tumeurs du côlon, le bévacizumab a déjà fourni des résultats encourageants aboutissant à sa commercialisation récente dans cette indication. Pour les autres cancers, on n’a pas encore assez de recul pour se prononcer. A l’avenir, nous pensons traiter d’emblée, après la chirurgie, les cancers locaux du rein afin de prévenir l’apparition d’une métastase (des recherches sont en cours). Personnellement, je pense qu’on va désormais beaucoup plus s’intéresser à détruire les vaisseaux nourriciers d’une tumeur plutôt qu’à s’attaquer à la tumeur elle-même. Pourquoi ? Parce que c’est tout simplement plus facile de tuer des vaisseaux que des cellules malignes qui ont toutes sortes de parades pour échapper à l’action des médicaments.

Auteur : Sabine de la Brosse


Dernière édition par Denis le Mer 20 Déc 2017 - 8:34, édité 5 fois
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: V.E.G.F.    

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
V.E.G.F.
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 1

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
ESPOIRS :: Cancer :: recherche-
Sauter vers: