AccueilCalendrierFAQRechercherS'enregistrerMembresGroupesConnexion

Partagez | 
 

 Stars de la lutte contre le cancer.(patients mis à part)

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
AuteurMessage
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15768
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Stars de la lutte contre le cancer.(patients mis à part)   Lun 3 Oct 2016 - 10:52



Né à Fukuoka, Yoshinori Ohsumi, 71 ans, a obtenu son doctorat en 1964 de l'université de Tokyo. Après trois ans à l'université Rockefeller de New York, il est revenu à Tokyo pour créer son propre laboratoire. Depuis 2009, il est professeur à l'institut de Technologie de la capitale nippone.

Il "était un peu surpris", a raconté le secrétaire du jury Thomas Perlmann, qui lui a téléphoné avant l'annonce.

Yoshinori Ohsumi succède à William Campbell, Américain né en Irlande, au Japonais Satoshi Ōmura et à la Chinoise Tu Youyou, découvreurs de traitements contre les infections parasitaires et le paludisme.

Le diplôme et la médaille Nobel sont assortis d'une récompense de 8 millions de couronnes suédoises, soit environ 1,2 million de dollars canadiens.

Le prix de médecine est le premier de la saison des Nobel 2016. Il doit être suivi de ceux de physique mardi, de chimie mercredi, de la paix vendredi et d'économie lundi. Le prix Nobel de littérature sera annoncé le jeudi 13 octobre.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15768
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Stars de la lutte contre le cancer.(patients mis à part)   Mer 20 Juil 2016 - 17:50



Janet D. Rowley, MD

Even as a child, Janet D. Rowley, MD, found the intellectual order and logic of science appealing. Born on April 5, 1925, in New York, Dr. Rowley’s parents, Hurford and Ethel Ballantyne Davison, moved the family to Chicago 2 years later. Both educators, the Davisons encouraged their only child in her academic pursuits, especially her interest in science.

Advanced Placement Program

When Dr. Rowley’s mother learned about an advanced placement program at the University of Chicago’s Hutchins College that combined the last 2 years of high school with the first 2 years of college, she helped her daughter apply for a scholarship. That event would prove to be the catalyst for a 7-decades-long association with the University of Chicago and alter the course of Dr. Rowley’s professional and personal life.

In 1940, at just 15, Dr. Rowley was awarded the scholarship, and earned a Bachelor of Philosophy degree in 1944. Two years later, she completed a Bachelor of Science degree and graduated from medical school in 1948. The following day, she married fellow medical student Donald Adams Rowley  and, after completing an internship in 1951, she began raising a family that would eventually include four sons.

Wanting to practice medicine only part-time while her children were young, Dr. Rowley spent three afternoons each week working in a variety of well-baby clinics. Later she worked in a Chicago clinic for children with mental disabilities, including Down syndrome, a genetic disorder caused by an extra chromosome. That experience would lead to a change in her professional focus from medicine to research and a lifelong study of the genetics of cancer.

“In 1959, the French pediatrician and geneticist Jérôme Lejeune reported that Down syndrome resulted from trisomy 21,” said Dr. Rowley. “My husband was going to England on sabbatical, and I couldn’t practice medicine there, so I decided I would learn cytogenetics at Oxford University. I got involved in a research project studying the pattern of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) replication in normal and abnormal human chromosomes. The field was so interesting, I decided I didn’t want to go back to work in the clinic and instead wanted to keep on doing research in chromosomes.”

Chromosomal Translocations

When Dr. Rowley returned to the University of Chicago in 1962, with the support of hematologist Leon Jacobson, MD, she continued work on her research project while obliging Dr. Jacobson, who asked Dr. Rowley to look at the chromosomes of his leukemia patients.

“The problem in the 1960s was that the method of staining chromosomes resulted in a uniform stain and you couldn’t tell one from the other except for a few that had distinctive sizes and shapes. All you could do was count and see whether there were 46 chromosomes, more than 46, or less than 46,” said Dr. Rowley.

By the early 1970s, a new chromosomal staining technique called banding came into use. With this method, metaphase chromosomes are treated with trypsin and  stained with Giemsa, or stained with quinacrine mustard, and then examined under a fluorescent microscope to analyze chromosomes for alternating light and dark stripes that appear along their length. The banding pattern allows the identification of chromosomal aberrations. (Today, molecular cytogenetic techniques such as fluorescence in situ hybridization [FISH] are often used to detect genetic abnormalities associated with cancer.)

Dr. Rowley learned the banding technique during her return trip to England while her husband was completing his second sabbatical at Oxford University. When she moved back to Chicago in 1972, Dr. Rowley used that knowledge to reexamine the slides of Dr. Jacobson’s patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and found that chromosomes 8 and 21 were broken and had switched ends. It was the first discovery of a recurring chromosomal translocation in cancer.

Soon after, Dr. Rowley found a different translocation in the cells of patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). This time, one end of chromosome 22 was exchanged for a piece of chromosome 9, a translocation that results in the Philadelphia chromosome seen in CML.

“Prior to this discovery, the Philadelphia chromosome had been thought to be a deletion, and the biology was thought to involve a loss of DNA from the cell, with the missing genes on that DNA involved in regulating normal cell growth. Showing that it wasn’t a deletion but was instead a translocation was a pretty major event,” said Dr. Rowley.

Understanding the genetic abnormalities of CML eventually led to the development by Nicholas Lydon, PhD, and Brian Druker, MD, in the 1990s, of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib (Gleevec), which was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 2001 for the treatment of CML.

In the late 1970s, Dr. Rowley identified a third translocation, the 15;17 translocation found in the rare disease acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). This discovery convinced Dr. Rowley of the importance of translocations and helped her to solidify the consensus among scientists that cancer is a genetic disease.

Dr. Rowley has been the recipient of numerous awards, including the Albert Lasker Clinical Research Award and the National Medal of Science. In 2009, she received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honor. In May, she was awarded the Albany Medical Center Prize in Medicine and Biomedical Research along with Peter Nowell, MD, for his work showing that a genetic defect could be responsible for cancer, and Dr. Druker for the development of imatinib. The three scientists will share the $500,000 award. Dr. Rowley’s portion will go to fund her five grandchildren’s college educations.

Early Fascination with Patterns

While Ethel Davison’s encouragement of her daughter’s academic pursuits and her doggedness in tracking down the scholarship that led to Dr. Rowley’s enrollment in Hutchin’s College at age 15 were instrumental in Dr. Rowley’s professional success, it was her father’s hobby of stamp collecting that developed the skills   contributing to Dr. Rowley’s later interest in deciphering the patterns in chromosomal aberrations in cancer.

“My father introduced me to stamp collecting when I was about 10 or 12 and while the stamps looked similar on the surface, there were subtle variations in the engraving or the watermarks, which make the stamps different. Studying those patterns taught me to pay close attention to patterns early on,” said Dr. Rowley.

Named the Blum-Riese Distinguished Service Professor of Medicine, Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology at the University of Chicago in 1984, the university further recognized Dr. Rowley’s scientific accomplishments with the establishment of the Janet Davison Rowley, MD, Professorship in Cancer Research in 2012.

Now, 88, Dr. Rowley interacts actively with colleagues in a laboratory in the Department of Medicine/Section of Hematology/Oncology at the University of Chicago, investigating the expression patterns of microRNA in leukemia cells. ■

---

Même enfant, Janet D. Rowley, MD, a trouvé l'ordre intellectuel et la logique de la science attrayante. Né le 5 Avril 1925, à New York, les parents de M. Rowley, Hurford et Ethel Ballantyne Davison, ont déplacé la famille à Chicago 2 ans plus tard. Les deux éducateurs, les Davisons, ont encouragé leur seul enfant dans ses activités académiques, en particulier dans son intérêt pour la science.

Lorsque la mère de M. Rowley a appris au sujet d'un programme de placement de pointe à l'Université de Hutchins College de Chicago qui a combiné les 2 dernières années de lycée avec les 2 premières années de collège, elle a aidé sa fille à postuler une bourse d'études. Cet événement se révélera être le catalyseur de 7 ans d'association avec l'Université de Chicago et va modifier le cours de la vie professionnelle et personnelle de M. Rowley.

En 1940, à seulement 15 ans, le Dr Rowley a reçu la bourse, et a obtenu un baccalauréat en philosophie en 1944. Deux ans plus tard, elle a obtenu un baccalauréat en sciences et est diplômé de l'école de médecine en 1948. Le lendemain, elle a épousé un compatriote étudiant en médecine Donald Adams Rowley et, après avoir terminé un stage en 1951, elle a commencé à élever une famille qui comptera quatre fils.

Voulant pratiquer la médecine à temps partiel seulement, tandis que ses enfants étaient jeunes, le Dr Rowley a passé trois après-midi par semaine de travail dans une variété de cliniques pour bébé. Plus tard, elle a travaillé dans une clinique de Chicago pour les enfants handicapés mentaux, y compris le syndrome de Down, une maladie génétique causée par un chromosome supplémentaire. Cette expérience conduirait à un changement dans son objectif professionnel de la médecine à la recherche et une étude tout au long de la génétique du cancer.

"En 1959, le pédiatre et généticien français Jérôme Lejeune ont rapporté que le syndrome de Down a résulté de la trisomie 21», a déclaré le Dr Rowley. "Mon mari allait en Angleterre en congé sabbatique, et je ne pouvais pas pratiquer la médecine là-bas, donc je décide que je voudrais apprendre la cytogénétique à l'Université d'Oxford. Je me suis impliqué dans un projet de recherche étudiant la structure de l'acide désoxyribonucléique (ADN) dans les chromosomes humains normaux et anormaux. Le champ était si intéressant, je décidé que je ne voulais pas retourner au travail à la clinique et au lieu voulu continuer à faire de la recherche dans les chromosomes. "

translocations chromosomiques

Lorsque le Dr Rowley est retourné à l'Université de Chicago en 1962, avec le soutien de hématologue Leon Jacobson, MD, elle a continué à travailler sur son projet de recherche tout en obligeant le Dr Jacobson, qui a demandé à M. Rowley de regarder les chromosomes de ses patients atteints de leucémie .

"Le problème dans les années 1960 était que la méthode de coloration des chromosomes a abouti à une tache uniforme et on ne pouvait pas distinguer l'un de l'autre, sauf pour quelques-uns qui avaient des tailles et des formes distinctives. Tout ce que vous pourriez faire était compter et voir s'il y avait 46 chromosomes, plus de 46 ou moins de 46 ", a déclaré le Dr Rowley.

Au début des années 1970, une nouvelle technique de coloration chromosomique appelée baguage est entré en usage. Avec cette méthode, des chromosomes en métaphase sont traités avec de la trypsine et on les colore avec du Giemsa ou avec de la moutarde quinacrine, puis on les examine au microscope à fluorescence pour analyser les chromosomes qui alternent des bandes claires et sombres qui apparaissent tout le long de leur longueur. Le motif de bandes permet l'identification des aberrations chromosomiques. (Aujourd'hui, les techniques cytogénétiques moléculaires telles que la fluorescence hybridation in situ [FISH] sont souvent utilisées pour détecter les anomalies génétiques associées à un cancer).

Dr Rowley a appris la technique de baguage lors de son voyage de retour en Angleterre pendant que son mari achève sa deuxième année sabbatique à l'Université d'Oxford. Quand elle est revenue à Chicago en 1972, le Dr Rowley a utilisé ces connaissances pour réexaminer les diapositives des patients du Dr Jacobson atteints de leucémie myéloïde aiguë (LMA) et a constaté que les chromosomes 8 et 21 ont été brisées et avaient les extrémités commutées. Ce fut la première découverte d'une translocation chromosomique récurrente dans le cancer.

Peu de temps après, M. Rowley a trouvé une autre translocation dans les cellules des patients atteints de leucémie myéloïde chronique (LMC). Cette fois-ci, une extrémité du chromosome 22 a été remplacé par un morceau du chromosome 9, une translocation qui se traduit par le chromosome de Philadelphie vu dans la LMC.

"Avant cette découverte, le chromosome de Philadelphie avait été pensé pour être une suppression, on pensait en biologie que c'était une perte dans l'ADN de la cellule, avec les gènes manquants sur l'ADN impliqué dans la régulation de la croissance cellulaire normale. Montrer que ce n'était pas une suppression, mais était plutôt une translocation a été un événement très important ", a déclaré le Dr Rowley.

Comprendre les anomalies génétiques de la LMC a finalement conduit à la mise au point par Nicholas Lydon, PhD, et Brian Druker, MD, dans les années 1990, de l'inhibiteur de la tyrosine kinase imatinib (Gleevec), qui a été approuvé par la Food and Drug Administration en 2001 pour la le traitement de la LMC.

À la fin des années 1970, le Dr Rowley a identifié un troisième translocation, 15; 17 translocation trouvé dans la maladie rare de leucémie promyélocytaire aiguë (APL). Cette découverte a convaincu le Dr Rowley de l'importance des translocations et l'aida à solidifier le consensus parmi les scientifiques que le cancer est une maladie génétique.

Dr Rowley a été le récipiendaire de nombreux prix, dont le prix de recherche clinique Albert Lasker et la National Medal of Science. En 2009, elle a reçu la Médaille présidentielle de la Liberté, la plus haute distinction civile de la nation. En mai, elle a reçu le prix de l'Albany Medical Center en médecine et en recherche biomédicale avec Peter Nowell, MD, pour son travail qui montre qu'un défaut génétique pourrait être responsable du cancer, et avec le docteur Druker pour le développement de l'imatinib. Les trois scientifiques se partageront le prix de 500.000 $. La part du Dr Rowley servira à financer les études collégiales de ses cinq petits-enfants.

Fascination précoce.

Alors que l'encouragement de Ethel Davison activités académiques de sa fille et de son acharnement à traquer la bourse qui a conduit à l'inscription de M. Rowley College Hutchin à 15 ans ont contribué à la réussite professionnelle du Dr Rowley, le passe-temps de son père était la philatélie, ce qui a développé les compétences contribuant à l'intérêt plus tard de M. Rowley à déchiffrer les motifs des aberrations chromosomiques dans le cancer.

«Mon père m'a présenté à la philatélie quand j'étais environ 10 ou 12 et alors que les timbres ressemblaient à la surface, il y avait des variations subtiles de la gravure ou les filigranes, qui rendent les timbres différents. Étudier ces modèles m'a appris à prêter attention aux modèles tôt ", a déclaré le Dr Rowley.

Nommé professeur de médecine émérite de génétique moléculaire et de biologie cellulaire à l'Université de Chicago en 1984, l'université a également reconnu les réalisations scientifiques du Dr Rowley avec la création de la Janet Davison Rowley, MD, professeur de recherche sur le cancer en 2012 .

Maintenant, à 88 ans, le Dr Rowley interagit activement avec des collègues dans un laboratoire du Département de médecine / Section d'hématologie / oncologie à l'Université de Chicago, pour enquêter sur les profils d'expression de microARN dans les cellules leucémiques. ■

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15768
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Stars de la lutte contre le cancer.(patients mis à part)   Jeu 14 Avr 2016 - 15:56



70 % : ce n’est pas rien! En effet, vous pouvez prévenir de 20 % à 50 % le développement de différents cancers en agissant simplement sur le contenu de vos repas. Si de plus, vous ne fumez pas, vous vous protégez du soleil et vous faites au moins 30 minutes d’exercice physique par jour, votre risque de développer un cancer chute de 70 %. Il en va de même pour la prévention du diabète, des maladies cardiaques et même de l’Alzheimer.

Le 18 juillet dernier, un article s’intitulant LES 30 ALIMENTS conseillés par la science faisait la une du magazine Le Point. C’est au docteur Richard Béliveau, celui qui a inventé le concept de « nutriprévention » et auteur de plus de 250 publications dans des revues médicales internationales, que les journalistes du Point ont fait appel. Il fut interviewé pour leur révéler les plus récentes données concernant l’impact de l’alimentation sur la santé. Voici un très bref aperçu des informations à retenir de ce reportage.

Une étude prospective d’une durée de 8 ans effectuée sur 400 000 Européens vient de confirmer le bien-fondé des 10 règles émises en 2007 par le Fonds mondial de recherche contre le cancer, dont 6 d’entre elles concernent l’alimentation. Mais il ne suffit pas de manger de tout! Parmi les aliments ayant un impact majeur sur la santé, on note les légumes verts, les petits fruits, les crucifères, le thé vert, le curcuma, les agrumes, l’ail et l’oignon. En intégrant ces aliments à notre menu, on prévient le cancer de façon efficace et sans effets secondaires.

Chaque jour notre corps produit 1 million de cellules précancéreuses!

Aussi inquiétant que cela puisse paraître, il s’agit d’une vérité. 30 % des femmes de 40 ans ont des microtumeurs du sein, 40 % des hommes des microtumeurs de la prostate et 98 % de la population des tumeurs de la thyroïde. En consommant des végétaux ayant des propriétés anticancéreuses, anti-inflammatoires, hypoglycémiantes, antioxydantes et hypocholestérolémiantes on empêche ces tumeurs de progresser jusqu’à la maladie.

Dans cet article, Richard Béliveau rappelle que le second facteur de risque de cancer, après la cigarette, est l’obésité. Il décourage la consommation de gras, de sucre et de sel. Ces trois ingrédients nuisibles à la santé sont malheureusement grandement utilisés par l’industrie agroalimentaire. Comme ils ont un pouvoir d’accoutumance, on a tendance à vouloir les consommer en quantité plus grande que nos besoins, ce qui met en danger notre organisme. On doit donc réduire sa consommation de produits industriels. Parmi les autres règles favorisant une santé de fer vous trouverez : ne pas fumer, demeurer mince, manger quotidiennement 7 à 10 fruits, légumes, légumineuses, céréales entières et faire au moins 30 minutes d’exercice chaque jour.

Richard Béliveau termine l’entrevue en expliquant la raison pour laquelle les gens mettent autant de temps à appliquer ces principes : « Quand vous faites de la prévention, vous demandez aux gens de faire des choix maintenant pour un bénéfice à long terme et les obligez à remettre en question leur mode de vie. Le message est pourtant positif : nous pouvons faire de notre alimentation une arme qui nous fait vivre plus longtemps et en meilleure santé! »

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15768
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Stars de la lutte contre le cancer.(patients mis à part)   Ven 8 Avr 2016 - 16:20




The concept of using activation of the innate immune system and an inflammatory response against a bacterial component to instigate an antitumor response was studied in the 1960s, which led to the development of intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guérin, now used in the treatment of superficial bladder cancer. Over the following decades, the promise of immunotherapy ebbed and flowed until a couple of decades ago, when researchers saw promise in T-cell activation, paving the way for a revival of immunotherapy. Today, one of the most exciting areas in immunotherapy is checkpoint blockade.

The ASCO Post recently spoke with James P. Allison, PhD, who received the 2015 Lasker-DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award for his pioneering work in enabling T cells to attack cancer cells by removing “checkpoints” that normally inhibit T-cell activity.

A Career-Changing Period

Please tell the readers a bit about your career and your current position.

I came from a small town in south Texas and received both my bachelor degree and PhD at the University of Texas in Austin. I then did postdoctoral training at the Scripps Clinic in La Jolla, California. I returned to Texas and took my first faculty position at the University of Texas Science Park, which was part of MD Anderson Cancer Center. I stayed there about 8 years. I was actually trained in biochemistry but became interested in immunology—specifically T cells and the complex activation processes—and switched fields.

In 1984, I moved to the University of California, Berkeley, where I became Head of the Immunology Program and Director of the Cancer Research Lab. I continued my work in T cells, and during that work, I began wondering whether T cells could be manipulated in a way to fight cancer cells. It turned out to be a career-changing period.

Although Berkeley was a fantastic place, it didn’t have a clinic, so in 2004, I moved to Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York and was there for almost 10 years. About 3 years ago, I returned to MD Anderson Cancer Center, where I am now Chair of the Immunology Program and Director of the Immunotherapy Platform.

Immunosurveillance

The concept of immunosurveillance was proposed back in the 1950s. What did we learn from this approach that helped move the field forward?

From its inception, the idea of immunosurveillance was quite controversial. It regained favor in the 1960s and then lost support for awhile. The theory suggested that tumors are constantly developing, but they are detected by immune system cells, which can eradicate them; the cancer only recurs when this immune surveillance fails. And now we’ve reached a point where we recognize that the immune system can detect tumors, and we are using this knowledge to further the field.

 

Please discuss the initial investigations on T-cell activation and how they paved the way for the renewed interest in ­immunotherapy.

During my first faculty job, I became very interested in T cells, which could cruise around your body with about 100 million different specific receptors. When a T cell encounters a foreign antigen, it results in T-cell activation, rapid proliferation, and development of the functional capacity to directly kill or make cytokines to help kill the offending cell.

Moreover, we thought that immunotherapy using T cells could cure the problem without killing you in the process. That said, cell communication is a very complicated process, and my first accomplishment was defining the structure of the T-cell antigen receptor at the protein level. It became clear very quickly in work from many labs that the antigen receptor signal by itself was not sufficient to “turn on” a naive T cell. It’s necessary but not sufficient.

Several labs demonstrated that costimulatory factors could only be provided by dendritic cell signals, which were unique in providing that second signal. The question remained: What is that signal? We showed that the receptor on the T cell was a molecule called CD-28. Turning it on required both the T-cell antigen-receptor signal and CD-28 costimulatory signal, at pretty much the same time. Subsequently, other researchers showed that a molecule called B7 was the CD-28 ligand on antigen-presenting cells. Given this finding, it seemed that one of the reasons that tumor cells are virtually invisible is because solid tumors do not provide the costimulatory signal.

There was also a molecule called CTLA-4 with a DNA sequence very homologous to CD-28, but nobody knew what it did, except that it only expressed itself after activation. There was a vigorous race to figure it out. The group that got there first showed that it bound to the same molecule that CD-28 bound to.

The first studies demonstrated that CTLA-4 could not costimulate on itself; however, it could synergize with CD-28 and sustain costimulation to keep the T cells activated. My lab and that of Jeff Bluestone came to the conclusion that the prevailing notion, which was already in textbooks, was backward. Actually the CTLA-4 antibodies were removing the negative signal, resulting in an increase in activity, not providing another positive signal. This finding kicked up some heated negative and positive debates at conferences. It was a lot of fun.

When we got the results, I started thinking about it in the context of tumors, which was a change of focus for me, because I didn’t originally get into this work in cancer therapies; I wanted to know how T cells worked. So, we then knew that tumors didn’t have the second costimulatory ligand, making them essentially invisible to the immune system. So the tumors just kept growing. But by then, we realized that when a T cell gets a costimulatory signal, it initiates its natural propensity to kill things. However, at the same time, the costimulatory signal turns on the CTLA-4 gene, which basically initiates an off switch (or inhibitory program), which will eventually stop the T-cell response and let the tumor continue to grow unmolested by the immune system.

After a lot of thinking on this, I realized that since the tumor has had a head start, maybe the CTLA-4–driven program stops the T cell before it can respond effectively with the tumor. Therefore, setting up a blockade of the CTLA-4 expression, or checkpoint, enhances antitumor T-cell responses and the tumor-rejection process.

Creation of Immune Checkpoint Therapy

How did this concept of checkpoint blockade relate to cancer therapy?

Actually it did so in two ways. First, using a monoclonal antibody therapy doesn’t target the tumor cell specifically but engages a target on the patient’s immune system, giving it the opportunity to have benefit in a wide variety of ­tumors.

Second, this action of not targeting a specific tumor unleashes the immune system by removing the inhibitory pathways. And clinical trials with anti–CTLA-4 showed tumor regression in patients with a host of different tumors, and based largely on this work, the field of immune checkpoint therapy was created.

Raising the Tail of the Survival Curve

Do you have any last thoughts on this exciting line of research?

In melanoma, 22% of patients given ipilimumab (Yervoy) are still alive after 10 years, but what about the other 78% of melanoma patients? And what about patients with other tumors? These are the challenges we are wrestling with daily in the lab. Raising the tail of the survival curve, which is our slogan for getting durable responses and perhaps cures in the largest fraction of our patients, is possible. It’s a huge challenge, but I’m confident it is within reach. ■

Disclosure: Dr. Allison is a licensor of intellectual property and receives royalties from Bristol Myers-Squibb; is founder, a licensor of intellectual property, and scientific advisory board member of Jounce Therapeutics; is a licensor of intellectual property and receives royalties from Merck; is a founder and scientific advisory board member of Neon Therapeutics; and a scentific advisory board member of Kite Pharmaceuticals.

 ---

Le concept d'utiliser l'activation du système immunitaire inné et une réponse inflammatoire contre un composant bactérien pour susciter une réponse antitumorale a été étudiée dans les années 1960, ce qui a conduit à l'élaboration du bacillus intravésicale de Calmette-Guérin, actuellement utilisé dans le traitement du cancer superficiel de la vessie . Au cours des décennies suivantes, la promesse de l'immunothérapie a fluctué jusqu'à ce qu'une vingtaine d'années de maintenant, lorsque les chercheurs ont vu la promesse dans l'activation des cellules T, ouvrant la voie à un renouveau de l'immunothérapie. Aujourd'hui, l'un des domaines les plus passionnants dans l'immunothérapie est le blocus de point de contrôle.

L'ASCO Post a récemment parlé avec James P. Allison, PhD, qui a reçu le Lasker-DeBakey Bourse de recherche clinique médicale 2015 pour son travail de pionnier en permettant aux cellules T d'attaquer les cellules cancéreuses en supprimant les "points de contrôle" qui inhibent normalement l'activité des cellules T.

Une période de changement de carrière.

S'il vous plaît pourriez-vous dire aux lecteurs à propos de votre carrière et de votre position actuelle.

Je viens d'une petite ville dans le sud du Texas et reçu à la fois mon baccalauréat et un doctorat à l'Université du Texas à Austin. J'ai ensuite fait un stage postdoctoral à la Clinique Scripps à La Jolla, en Californie. Je suis retourné au Texas et a pris mon premier poste de professeur à l'Université du Texas Science Park, qui faisait partie du MD Anderson Cancer Center. Je suis resté là environ 8 ans. En fait, j'ai travaillé en biochimie, mais je me suis intéressé à l'activation complexes d'immunologie spécifiquement les cellules T , les processus et les champs commutés.

En 1984, je me suis déplacé à l'Université de Californie, Berkeley, où je suis devenu responsable du programme d'immunologie et directeur du Laboratoire de recherche sur le cancer. Je continuai mon travail dans les cellules T, et pendant ce travail, je me suis demandé si les cellules T peuvaient être manipulées de manière à lutter contre les cellules cancéreuses. ça a été  une période de carrière en évolution.

Bien que Berkeley était un endroit fantastique, il n'y avait pas une clinique, donc en 2004, je me suis déplacé à Sloan Kettering Cancer Center à New York et j'ai été là depuis presque 10 ans. Il y a environ 3 ans, je suis retourné au MD Anderson Cancer Center, où je suis maintenant président du programme d'immunologie et directeur de la plate-forme Immunothérapie.

immunosurveillance

Le concept de immunosurveillance a été proposé dans les années 1950. Qu'avons-nous appris de cette approche et qui a contribué à améliorer ce champs de recherche?

Depuis sa création, l'idée de immunosurveillance était très controversée. Il a repris faveur dans les années 1960, puis a perdu son soutien pendant un certain temps. La théorie suggère que les tumeurs se développent constamment, mais qu'elles sont détectés par les cellules du système immunitaire, ce qui peut les éradiquer; le cancer n'arrive que lorsque cette surveillance immunitaire échoue. Et maintenant, nous avons atteint un point où nous reconnaissons que le système immunitaire peut détecter des tumeurs, et nous utilisons ces connaissances pour faire avancer le domaine.

S'il vous plaît pouvez-vous discuter des enquêtes initiales sur l'activation des cellules T et comment ils ont ouvert la voie pour le regain d'intérêt pour l'immunothérapie.

Au cours de mon premier emploi de la faculté, je suis devenu très intéressé par les cellules T, ce qui pourrait circuler dans votre corps avec environ 100 millions de différents récepteurs spécifiques. Lorsqu'une cellule T rencontre un antigène étranger, il en résulte dans l'activation des lymphocytes T, et leur prolifération rapide, et le développement de la capacité fonctionnelle de tuer ou de faire des cytokines pour aider à tuer la cellule incriminée directement.

De plus, nous avons pensé que l'immunothérapie utilisant des cellules T pourrait guérir le problème sans vous tuer dans le processus. Cela dit, la communication cellulaire est un processus très compliqué, et ma première réalisation a été de définir la structure du récepteur de l'antigène des cellules T au niveau de la protéine. Il est devenu clair très rapidement dans le travail de nombreux laboratoires que le signal de récepteur d'antigène par lui-même ne suffisait pas à "allumer" une cellule T naïve. Il est nécessaire, mais pas suffisant.

Plusieurs laboratoires ont démontré que les facteurs de costimulation ne pourraient être fournis par des signaux de cellules dendritiques, qui étaient uniques en prévoyant un second signal. La question est restée: Qu'est-ce que le signal? Nous avons montré que le récepteur de la cellule T est une molécule appelée CD-28. Passant à la fois sur le signal antigène-récepteur nécessaire des cellules T et CD-28 signal de costimulation, à peu près en même temps. Par la suite, d'autres chercheurs ont montré qu'une molécule appelée B7 est le ligand de CD-28 sur des cellules présentatrices d'antigène. Compte tenu de cette constatation, il semble que l'une des raisons que les cellules tumorales sont pratiquement invisibles est parce que les tumeurs solides ne fournissent pas le signal de costimulation.

Il y avait aussi une molécule appelée CTLA-4 avec une séquence d'ADN très homologue à CD-28, mais personne ne savait ce qu'elle faisait, sauf qu'elle ne s'exprime pas après l'activation. Il y avait une course vigoureuse pour comprendre le phénomène. Le groupe qui y est arrivé d'abord montré qu'elle était liée à la même molécule que le CD-28.

Les premières études ont démontré que CTLA-4 ne pouvait se costimulater elle-même; Cependant, elle le pourrait en synergie avec CD-28 et soutenir la costimulation pour maintenir les cellules T activées. Mon laboratoire et celle de Jeff Bluestone sont venus à la conclusion qu'une idée dominante, qui était déjà dans les manuels scolaires, était en arrière. En fait, les CTLA-4 enlevait le signal négatif, résultant en une augmentation de l'activité, mais ne fournissant pas un autre signal positif. Cette constatation a fait débuté quelques débats positifs et négatifs tr`s chauds à des conférences. C'était très amusant.

Quand nous sommes arrivés aux résultats, je commencé à penser à ce sujet dans le contexte des tumeurs, ce qui était un changement d'orientation pour moi, parce que je ne comprends pas à l'origine ce travail dans les thérapies contre le cancer; Je voulais savoir comment les cellules T ont travaillé. Donc, on connaissait alors que les tumeurs ne fournissent pas le second ligand de costimulation, ce qui les rend pratiquement invisibles pour le système immunitaire. Ainsi, les tumeurs ne cessait de croître. Mais d'ici là, nous avons réalisé que lorsqu'une cellule T reçoit un signal de costimulation, il initie sa propension naturelle à tuer des choses. Cependant, en même temps, le signal de co-stimulation active le gène de CTLA-4, qui déclenche essentiellement un commutateur hors tension (ou un programme d'inhibition), ce qui finit par arrêter la réponse des lymphocytes T et de laisser la tumeur continue à croître sans encombre par le système immunitaire système.

Après beaucoup de réflexion à ce sujet, je réalisai que puisque la tumeur a eu un début rapide, peut-être le programme qui conduit CTLA-4 arrête la cellule T avant qu'elle puisse répondre efficacement à la tumeur. Par conséquent, la mise en place d'un blocus de l'expression de CTLA-4, ou point de contrôle, améliorerait les réponses des lymphocytes T antitumoraux et le processus de rejet tumorale.

La création de la thérapie immunitaire de checkpoint

Comment ce concept de blocus checkpoint se rapporte à la thérapie du cancer?

En fait, il a fait de deux façons. Tout d'abord, en utilisant une thérapie par anticorps monoclonal qui ne cible pas la cellule tumorale spécifique, mais qui implique une cible sur le système immunitaire du patient, ce qui lui donne la possibilité d'avoir des avantages dans une grande variété de tumeurs.

D'autre part, cette action ne va pas cibler une tumeur spécifique qui déclenche le système immunitaire en supprimant les voies inhibitrices. Et les essais cliniques avec anti-CTLA-4 ont montré une régression tumorale chez les patients avec une foule de différentes tumeurs, et basé en grande partie sur ce travail, le domaine de la thérapie de point de contrôle immunitaire a été créé.

Augmenter la queue de la courbe de survie

Avez-vous des dernières pensées sur cette ligne de recherche passionnant?

Dans le mélanome, 22% des patients recevant l'ipilimumab (Yervoy) sont encore en vie après 10 ans, mais qu'en est-il l'autre 78% des patients atteints de mélanome? Et qu'en est-il des patients avec d'autres tumeurs? Ce sont les défis avec lesquels nous sommes aux prises avec tous les jours dans le laboratoire. Élever la queue de la courbe de survie, ce qui est notre slogan pour obtenir des réponses durables et guérit dans la plus grande partie de nos patients est peut-être possible. C'est un énorme défi, mais je suis convaincu qu'il est à portée de main. ■

Divulgation: Le dr. Allison est un concédant de licence de propriété intellectuelle et reçoit des redevances de Bristol Myers-Squibb; est le fondateur, le donneur de licence de la propriété intellectuelle, scientifique et membre du conseil consultatif de Jounce Therapeutics; est un concédant de licence de propriété intellectuelle et reçoit des redevances de Merck; est un fondateur et membre du conseil consultatif scientifique de Therapeutics Neon; et un membre du conseil consultatif scentific de Kite Pharmaceuticals.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15768
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Stars de la lutte contre le cancer.(patients mis à part)   Ven 1 Jan 2016 - 16:24



Emmanuelle Charpentier

La chercheuse Emmanuelle Charpentier est la seule Française au palmarès 2015 du magazine Time des 100 personnalités qui comptent dans le monde. La clé de son succès ? Une découverte médicale qui est déjà en train de révolutionner la médecine de pointe…

Emmanuelle Charpentier est généticienne et biologiste. Elle était inconnue il y a seulement quatre ans, mais aujourd’hui elle est couverte de prix scientifiques. Elle ne savait d’ailleurs pas qu’il en existait autant. Sa découverte ? le CRISPR un acrononyme qui désigne ni plus ni moins que le couteau suisse de la génétique, un outil qui permet d’isoler et de neutraliser un gène.

Au départ c’est un Japonais qui découvre un mécanisme génétique qui permet aux bactéries de se défendre contre les virus. Emmanuelle Charpentier associée à une chercheuse américaine Jennifer Doudna comprend que les bactéries se servent de ce mécanisme comme d’une paire de ciseaux pour isoler l’intrus. Les deux scientifiques développent cet outil et mettent en place une méthode très simple pour le faire intervenir sur n’importe quel ADN.

Grâce à CRISPR, il devient maintenant possible d’élucider le rôle d’un gène, mais aussi de corriger ses défauts dans le cas des maladies génétiques par exemple et pour certains cancers. Des progrès en vue pour la médecine donc, mais aussi la crainte de rendre les manipulations génétiques beaucoup plus faciles. L'Unesco a d'ailleurs demandé cette année un moratoire pour évaluer la portée de ces découvertes.

Emmanuelle Charpentier travaille aujourd’hui à la tête d’un centre de recherche en Allemagne, inabordable et courtisée par le monde scientifique.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15768
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Stars de la lutte contre le cancer.(patients mis à part)   Mer 7 Oct 2015 - 11:24



Le prix Nobel de chimie a été décerné mercredi à un Suédois, un Américain et un Turco-Américain dont les travaux sur la réparation d'un ADN dégradé servent à la recherche contre le cancer.

Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich et Aziz Sancar sont récompensés «pour leur étude de la réparation de l'ADN», qui peut être endommagé par exemple par les rayonnements ultraviolets ou des substances agressives, a expliqué le jury suédois.

Ils ont «cartographié, au niveau moléculaire, la façon dont les cellules réparent l'ADN endommagé et sauvegardent les informations génétiques. Leur travail a fourni une connaissance fondamentale de la manière dont une cellule vivante fonctionne et est, par exemple, utilisé pour le développement de nouveaux traitements du cancer», a-t-il expliqué.

L'ADN (acide désoxyribonucléique, molécule des cellules vivantes) peut être agressé tout au long de la vie, et présenter des lésions qui provoquent des mutations responsables de cancers et accélèrent le vieillissement.

M. Lindahl avait établi au début des années 1970 qu'au rythme auquel l'ADN se dégradait, le monde et la vie sur Terre tel que nous les connaissions ne pourraient pas exister. Par conséquent, l'ADN devait nécessairement avoir un moyen de se réparer: il en a découvert un, la «réparation par excision de base».

Mais «non, je ne crois pas à la vie éternelle», a-t-il dit à la presse qui l'interrogeait mercredi sur le potentiel de cette mécanique.

M. Sancar a identifié un autre processus de défense contre les attaques, la «réparation par excision de nucléotides», cruciale pour préserver notre patrimoine génétique. Si ce processus a des ratés, l'exposition au soleil provoque un cancer de la peau. Il peut aussi «corriger les déficiences causées par les substances mutagéniques», a expliqué le jury.

Ce chercheur est le deuxième Turc à remporter un prix Nobel, après l'écrivain Orhan Pamuk. «On m'a demandé pendant des années et j'étais lassé de l'entendre: quand est-ce que tu vas gagner le prix Nobel? Donc je suis heureux pour mon pays», a-t-il raconté à la Fondation Nobel.

M. Modrich, enfin, a «démontré comment la cellule corrige les erreurs qui interviennent quand l'ADN se réplique durant la division cellulaire». Et ici les déficiences sont par exemple responsables entre autres d'une variété du cancer du côlon transmise par hérédité.

Ancien médecin de campagne

Le destin le plus original est celui d'Aziz Sancar, 69 ans, né à Savur, petite ville du sud-est de la Turquie, au sein d'une famille modeste de huit enfants.

Il aurait pu devenir footballeur professionnel, puisque l'équipe nationale junior pensait à lui comme gardien de but, mais il avait décidé de se concentrer sur ses études. Après avoir exercé comme médecin de campagne en Turquie, il avait repris des études de biochimie à 27 ans, puis rejoint l'université du Texas à Dallas. Il enseigne aujourd'hui à celle de Chapel Hill (Caroline du Nord).

Tomas Lindahl, 77 ans, a fait ses études dans son pays, mais travaille aujourd'hui en Grande-Bretagne, au Francis Crick Institute de Londres et dans son laboratoire Clare Hall dans le Hertfordshire (sud-est).

«C'était une surprise. Je sais qu'au fil des ans j'ai été envisagé pour le prix comme des centaines d'autres», a-t-il déclaré, interrogé au téléphone par le jury.

Paul Modrich, né en 1946, qui a obtenu son doctorat à Stanford (Californie), travaille comme chercheur au Howard Hughes Medical Institute en banlieue de Washington, et est professeur de biochimie à l'université de Duke (Caroline du Nord).

Ayant grandi au Nouveau-Mexique, il était passionné par les changements spectaculaires de paysages et de flore dans le désert. Un professeur de lycée lui avait conseillé en 1963 de s'intéresser à l'ADN, découverte récente.

Chacun obtient un tiers du prix doté de huit millions de couronnes suédoises (plus de 860 000 euros).

En 2014, le prix avait été décerné à deux Américains, Eric Betzig et William Moerner, et un Allemand, Stefan Hell, pour leurs travaux sur la «microscopie à fluorescence à très haute résolution», qui avaient permis de voir l'extrêmement petit.

Le Nobel de chimie est chaque année le dernier décerné en sciences dures. Doivent encore être annoncés les prix de littérature jeudi, de la paix vendredi et d'économie lundi.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15768
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Stars de la lutte contre le cancer.(patients mis à part)   Dim 5 Avr 2015 - 7:31




« À 10 ans, je savais que je voulais être oncologue »
Pour Annick Desjardins, la fascination pour le cerveau et le cancer remonte à la petite enfance.
«À l’âge de 10 ans, je savais déjà que je voulais être oncologue. Mes parents ont toujours fait beaucoup de bénévolat pour la Société canadienne du cancer. On faisait des collectes de fonds, c’était une cause très importante dans ma famille», raconte la scientifique de 40 ans.  
«Lorsque j’ai fait ma médecine, je suis tombée amoureuse de la neurologie. J’ai donc décidé de combiner mes deux passions, la neurologie et l’oncologie».
Du Bic à la Caroline
Originaire de Rimouski, Dre Desjardins a fait ses études de médecine à l’Université Sherbrooke, où elle s’est spécialisée en neurologie.
Elle a ensuite reçu une bourse de recherche en neuro-oncologie de l’université Duke en Caroline du Nord en 2003.
Elle n’est jamais repartie. La faculté lui a offert un emploi avant même la fin de ses études.
«C’était toute une surprise, je devais revenir au Québec après. Tous mes meubles étaient entreposés au Québec. Je ne pouvais pas refuser, c’est tout un honneur de se faire offrir un poste de recherche à Duke. Ici, je peux me dévouer à 100 % au cancer du cerveau, c’est très spécialisé et il n’y a pas de manque de financement pour la recherche».

_________________


Dernière édition par Denis le Sam 2 Juil 2016 - 13:36, édité 2 fois
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15768
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Stars de la lutte contre le cancer.(patients mis à part)   Mar 28 Mai 2013 - 14:11




Patrick Couvreur décroche le Prix de l'inventeur européen
Par Yves Vilagines, journaliste | 28/05/2013

Le biopharmacien, professeur à l’université Paris sud, est récompensé pour ses recherches sur les nano-médicaments. L'Office européen des brevets a dévoilé les six lauréats du Prix de l'inventeur européen 2013.



Imaginez une capsule de 10 nanomètres (soit 0,00001 mm) avec à l'intérieur un médicament. Une fois dans le corps, la capsule délivre son principe actif au plus près de la tumeur dans le cas d'un cancer. A l'avenir, elle pourra être magnétisée afin d'être attirée encore plus près de la zone à traiter. Pour ses recherches dans le domaines des nanomédicaments, Patrick Couvreur, 63 ans, vient de recevoir le Prix l'inventeur européen dans la catégorie Recherche, décerné par l'Office européen des brevets.



Ce Français d'origine belge est professeur à l'université Paris-sud depuis 1984. Bio-pharmacien, éminent spécialiste des nanoparticules, Patrick Couvreur a développé des capsules en acide squalénique. Associées au principe actif utilisé dans le traitement des cancers du pancréas (gemcitabine), ces capsules amènent le traitement au plus près des tissus malades. Le ciblage réduit la dose nécessaire à l'efficacité du traitement, et donc les effets secondaires et les dommages « collatéraux » sur les tissus sains.





Après avoir co-fondé une première entreprise en 1997, Bioalliance, Patrick Couvreur a créé, en 2007, Medsqual, une start-up qui développe les nanomédicaments de nouvelle génération. Les premières phases d'essais cliniques sont concluantes et les autorisations de mise sur le marché sont attendues pour d'ici 2016. Les perspectives des nanomédicaments sont immenses, dans le traitement du cancer mais aussi du VIH et des infections.

_________________


Dernière édition par Denis le Ven 1 Jan 2016 - 16:31, édité 1 fois
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15768
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Stars de la lutte contre le cancer.(patients mis à part)   Dim 6 Jan 2013 - 8:55



En ouverture de l’une des distinctions scientifiques les plus prestigieuses, le prix Nobel de médecine 2012 a été remis conjointement au Britannique John Gurdon et au Japonais Shinya Yamanaka pour « la découverte que les cellules matures peuvent être reprogrammées pour devenir pluripotentes ». En d’autres termes, ils sont récompensés pour avoir montré qu'on pouvait créer des cellules souches à partir de cellules déjà différenciées.

Pas de surprise de la part du Karolinska Institutet, en Suède. Le titre de prix Nobel de médecine 2012 est revenu aux favoris, le Britannique John Gurdon et le Japonais Shinya Yamanaka. Grâce à leurs travaux, pourtant séparés de 45 années, les deux scientifiques ont permis le développement de cellules souches à partir de tissus déjà différenciés. Un bouleversement de notre connaissance et une découverte qui devrait trouver de nombreuses applications en médecine.

L’histoire commence il y a 50 ans. En 1962, John Gurdon suppose que la spécialisation des cellules est réversible. Il entreprend une expérience pionnière : il remplace le noyau d’un ovule de grenouille par celui d’une cellule intestinale, déjà différenciée. À l’époque, on pensait que cela ne pouvait aboutir. Pourtant, l’embryon est devenu un têtard bien vivant. Ainsi, on a pu en déduire que l’ADN de la cellule adulte contenait toujours l’information nécessaire au développement de la grenouille.

La nouvelle fut d’abord très mal perçue par la communauté scientifique. Mais d’autres après lui en arriveront aux mêmes conclusions et prouveront effectivement qu’une cellule différenciée porte toujours en elle les éléments nécessaires pour devenir n’importe quelle autre cellule. La technique, améliorée, conduira plus tardivement au clonage des mammifères.

Des cellules souches à partir de cellules de la peau

La découverte des cellules souches en 1981 par Martin Evans (prix Nobel de médecine 2007) allait de nouveau bouleverser le paysage biologique. Il existe dans l’embryon des cellules immatures capables de devenir n’importe quel tissu de l’organisme, les fameuses cellules souches embryonnaires (CSE). Chez l’Homme, ces cellules ont été mises en évidence en 1998 par l’Américain James Thomson mais posent des problèmes éthiques, car pour les exploiter elles nécessitent la destruction de l’embryon.

Quelques années plus tard, en 2007 dans la revue Cell, une équipe de la Kyoto University (Japon), dirigée par Shinya Yamanaka et en collaboration avec Thomson, a une idée un peu folle : obliger des cellules à faire marche arrière et à redevenir des cellules souches pluripotentes.

Il avait été remarqué auparavant que quelques gènes étaient impliqués dans ce processus. Encore fallait-il les activer comme il fallait. Les chercheurs ont alors testé différentes combinaisons. L’une d’entre elles, nécessitant l’activation de quatre de ces gènes, s’est révélée fructueuse. Ils avaient reprogrammé des cellules différenciées de la peau en cellule souche pluripotente induite (CSPi).

Les CSPi, un rôle clé dans la médecine de demain

Ces découvertes ont profondément changé notre conception du vivant et du pouvoir des cellules : autrefois restreintes à un rôle spécifique, elles s’avéraient dotées de qualités insoupçonnées. Ouvrant par là même un boulevard à la médecine régénérative, celle qui, les scientifiques l’espèrent, permettra un jour de remplacer les organes défaillants par de nouveaux plus jeunes et en pleine santé.

Ainsi, il est en théorie possible d’utiliser ces cellules souches pour recréer n’importe quel tissu, partiellement ou en intégralité. Il reste encore de nombreux obstacles à surmonter pour les scientifiques avant de façonner un organe complet, mais des premières tentatives (que ce soit avec un foie ou un œil) montrent que cela ne relève probablement pas de l’utopie. Les CSPi mises au point par Yamanaka grâce aux travaux antérieurs de Gurdon représentent donc l’avenir de la médecine, évitant le recours aux CSE, et pour toutes les applications qui en découleront à l’avenir, ces deux chercheurs ont été récompensés.


_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
alainp47



Nombre de messages : 337
Age : 51
Localisation : Jonquière
Date d'inscription : 23/12/2012

MessageSujet: Re: Stars de la lutte contre le cancer.(patients mis à part)   Lun 31 Déc 2012 - 21:20


Merci Denis ...c'est une bonne nouvelle, j'espère que cette molécule puisse s'appliquer à plusieurs sortes de cancer et qu'elle sortira le plus tôt possible !

Alain ok
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15768
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Stars de la lutte contre le cancer.(patients mis à part)   Lun 31 Déc 2012 - 12:58

ISERE La personnalité de l'année : Une chercheuse contre le cancer








Comment avez-vous réagi aux résultats de ce vote ?

« Je suis à la fois fière et touchée et je remercie tous ceux qui ont voté. Je ressens aussi une grande responsabilité, cela confirme qu’il y a une vraie attente de la société en ce qui concerne le traitement du cancer. J’ai été nominée, mais j’ai le sentiment qu’à travers moi, c’est l’ensemble de la communauté des chercheurs en biologie et en santé qui est reconnue. Et si je suis aujourd’hui la personne qui communique, il faut rappeler qu’il y a, derrière moi, toute une équipe, dirigée par Marc Billaud, à l’Institut Albert-Bonniot à La Tronche. Et que cette découverte est aussi le résultat d’une collaboration, avec les chercheurs du CNRS, du CEA à Grenoble, et de l’Institut Curie à Paris.

De plus, cette reconnaissance par le “grand public” arrive presqu’un an, jour pour jour, après l’obtention par notre équipe du trophée décerné par le Cancéropôle Lyon-Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes (CLARA), (trophée pour lequel j’avais eu le plaisir d’être à l’honneur dans vos colonnes). »
Quelle est la particularité de cette nouvelle molécule ?

« Cette molécule se nomme “Liminib”. Pour bien comprendre, il faut savoir, qu’au départ, une tumeur résulte d’une multiplication incontrôlée des cellules. Mais elle devient vraiment grave, d’une part quand les cellules s’échappent de la tumeur, pour établir des colonies ailleurs dans le corps – ce qu’on appelle des métastases – et, d’autre part, quand les cellules deviennent résistantes aux chimiothérapies. La molécule que l’on a découverte empêche les tumeurs de grossir et devrait empêcher les métastases de se former. De plus, elle est efficace même sur les cellules résistantes. »
Quelles peuvent être les applications d’une telle découverte ?

« De nouveaux médicaments, actifs sur les cancers résistants et empêchant la formation de métastases constitueraient une percée thérapeutique majeure. »
A quelle échéance peut-on envisager des médicaments pour l’homme ?

« La molécule n’est pas encore applicable à l’homme. Il a déjà fallu dix ans de recherche pour la découvrir. Et il va falloir faire des tests précliniques sur l’animal pour que l’on soit certain qu’il n’y ait pas d’effets collatéraux. Au stade où nous en sommes aujourd’hui, même si la molécule est prometteuse, on est trop en amont pour que des sociétés pharmaceutiques prennent le risque d’ investir dans cette molécule. »
Comment va se dérouler le développement de cette molécule ?

« On a décidé de créer une société baptisée Cellipse. Elle aura pour objectif de pousser le développement jusqu’aux premières études sur l’homme. Et si l’efficacité de notre molécule se confirme, on pourra alors continuer le développement avec l’industrie pharmaceutique.

C’est d’ailleurs, pour moi, l’occasion de rappeler que Grenoble est un bassin efficace pour accompagner pour l’innovation. Cellipse est actuellement incubée à GRAIN (Grenoble-Alpes Incubation) et nous avons eu la chance d’avoir été, tout récemment, lauréats du réseau Isère Entreprendre. »
L’argent est donc aussi déterminant que cela ?

« Oui bien entendu, pour rester compétitive, la recherche a besoin de crédits. Je passe une grande partie de mon temps, comme beaucoup d’autres chercheurs, à faire des demandes de financements extérieurs, auprès d’organismes d’Etat, comme auprès d’associations caritatives. C’est dommage, car tout ce temps passé à remplir des dossiers sur un ordinateur pourrait être beaucoup plus efficacement utilisé derrière “la paillasse”, à réaliser des expériences. »

_________________


Dernière édition par Denis le Lun 6 Avr 2015 - 17:56, édité 1 fois
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15768
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Stars de la lutte contre le cancer.(patients mis à part)   Mar 18 Déc 2012 - 20:37



Le Docteur Karl Peggs est Maître de conférence spécialiste de la transplantation de cellules souches et de l'immunothérapie à l'UCL et Consultant honoraire en hématologie et transplantation des Hôpitaux de l'UCL. C'est à l'Université de Cambridge qu'il a reçu sa formation préclinique ainsi que sa maîtrise. Il a ensuite complété sa formation clinique à Oxford University Medical School. Il a également suivi une formation générale en médecine à Addenbrookes Hospital Cambridge, puis une spécialisation en hématologie au John Radcliffe Hospital à Oxford puis à l'UCLH à Londres. Il a passé trois ans dans le groupe de recherche du professeur Stephen Mackinnon à travailler sur des thérapies cellulaires adoptives contre le cytomégalovirus. Après avoir pris le poste de Maître de conférence à l'UCL en 2003, il a passé deux ans au Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Institute à New York, dans le laboratoire du professeur James Allison à étudier les points de contrôle réglementaires sur des modèles murins.

Ses travaux portent sur la reconstitution du système immunitaire, les thérapies cellulaires adoptives contre des agents pathogènes spécifiques, et la mise au point de contrôles réglementaires de l'immunothérapie dirigée. Il est membre du Comité Leukemia and Lymphoma Research Clinical Trials, administrateur de l'association Teens Unite, et a participé à plusieurs groupes de travail internationaux sur les complications infectieuses et les rechutes suite à des transplantations de cellules souches. Il est en charge de quatre études nationales de type « UKCRN » portant sur le lymphome de Hodgkin et les thérapies cellulaires ciblant le cytomégalovirus.



_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15768
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Stars de la lutte contre le cancer.(patients mis à part)   Ven 14 Déc 2012 - 10:57



Professeur d’oncologie médicale à l’Université Lyon I, Jean-Yves Blay est responsable du département d’oncologie du pôle de recherche translationnelle du Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer (CLCC) Léon Bérard à Lyon.

Pr. Blay est (ou a été) président de l’Organisation Européenne pour la Recherche et le Traitement du Cancer (EORTC).

Il a obtenu son diplôme de médecine de l’UCBL en 1990, spécialisé en oncologie, et son doctorat en 1994. Il a également un DEA en oncologie biologique (Paris VI, 1988), et une maîtrise de statistiques (Paris XI, 1989).

Jean-Yves Blay est un membre actif de la European Society for Medical Oncology de la Connective Tissue Oncology Society, de l‘American Society of Clinical Oncology, de l’American Association for Cancer Research, de l’American Society of Hematology, de la Société Française du Cancer (membre du conseil), de la European Association of Cancer Research.

Il est le co-auteur de plus de 350 publications, investigateur principal sur 6 études cliniques prospectives multicentriques et co-investigateur de nombreux essai cliniques (Phases I, II et III).

Il co-préside le Groupe sarcome français et le réseau national français dédié au sarcome Netsarc (netsarc.org). Pr Blay a été le directeur du réseau de CONTICANET, un programme FP6 (conticabase.org, conticagist.org) et conduit le courant projet FP7 Eurosarc.

Il est le directeur du Site de Recherche Intégrée sur le Cancer de Lyon (SIRIC), l’un des deux sites français de recherche pluridisciplinaire intégrée aujourd’hui labellisés par l’Institut National du Cancer (INCa).

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15768
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Stars de la lutte contre le cancer.(patients mis à part)   Ven 14 Déc 2012 - 10:45



Une sommité mondiale de la recherche sur le cancer.

Patrick Mehlen, jeune chercheur au Centre de lutte contre le cancer Léon-Bérard à l’Université de Lyon, s’est fait connaître en proposant une hypothèse originale sur les récepteurs cellulaires. Celle-ci ouvre une nouvelle approche pour attaquer les tumeurs. Les travaux du Dr Mehlen, publiés dans les plus prestigieux journaux, dont Nature, lui ont valu en 2011 le Prix Bettancourt en sciences biologiques, assorti d’une bourse de 250 000 euros.

_________________


Dernière édition par Denis le Mer 3 Aoû 2016 - 15:03, édité 3 fois
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: Stars de la lutte contre le cancer.(patients mis à part)   Aujourd'hui à 18:11

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
Stars de la lutte contre le cancer.(patients mis à part)
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 1
 Sujets similaires
-
» Associations de lutte contre l'illettrisme
» Le plan de lutte contre les addictions
» Lutte contre les phénomènes sectaires
» UNADFI, passe droit au nom de la lutte contre les "sectes"
» lutte contre le gaspillage

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
ESPOIRS :: Cancer :: Société-
Sauter vers: