AccueilCalendrierFAQRechercherS'enregistrerMembresGroupesConnexion

Partagez | 
 

 La biologie synthétique

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
AuteurMessage
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15768
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: La biologie synthétique   Mer 10 Aoû 2016 - 17:56

Michigan Technological University scientists have developed a process that could lead to stickier -- and better -- gene therapy drugs.

The drugs, called antisense DNA, are made from short, single strands of synthetic DNA. They work by blocking cells from making harmful proteins, which can cause maladies ranging from cancer to Ebola to HIV-AIDS. Only a couple of these synthetic DNA drugs are on the market, but a number are in clinical trials, including a potential treatment for ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease.

Disease organisms can inject harmful proteins into our bodies, and so can mutations in our own genetic material.

When Messenger RNA Goes Rogue

Here's how it works in a nutshell. When all goes well, messenger RNA molecules in our cells produce the good proteins that are essential to life. However, when mutations occur, messenger RNA can go rogue and start making proteins that make us sick.

Drugs made from synthetic DNA are tailored to grab onto these mutant messenger RNA molecules, binding to them and preventing them from churning out toxic proteins. However, a serious shortfall with synthetic DNA is that it can be wimpy. Sometimes it loosens its grip, setting the messenger RNA free to resume its dirty work.

Scientists know how to make synthetic DNA stickier, says Shiyue Fang, a professor of chemistry. One way is to tack on some functional groups of atoms with a partial positive charge, called electrophiles. The electrophiles react with nucleophiles -- groups in the RNA with a partial negative charge. This forms a powerful covalent bond, locking the RNA up for good.

Toxic Ammonia Bath

Unfortunately, the conventional process for making synthetic DNA involves a final bath in ammonia. The ammonia washes away the chemical groups used to assemble synthetic DNA, called linkers and protecting groups -- and it also neutralizes electrophiles. And other processes are expensive, unreliable and can involve toxic materials.

"So far, it's been very difficult to incorporate electrophiles in synthetic DNA," Fang said. "It's been like treating a garden with an herbicide that kills everything."

That's about to change, he said. "Our method just takes out the weeds."

In synthesizing DNA, Fang's group uses different chemicals to make linkers and protecting groups. These chemicals wash away easily in a relatively harmless solution that doesn't destroy electrophiles.

The new process has other advantages: it's cheap and safe, making it ideal for manufacturing life-saving drugs. Plus, it gives a new tool to microbiologists and biochemists, who could use the technique to develop synthetic DNA with a whole array of new properties.

An article on this work, "Synthesis of Oligodeoxynucleotides Containing Electrophilic Groups," was published July 22 in Organic Letters. The coauthors are Fang, PhD graduate Xi Lin, PhD student Shahien Shahsavari, undergraduate Nathanael Green, postdoctoral researchers Jinsen Chen and Deepti Goyal, all of Michigan Tech's Department of Chemistry.


---

Les scientifiques de l'Université technologique du Michigan ont mis au point un processus qui pourrait conduire à des médicaments plus collants de thérapie génique.

Les médicaments, appelés ADN antisens, sont fabriqués à partir de courts brins simples d'ADN synthétique. Ils agissent en bloquant les cellules de fabriquer des protéines nocives, qui peuvent causer des maladies allant du cancer à Ebola au VIH-SIDA. Seul un couple de ces médicaments d'ADN synthétiques sont sur le marché, mais un certain nombre sont dans des essais cliniques, y compris un traitement potentiel pour la SLA, également connue sous le nom de maladie de Lou Gehrig.

Les organismes pathogènes peuvent injecter des protéines nocives dans nos corps, et peuvent ainsi provoquer des mutations dans notre propre matériel génétique.

Lorsque l'ARN messager devient voyou

Voici comment cela fonctionne en un mot. Quand tout va bien, les molécules d'ARN messager dans nos cellules produisent les bonnes protéines qui sont essentielles à la vie. Cependant, lorsque des mutations se produisent, l'ARN messager peut devenir voyou et commencer à faire des protéines qui nous rendent malades.

Les médicaments fabriqués à partir de l'ADN synthétique sont adaptés pour saisir ces molécules d'ARN messager mutants, se lier à elles et les empêchant de baratter des protéines toxiques. Cependant, un grave déficit avec de l'ADN synthétique est qu'il peut être wimpy. Parfois, il desserre son emprise et rend l'ARN messager libre de reprendre son sale travail.

Les scientifiques savent comment faire l'ADN synthétique collantes, dit Shiyue Fang, professeur de chimie. Une façon est de virer de bord certains groupes fonctionnels des atomes avec une charge positive partielle, appelée électrophiles. Les électrophiles réagissent avec des nucléophiles - groupes dans l'ARN avec une charge négative partielle. Cela forme une liaison covalente puissante, qui verrouille l'ARN pour de bon.

Bath Toxique Ammoniac

Malheureusement, le procédé classique pour fabriquer de l'ADN synthétique implique un bain final dans l'ammoniac. L'ammoniac lave les groupes chimiques utilisés pour assembler l'ADN synthétique, appelés linkers et les groupes protecteurs à l'extérieur - et il neutralise également les électrophiles. Et les autres processus sont coûteux, peu fiables et peuvent impliquer des matériaux toxiques.

"Jusqu'à présent, il a été très difficile d'incorporer des électrophiles dans l'ADN synthétique", a déclaré Fang. "ça a été comme le traitement d'un jardin avec un herbicide qui tue tout."

C'est sur le point de changer, dit-il. «Notre méthode s'attaque juste aux mauvaises herbes."

Dans la synthèse de l'ADN, le groupe Fang utilise différents produits chimiques pour faire des linkers et des groupes protecteurs. Ces produits chimiques lavent facilement dans une solution relativement inoffensive qui ne détruit pas électrophiles.

Le nouveau processus a d'autres avantages: il est pas cher et en toute sécurité, ce qui est idéal pour la fabrication de médicaments de sauvetage. De plus, il donne un nouvel outil pour les microbiologistes et les biochimistes, qui pourraient utiliser la technique pour développer l'ADN synthétique avec toute une gamme de nouvelles propriétés.

Un article sur ce travail, «Synthèse des oligodésoxynucléotides contenant des groupes électrophiles," a été publié le 22 Juillet dans Organic Letters. Les co-auteurs sont Fang, PhD diplômé Xi Lin, étudiant au doctorat Shahien Shahsavari, premier cycle Nathanael vert, les chercheurs postdoctoraux Jinsen Chen et Deepti Goyal, tous du Département de Michigan Tech de chimie.


_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15768
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: La biologie synthétique   Jeu 21 Juil 2016 - 17:23




Researchers at the University of California San Diego and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have come up with a strategy for using synthetic biology in therapeutics. The approach enables continual production and release of drugs at disease sites in mice while simultaneously limiting the size, over time, of the populations of bacteria engineered to produce the drugs. The findings are published in the July 20 online issue of Nature.

UC San Diego researchers led by Jeff Hasty, a professor of bioengineering and biology, engineered a clinically relevant bacterium to produce cancer drugs and then self-destruct and release the drugs at the site of tumors. The team then transferred the bacterial therapy to their MIT collaborators for testing in an animal model of colorectal metastasis. The design of the therapy represents a culmination of four previous Nature papers from the UC San Diego group that describe the systematic development of engineered genetic clocks and synchronization. Over the years, the researchers have employed a broad approach that spans the scales of synthetic biology.

The new study offers a therapeutic approach that minimizes damage to surrounding cells.

"In synthetic biology, one goal of therapeutics is to target disease sites and minimize damage," said UC San Diego bioengineering and biology professor Jeff Hasty. He wondered if a genetic "kill" circuit could be engineered to control a population of bacteria in vivo, thus minimizing their growth. "We also wanted to deliver a significant therapeutic payload to the disease site."

In order to achieve this, he and his team synchronized the bacteria to release bursts of known cancer drugs when a bacterial colony self-destructs within the tumor environment. The use of bacteria to deliver cancer drugs in vivo is enticing because conventional chemotherapy doesn't always reach the inner regions of a tumor, but bacteria can colonize there. Importantly, the researchers observed that the combination of chemotherapy and the gene products produced by the bacterial circuit consistently reduced tumor size.

"The new work by Jeff Hasty and team is a brilliant demonstration of how theory in synthetic biology can lead to clinically meaningful advances," said Jim Collins, a professor at MIT who is known as a founder of the field of synthetic biology. "Over a decade ago during the early days of the field, Jeff developed a theoretical framework for synchronizing cellular processes across a community of cells. Now his team has shown experimentally how one can harness such effects to create a novel, clinically viable therapeutic approach."

Limiting the bacterial population

In order to observe the bacterial population dynamics, the researchers designed custom microfluidic devices for careful testing before investigations in animal disease models. Consistent with the engineering design, they observed cycling of the bacterial population that successfully limits overall growth while simultaneously enabling production and release of encoded cargo. When the bacteria were equipped with a gene that drives production of a therapeutic, the synchronized lysis of the bacterial colony was shown to kill human cancer cells. It is the first engineered gene circuit in synthetic biology to achieve these objectives.

"In this paper, we describe a circuit that contains a gene that codes for a small molecule that can diffuse between cells and can turn on genes," said Omar Din, the paper's lead author and a UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering bioengineering Ph.D. student in Hasty's research group. "Once the population grows to a critical size -- a few thousand cells -- there's a high-enough concentration of that molecule present in the cells to cause mass transcription of the genes behind the promoter."

The molecule, AHL, is known to coordinate gene expression across a colony of bacterial cells. Once on, the genes driven by the promoter are also activated, including the AHL-producing gene itself. Thanks to this positive feedback loop, the more AHL accumulates, the more it is produced. Because AHL is small enough to diffuse between cells and turn on the promoter in neighboring cells, the genes activated by it would also be produced in high amounts, leading to a phenomenon known as quorum sensing. Bacteria use quorum sensing to communicate with each other about the size of their population, and regulate gene expression accordingly. Scientists have used this natural ability of bacteria extensively as a tool.

Din used quorum sensing as an engineering tool to synchronize the cells and then added a kill gene that causes cells to break open (lyse) when a bacterial colony grows to a threshold. After the mass self-destruction event, a few cells remain to repopulate the colony and the resulting population dynamics are cyclical.

"The lysis circuit was originally conceived for use as an aquatic biosensor, but it subsequently became clear that an exciting application could be the coordinated release of drugs when bacteria lyse in vivo," Hasty said.

Watch a video showing the programmed cycles of bacterial drug delivery.

Finding the right drug combination

Next, the researchers needed to find the right drug for delivery by the bacteria. They tested three different therapeutic proteins that had been shown to shrink tumors. The tests showed that the proteins were most effective when combined. They placed the genes responsible for these proteins in the circuit along with the lysis gene. They then conducted experiments with HeLa cells that showed enough protein was produced to kill cancer cells.

The testing of the therapy in mice was carried out by UC San Diego bioengineering alumnus Tal Danino while he was a postdoctoral researcher in Sangeeta Bhatia's research group at MIT. Danino is now a professor at Columbia University.

The bacteria were first injected into mice with a grafted subcutaneous tumor. This mouse model was used to visualize the bacterial population in vivo and observe their dynamics. The result was a decrease in tumor size. Danino then used a more advanced mouse model with liver metastases, where bacteria were fed to the mice. After testing a combination of the engineered bacteria and chemotherapy with this model, the researchers found that the combined therapy prolonged survival of the mice over either therapy administered alone. The researchers note that this new approach has not yet cured any mice. They did find that the therapy led to around a 50 percent increase in life expectancy, but it's difficult to anticipate how this would translate to humans. Taken together, the experiments in mice establish a proof-of-principle for using the tools of synthetic biology to engineer 'tumor-targeting' bacteria to deliver therapeutic proteins in vivo.

Developing a strategy

The new Nature paper shows the use of quorum sensing to limit bacterial population growth and release drugs. In previous Nature papers, the Hasty lab has shown how engineered cellular oscillations can be coordinated within a bacterial colony and even between thousands of interacting colonies.

"This paper describes a highly innovative strategy employing synthetic biology to weaponize bacteria," said Bert Vogelstein, Director of the Ludwig Center at Johns Hopkins University and pioneer in the field of cancer genomics. "The authors show that these bacteria can be used to slow the growth of tumors growing in mice. Though much further work will be required to make this therapy applicable to humans, it's just the kind of new, forward-thinking approach that we desperately need if we are to more effectively combat cancer."

Next possible steps include investigating the natural presence of bacteria in tumors and then engineering these bacteria for use in vivo and using multiple strains of bacteria to form a therapeutic community.

"Additionally, we are currently investigating methods for maintaining the circuit inside bacteria," said Din. "Since the proteins produced by the circuit put a burden on the bacteria, the bacteria are prone to mutate these genes. Additionally, there is a selection pressure to get rid of the plasmids which harbor the genes comprising the circuit. Thus, one of our future research aims is to identify strategies for stabilizing the circuit components in bacteria and decreasing their susceptibility to mutations."


---

Des chercheurs de l'Université de Californie à San Diego et le Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) ont mis au point une stratégie pour l'utilisation de la biologie synthétique en thérapeutique. L'approche permet une production continue et une libération de médicaments sur les sites de la maladie chez la souris tout en limitant la taille, au fil du temps, des populations de bactéries modifiées pour produire les médicaments. Les résultats sont publiés dans le Juillet 20 exemplaire en ligne de Nature.

Les chercheurs UC San Diego dirigé par Jeff Hasty, professeur de bioingénierie et de la biologie, conçus une bactérie cliniquement pertinente pour produire des médicaments anticancéreux et puis s'auto-détruire pour libérer les médicaments sur le site des tumeurs. L'équipe a ensuite transféré la thérapie bactérienne à leurs collaborateurs du MIT pour les tests dans un modèle animal de la métastase colorectal. La conception de la thérapie représentant l'aboutissement de quatre documents de nature précédents du groupe UC San Diego qui décrivent le développement systématique des horloges génétiques d'ingénierie et de synchronisation. Au fil des ans, les chercheurs ont utilisé une approche globale qui couvre les échelles de la biologie synthétique.

La nouvelle étude offre une approche thérapeutique qui minimise les dommages aux cellules environnantes.

"En biologie synthétique, un but de la thérapeutique est de cibler les sites de la maladie et de minimiser les dommages", a déclaré l'UC San Diego bioingénierie et professeur de biologie Jeff Hasty. Il se demande si un "kill" circuit génétique pourrait être conçu pour contrôler une population de bactéries in vivo, minimisant ainsi leur croissance. "Nous voulions aussi offrir une charge utile thérapeutique importante pour le site de la maladie."

Afin d'y parvenir, lui et son équipe ont synchronisé les bactéries pour libérer des éclats de médicaments anticancéreux connus quand une colonie bactérienne s'auto-détruit dans l'environnement de la tumeur. L'utilisation de bactéries pour délivrer des médicaments contre le cancer in vivo est attrayante parce que la chimiothérapie conventionnelle ne parvient pas toujours dans les régions intérieures d'une tumeur, mais les bactéries peuvent y coloniser. Surtout, les chercheurs ont observé que l'association de la chimiothérapie et des produits des gènes produits par le circuit bactérien réduit de façon consistante la taille de la tumeur.

"Le nouveau travail de Jeff Hasty et l'équipe est une brillante démonstration de la façon dont la théorie en biologie synthétique peut conduire à des progrès significatifs sur le plan clinique», a déclaré Jim Collins, professeur au MIT qui est connu comme un des fondateurs du domaine de la biologie synthétique. "Il y a plus d'une décennie au cours des premiers jours du terrain, Jeff a développé un cadre théorique pour la synchronisation de processus cellulaires à travers une communauté de cellules. Maintenant, son équipe a montré expérimentalement comment on peut exploiter de tels effets pour créer une nouvelle approche thérapeutique cliniquement viable. "

Limitation de la population bactérienne

Afin d'observer la dynamique des populations bactériennes, les chercheurs ont conçu des dispositifs microfluidiques personnalisé pour un contrôle minutieux avant d'enquêter dans des modèles de maladies animales. Conformément à la conception technique, ils ont observé le cyclisme de la population bactérienne qui limite avec succès la croissance globale tout en permettant simultanément la production et la libération de la cargaison codée. Lorsque les bactéries ont été équipés d'un gène qui entraîne la production d'un agent thérapeutique, la lyse synchronisée de la colonie bactérienne a  démontré pouvoir tuer des cellules cancéreuses humaines. C'est le circuit de premier gène d'ingénierie en biologie synthétique à atteindre ces objectifs.

"Dans cet article, nous décrivons un circuit qui contient un gène qui code pour une petite molécule qui peut diffuser entre les cellules et peut allumer les gènes», a déclaré Omar Din, auteur principal de l'article et Jacobs School UC San Diego of Engineering bioingénierie Ph .RÉ. étudiant dans le groupe de recherche de Hasty. "Une fois que la population croît à une taille critique - quelques milliers de cellules - il y a une concentration suffisamment élevée de cette molécule présente dans les cellules pour provoquer la transcription de masse des gènes à l'origine du promoteur."

La molécule AHL, est connu pour coordonner l'expression génique dans une colonie de cellules bactériennes. Une fois parti, les gènes entraînés par le promoteur sont également activés, y compris le gène de la AHL qui se produit elle-même donc. Merci à cette boucle de rétroaction positive, plus AHL accumule, plus elle est produite. Parce que AHL est assez petit pour diffuser entre les cellules et allumer le promoteur dans les cellules voisines, les gènes activés par elle seront également produits en grandes quantités, ce qui conduit à un phénomène connu sous le nom de quorum sensing. Les bactéries utilisent le quorum sensing à communiquer entre eux au sujet de la taille de leur population pour réguler l'expression des gènes en conséquence. Les scientifiques ont utilisé cette capacité naturelle de bactéries largement comme un outil.

Din a utilisé le quorum sensing comme un outil d'ingénierie pour synchroniser les cellules, puis ajouté un gène kill qui provoque des cellules à se briser quand une colonie bactérienne se développe à un seuil. Après l'événement d'auto-destruction massive, quelques cellules restent à repeupler la colonie et la dynamique des populations résultant est cyclique.

"Le circuit de lyse a été initialement conçu pour être utilisé comme un biocapteur aquatique, mais il est ensuite devenu clair qu'une recherche passionnante pourrait être la libération coordonnée des médicaments lorsque les bactéries lyses sont in vivo," dit Hasty.


Ensuite, les chercheurs ont besoin de trouver le bon médicament pour la livraison par les bactéries. Ils ont testé trois protéines thérapeutiques différentes qui ont été démontrés comme réduisant  les tumeurs. Les tests ont montré que les protéines étaient plus efficaces lorsqu'elles sont combinées. Ils ont placé les gènes responsables de ces protéines dans le circuit en même temps que le gène de lyse. Ils ont ensuite effectué des expériences avec des cellules HeLa qui ont montré que assez de protéine a été produite pour tuer les cellules cancéreuses.

Les essais de la thérapie chez la souris a été réalisée par l'UC San Diego bioingénierie ancien Tal Danino alors qu'il était chercheur postdoctoral dans le groupe de recherche de Sangeeta Bhatia au MIT. Danino est maintenant professeur à l'Université de Columbia.

Les bactéries ont d'abord été injectées dans des souris avec une tumeur sous-cutanée greffée. Ce modèle de souris a été utilisé pour visualiser la population bactérienne in vivo et observer leur dynamique. Le résultat a été une diminution de la taille de la tumeur. Danino a ensuite utilisé un modèle de souris plus avancé avec métastases hépatiques, où les bactéries ont été développé dans la souris. Après avoir testé une combinaison des bactéries d'ingénierie et de chimiothérapie avec ce modèle, les chercheurs ont constaté que la thérapie prolongeait la survie des souris après soit une thérapie administrée seule soit la thérapie combinée. Les chercheurs notent que cette nouvelle approche n'a pas encore guéri des souris. Ils ont pu constater que la thérapie a conduit à une augmentation d'environ 50 pour cent de l'espérance de vie, mais il est difficile de prévoir comment cela se traduirait pour les humains. Pris ensemble, les expériences chez la souris établissent une preuve de principe pour l'utilisation des outils de la biologie synthétique pour concevoir «ciblage tumoral avec des bactéries pour délivrer des protéines thérapeutiques in vivo.

Élaboration d'une stratégie

Le nouveau document de "Nature" montre l'utilisation de la détection du quorum sensing pour limiter la croissance de la population de bactéries.

"Ce document décrit une stratégie très novatrice utilisant la biologie synthétique pour se servir des bactéries comme arme", a déclaré Bert Vogelstein, directeur du Centre Ludwig à l'Université Johns Hopkins, un pionnier dans le domaine de la génomique du cancer. "Les auteurs montrent que ces bactéries peuvent être utilisées pour ralentir la croissance des tumeurs à croissance chez la souris. Bien que beaucoup d'autres travaux seront nécessaires pour faire que ce traitement soit applicable à l'homme, c'est justement le genre d'approche nouvelle, avant-gardiste dont nous avons désespérément besoin si nous voulons lutter plus efficacement contre le cancer ".

Les prochaines étapes possibles comprennent rechercher la présence naturelle de bactéries dans les tumeurs et l'ingénierie de ces bactéries pour une utilisation in vivo et l'utilisation de plusieurs souches de bactéries pour former une communauté thérapeutique.

"De plus, nous étudions actuellement des méthodes pour maintenir le circuit à l'intérieur des bactéries", a déclaré Din. "Etant donné que les protéines produites par le circuit mettent un fardeau sur les bactéries, les bactéries sont sujettes à muter ces gènes. De plus, il y a une pression de sélection pour se débarrasser des plasmides qui abritent les gènes compris dans le circuit. Ainsi, l'un de nos la recherche future vise à identifier des stratégies pour stabiliser les composants du circuit dans les bactéries et diminuer leur sensibilité aux mutations ".


_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15768
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: La biologie synthétique   Ven 1 Juil 2016 - 19:39

Mise à jour, l'article date de 2015

Steven Benner est un des fondateur de ce champ de recherche. Il a crée le Westheimer Institute of Science and Technology et la Foundation for Applied Molecular Evolution (FfAME). Il participe à deux start-up(s) qui en proposent des applications dans certains domaines, notamment en thérapeutique. On objectera que son point de vue risque de perdre l'objectivité scientifique nécessaire au profit de certains intérêts économiques. Mais il va de soi que l'objection ne peut être reçue, dans le cadre de cet article. Les bases théoriques de ses travaux font en effet l'objet d'une large diffusion dans le monde académique.

Steven Benner rappelle dans son article des points que les biologistes évolutionnistes et les généticiens, ne fussent-ils pas experts en biologie synthétique, ne contestent pas. La plupart des hypothèses concernant les premières formes de vie sur Terre admettent que celles-ci se sont initialement développées à partir de ce qui a été nommé un « monde de l'ARN » (DNA world).

Initialement l'ADN qui est à la base de tous les mécanismes génétiques n'existait pas. Sa structure était trop complexe pour avoir été « inventée » par les premières formes de vie. Il s'est progressivement développé, sur le mode darwinien, à partir des molécules d'ARN qui constituait les seules formes d'information génétique existantes, notamment chez les virus.

L'ADN, que chaque géniteur transmet à sa descendance, est indispensable pour permettre à l'embryon de produire les différentes variétés de protéines indispensables au métabolisme. Mais compte tenu de son peu d'efficacité en ce domaine, l'ADN fait appel à l'ARN pour catalyser les réactions chimiques nécessaires. On parle d'ARN messager pour désigner les molécules d'ARN qui, à travers une structure cellulaire spécifique, le ribosome, vont faire ce travail. Le ribosome est un mélange d'ARN et de protéines et joue le rôle de machine moléculaire nécessaire à la fabrication des milliers de protéines utilisées par les cellules pour remplir leur rôle dans l'organisme.

L'ARN n'agit pas seulement à travers les ribosomes, structures complexes n'existant pas dans les cellules primitives. On le rencontre aujourd'hui partout en biologie pour aider les protéines à catalyser les réactions métaboliques nécessaires à la vie. Si cependant l'ARN est généralement remplacée par l'ADN dans les grands processus biologiques, c'est qu'il n'est pas une molécule stable et d'autre part ne comporte pas assez d'éléments pour être un catalyseur efficace.

Les mécanismes darwiniens considérés comme facteurs essentiels de l'évolution biologique ont fait que l'invention, sans doute par hasard, de l'ADN par certaines cellules a donné à ces cellules un avantage compétitif considérable, faisant ainsi disparaitre le monde de l'ARN primitif. L'ARN n'a survécu que comme vestige, limité essentiellement au rôle de messager à travers les ribosomes.



Imaginer d'autres formes de vie

Si l'on s'interroge sur ce qu'aurait pu être l'évolution de la vie sur Terre sans l'apparition de l'ADN, sous la seule action de l'ARN, ou sur ce que pourraient être des formes exobiologiques (existant sur d'autres planètes) n'ayant pas « inventé » « l'ADN, toutes les suppositions sont possibles concernant ces formes de vie. On pourrait, à une autre échelle, se demander quelles auraient été les espèces animales si certaines d'entre elles n'avaient pas « inventé » l'aile. Elles n'auraient pas disparu pour autant, mais elles se seraient développées en s'adaptant aux seuls milieux terrestres et maritimes.

Pour limiter l'exploration du champ des possibles, le laboratoire de Steven Benner a montré que l'ARN aurait pu évoluer différemment de ce qu'il a fait dans l'histoire de la vie. L'ARN (cf wikipedia référencé ci-dessous) ne comporte que quatre bases nucléiques, l'adénine, la guanine, la cytosine et l'uracile. Il a de nombreuses similitudes avec l'ADN, avec cependant quelques différences importantes : d'un point de vue structurel, l'ARN contient des résidus de ribose là où l'ADN contient du désoxyribose, ce qui rend l'ARN chimiquement moins stable, tandis que la thymine de l'ADN y est remplacée par l'uracile, qui possède les mêmes propriétés d'appariement de base avec l'adénine. Sur le plan fonctionnel, l'ARN se trouve le plus souvent dans les cellules sous forme monocaténaire, c'est-à-dire de simple brin, tandis que l'ADN est présent sous forme de deux brins complémentaires formant une double-hélice.

Enfin, les molécules d'ARN présentes dans les cellules sont plus courtes que l'ADN du génome, leur taille variant de quelques dizaines à quelques milliers de nucléotides, contre quelques millions à quelques milliards de nucléotides pour l'acide désoxyribonucléique. Par ailleurs, dans la cellule telle qu'elle a résulté de l'évolution, l'ARN est produit par transcription à partir de l'ADN situé dans le noyau. L'ARN est donc une copie d'une région de l'un des brins de l'ADN.

Cependant rien n'interdit de penser qu'un ARN comportant un plus grand nombre de bases nucléiques, lesquelles auraient pu résulter d'un appariement différent entre nucléotides, n'aurait pu apparaître. Il aurait pu en ce cas devenir un aussi bon catalyseur que l'ADN, produisant donc autant sinon davantage de protéines. L'ADN serait resté nécessaire, du fait de sa grande stabilité, mais de nouveaux métabolismes, et donc finalement de nouveaux types de cellules et d'organismes ; auraient pu apparaître.

La biologie synthétique

On ne peut évidemment pas en laboratoire reconstruire une évolution hypothétique qui, sur des bases biologiques différentes, se seraient déroulées pendant des millions d'années. Mais la toute récente biologie synthétique pourrait en principe le faire. Elle peut dorénavant produire en laboratoire des ARN et ADN de synthèse utilisant des alphabets génétiques plus larges que ceux de leurs homologues naturels. Il est possible de provoquer par ailleurs des processus évolutifs considérablement accélérés. Autrement dit, il devient possible de reproduire en laboratoire le cycle darwinien bien connu : mutation, compétition, sélection et expansion, fut-ce encore à très petite échelle.

Ceci ne veut pas dire qu'à horizon prévisible la biologie darwinienne synthétique puisse faire apparaître de nouvelles espèces, par exemple comportant une douzaine de paires d'ailes. Mais elle a pu déjà produire, dans le laboratoire de Steven Benner, en collaboration avec une équipe dirigée par Weihong Tan à l'université de Floride, des molécules nouvelles ayant la propriété de se lier à des cellules cancéreuses de façon à mieux les combattre.

Sur d'autres planètes, il serait possible d'imaginer que des formes de vie ayant évolué dans un monde exclusivement à ARN auraient pu naitre et se développer de façon darwinienne, sans avoir besoin de protéines. En ce cas, elles pourraient être si différentes de la vie telle que nous la connaissons que les premiers explorateurs pourraient les côtoyer sans, au moins dans un premier temps, les identifier comme vivantes.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15768
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: La biologie synthétique   Jeu 2 Juin 2016 - 18:49

Two decades ago we learned to “read” the human genome – the entire three-billion-letter DNA recipe for life coiled in the human chromosomes. Now scientists want to start writing it.

A $100 million global consortium has been proposed, to devise ways to assemble human DNA in the laboratory so as to better understand how it works, and look for new ways of treating disease and saving lives.

So far, the scientists in question haven’t the technology, the money, or the public support. But a proposal launched in the journal Science, led by Jef Boeke of the New York University Langone Medical Centre and colleagues, aims explicitly to tell citizens and taxpayers what they hope to do, and why, and encourage public interest and involvement.

The original project to sequence the entire human genome was conceived 30 years ago as a slow, costly, once-only mission: biology’s version of the Apollo moon landings. The full sequence was published in in 2003.

But dramatic advances in robotics, computing and molecular biology now mean that biologists have astonishing amounts of information not just about what DNA spells out for conception, development, reproduction and disease in humans, but in hundreds of microbes, crop plants, laboratory and domestic animals, reptiles and insects. They can sequence DNA, analyse it, and edit it in relatively small lengths. They have been manipulating DNA in the biotechnology industry for 40 years.

But they don’t yet know how to put a lot of DNA together to see how a complex organism works.

The scientists write that they want to be able to do so with public support and within an ethical and legal framework for what would be synthetic human biology. They do not aim to synthesise a human, but to understand how human genes work together in cells in a laboratory dish.

“The major benefit is an enhanced understanding of things like chromosome structure and how the genome works – it is a basic understanding effort in the same way as sequencing the human genome has given us a huge amount of information, and thrown up some surprises,” said Susan Rosser, one of the signatories, and who holds the chair of synthetic biology at Edinburgh University.

“There is no question of humans being made – we are simply talking about cell lines and pieces of DNA.”

Synthetic biology is not new: in 2010 the scientist-entrepreneur Craig Venter who helped accelerate the human genome project announced that his team had after years of effort, synthesised a simple life form. In March 2016 he announced the completion of an organism with what he said were the minimum number of genes necessary to sustain life.

His creation replicated itself in a laboratory dish with just 473 genes. And, he said at the time, what was humbling was that the organism’s own creators had no idea what a third of those genes did.

But humans have more than 20,000 genes. The backers of the new project – dubbed the Human Genome Project–Write (HGP-Write) to distinguish it from the original HGP-Read – propose hugely ambitious and technologically challenging projects such as the construction of a human chromosome, or the making of a human cancer genotype. They want to experiment with the biological machinery of virus resistance or genes, that could suppress tumour formation, and they want to work out how to do it cheaply.

One unexpected aspect of the human genome sequence was that only 2% of the genetic sequence actually codes for genes that make proteins, said Paul Freemont, co-director of the Centre for Synthetic Biology at Imperial College in London. This left 98% of the genome sequence unaccounted for.

“The human genome synthesis project is a natural extension of this project in that by synthesising the human genome we will be able to uncover what the ‘dark matter’ in the human genome does and why we have it,” he said.

But his colleague Tom Ellis was not so sure. “I should say that for synthesising the complete human genome I am still on the fence. I am not particularly sold on it yet. While we will probably learn a lot from it and it will drive the technologies, I don’t see an obvious use for it at the end when we are done.”

But he would prefer to see it done by a team of academics rather than individuals who might claim patents.

“The idea of discussing it and coming to some sort of ethical and technological standards before anyone starts work on this, I really like the idea of.”


---

Il y a deux décennies, nous avons appris à «lire» le génome humain - l'ensemble de la recette de l'ADN de trois milliards de lettres de la vie lové dans les chromosomes humains. Maintenant, les scientifiques veulent commencer à l'écrire.

Un consortium mondial de 100 millions $ a été proposé, pour trouver des moyens pour assembler l'ADN humain en laboratoire afin de mieux comprendre comment il fonctionne, et chercher de nouvelles façons de traiter la maladie et sauver des vies.

Jusqu'à présent, les scientifiques en question n'ont pas la technologie, l'argent, ou le soutien public. Mais une proposition lancée dans la revue Science, dirigé par Jef Boeke de l'Université Centre médical Langone de New York et ses collègues, vise explicitement à dire aux citoyens et aux contribuables ce qu'ils espèrent faire, et pourquoi, et d'encourager l'intérêt public et la participation.

Le projet initial de séquencer l'ensemble du génome humain a été conçu il y a 30 ans comme une lente, coûteuse mission qui ne serait accomplie qu'une seule fois: la version de la biologie des alunissages d'Apollo. La séquence complète a été publiée en 2003.

Mais les progrès spectaculaires dans la robotique, l'informatique et la biologie moléculaire aujourd'hui signifie que les biologistes ont des quantités étonnantes d'information non seulement sur ce que l'ADN précise pour la conception, le développement, la reproduction et de la maladie chez l'homme, mais pour des centaines de microbes, plantes cultivées,  les animaux domestiques et de laboratoire, les reptiles et les insectes. Ils peuvent séquencer l'ADN, l'analyser, et de le modifier en relativement petites longueurs. Ils ont manipulé l'ADN dans l'industrie de la biotechnologie depuis 40 ans.

Mais ils ne savent pas encore comment mettre beaucoup d'ADN ensemble pour voir comment un organisme complexe fonctionne.

Les scientifiques écrivent qu'ils veulent être en mesure de le faire avec le soutien du public et dans un cadre éthique et juridique pour ce qui serait la biologie humaine synthétique. Ils ne visent pas à synthétiser un être humain, mais de comprendre comment les gènes humains travaillent ensemble dans des cellules dans un plat de laboratoire.

«Le principal avantage est une meilleure compréhension des choses comme la structure des chromosomes et comment le génome fonctionne - C'est un effort de compréhension de base de la même manière que le séquençage du génome humain nous a donné une énorme quantité d'informations, et jeté quelques surprises," dit Susan Rosser, l'un des signataires, et titulaire de la chaire de biologie synthétique à l'Université d'Edimbourg.

"Il n'est pas question de faire un homme - nous parlons simplement des lignées cellulaires et des morceaux d'ADN."

La biologie synthétique n'est pas nouvelle: en 2010, le chercheur-entrepreneur Craig Venter qui a contribué à accélérer le projet du génome humain a annoncé que son équipe avait, après des années d'efforts, synthétisé une forme de vie simple. En mars 2016, il a annoncé l'achèvement d'un organisme avec ce qu'il a dit était le nombre minimal de gènes nécessaires à la vie.

Sa création se reproduit dans un plat de laboratoire avec seulement 473 gènes. Et, a-t-il dit à l'époque, ce qui a été une leçon d'humilité était que les propres créateurs de l'organisme n'avaient aucune idée de ce que un tiers de ces gènes fait.

Mais les humains ont plus de 20.000 gènes. Les bailleurs de fonds du nouveau projet - baptisé le Projet du génome humain-Write (HGP-Write) pour la distinguer de l'original HGP-Read - proposer des projets extrêmement ambitieux et technologiquement difficiles telles que la construction d'un chromosome humain, ou la réalisation d'un le génotype du cancer humain. Ils veulent expérimenter avec la machinerie biologique la résistance des virus ou des gènes, qui pourraient supprimer la formation de la tumeur, et ils veulent travailler sur la façon de le faire à moindre coût.

Un aspect inattendu de la séquence du génome humain était que seulement 2% de la séquence génétique code pour les gènes qui font  les protéines, a déclaré Paul Freemont, co-directeur du Centre pour la biologie synthétique à l'Imperial College à Londres. Cela a laissé 98% de la séquence du génome portée disparue.

"Le projet de synthèse du génome humain est une extension naturelle de ce projet, en synthétisant le génome humain, nous serons en mesure de découvrir ce qu'est la« matière noire » dans ce que le génome humain fait et pourquoi nous l'avons» dit-il.

Mais son collègue Tom Ellis n'était pas si sûr. "Je dois dire que pour la synthèse du génome humain complet, je suis toujours sur la clôture. Je ne suis pas particulièrement encore vendu à l'idée. Alors que nous allons probablement apprendre beaucoup de cela et que ça va conduire à des technologies nouvelles, je ne vois pas une utilisation évidente pour  le génome synthétique à la fin quand nous aurons fini. "

Mais il préférerait que cela se fasse par une équipe d'universitaires plutôt que des personnes qui pourraient prétendre à des brevets.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15768
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: La biologie synthétique   Ven 28 Nov 2014 - 12:39

Plusieurs consortiums internationaux ont été créés pour dresser une carte moléculaire des cancers. Il s'agit d'abord d'établir une cartographie de l’ARN, ces petites molécules issues de la transcription du génome et servant ensuite de matrice à la formation des protéines. Ce "transcriptome" permet de mesurer l’activité des gènes. Or, comme le cancer se développe en utilisant une dérégulation d’un certain nombre de gènes, le transcriptome apporte des informations précieuses sur les cellules malades et leur environnement.

"Grâce à de nouveaux modèles mathématiques, nous avons "relu" avec un œil neuf certaines des données de transcriptome obtenues par nos équipes et celles d’autres laboratoires, et les avons associées à d’autres données moléculaires et aux données cliniques", explique François Radvanyi, chef de l’équipe Oncologie moléculaire (CNRS UMR 144 / Institut Curie).

"Ces travaux ont porté sur les données de 6671 tumeurs dans 9 cancers différents et ont permis d' identifier leurs points communs et les spécificités des cancers de la vessie", souligne Andrei Zinovyev, coordinateur de l’étude mathématique Unité Cancer et génome Inserm U900 / Institut Curie. Ainsi, les chercheurs ont clairement défini et caractérisé deux sous-types de cancers de la infiltrant le muscle. Cette forme invasive des cancers de la vessie représente 40 % à 50 % des 12 000 nouveaux cas de cancer de la vessie diagnostiqués en 2012. Ces tumeurs qui ont déjà infiltré le muscle de la vessie sont de mauvais pronostics.

Ces recherches font émerger une autre vision de la classification tumorale, jusqu’à présent principalement basée sur la localisation des cancers. Si la localisation tumorale reste un critère majeur de la prise en charge, il devient essentiel d’intégrer les paramètres biologiques et les spécificités des différents sous-groupes tumoraux dans les analyses, dans le but de rechercher de nouvelles voies thérapeutiques.

Article rédigé par Georges Simmonds pour RT Flash

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15768
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: La biologie synthétique   Mer 5 Juin 2013 - 9:27

Two decades ago we learned to “read” the human genome – the entire three-billion-letter DNA recipe for life coiled in the human chromosomes. Now scientists want to start writing it.

A $100 million global consortium has been proposed, to devise ways to assemble human DNA in the laboratory so as to better understand how it works, and look for new ways of treating disease and saving lives.

So far, the scientists in question haven’t the technology, the money, or the public support. But a proposal launched in the journal Science, led by Jef Boeke of the New York University Langone Medical Centre and colleagues, aims explicitly to tell citizens and taxpayers what they hope to do, and why, and encourage public interest and involvement.

The original project to sequence the entire human genome was conceived 30 years ago as a slow, costly, once-only mission: biology’s version of the Apollo moon landings. The full sequence was published in in 2003.

But dramatic advances in robotics, computing and molecular biology now mean that biologists have astonishing amounts of information not just about what DNA spells out for conception, development, reproduction and disease in humans, but in hundreds of microbes, crop plants, laboratory and domestic animals, reptiles and insects. They can sequence DNA, analyse it, and edit it in relatively small lengths. They have been manipulating DNA in the biotechnology industry for 40 years.

But they don’t yet know how to put a lot of DNA together to see how a complex organism works.

The scientists write that they want to be able to do so with public support and within an ethical and legal framework for what would be synthetic human biology. They do not aim to synthesise a human, but to understand how human genes work together in cells in a laboratory dish.

“The major benefit is an enhanced understanding of things like chromosome structure and how the genome works – it is a basic understanding effort in the same way as sequencing the human genome has given us a huge amount of information, and thrown up some surprises,” said Susan Rosser, one of the signatories, and who holds the chair of synthetic biology at Edinburgh University.

“There is no question of humans being made – we are simply talking about cell lines and pieces of DNA.”

Synthetic biology is not new: in 2010 the scientist-entrepreneur Craig Venter who helped accelerate the human genome project announced that his team had after years of effort, synthesised a simple life form. In March 2016 he announced the completion of an organism with what he said were the minimum number of genes necessary to sustain life.

His creation replicated itself in a laboratory dish with just 473 genes. And, he said at the time, what was humbling was that the organism’s own creators had no idea what a third of those genes did.

But humans have more than 20,000 genes. The backers of the new project – dubbed the Human Genome Project–Write (HGP-Write) to distinguish it from the original HGP-Read – propose hugely ambitious and technologically challenging projects such as the construction of a human chromosome, or the making of a human cancer genotype. They want to experiment with the biological machinery of virus resistance or genes, that could suppress tumour formation, and they want to work out how to do it cheaply.

One unexpected aspect of the human genome sequence was that only 2% of the genetic sequence actually codes for genes that make proteins, said Paul Freemont, co-director of the Centre for Synthetic Biology at Imperial College in London. This left 98% of the genome sequence unaccounted for.

“The human genome synthesis project is a natural extension of this project in that by synthesising the human genome we will be able to uncover what the ‘dark matter’ in the human genome does and why we have it,” he said.

But his colleague Tom Ellis was not so sure. “I should say that for synthesising the complete human genome I am still on the fence. I am not particularly sold on it yet. While we will probably learn a lot from it and it will drive the technologies, I don’t see an obvious use for it at the end when we are done.”

But he would prefer to see it done by a team of academics rather than individuals who might claim patents.

“The idea of discussing it and coming to some sort of ethical and technological standards before anyone starts work on this, I really like the idea of.”


---

Il y a deux décennies, nous avons appris à «lire» le génome humain - l'ensemble de la recette de l'ADN de trois milliards de lettres de la vie lové dans les chromosomes humains. Maintenant, les scientifiques veulent commencer à l'écrire.

Un consortium mondial de 100 millions $ a été proposé, pour trouver des moyens pour assembler l'ADN humain en laboratoire afin de mieux comprendre comment il fonctionne, et chercher de nouvelles façons de traiter la maladie et sauver des vies.

Jusqu'à présent, les scientifiques en question n'ont pas la technologie, l'argent, ou le soutien public. Mais une proposition lancée dans la revue Science, dirigé par Jef Boeke de l'Université Centre médical Langone de New York et ses collègues, vise explicitement à dire aux citoyens et aux contribuables ce qu'ils espèrent faire, et pourquoi, et d'encourager l'intérêt public et la participation.

Le projet initial de séquencer l'ensemble du génome humain a été conçu il y a 30 ans comme une lente, coûteuse mission qui ne serait accomplie qu'une seule fois: la version de la biologie des alunissages d'Apollo. La séquence complète a été publiée en 2003.

Mais les progrès spectaculaires dans la robotique, l'informatique et la biologie moléculaire aujourd'hui signifie que les biologistes ont des quantités étonnantes d'information non seulement sur ce que l'ADN précise pour la conception, le développement, la reproduction et de la maladie chez l'homme, mais pour des centaines de microbes, plantes cultivées,  les animaux domestiques et de laboratoire, les reptiles et les insectes. Ils peuvent séquencer l'ADN, l'analyser, et de le modifier en relativement petites longueurs. Ils ont manipulé l'ADN dans l'industrie de la biotechnologie depuis 40 ans.

Mais ils ne savent pas encore comment mettre beaucoup d'ADN ensemble pour voir comment un organisme complexe fonctionne.

Les scientifiques écrivent qu'ils veulent être en mesure de le faire avec le soutien du public et dans un cadre éthique et juridique pour ce qui serait la biologie humaine synthétique. Ils ne visent pas à synthétiser un être humain, mais de comprendre comment les gènes humains travaillent ensemble dans des cellules dans un plat de laboratoire.

«Le principal avantage est une meilleure compréhension des choses comme la structure des chromosomes et comment le génome fonctionne - C'est un effort de compréhension de base de la même manière que le séquençage du génome humain nous a donné une énorme quantité d'informations, et jeté quelques surprises," dit Susan Rosser, l'un des signataires, et titulaire de la chaire de biologie synthétique à l'Université d'Edimbourg.

"Il n'est pas question de faire un homme - nous parlons simplement des lignées cellulaires et des morceaux d'ADN."

La biologie synthétique n'est pas nouvelle: en 2010, le chercheur-entrepreneur Craig Venter qui a contribué à accélérer le projet du génome humain a annoncé que son équipe avait, après des années d'efforts, synthétisé une forme de vie simple. En mars 2016, il a annoncé l'achèvement d'un organisme avec ce qu'il a dit était le nombre minimal de gènes nécessaires à la vie.

Sa création se reproduit dans un plat de laboratoire avec seulement 473 gènes. Et, a-t-il dit à l'époque, ce qui a été une leçon d'humilité était que les propres créateurs de l'organisme n'avaient aucune idée de ce que un tiers de ces gènes fait.

Mais les humains ont plus de 20.000 gènes. Les bailleurs de fonds du nouveau projet - baptisé le Projet du génome humain-Write (HGP-Write) pour la distinguer de l'original HGP-Read - proposer des projets extrêmement ambitieux et technologiquement difficiles telles que la construction d'un chromosome humain, ou la réalisation d'un le génotype du cancer humain. Ils veulent expérimenter avec la machinerie biologique la résistance des virus ou des gènes, qui pourraient supprimer la formation de la tumeur, et ils veulent travailler sur la façon de le faire à moindre coût.

Un aspect inattendu de la séquence du génome humain était que seulement 2% de la séquence génétique code pour les gènes qui font  les protéines, a déclaré Paul Freemont, co-directeur du Centre pour la biologie synthétique à l'Imperial College à Londres. Cela a laissé 98% de la séquence du génome portée disparue.

"Le projet de synthèse du génome humain est une extension naturelle de ce projet, en synthétisant le génome humain, nous serons en mesure de découvrir ce qu'est la« matière noire » dans ce que le génome humain fait et pourquoi nous l'avons» dit-il.

Mais son collègue Tom Ellis n'était pas si sûr. "Je dois dire que pour la synthèse du génome humain complet, je suis toujours sur la clôture. Je ne suis pas particulièrement encore vendu à l'idée. Alors que nous allons probablement apprendre beaucoup de cela et que ça va conduire à des technologies nouvelles, je ne vois pas une utilisation évidente pour  le génome synthétique à la fin quand nous aurons fini. "

Mais il préférerait que cela se fasse par une équipe d'universitaires plutôt que des personnes qui pourraient prétendre à des brevets.

_________________


Dernière édition par Denis le Mer 10 Aoû 2016 - 17:58, édité 7 fois
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: La biologie synthétique   Aujourd'hui à 18:06

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
La biologie synthétique
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 1
 Sujets similaires
-
» Biologie synthétique
» recherche tableau synthétique des programmes
» la vitamine D, origine synthétique??
» la B12 synthétique
» [Info] Voyage astral, schéma synthétique

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
ESPOIRS :: Cancer :: recherche-
Sauter vers: