AccueilCalendrierFAQRechercherS'enregistrerMembresGroupesConnexion

Partagez | 
 

 Vitamine D et calcium pour prévenir le cancer du sein

Aller en bas 
AuteurMessage
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 17019
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Vitamine D et calcium pour prévenir le cancer du sein   Ven 4 Mar 2016 - 18:42

Breast tumors in laboratory mice deficient in vitamin D grow faster and are more likely to metastasize than tumors in mice with adequate levels of vitamin D, according to a preliminary study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

The research highlights a direct link between circulating vitamin D levels and the expression of a gene called ID1, known to be associated with tumor growth and breast cancer metastasis.

The finding builds upon several previous studies suggesting that low levels of vitamin D not only increase a person's risk of developing breast cancer, but are also correlated with more-aggressive tumors and worse prognoses. Although the research was conducted primarily in mice and on mouse cells, the researchers found in a study of 34 breast cancer patients that levels of circulating vitamin D were inversely correlated with the expression levels of ID1 protein in their tumors, and they confirmed that a vitamin D metabolite directly controls the expression of the ID1 gene in a human breast cancer cell line.

"Although much more research needs to be done, research from our lab and others suggests that people at risk for breast cancer should know their vitamin D levels and take steps to correct any deficiencies," said Brian Feldman, MD, PhD, assistant professor of pediatrics.

Feldman, who is a Bechtel Endowed Faculty Scholar, is the senior author of the study, which will be published online March 2 in Endocrinology. Lead authors of the work are graduate student Jasmaine Williams and postdoctoral scholar Abhishek Aggarwal, PhD.

Confusion about optimal dosage

The researchers emphasize that their findings don't imply that more vitamin D is always better. Correcting a deficiency is very different from taking more than the recommended dosage, which the Institute of Medicine says is 600 international units per day for people age 70 and younger, and 800 IU for older adults. Excess levels, variously estimated to occur at about 4,000 to 10,000 IU per day, have been linked to damage to the kidneys, cardiovascular system and other organs.

Not all medical organizations agree on the optimal amount of vitamin D. The confusion stems in part from the fact that, although it can be ingested via food and nutritional supplements, our bodies can also make vitamin D with the help of ultraviolet rays from the sun. So it's difficult to know exactly how much any individual may need to take as a supplement, and that amount can vary throughout the year. Those who don't get enough sun exposure, or people with darker skin, are more likely than fair-skinned individuals who spend time outdoors each day to be deficient. The use of sunscreen can also affect vitamin D synthesis.

Once ingested or made by the body, vitamin D is converted through a series of steps into its active form, calcitriol. Calcitriol binds to a protein in cells called the vitamin D receptor, which then enters the cell's nucleus to control the expression of a variety of genes, including those involved in calcium absorption and bone health.

A brake on tumor progression?

The link between vitamin D and calcium metabolism is well-known. More recently, however, researchers have begun to suspect that vitamin D may affect many other important biological processes, including tumor progression. However, it's not clear exactly which step in cancer development the vitamin may affect.

In the new study, Williams and Aggarwal investigated whether vitamin D levels affected the metastatic ability of mouse breast cancer cells implanted into the mammary fat pad of laboratory mice. One group of 10 mice was first fed a diet lacking in the vitamin for 10 weeks; the other 10 received a normal dose in their food.

Mice fed a diet deficient in vitamin D developed palpable tumors an average of seven days sooner than their peers, and after six weeks of growth those tumors were significantly larger in size than those in animals with adequate vitamin D levels.

The researchers then examined two well-characterized lines of mouse tumor cells, 168FARN and 4T1. Prior research has shown that cells from either group form tumors when implanted in laboratory mice, but only 4T1 results in aggressive tumors that spread to other parts of the animal's body.

Vitamin D and ID1 expression

The researchers found that the 4T1 cell line expresses significantly lower levels of the vitamin D receptor protein. When they genetically engineered 168FARN cells to also have lower-than-normal levels of the VDR protein, the cells began to behave much more like the 4T1 cells. They migrated more freely in a laboratory dish and, when injected into 10 mice, they grew aggressively. In six of these mice, the modified cancer cells metastasized to the liver during the course of four weeks. In contrast, none of the tumors in the 10 mice that received unmodified 168FARN cells spread to the liver during the study period.

To identify how vitamin D might be affecting metastasis, the researchers analyzed gene expression in the tumors that developed in mice with varied levels of vitamin D in their diets and in the tumors of mice injected with modified or unmodified 168FARN cells. They found that in cases in which vitamin D was lacking from the diet or in which cells were missing much of the VDR protein, tumor cells expressed more of a gene called ID1, which has been shown to play a role in breast cancer metastasis. Further investigation showed that VDR binds directly to a stretch of DNA near the ID1 gene and suppresses its expression in both mouse and human cells.

Finally, the researchers compared circulating vitamin D levels in 34 breast cancer patients at Stanford with the levels of ID1 in tumor cells that were surgically removed during the course of disease treatment. They found an inverse correlation: Women with lower levels of vitamin D expressed more ID1 in their tumor tissues than did women with higher levels of vitamin D.

"Our study shows that a deficiency in vitamin D levels, or an inability of tumor cells to respond appropriately to the presence of vitamin D, is sufficient to trigger non-metastatic cancer cells to become metastatic," said Feldman. "It's enough to significantly accelerate tumor progression in our mouse model. Further studies are warranted, but this direct association between vitamin D levels and ID1 expression is very interesting to us."


---


Les tumeurs du sein chez des souris de laboratoire déficientes en vitamine D se développent plus rapidement et sont plus susceptibles de métastaser que les tumeurs chez les souris avec des niveaux adéquats de vitamine D, selon une étude préliminaire par des chercheurs de l'École de médecine de l'Université Stanford.

La recherche met en évidence un lien direct entre les taux circulants de vitamine D et l'expression d'un gène appelé ID1, connue pour être associée à la croissance tumorale et les métastases du cancer du sein.

La conclusion se fonde sur plusieurs études antérieures suggérant que de faibles niveaux de vitamine D non seulement augmentent le risque de développer un cancer du sein d'une personne, mais sont également corrélées avec des tumeurs plus agressives et un pire pronostic. Bien que la recherche a été effectuée principalement chez la souris et sur des cellules de souris, les chercheurs ont découvert dans une étude sur 34 patients atteints de cancer du sein que le niveau de vitamine D en circulation étaient inversement corrélées avec les niveaux d'expression de la protéine ID1 dans leurs tumeurs, et ils ont confirmé qu'une métabolite de la vitamine D commande directement l'expression du gène ID1 dans une lignée cellulaire de cancer du sein humain.

"Bien que beaucoup plus de recherche doit être fait, la recherche de notre laboratoire et d'autres suggèrent que les personnes à risque pour le cancer du sein devraient connaître leurs niveaux de vitamine D et de prendre des mesures pour corriger les lacunes», a déclaré Brian Feldman, MD, PhD, professeur adjoint de pédiatrie.

Feldman, qui est un Bechtel Endowed Faculté Scholar, est l'auteur principal de l'étude, qui sera publiée en ligne 2 Mars en endocrinologie. Les principaux auteurs de ce travail sont étudiants diplômés Jasmaine Williams et chercheur postdoctoral Abhishek Aggarwal, PhD.

Confusion sur le dosage optimal

Les chercheurs soulignent que leurs résultats ne signifient pas que plus de vitamine D est toujours mieux. Correction d'un déficit est très différent de prendre plus que la dose recommandée, que l'Institut de médecine dit est de 600 unités internationales par jour pour les personnes âgées de 70 ans ou moins, et 800 UI pour les personnes âgées. Des niveaux excessifs, estimés diversement de se produire à environ 4.000 à 10.000 UI par jour, ont été liés à des dommages aux reins, le système cardiovasculaire et d'autres organes.

Les organisations médicales ne sont pas toutes d'accord sur la quantité optimale de vitamine D. La confusion vient en partie du fait que, même si elle peut être ingérée par voie alimentaire et des suppléments nutritionnels, notre corps peut également fabriquer de la vitamine D avec l'aide de rayons ultraviolets du soleil . Il est donc difficile de savoir exactement combien tout individu peut avoir besoin de prendre comme un supplément, et ce montant peut varier tout au long de l'année. Ceux qui ne reçoivent pas suffisamment l'exposition au soleil, ou les personnes ayant la peau foncée, sont plus susceptibles que les personnes à peau claire qui passent du temps en plein air chaque jour pour être déficient. L'utilisation d'un écran solaire peut également affecter la synthèse de la vitamine D.

Une fois ingérés ou fabriqués par le corps, la vitamine D est converti par une série d'étapes dans sa forme active, le calcitriol. Calcitriol se lie à une protéine dans des cellules appelé le récepteur de la vitamine D, qui pénètre ensuite dans le noyau de la cellule pour commander l'expression d'une variété de gènes, y compris ceux qui sont impliqués dans l'absorption du calcium et de la santé des os.

Un frein sur la progression tumorale?

Le lien entre la vitamine D et le métabolisme du calcium est bien connue. Plus récemment, cependant, les chercheurs ont commencé à soupçonner que la vitamine D peut affecter de nombreux autres processus biologiques importants, y compris la progression tumorale. Cependant, il ne sait pas exactement quelle étape dans le développement du cancer de la vitamine peut affecter.

Dans la nouvelle étude, Williams et Aggarwal ont cherché à savoir si les niveaux de vitamine D ont affecté la capacité métastatique des cellules de cancer du sein de souris implantées dans le coussinet adipeux mammaire de souris de laboratoire. Un groupe de 10 souris a d'abord été nourris avec un régime alimentaire dépourvu de la vitamine pendant 10 semaines; les 10 autres ont reçu une dose normale dans leur nourriture.

Les souris nourris avec un régime alimentaire déficient en vitamine D développé palpable tumeurs une moyenne de sept jours plus tôt que leurs pairs, et après six semaines de croissance de ces tumeurs étaient significativement de plus grande taille que ceux des animaux avec des niveaux de vitamine D adéquats.

Les chercheurs ont ensuite examiné deux lignes bien caractérisés de cellules tumorales de souris, et 168FARN 4T1. Des recherches antérieures ont montré que les cellules provenant des deux groupes forment des tumeurs lorsqu'elles sont implantées dans des souris de laboratoire, mais seulement 4T1 résulte dans des tumeurs agressives qui se propagent à d'autres parties du corps de l'animal.

La vitamine D et d'expression ID1

Les chercheurs ont découvert que la lignée cellulaire 4T1 exprime des taux significativement plus faible de la protéine du récepteur de la vitamine D. Quand ils ont génétiquement fait des cellules 168FARN pour avoir également des niveaux inférieurs à la normale de la protéine VDR, les cellules ont commencé à se comporter beaucoup plus comme les cellules 4T1. Elles ont migré plus librement dans un plat de laboratoire et, lorsqu'elles ont été injecté dans 10 des souris, elles ont augmenté de manière agressive. Dans six de ces souris, les cellules cancéreuses modifiées ont métastasé dans le foie au cours de quatre semaines. En revanche, aucune des tumeurs chez les 10 souris qui ont reçu des cellules non modifiées 168FARN se sont propagées vers le foie au cours de la période d'étude.

Pour déterminer comment la vitamine D peut avoir une incidence sur les métastases, les chercheurs ont analysé l'expression des gènes dans les tumeurs qui se sont développées chez les souris ayant des niveaux variés de la vitamine D dans leur régime alimentaire et dans les tumeurs des souris injectées avec des cellules 168FARN modifiées ou non modifiées. Ils ont constaté que dans le cas où la vitamine D faisait défaut dans l'alimentation ou dans lequel les cellules avaient disparu une grande partie de la protéine VDR, les cellules tumorales expriment plus d'un gène appelé ID1, ce qui a été démontré comme jouant un rôle dans les métastases du cancer du . Une enquête plus poussée a montré que VDR se lie directement à un segment d'ADN près du gène ID1 et supprime son expression dans la souris et les cellules humaines.

Enfin, les chercheurs ont comparé les niveaux de vitamine D circulant chez 34 patientes atteintes de cancer du sein chez Stanford avec les niveaux de ID1 dans des cellules tumorales qui ont été enlevées par voie chirurgicale au cours du traitement de la maladie. Ils ont trouvé une corrélation inverse: les femmes ayant un faible niveau de vitamine D ont exprimé plus ID1 dans leurs tissus tumorales que les femmes avec des niveaux plus élevés de vitamine D.

«Notre étude montre qu'une carence en vitamine D, ou une incapacité des cellules tumorales à répondre de manière appropriée à la présence de la vitamine D, est suffisante pour déclencher les cellules cancéreuses métastatiques à devenir métastatique», dit Feldman. "Il suffit d'accélérer de manière significative la progression de la tumeur dans notre modèle de souris. D'autres études sont nécessaires, mais cette association directe entre les niveaux de vitamine D et l'expression ID1 est très intéressant pour nous."

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur En ligne
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 17019
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Vitamine D et calcium pour prévenir le cancer du sein   Sam 8 Jan 2011 - 16:44

Plusieurs études ont montré ces derniers mois des relations entre la vitamine D et certains cancers : notamment les femmes qui manquent de vitamine D auraient plus de risques d’avoir un cancer du sein.

Une nouvelle étude française vient de les confirmer : le risque de cancer du sein serait diminué de 25% pour les femmes ayant un taux sanguin de vitamine D élevé.

Que faire en pratique ? Doit-on donner aux femmes un supplément de vitamine D ? D’autres études ont également montré un lien entre le manque de vitamine D et les cancers de la prostate et du côlon.

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur En ligne
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 17019
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Vitamine D et calcium pour prévenir le cancer du sein   Mar 28 Déc 2010 - 11:51

Près de la moitié des femmes avec un cancer du sein ont un niveau faible de vitamine D, d'après une étude préliminaire menée en Angleterre.

Pour cette étude pas encore publiée, les chercheurs britanniques ont recueilli des échantillons de sang de 166 femmes atteintes du cancer du sein et mesuré leur taux de vitamine D.

Sur ce total, 46% avaient une insuffisance en vitamine D (entre 12,5 et 50 nanomoles par litre de sang). Et 6% avaient une carence, avec des niveaux inférieurs à 12,5 nmol / L.


Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur En ligne
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 17019
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Vitamine D et calcium pour prévenir le cancer du sein   Mer 4 Nov 2009 - 20:56

Un bon contrôle des vitamines D intervient dans les maladies cancéreuses, les maladies cardio-vasculaires et certaines maladies auto-immunes, selon une conférence intitulée «Vitamine D et cancers», présentée le 6 novembre par le professeur Jean-Claude Souberbielle, dans le cadre des Journées internationales de biologie.

La majorité des plus de 50 ans auraient un déficit en vitamine D. Or la correction d'un déficit de vitamine relève de la prescription médicale.

Un déficit profond en vitamine D entraîne deux types de maladie : le rachitisme chez l'enfant et l'ostéomalacie chez l'adulte. Un déficit plus modéré peut entraîner un remodelage osseux, participant à une éventuelle ostéoporose, surtout chez le sujet âgé.

Le professeur Jean-Claude Souberbielle présentera des études selon lesquelles les personnes ayant un taux bas de vitamine D ont plus de risques de développer un cancer, particulièrement du sein ou digestif, indépendamment d'autres facteurs de risques de cancer.


Chez la personne âgée, la vitamine D administrée à forte dose s'accompagnerait d'une baisse de l'incidence des chutes, de 20 à 25%, selon une étude citée lors de cette conférence, et datant de 2006.
Une autre étude datant de 2007 a démontré l'effet de la vitamine D sur plusieurs cancers dont celui du sein. Plus de 1.100 femmes ménopausées recevaient un placebo, un traitement avec du calcium ou un mélange de

calcium et de vitamine D.

Celles ayant reçu un mélange de vitamine D et de calcium avaient une réduction de 60% de risque de plusieurs cancers dont celui du sein. Mais le professeur a rappelé que le dosage de la vitamine D relève de la prescription médicale, le produit étant potentiellement toxique.
Une prise excessive de vitamine D pourrait entraîner une intoxication, rare mais d'une forte gravité, pouvant entraîner le décès.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur En ligne
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 17019
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Vitamine D et calcium pour prévenir le cancer du sein   Ven 9 Sep 2005 - 13:38

Lien positif entre le cancer du sein et la consommation de calcium et de vitamine D



Selon un article paru en aout 2005 dans Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers Prevention par les Drs Bérubé et collaborateurs du Centre hospitalier universitaire du Québec, le calcium et la vitamine D diminuent la densité mammographique des seins.

Les auteurs ont étudié 777 femmes préménopausées et 783 postménopausées en 2001 et 2002. Ils leur ont demandé leurs habitudes alimentaires en incluant la consommation de suppléments vitaminiques et ont comparé ces données aux résultats de leurs mammographies.

La densité des seins était moins élevée chez les femmes préménopausées qui prenaient le plus de vitamine D et de calcium. Ce facteur est actuellement considéré être un indicateur du risque de développer un cancer du sein : plus la densité est élevée, plus le risque de développer un cancer est élevé.

La consommation quotidienne de 400 unités internationales de vitamine D ( 1/2 litre de lait ) et de 1000 milligrammes de calcium ( 3/4 de litre ) est liée à une réduction de 8,5 % de la densité du sein. Ces résultats ne sont pas retrouvés chez les femmes postménopausées.

Les sources alimentaires de vitamine D sont peu nombreuses. Les chercheurs ne recommandent pas nécessairement le lait car il est controversé. En effet la consommation quotidienne d'un verre de lait augmenterait de 13 % les risques de développer un cancer des ovaires selon un article de l'International Journal of Cancer. Selon une autre étude la consommation de trois verres de lait par jour pourrait mener les enfants à l'obésité. Ils ne recommandent pas non plus les suppléments vitaminés car certaines vitamines prises de façon excessive pourraient se révéler nuisibles.


Les chercheurs pensent que l'augmentation de la consommation de vitamine D et de calcium qui sont sûrs, pourrait représenter une stratégie dans la prévention du cancer du sein et en outre les auteurs rappellent que la vitamine D et le calcium aident à prévenir les cancers du côlon et du rectum.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur En ligne
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 17019
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Vitamine D et calcium pour prévenir le cancer du sein   Mer 10 Aoû 2005 - 7:05

Le poisson et les produits laitiers pourraient réduire les risques de cancer du sein


Mise à jour le mardi 9 août 2005, 18 h 01 .




Une cellule cancéreuse dans un sein (archives)

La consommation de produits laitiers et de poisson pourrait diminuer les risques de développer un cancer du sein, selon une étude réalisée auprès de femmes en préménopause de Québec.

Ces aliments contiennent beaucoup de vitamines D et de calcium, des nutriments qui contribuent à réduire la densité mammaire et qui, de ce fait, pourraient prévenir le cancer du sein.

Des études ont, en effet, démontré que plus la densité du sein est importante, plus les risques de développer un cancer sont élevés.

Le Dr Jacques Brisson, de l'unité de recherche en santé des populations de l'hôpital Saint-Sacrement a étudié les habitudes alimentaires de 1000 femmes de la région de Québec. Il a conclu qu'« une augmentation de vitamine D et de calcium, qu'on retrouve dans des doses normales, pouvait réduire la densité mammaire en moyenne de 8 %. Alors, si on peut réduire la densité mammaire, on pense qu'on pourrait aussi possiblement réduire les risques de cancer. »

Selon le chercheur, la vitamine D et le calcium pourraient s'avérer aussi efficaces que certains médicaments, qui permettent une réduction de la densité mammaire de 6 %.

La consommation appropriée de vitamine D et de calcium serait de 400 unités internationales, soit l'équivalent de deux grands verres de lait par jour.

Le lait pourrait augmenter les risques de cancer des ovaires

Toutefois, les chercheurs sont toutefois prudents, parce que d'autres études montrent que le lait peut augmenter les risques du cancer des ovaires. « Le mieux que l'on puisse dire, c'est de suivre le guide alimentaire canadien. »

De tous les cancers, celui du sein est le plus fréquent chez les femmes en Amérique du Nord.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur En ligne
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 17019
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Vitamine D et calcium pour prévenir le cancer du sein   Mar 9 Aoû 2005 - 12:53

Le calcium et la vitamine D pour contrer le cancer du sein

Une consommation importante de calcium et de vitamine D pourrait aider à prévenir le cancer du sein chez les femmes préménopausées.
Selon une récente étude publiée dans la revue médicale américaine Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, il y aurait beaucoup moins de cancer du sein si les femmes consommaient l'équivalent de deux grands verres de lait chaque jour.

Selon les chercheurs, la densité des seins, un indicateur important du risque de développer un cancer, est moins élevée chez les femmes qui prennent la quantité recommandée de vitamine D et de calcium.


Dernière édition par Denis le Ven 5 Aoû 2016 - 13:08, édité 1 fois
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur En ligne
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: Vitamine D et calcium pour prévenir le cancer du sein   

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
Vitamine D et calcium pour prévenir le cancer du sein
Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 1
 Sujets similaires
-
» Pour prévenir les vergetures...
» NV et vitamine B12
» Une méthode que j'essaye de mettre au point
» Les pigeons,nos moineaux et Cie,la guerre des oiseaux
» Pour en venir en aide à Ccil et sa famille

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
ESPOIRS :: Cancer :: Prévention-
Sauter vers: