AccueilCalendrierFAQRechercherS'enregistrerMembresGroupesConnexion

Partagez | 
 

 Le gène BRAF

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
AuteurMessage
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène BRAF   Lun 29 Aoû 2016 - 14:50

BRAF mutation occurs in between 40% and 50% of metastasising melanomas (skin cancers), boosting tumour growth. Patients with metastasising melanomas and who display BRAF mutation can be treated with an inhibitor that acts specifically against BRAF mutation (BRAF inhibitor in combination with MEK inhibitor). Initially the treatment is extremely effective but, after a maximum of 11 months, the patient becomes resistant to it. Verena Paulitschke from MedUni Vienna's Department of Dermatology has now identified some of the mechanisms that might cause this resistance. This could well lead to new treatment concepts and predictive biomarkers, as well as an improved general understanding of the pathomechanisms leading to the disease.

The human BRAF gene produces a protein (B-Raf) that is an important component of the RAS-RAF signalling pathway, thereby playing a role in normal cell growth and survival. However, mutated forms can cause this signalling pathway to become overactive. This in turn leads to uncontrolled cell growth and cancer.

The aim of the researchers from MedUni Vienna's Department of Dermatology is to understand these resistance mechanisms and, in a next step, to delay or even prevent the development of resistance. With the aid of proteomics technology, it has now been possible to obtain the first insights into the underlying mechanisms. The key technology of mass spectrometry ("shotgun proteomics"), in particular, enables to identify and characterise proteins from human cells. The proteins are enzymatically digested and the arising peptides separated.

"We were able to show that resistance to the BRAF inhibitor is associated with elevated expression of the lyosomal compartment (Note: spherical vesicular cell organelles), with increased cell binding and with morphological changes in the cells, from spherical to spindle-shaped," explains Paulitschke. Based on this resistance profile, it was then possible to demonstrate the effectiveness of the reservatrol derivative M8, a naturally occurring polyphenol found primarily in grapes. "As cell models, we used cells with induced resistance and primary cell systems, in which similar signatures were identified. It was then possible to correlate the expression of proteins (which were upregulated in the resistant cells) with poor progression free survival using tissue sections or sera of melanoma patients. ," says the MedUni Vienna researcher.

"New technologies such as "shotgun proteomics" have enabled us to make a mechanistic analysis of innovative therapeutic approaches. Using these strategies, it has been possible to obtain new insights into the underlying mechanism of resistance to BRAF inhibition and, based on that, we might be able to develop new rational therapeutic concepts and predictive and pharmacodynamic biomarkers," says Paulitschke.

---

La mutation BRAF se produit dans environ 40% et 50% des mélanomes métastasique (cancers de la peau), et stimule la croissance tumorale. Les patients atteints de mélanomes et des métastases qui présentent une mutation BRAF peuvent être traités avec un inhibiteur qui agit spécifiquement contre la mutation BRAF (inhibiteur de BRAF, en combinaison avec un inhibiteur de MEK). Initialement, le traitement est très efficace, mais, après un maximum de 11 mois, le patient devient résistant. Verena Paulitschke du Département MedUni Vienne de Dermatologie a maintenant identifié certains des mécanismes qui pourraient causer cette résistance. Cela pourrait bien conduire à de nouveaux concepts de traitement et de biomarqueurs prédictifs, ainsi qu'une meilleure compréhension générale des mécanismes pathologiques conduisant à la maladie.

Le gène BRAF humain produit une protéine (B-Raf) qui est une composante importante de la  voie de signalisation RAS-RAF, qui joue un rôle dans la croissance cellulaire normale et la survie. Cependant, des formes mutées peuvent provoquer que cette voie de signalisation devienne hyperactive. Phénomène qui conduira à une croissance incontrôlée des cellules et au cancer.

L'objectif des chercheurs du Département de MedUni Vienne de dermatologie est de comprendre ces mécanismes de résistance et, dans une étape suivante, retarder ou même empêcher le développement de la résistance. A l'aide de la technologie de la protéomique, on a maintenant pu obtenir les premiers aperçus sur les mécanismes sous-jacents. La technologie clé de la spectrométrie de masse ( «protéomique de fusil de chasse»), en particulier, permet d'identifier et de caractériser des protéines à partir de cellules humaines. Les protéines sont digérées enzymatiquement et les peptides résultant séparés.

«Nous avons pu montrer que la résistance à l'inhibiteur de BRAF est associé à une expression élevée du compartiment lysosomale (Note: organites cellulaires vésiculaires et sphériques), avec une liaison cellulaire accrue et des changements morphologiques dans les cellules, à partir de la forme sphérique à la forme de fuseau," explique Paulitschke. Sur la base de ce profil de résistance, il est alors possible de démontrer l'efficacité du reservatrol dérivé de M8, un polyphénol naturel qui se trouve principalement dans les raisins. "En tant que modèles cellulaires, nous avons utilisé des cellules avec la résistance induite par les systèmes de cellules primaires, dans lesquels les signatures similaires ont été identifiés. Il est alors possible d'établir une corrélation entre l'expression des protéines (qui étaient régulés à la hausse dans les cellules résistantes) avec des coupes de tissus de patients survivants avec peu de survie sans progression en utilisant ou des sérums de patients atteints de mélanome. », explique le chercheur MedUni Vienne.

Les nouvelles technologies telles que le "shutgun protéomique" nous ont permis de faire une analyse mécaniste des approches thérapeutiques innovantes. Grâce à ces stratégies, il a été possible d'obtenir de nouvelles connaissances sur le mécanisme sous-jacent de la résistance à l'inhibition de BRAF et, sur cette base, nous pourrait être en mesure de développer de nouveaux concepts thérapeutiques rationnels et biomarqueurs prédictifs et pharmacodynamiques ", dit Paulitschke.


_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène BRAF   Sam 7 Nov 2015 - 11:47

A team led by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators has reported the first successful use of a targeted therapy drug to treat a patient with a debilitating, recurrent brain tumor. In a paper published online in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, the researchers report that treatment with the BRAF inhibitor dabrafinib led to shrinkage of a BRAF-mutant craniopharyngioma that had recurred even after four surgical procedures. More than a year after dabrafinib treatment, which was followed by surgery and radiation therapy, the patient's tumor has not recurred.

"This is the first time that a systemic therapy has shown efficacy against this type of tumor," says Priscilla Brastianos, MD, of the MGH Cancer Center, co-lead author of the JNCI report. "This has the potential of completely changing the management of papillary craniopharyngiomas, which can cause lifelong problems for patients -- including visual defects, impaired intellectual function, and pituitary and other hormonal dysfunction."

Craniopharyngiomas are pituitary tumors that, while technically benign, can cause serious problems because of their location near critical structures, such as optic and other cranial nerves and the hypothalamus. Not only does the growing tumor compromise neurological and hormonal functions by impinging on these structures, but treatment by surgical removal or radiation therapy can produce the same symptoms by damaging adjacent tissues. In addition, since the tumor can adhere to nearby brain and vascular structures, complete removal is difficult, leading to often rapid recurrence.

The patient described in the JNCI paper came to the MGH Emergency Department with confusion, impaired vision, severe headaches and vomiting seven months after he had been surgically treated for a brain tumor in another country. A CT scan revealed a 4 cm cystic tumor -- tumor enclosed in a fluid-filled sac -- that was pressing against midbrain structures and blocking drainage of cerebrospinal fluid. While his symptoms improved after surgical removal of part of the tumor, they did not disappear; and six weeks later he returned to the MGH, this time in a nearly comatose condition.

MGH neurosurgeons again removed the tumor, which was confirmed to be a BRAF-mutant craniopharyngioma. But two weeks later, before planned radiation therapy could be carried out, his condition again deteriorated into a minimally responsive state, leading to a fourth emergency surgery. Seven weeks later he was back at the hospital with progressive vision loss, and an MRI showed that the tumor had once again recurred. Since the growth of this tumor was likely driven by the BRAF mutation, which is known to drive the growth of melanomas and other malignant tumors, the team decided to try treatment with dabrafinib, which is FDA approved for the treatment of BRAF-mutant melanomas.

After only four days of treatment, the patient's tumor was around 25 percent smaller; and by day 17 the tumor was half the pretreatment size, and the surrounding cyst was 70 percent smaller. On day 21, the treatment team added the MEK inhibitor trametinib, which is known to enhance the effects of BRAF inhibition, to the protocol; and by day 35 both the tumor and the cyst had lost more than 80 percent of their pretreatment size. Endoscopic surgery to remove accessible tumor was performed on day 38, and drug treatment was stopped a week later, soon followed by radiation treatment. At the time the paper was written, the patient had remained symptom-free for seven months and continues to do so more than a year after his last treatment.

In addition to finding evidence of the antitumor effects of dabrafinib in the removed tumor tissues, the investigators were surprised to find the BRAF mutation circulating in blood samples taken at several times during the course of the patient's treatment. "That result was absolutely novel," says William Curry, Jr., MD, of MGH Neurosurgery, a co-senior author of the JNCI paper. "Finding evidence of the BRAF mutation in the blood raises the hope of potentially diagnosing this mutation and perhaps shrinking these tumors with targeted therapy before surgery, which could make surgical removal safer and possible unnecessary for some patients." He also notes that, since craniopharyngiomas are less molecularly complex than malignant tumors, they may be less likely to develop resistance to BRAF inhibition, a problem that has plagued targeted therapy for several types of cancer.

Sandro Santagata, MD, PhD, of Brigham and Women's Hospital's Pathology Department, a co-senior author of the JNCI paper, adds,"It is quite remarkable how quickly we have been able to go from identifying the genetic driver of papillary craniopharyngiomas to testing the idea in a patient that needed help. It was only last year that, along with Dr. Brastianos and colleagues, we first described in Nature Genetics that nearly all papillary cranionpharyngiomas have mutations in BRAF. This is the same mutation that is found in many melanomas, allowing us to use treatment strategies that have been so promising in melanoma patients."


---


Une équipe de chercheurs du Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) a rapporté la première utilisation réussie d'un médicament de thérapie ciblée pour traiter un patient ayant une maladie débilitante, récurrente de tumeur au . Dans un article publié en ligne dans le Journal de l'Institut national du cancer, les chercheurs rapportent que le traitement avec le dabrafinib, inhibiteur de BRAF, a conduit au retrait d'un craniopharyngiome mutant BRAF qui avait récidivé même après quatre interventions chirurgicales. Plus d'un an après le traitement au dabrafinib, qui a été suivie par la chirurgie et la radiothérapie, la tumeur du patient n'a pas récidivée.

"Ceci est la première fois qu'une thérapie systémique a démontré l'efficacité contre ce type de tumeur», explique Priscilla Brastianos, MD, de l'auteur MGH Cancer Center, co-chef de file du rapport JNCI. "Cela a le potentiel de changer complètement la gestion des craniopharyngiomes papillaires, qui peuvent causer des problèmes toute leurs vie pour ces patients - y compris les défauts visuels, troubles de la fonction intellectuelle, et l'hypophyse et autres dysfonctionnement hormonal."

Les tumeurs Craniopharyngiomes hypophysaires sont que, bien que techniquement bénignes, elles peuvent causer de graves problèmes en raison de leur emplacement à proximité des structures critiques, comme le nerf optique et d'autres nerfs crâniens et l'hypothalamus. Non seulement la croissance de la tumeur compromet les fonctions neurologiques et hormonales parce qu'elles empiétent sur ces structures, mais le traitement par l'élimination ou la radiothérapie chirurgicale peut produire les mêmes symptômes en endommageant les tissus adjacents. En outre, parce que la tumeur peut adhérer aux structures cérébrales et vasculaires avoisinantes, l'élimination complète est difficile, conduisant à la récurrence souvent rapide.

Le patient décrit dans le document JNCI était venu à l'urgence de l'HGM avec confusion, troubles de la vision, des maux de tête sévères et des vomissements sept mois après avoir été traités chirurgicalement pour une tumeur au cerveau dans un autre pays. Un scanner a révélé une 4 cm de tumeur kystique - tumeur enfermé dans un sac rempli de liquide - qui se pressait contre les structures du mésencéphale et le blocage de drainage du liquide céphalo-rachidien. Alors que ses symptômes se sont améliorés après l'ablation chirurgicale d'une partie de la tumeur, ils ne disparaissent pas; et six semaines plus tard, il est retourné à l'HGM, cette fois dans un état presque comateux.

Les neurochirurgiens du MGH ont de nouveau enlevé la tumeur, qui a été confirmé pour être un craniopharyngiome mutant BRAF. Mais deux semaines plus tard, avant la radiothérapie prévue pourrait être réalisée, son état s'était de nouveau détériorée vers un état ou il réagit peu, conduisant à une quatrième intervention chirurgicale d'urgence. Sept semaines plus tard, il était de retour à l'hôpital avec une perte de vision progressive, et une IRM a montré que la tumeur avait une fois de plus récidivé. Etant donné que la croissance de cette tumeur était probablement entraînée par la mutation de BRAF, qui est connu pour stimuler la croissance des mélanomes et d'autres tumeurs malignes, l'équipe a décidé d'essayer un traitement avec dabrafinib, qui est approuvé par la FDA pour le traitement de mélanomes mutant BRAF.

Après quatre jours de traitement, la tumeur du patient est d'environ 25 pour cent plus petite; et le jour 17 de la tumeur était moitié de la taille de prétraitement, et ce quientourait le kyste était 70 pour cent plus petit. Au jour 21, l'équipe de traitement a ajouté au protocole le trametinib, inhibiteur de MEK, qui est connu pour augmenter les effets de l'inhibition du gène BRAF; et au jour 35, la tumeur et le kyste avaient perdu plus de 80 pour cent de leur taille de prétraitement. La chirurgie endoscopique pour enlever la tumeur accessible a été réalisée au jour 38, et le traitement avec les médicaments a été arrêté une semaine plus tard, bientôt suivi par des traitements de radiothérapie. Au moment où le document a été rédigé, le patient était resté sans symptôme pendant sept mois et continue de le faire plus d'un an après son dernier traitement.

En plus de trouver des preuves des effets antitumoraux de dabrafinib dans les tissus de la tumeur enlevée, les enquêteurs ont été surpris de trouver la mutation BRAF circulant dans des échantillons sanguins prélevés à plusieurs reprises au cours du traitement par le patient. "Ce résultat était absolument nouveau», dit William Curry, Jr., MD, de l'Hôpital général de Montréal, un auteur de co-principal du document JNCI. "Trouver des preuves de la mutation BRAF dans le sang soulève l'espoir de potentiellement faire diagnostic de cette mutation et peut-être pouvoir faire rétrécir ces tumeurs avec une thérapie ciblée avant la chirurgie, ce qui pourrait rendre l'ablation chirurgicale sûre et possiblement inutile pour certains patients." Il note également que, parce que les craniopharyngiomes sont complexes au point de vue moléculaire que les tumeurs malignes, ils peuvent être moins susceptibles de développer une résistance à l'inhibition du gène BRAF, un problème qui a tourmenté la thérapie ciblée pour plusieurs types de cancer.

Sandro Santagata, MD, PhD, de Brigham et de département de pathologie de l'Hôpital des femmes, un auteur de co-principal du document JNCI, ajoute: «C'est tout à fait remarquable la rapidité avec laquelle nous avons été en mesure d'aller de l'identification du conducteur génétique du craniopharyngiome papillaire à tester une idée chez un patient qui avait besoin d'aide. C'est seulement l'année dernière que, avec le Dr Brastianos et ses collègues, nous avons d'abord décrit dans Nature Genetics que presque tous cranionpharyngiomas papillaires ont des mutations dans BRAF. Ceci est la même mutation que l'on retrouve dans de nombreux mélanomes , nous permettant d'utiliser les stratégies de traitement qui ont été si prometteuses chez les patients du mélanome ".

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène BRAF   Lun 6 Juil 2015 - 13:38

A mutation found in most melanomas rewires cancer cells' metabolism, making them dependent on a ketogenesis enzyme, researchers at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University have discovered.

The finding points to possible strategies for countering resistance to existing drugs that target the B-raf V600E mutation, or potential alternatives to those drugs. It may also explain why the V600E mutation in particular is so common in melanomas.

The results are scheduled for publication in Molecular Cell.

The growth-promoting V600E mutation in the gene B-raf is present in most melanomas, and also in some cases of colon and thyroid cancer. Drugs such as vemurafenib are available that target this mutation, but in clinical trials, after a period of apparent remission, cancers carrying the V600E mutation invariably develop drug resistance.

Researchers led by Jing Chen, PhD and Sumin Kang, PhD found that the B-raf V600E mutation stimulates cancer cells to produce more of the enzyme HMG-CoA lyase, and that melanoma cells with the V600E mutation are dependent on that enzyme, while other melanoma cells are not.

HMG-CoA lyase is part of the ketogenesis pathway, which allows the body to break down fats for energy when glucose levels in the blood are low. Ketogenesis can be activated by a low-carbohydrate, high-fat diet, and usually takes place in the liver. However, the B-raf V600E mutation appears to be turning on ketogenesis in the cancer cells.

One of the alternative energy sources generated through ketogenesis is acetoacetate, whose levels are controlled by HMG CoA lyase. Acetoacetate combines with the B-raf V600E mutation to stimulate proliferation, the researchers found.

"This combination effect provides an explanation for why V600E is the predominant mutation of B-raf in human cancers," Chen says.

Many possible random mutations occurring in pre-cancerous cells could affect B-raf. This one particular mutation seems to give a pre-cancerous cell an evolutionary advantage, Chen says. The V600E mutation alters the structure of B-raf, so that acetoacetate both binds B-raf and promotes B-raf's oncogenic signaling. Elevated acetoacetate seems to act as a positive feedback mechanism accelerating growth.

Drugs that inhibit HMG-CoA lyase or compete with acetoacetate could be alternatives to or counter resistance to drugs such as vemurafenib, which target the V600E-mutated form of B-raf. Efficacy and toxicity would need to be tested.

"Our results support an emerging concept in cancer metabolism where particular mutations rewire metabolic pathways in cancer cells, in a manner that is distinct from the general Warburg effect favoring glycolysis," Chen adds.

Most of the paper's experiments were performed on human melanoma cells in culture or injected into mice. To show that the metabolic changes they discovered were clinically relevant, researchers tested hairy cell leukemia (a form of leukemia caused by the B-raf V600E mutation) cells obtained directly from patients and found elevated levels of HMG-CoA lyase and acetoacetate, compared to control cells.

---

Une mutation trouvée dans la plupart des mélanomes rebranche le métabolisme des cellules cancéreuses, ce qui les rend dépendant d'une enzyme de la cétogenèse, selon les chercheurs de Winship Cancer Institute de l'Université Emory.

Ces constatations rendent possibles des stratégies pour lutter contre la résistance aux médicaments existants qui ciblent la mutation V600E B-Raf, ou à des alternatives possibles à ces médicaments. Elles peuvent également expliquer pourquoi la mutation V600E en particulier, est si commune dans les mélanomes.

Les résultats sont prévus pour publication dans Molecular Cell.

La mutation V600E favorisant la croissance dans le gène B-Raf est présent dans la plupart des mélanomes, et aussi dans certains cas de et le cancer de la thyroïde. Des médicaments tels que vemurafenib sont disponibles qui cible cette mutation, mais dans des essais cliniques, après une période de rémission apparente, les cancers portant la mutation V600E développent invariablement une résistance aux médicaments.

Les chercheurs dirigés par Jing Chen, Ph.D., et Soumine Kang, PhD trouvé que la mutation V600E B-RAF stimule les cellules cancéreuses à produire plus de l'enzyme HMG-CoA lyase, et que les cellules de mélanome avec mutation V600E sont tributaires de cette enzyme, tandis que d'autres les cellules d'autres mélanomes ne le sont pas.

Le HMG-CoA lyase fait partie de la voie de la cétogenèse, qui permet au corps de décomposer les graisses de l'énergie lorsque les niveaux de glucose dans le sang est faible. La cétogénèse peut être activée par une faible teneur en glucides, régime riche en graisses, et se déroule généralement dans le foie. Cependant, la mutation V600E B-Raf est déclenchée par la cétogenèse dans les cellules cancéreuses.

Une des sources d'énergie alternative générée par cétogénèse est l'acétoacétate, dont les niveaux sont contrôlés par HMG CoA lyase. Les chercheurs ont constaté que l'acétoacétate se combine avec la mutation V600E B-raf pour stimuler la prolifération.

"Cet effet de combinaison fournit une explication du pourquoi V600E est la mutation prédominante de B-Raf dans les cancers humains», dit Chen.

De nombreuses mutations aléatoires possibles survenant dans les cellules pré-cancéreuses pourraient affecter B-RAF. Cette mutation particulière-ci semble donner à une cellule précancéreuse un avantage évolutif, dit Chen. La mutation V600E modifie la structure de B-Raf, de sorte que l'acétoacétate se lie à la fois à B-Raf et favorise la signalisation oncogénique de B-RAF. L'acétoacétate élevée semble agir comme un mécanisme de rétroaction pour une accélération de la croissance du cancer.

Les médicaments qui inhibent la HMG-CoA lyase ou qui concurrencent avec l'acétoacétate pourraient être des alternatives à la résistance aux médicaments tels que le vemurafenib, qui ciblent la forme de B-Raf V600E muté. L'efficacité et la toxicité devraient être testées.

"Nos résultats appuient un concept émergent dans le métabolisme du cancer où des mutations particulières reconnectent des voies métaboliques dans les cellules cancéreuses, d'une manière qui est distinct de l'effet Warburg générale favorisant la glycolyse", ajoute Chen.

La plupart des expériences de l'article ont été réalisées sur des cellules de mélanome humaines en culture ou injectées dans les souris. Pour montrer que les changements métaboliques qu'ils ont découverts étaient cliniquement pertinents, les chercheurs ont testé sur des cellules de la leucémie à tricholeucocytes (une forme de leucémie causée par l'V600E mutation B-RAF) obtenues directement auprès des patients et ont trouvé des niveaux élevés de l'HMG-CoA lyase et acétoacétate, comparativement aux cellules témoins.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène BRAF   Ven 17 Avr 2015 - 9:27

Décidément, le traitement du mélanome avancé connaît une véritable révolution thérapeutique et celle-ci se poursuit ! L'équipe américaine de Siwen Hu-Lieskovan, spécialiste en immunologie à l'Université d'UCLA (Californie), vient de montrer dans un modèle murin de mélanome métastatique avec mutation BRAF, l’intérêt d’ajouter un inhibiteur MEK à l’association inhibiteur BRAF et immunothérapie.

L’identification de mutations BRAF causales, activant la voie MAPK (mitogen activated protein kinase), dans la moitié des mélanomes a déjà conduit au développement d’inhibiteurs de BRAF (vemurafenib et dabrafenib) et de MEK (trametinib).

Parallèlement, des immunothérapies ont été développées pour bloquer des mécanismes qui freinent le système immunitaire et entravent la réponse immunitaire anti-tumorale. Ainsi, des anticorps contre les checkpoints CTLA4 (ipilimumab) ou PD-1 (pembrolizumab, nivolumab) améliorent la survie.

Cette fois, les chercheurs ont combiné les deux approches (thérapie ciblée et immunothérapie) pour améliorer les résultats mais se sont heurtés à des problèmes de toxicité. Ces chercheurs ont alors montré, sur le mélanome avec mutation BRAF, que la trithérapie, associant les inhibiteurs de BRAF (dabrafenib) et MEK (trametinib) et une immunothérapie (transfert cellulaire adoptif - ACT, ou anti-PD1), provoquait un effet antitumoral plus puissant avec moins d’effets secondaires que la bithérapie dabrafenib/immunothérapie. La trithérapie induit une régression tumorale complète, augmente l’infiltration des cellules T dans les tumeurs, et améliore la cytotoxicité.

Ces résultats sont de bon augure pour les essais de phase 1 qui évaluent actuellement des trithérapies, combinant inhibiteurs de BRAF et MEK avec immunothérapie, chez des patients affectés d’un mélanome métastatique portant la mutation BRAF.

Article rédigé par Georges Simmonds pour RT Flash

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène BRAF   Mar 13 Jan 2015 - 20:53

Moffitt Cancer Center researchers have discovered a mechanism that leads to resistance to targeted therapy in melanoma patients and are investigating strategies to counteract it. Targeted biological therapy can reduce toxicity and improve outcomes for many cancer patients, when compared to the adverse effects of standard chemotherapeutic drugs. However, patients often develop resistance to these targeted therapies, resulting in more aggressive cells that can spread to other sites or cause regrowth of primary tumors.

B-Raf is a protein that is frequently mutated in human cancers, leading to increased tumor cell growth, survival and migration. Drugs that target B-Raf or another protein in the same network called MEK have proved effective in clinical trials. Several B-Raf and MEK inhibitors have been approved with the combination of a B-Raf and a MEK inhibitor being the current standard of care for patients with B-Raf mutant melanoma. However over time many patients become resistant to B-Raf and B-Raf/MEK inhibitor therapy.

Moffitt researchers found that patients who are on B-Raf inhibitor drugs develop more new metastases than patients who are on standard chemotherapy. The researchers wanted to determine how this acquired resistance develops in order to devise better treatment options for patients. They found that melanoma cells that are resistant to B-Raf inhibitors tend to be more aggressive and invasive, thereby allowing the tumor to spread to a new organ site. They used a large screening approach and discovered that this resistance and aggressive behavior was due to high activity of a cell surface protein called EphA2, which is also found on glioblastoma stem cells.

Their study found that simply withdrawing the B-Raf or MEK inhibitor drugs reversed the cells' aggressive behavior. "This suggests that alternate dose scheduling where B-Raf and MEK inhibitors are given to patients intermittently may reduce the aggressiveness of the disease… meaning patients could stay on therapy for more time," said Keiran S. Smalley, Ph.D., scientific director of the Donald A. Adam Comprehensive Melanoma Research Center of Excellence at Moffitt.

The research also showed that targeting EphA2 reduced the aggressive behavior of the melanoma cells. This suggests that drugs that target EphA2 may prevent the development of new disease in patients who receive B-Raf and B-Raf /MEK inhibitor therapy.

The study was published in the online edition of Cancer Discovery on Dec. 26, 2014.

---

Des chercheurs ont découvert un mécanisme qui conduit à une résistance à la thérapie ciblée dans patients atteints de mélanome et enquêtent sur des stratégies visant à contrecarrer cette résistance. La thérapie biologique ciblée peut réduire la toxicité et améliorer les résultats pour de nombreux patients atteints de cancer, par rapport aux effets indésirables des médicaments chimiothérapeutiques standards. Cependant, les patients développent souvent une résistance à ces thérapies ciblées, résultant dans des cellules plus agressives qui peuvent se propager à d'autres sites ou causer la repousse des tumeurs primaires.

B-Raf est une protéine qui est fréquemment muté dans les cancers humains, ce qui conduit à une augmentation de la croissance cellulaire tumorale, la survie et la migration. Les médicaments qui ciblent B-Raf ou d'une autre protéine dans le même réseau appelé MEK ont démontré leur efficacité dans des essais cliniques. Plusieurs inhibiteurs de B-Raf et de MEK ont été approuvés par la combinaison d'un B-Raf et un inhibiteur de MEK étant la norme actuelle de soins pour les patients atteints de mélanome B-Raf mutante. Cependant au fil du temps de nombreux patients deviennent résistantes à B-Raf et la thérapie d'inhibiteur de B-Raf / MEK.

Les chercheurs du centre Moffit ont constaté que les patients qui sont sur les médicaments inhibiteurs de B-raf ont développés de nouvelles métastases plus que les patients qui sont sur la chimiothérapie standard. Les chercheurs ont voulu déterminer comment cette résistance acquise se développe afin de concevoir de meilleures options de traitement pour les patients. Ils ont constaté que les cellules du mélanome qui sont résistantes à des inhibiteurs de B-Raf ont tendance à être plus agressives et invasives, permettant ainsi à la tumeur de se propager vers un nouveau site d'organes. Ils ont utilisé une approche de dépistage et ont découvert que cette résistance et le comportement agressif était due à une forte activité d'une protéine de surface cellulaire appelé EphA2, qui se trouve également sur les cellules souches du glioblastome.

Leur étude a révélé que le simple retrait des médicaments inhibiteurs de B-Raf et de MEK inversait le comportement agressif des cellules. «Cela suggère qu'une autre programmation de la dose des inhibiteurs de B-Raf et de MEK ou que ceux-ci soeint donnés aux patients par intermittence peut réduire l'agressivité de la maladie ... ce qui signifie les patients pourraient rester sur la thérapie pour plus de temps», a déclaré S. Keiran Smalley, Ph.D., scientifique directeur de la A. Adam Comprehensive Melanoma Research Centre d'excellence à Donald Moffitt.

L'étude a également montré que le ciblage EphA2 a réduit le comportement agressif des cellules de mélanome. Ceci suggère que des médicaments qui ciblent EphA2 peuvent empêcher le développement de nouvelle maladie chez les patients qui reçoivent des B-Raf et B-Raf / MEK thérapie d'inhibiteur.

L'étude a été publiée dans l'édition en ligne du cancer découverte sur le 26 décembre.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène BRAF   Mer 12 Nov 2014 - 15:15

A University of Colorado Cancer Center study published online this week in the journal Molecular Cancer Therapeutics reports anti-cancer activity in 10 out of 11 patient tumor samples grown in mice and treated with the experimental drug TAK-733, a small molecule inhibitor of MEK1/2. While the drug is conceived as a second-generation inhibitor in patients harboring the BRAF mutation, the study shows drug activity in melanoma models regardless of BRAF mutation status. Treated tumors shrunk up to 100 percent.

"The importance of this molecule is that it's a next-generation and highly potent inhibitor of a known melanoma pathway. It was highly effective against melanoma and the method of our study -- using patient-derived tumor samples grown in mice -- makes us especially optimistic that we should see similar results in the human disease," says John Tentler, PhD, investigator at the CU Cancer Center, associate professor at CU School of Medicine and one of the paper's lead authors.

Between fifty and sixty percent of human melanomas have an activating mutation in the gene BRAF. According to National Cancer Institute statistics, approximately 1 million people in the United States live with melanoma at any given time. In 2011, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the drug vemurafenib to treat BRAF-mutant melanoma. But while response rates to vemurafenib are in the range of 80 percent for patients with the BRAF mutation, the duration of response if frequently limited to between 2 and 18 months.

"We're learning how to use existing drugs better, for example RAF along with MEK inhibitors to block both mutations and thus a common mechanism of resistance. But there is also room for improvement in the drugs themselves and we hope that TAK-733 could improve on the results of existing, approved MEK inhibitors," Tentler says.

Tentler points to the study's use of melanoma samples contributed by human patients and then grown in mice (called "patient-derived xenografts") as a better predictor of the drug's effectiveness in humans. A common alternative to patient-derived xenografts is to grow tumors in mice from cancer cells that have previously been cultured on plastic, sometimes having been derived from patients decades earlier. Previous work at the CU Program for the Evaluation of Targeted Therapy (PETT) lab and elsewhere shows that cultured cells adapt to their plastic environment, over time potentially losing genetic characteristics of the original cancer and also learning to grow in an environment optimized for plastic.

"When you grow cells on plastic and inject them into mice, that's not what a real tumor looks like. Instead, when you take a sample and grow it as a living tumor in a mouse model, you much more faithfully preserve the genetic and tissue landscape characteristics of the original tumor," Tentler says.

Tentler suggests that while approved BRAF inhibitors such as vemurafenib and MEK inhibitors such as trametinib have proved effective in melanoma, TAK-733 may offer substantial enough improvements to justify its continued development. "There's always a need for better, more potent molecules," Tentler says.


---



Une étude de l'Université du Colorado Cancer Center publié en ligne cette semaine dans la revue Molecular Cancer Therapeutics signale une activité anti-cancer dans des échantillons de tumeurs de 10 sur 11, il s'agit de tumeurs cultivés dans des souris et traités avec le médicament expérimental TAK-733, un inhibiteur de petite molécule de MEK1 / 2. Bien que le médicament est conçu comme un inhibiteur de seconde génération chez les patients porteurs de la mutation BRAF, l'étude montre l'activité du médicament dans les modèles de mélanome BRAF indépendamment de l'état de mutation. Les tumeurs traitées rétrécissent jusqu'à 100 pour cent.

"L'importance de cette molécule est qu'il est une nouvelle génération et puissant inhibiteur d'une voie de mélanome connu Il est très efficace contre le mélanome et la méthode de notre étude -. En utilisant des échantillons de tumeurs provenant de patients adultes chez la souris - nous rend particulièrement optimiste que nous devrions voir des résultats similaires à la maladie humaine ", dit John Tentler, Ph.D., chercheur au Centre du cancer CU, professeur agrégé à l'école de médecine de CU et l'un des auteurs principaux du journal.

Entre cinquante et soixante pour cent des mélanomes humains ont une mutation activatrice du gène BRAF. Selon les statistiques de l'Institut national du cancer, environ 1 million de personnes aux États-Unis vivent avec un mélanome à un moment donné. En 2011, la Food and Drug Administration des États-Unis a approuvé le vemurafenib de médicament pour traiter BRAF-mutant mélanome. Mais alors que les taux de réponse à vemurafenib sont de l'ordre de 80 pour cent pour les patients porteurs de la mutation BRAF, la durée de la réponse est souvent limitée à entre 2 et 18 mois.

«Nous apprenons comment mieux utiliser les médicaments existants, par exemple RAF avec inhibiteurs de MEK pour bloquer les deux mutations et donc un mécanisme commun de résistance. Mais il y a aussi de la place pour l'amélioration dans les médicaments eux-mêmes, et nous espérons que TAK-733 pourrait améliorer les résultats des inhibiteurs de MEK existant, approuvé ", dit Tentler.

Tentler rappelle que l'utilisation d'échantillons humains de mélanome et qui ont été cultivés chez les souris (appelé "xénogreffes dérivées de patients») sont un meilleur indicateur de l'efficacité du médicament chez les humains. Une alternative courante pour le patient est dérivé des xénogreffes de tumeurs de se développer dans des souris à partir de cellules cancéreuses qui ont déjà été mises en culture sur plastique, ayant parfois été dérivé à partir de patients décennies précédentes. Des travaux antérieurs au programme de CU pour l'évaluation de la thérapie ciblée (PETT) en laboratoire et ailleurs montre que les cellules cultivées adapter à leur environnement de plastique, au fil du temps subissent une perte potentielle de caractéristiques génétiques du cancer primitif et aussi apprennent à croitre dans un environnement optimisé pour le plastique.

"Quand vous faites croitre des cellules sur du plastique et les injecter à des souris, ça ne ressemble pas à une vraie tumeur. Au lieu de cela, lorsque vous prenez un échantillon et faites croitre une vraie tumeur dans un modèle de souris, vous avez préservé beaucoup plus fidèlement la génétique et de tissus caractéristiques du paysage de la tumeur d'origine », explique Tentler.

Tentler suggère que, bien que les inhibiteurs de BRAF approuvé tels que vemurafenib et inhibiteurs de MEK comme trametinib ont prouvé leur efficacité dans le mélanome, TAK-733 peut offrir suffisamment d'améliorations substantielles pour justifier son développement. «Il ya toujours un besoin pour de meilleures molécules, plus puissantes», dit Tentler.


_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène BRAF   Sam 13 Sep 2014 - 23:12

Dartmouth researchers have found that the genetic mutation BRAFV600E , frequently found in metastatic melanoma, not only secretes a protein that promotes the growth of melanoma tumor cells, but can also modify the network of normal cells around the tumor to support the disease's progression. Targeting this mutation with Vemurafenib reduces this interaction, and suggests possible new treatment options for melanoma therapy. They report on their findings in "BRAFV600E melanoma cells secrete factors that activate stromal fibroblasts and enhance tumourigenicity," which was recently published in British Journal of Cancer.

Authors of the study are Dr. Chery A. Whipple, research associate at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, and Dr. Constance Brinckerhoff, professor of Medicine and of Biochemistry at Geisel and member of Dartmouth-Hitchcock Norris Cotton Cancer Center.

"This work supports the importance of the tumor cells "talking" with the normal cells present in the tumor microenvironment," said Whipple, first author on the study. "Targeting the tumor cells with specific therapy to reduce the secreted proteins can reduce the aggressive behavior of the tumor and inhibit disease progression."

Melanoma, the most lethal form of skin cancer, is responsible for more than 80 percent of all skin cancer deaths and spreads readily to the lymph nodes and other organs. While early stage melanoma is curable, the later vertical growth phase (VGP) is frequently metastatic, with median survival times of less than nine months. Melanoma that progresses to this stage is often associated with the gene mutation BRAFV600E, which is found in about 50 percent of melanomas. This BRAF mutation activates certain enzyme pathways that are involved in many cell processes.

Using genetically engineered melanoma cell lines and xenograft mouse models, the Dartmouth researchers found that BRAFV600E melanoma cells expressed higher levels of several cytokines (proteins that act on the immune system and can be used to help the body fight cancer) and Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1; MMPs are associated with various processes including tissue repair and metastasis). Their study also suggests a mechanistic link between BRAFV600E and MMP-1 that modifies the network of normal cells surrounding melanoma tumors, making these "normal cells" more supportive of tumor growth and development. Vemurafenib, a therapeutic drug that specifically targets the BRAFV600E mutation, is able to reduce the expression of several proteins essential for activating this interaction.

"Given that our data show that Vemurafenib is able to reduce the expression of several proteins that are essential for activating the tumor microenvironment (TME), a next step would be to ask whether Vemurafenib normalizes the TME, or keeps it from becoming activated," said Whipple. "If so, does it create a window of time where we could target the TME, normalize it, and enhance the patient's therapeutic response?"
---

Des chercheurs de Dartmouth ont trouvé que la mutation génétique BRAFV600E, fréquemment trouvé dans le mélanome métastatique, non seulement sécrète une protéine qui favorise la croissance des cellules tumorales du mélanome, mais peut également modifier le réseau de cellules normales autour de la tumeur pour soutenir la progression de la maladie. Cibler cette mutation avec vemurafenib réduit cette interaction, et suggère d'éventuelles nouvelles options de traitement pour le traitement du mélanome. Ils rendent compte de leurs résultats dans des «Les cellules de mélanome BRAFV600E sécrétent des facteurs qui activent les fibroblastes du stroma et améliorent tumorigénicité," qui a été récemment publié dans British Journal of Cancer.

Les auteurs de l'étude sont le Dr Chery A. Whipple, associé de recherche à l'École de médecine Geisel à Dartmouth, et le Dr Constance Brinckerhoff, professeur de médecine et de biochimie de Geisel et membre de Dartmouth-Hitchcock Norris Cotton Cancer Center.

«Ce travail confirme l'importance des cellules tumorales qui "parlent" avec les cellules normales présentes dans le microenvironnement de la tumeur", a déclaré Whipple, premier auteur de l'étude. "Le ciblage des cellules tumorales avec une thérapie spécifique pour réduire les protéines sécrétées peuvent réduire l'agressivité de la tumeur et d'inhiber la progression de la maladie."

Le mélanome, la forme la plus mortelle de cancer de la peau, est responsable de plus de 80 pour cent de tous les décès par cancer de la peau et se propage facilement dans les ganglions lymphatiques et d'autres organes. Bien que le mélanome de stade précoce est guérissable, la phase de croissance verticale plus tard (VGP) est souvent métastatique. Le mélanome qui progresse à ce stade est souvent associée à la mutation génique BRAFV600E, qui se trouve dans environ 50 pour cent des mélanomes. Cette mutation BRAF active certaines voies enzymatiques qui sont impliqués dans de nombreux processus cellulaires.

En utilisant des lignées de cellules de mélanome modifiées génétiquement et les modèles de xénogreffe de souris, les chercheurs de Dartmouth ont constaté que les cellules BRAFV600E du mélanome ont exprimé des niveaux élevés de plusieurs cytokines (protéines qui agissent sur le système immunitaire et peuvent être utilisés pour aider à la lutte cancer du corps) et la métalloprotéinase-1 (MMP-1; MMPs sont associés à divers procédés, y compris la réparation tissulaire et la métastase). Leur étude suggère également un lien mécanique entre BRAFV600E et MMP-1 et qui modifie le réseau de cellules normales environnantes des tumeurs de mélanome, ce qui rend ces cellules "normales" plus favorable à la croissance et au développement de la tumeur. Vemurafenib, un médicament thérapeutique qui cible spécifiquement la mutation BRAFV600E, est capable de réduire l'expression de plusieurs protéines essentielles pour l'activation de cette interaction.

"Étant donné que nos données montrent que le vemurafenib est capable de réduire l'expression de plusieurs protéines qui sont essentielles pour l'activation du microenvironnement de la tumeur (TME), la prochaine étape serait de se demander si le vemurafenib normalise la TME, ou l'empêche de devenir actif," dit Whipple. "Si c'est le cas, faut-il créer une fenêtre de temps où nous pouvions viser la TME, la normaliser et d'améliorer la réponse thérapeutique du patient?"

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène BRAF   Mer 7 Mai 2014 - 19:38

Roche a dévoilé mercredi des résultats de phase 1b sur la conjugaison MEK-BRAF montrant que l'association des deux molécules s'était révélée efficace dans le traitement du mélanome métastatique (cancer de la peau).

Le groupe biopharmaceutique suisse explique que le cobimetinib associé au Zelboraf (vemurafenib) a entraîné une amélioration médiane de 13,7 mois de la durée de vie des patients traités.

Roche rappelle qu'une autre étude de phase 3 doit maintenant venir confirmer ces conclusions d'ici à la fin de l'année.

Ces données de phase 1b ont été présentées à l'occasion du congrès de l'association européenne de dermato-oncologie (EADO), organisé à Vilnius (Lituanie).

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène BRAF   Jeu 10 Avr 2014 - 8:04

Drugs used to block copper absorption for a rare genetic condition may find an additional use as a treatment for certain types of cancer, researchers at Duke Medicine report.

The researchers found that cancers with a mutation in the BRAF gene require copper to promote tumor growth. These tumors include melanoma, the most dangerous form of skin cancer that kills an estimated 10,000 people in the United States a year, according to the National Cancer Institute.

"BRAF-positive cancers like melanoma almost hunger for copper," said Christopher M. Counter, Ph.D., professor of Pharmacology & Cancer Biology at Duke University School of Medicine and senior author of the study published April 9, 2014, in Nature.

The BRAF gene is involved in regulating cell division and differentiation. When mutated, the gene causes cells to grow out of control. Using animal models and cells, Counter and colleagues found that when they experimentally inhibited copper uptake by tumors with the BRAF mutation, they could curb tumor growth.

They achieved similar results with drugs used to treat patients with Wilson disease, a genetic disorder in which copper builds up in the tissue, primarily the brain and liver, causing damage.

"Oral drugs used to lower copper levels in Wilson disease could be repurposed to treat BRAF-driven cancers like melanoma, or perhaps even others like thyroid or lung cancer," said Donita C. Brady, Ph.D., lead author of the study.

Already, a clinical trial has been approved at Duke to test the copper-reducing drugs in patients with melanoma, although enrollment has not yet begun: http://1.usa.gov/1qefSJm

"This is a great example of how basic research moves from the laboratory to the clinic," Counter said.

---

Les médicaments utilisés pour bloquer l'absorption du cuivre pour une maladie génétique rare peuvent trouver une utilisation supplémentaire dans le traitement de certains types de cancer.

Les chercheurs ont découvert que les cancers ayant une mutation dans le gène BRAF nécessitent du cuivre afin de promouvoir la croissance tumorale. Ces tumeurs incluent le mélanome.

"Les cancers de BRAF positif comme le mélanome sont presque affamés de cuivre », a déclaré Christopher M. compteur , Ph.D., professeur de pharmacologie.

Le gène BRAF est impliqué dans la régulation de la division cellulaire et la différenciation . Lorsque muté, le gène provoque des cellules à croître hors de contrôle. En utilisant des modèles et des cellules animales, Counter et ses collègues ont constaté que quand ils ont expérimentalement inhibé l'absorption du cuivre par des tumeurs avec mutation BRAF, ils pourraient freiner la croissance de la tumeur.

Ils ont obtenu des résultats similaires avec des médicaments utilisés pour traiter les patients atteints de la maladie de Wilson, une maladie génétique dans laquelle le cuivre s'accumule dans les tissus, principalement le cerveau et le foie, causant des dommages .

«Les médicaments oraux utilisés à des niveaux inférieurs de cuivre dans la maladie de Wilson pourraient être réutilisés pour traiter les cancers entraînés par BRAF comme le mélanome, ou peut-être même d'autres comme la thyroïde ou le cancer du poumon », a déclaré l'auteur principal de l'étude .

Déjà , un essai clinique a été approuvé pour tester les médicaments entrainant une de réduction du cuivre chez les patients atteints de mélanome, bien que l'inscription n'a pas encore commencé : http://1.usa.gov/1qefSJm

«C'est un excellent exemple de la façon dont se déplace de recherche fondamentale du laboratoire à la clinique ", a déclaré counter.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène BRAF   Mar 28 Jan 2014 - 18:44

Moffitt Cancer Center researchers have laid the groundwork for a revolutionary new combination therapy for the treatment of advanced melanoma – melanoma that cannot be removed surgically or has spread to other areas of the body. The newly FDA-approved therapy, Mekinist (trametinib) in combination with Tafinlar (dabrafenib), is one of the biggest advancements in melanoma treatment in the past 30 years.

Des chercheurs ont jeté les bases d'une nouvelle combianison de thérapie révolutionnaire pour le traitement du mélanome avancé - le mélanome qui ne peut être enlevé chirurgicalement ou s'est propagé à d' autres parties du corps . La thérapie nouvellement approuvé par la FDA , Mekinist ( trametinib ) en combinaison avec Tafinlar ( dabrafenib ) , est l'un des plus grands progrès dans le traitement du mélanome au cours des 30 dernières années .

“Melanoma is the most aggressive type of skin cancer and the leading cause of death from skin disease,” said Jeffrey S. Weber, M.D., Ph.D., director of Moffitt’s Melanoma Research Center of Excellence. “This new combination therapy is a huge step in the right direction for the treatment of melanoma, and our researchers played a large role in bringing this treatment option to patients.”

"Le mélanome est la forme la plus agressive de cancer de la peau et la principale cause de décès par maladie de la peau », a déclaré Jeffrey S. Weber , MD , Ph.D., directeur du Centre d'excellence de recherche sur le mélanome de Moffitt. " Cette nouvelle combinaison thérapeutique est un grand pas dans la bonne direction pour le traitement du mélanome , et nos chercheurs ont joué un grand rôle en apportant cette option de traitement pour les patients."

Mekinist and Tafinlar are used to block signaling in different sites of the same molecular pathway – the MAP kinase pathway. Keiran S. Smalley, Ph.D., scientific director of the Melanoma Research Center of Excellence, and his team began investigating this pathway in 2010 and discovered the best way to block its ability to promote cancer cell growth was with combined inhibitor therapy.

Mekinist et Tafinlar sont utilisés pour bloquer la signalisation dans les différents sites d'une même voie moléculaire - la voie de la MAP kinase . Keiran S. Smalley , Ph.D., directeur scientifique du Centre de recherche de mélanome d'excellence , et son équipe ont commencé à enquêter cette voie en 2010 et découvert la meilleure façon de bloquer sa capacité de promouvoir la croissance des cellules de cancer était à la thérapie combinée de l'inhibiteur.

The new combination therapy is indicated for melanoma patients whose tumors express gene mutations called BRAF V600E and V600K. Approximately half of all metastatic melanoma patients’ tumors have a BRAF mutation, an abnormal change that can enable melanoma tumor cells to grow and spread.

La nouvelle combinaison de thérapie est indiquée pour les patients atteints de mélanome dont les tumeurs expriment des mutations du gène BRAF V600E et V600K. Environ la moitié des tumeurs de tous les patients de mélanome métastatique ont une mutation de BRAF, un changement anormal qui peut permettre à des cellules tumorales de mélanome de croître et de s'étendre.

BRAF-inhibitor resistance has long been a problem in the melanoma field, but Moffitt researchers found that using two inhibitors to block different growth pathways during treatment prevented resistance in patients with this mutation.

La résistance aux inhibiteurs de BRAF a longtemps été un problème pour ce qui est du mélanome, mais des chercheurs Moffitt ont trouvé que l'utilisation de deux inhibiteurs pour bloquer différentes voies de croissance au cours du traitement a empêché une résistance chez les patients présentant cette mutation.

“A clinical trial in which Moffitt was the major contributor showed a 76 percent success rate for patients treated with the Mekinist and Tafinlar combination. We also found this therapy reduced the incidence and severity of some of the toxic effects patients experienced when the drugs were used alone,” said Weber.

"Un essai clinique dans lequel Moffitt a été le principal contributeur a montré un taux de réussite de 76 pour cent pour les patients traités avec la combinaison et Mekinist et Tafinlar . Nous avons également constaté ce traitement réduit l'incidence et la gravité des effets toxiques que certains patients ont connu lorsque les médicaments ont été utilisés seuls », a déclaré Weber

The FDA approved the combination of Mekinist and Tafinlar through its accelerated approval program, which allows the agency to approve drugs to treat a serious disease based on clinical data showing the therapy has a proven effect and clinical benefit to patients. The FDA also reviewed this combination of drugs under the agency’s priority review because they demonstrated the potential to be a significant improvement in safety or effectiveness in the treatment of melanoma.

La FDA a approuvé la combinaison de Mekinist et Tafinlar à travers son programme d'approbation accélérée, qui permet à l'organisme d'approuver des médicaments pour traiter une maladie sérieuse basée sur des données cliniques montrant que le traitement a un effet prouvé et un bénéfice clinique pour les patients. La FDA a également examiné cette combinaison de médicaments en vertu de la revue prioritaire de l'agence , car il a démontré le potentiel d'être une amélioration significative de la sécurité ou de l'efficacité dans le traitement du mélanome.[/b]

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène BRAF   Mer 29 Mai 2013 - 17:19

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved two new drugs, dabrafenib (Tafinlar) and trametinib (Mekinist), for patients with advanced or unresectable melanoma, the most dangerous type of skin cancer.

La FDA a approuvé aujourd'hui 2 nouveaux médicaments : le dabrafenif et le trametib pour les patients avec un mélanome avancé.

Dabrafenib, a BRAF inhibitor, is approved to treat patients with melanoma whose tumors express the BRAF V600E gene mutation. Trametinib, a MEK inhibitor, is approved to treat patients whose tumors express the BRAF V600E or V600K gene mutations. Approximately half of melanomas arising in the skin have a BRAF gene mutation. Dabrafenib and trametinib are being approved as single agents, not as a combination treatment.

Le dabraaferib, un inhibiteur de BRAF est approuvé pour traité les patients avec une mutation V600E. Le trametinib, un inhibiteur de MEK est approuvé pour trater les patients avec une mutation BRAF V600E ou V600K. La moitié des mélanome ont une mutation BRAF. Les agents sont approuvés pour être employés seul pas en combinaison.

The FDA approved dabrafenib and trametinib with a genetic test called the THxID BRAF test, a companion diagnostic that will help determine if a patient’s melanoma cells have the V600E or V600K mutation in the BRAF gene.

Il y a un test génétique appelé THxID BRAF pour déterminer lequel des mutations a un patient

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène BRAF   Ven 12 Avr 2013 - 12:57

Apr. 7, 2013 — Vemurafenib-resistant tumors in patients with melanoma showed reduced growth after cessation of treatment, and in animal models, drug resistance was prevented by intermittent treatment, according to data presented at the AACR Annual Meeting 2013, held in Washington, D.C., April 6-10.

"It was exciting to witness the discovery of BRAF mutations in melanoma and the translation of this discovery into an effective therapy with vemurafenib," said Darrin Stuart, Ph.D., senior research investigator at the Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research in Emeryville, Calif. "It was, however, disappointing to see patients stop responding to such a promising therapy after six to eight months of treatment."

Ça a été désappointant de voir les patients cesser de répondre à la thérapie après 6 ou 8 mois de traitement.

BRAF mutations are found in more than half of all cases of melanoma, and previous studies have shown vemurafenib increases survival for these patients, according to Stuart. However, most patients relapse with lethal, drug-resistant disease.

Les mutations BRAF sont trouvé dans plus de la moitié des cas de mélanome et des études antérieures ont montré des accroissements de survie pour ces patients. Toutefois la plupart des patients rechûte après une résistance au médicament.

In a previous study to investigate the mechanisms causing melanomas to become resistant to vemurafenib, Stuart and his colleagues grew patient-derived tumors expressing BRAF mutations in mice and demonstrated that not only do these tumors develop vemurafenib resistance, but they become dependent on the drug to grow. Tumors stopped growing and regressed after cessation of the drug in these animals.

Dans une étude pour trouver les mécanismes qui causent la résistance au vemurafenib, Stuart et ses collègues ont démontré que non seulement ces tumeurs développent une résistance aux vemurafenib mais elles deviennent dépendantes du médicament pour croitre, les tumeurs arrêtent de croitre et régressent après l'arrêt de la médication chez les animaux.

To evaluate whether the drug dependency observed in animals is seen in humans as well, Stuart and his team collaborated with colleagues who evaluated 42 patients with vemurafenib-resistant tumors at the Royal Marsden Hospital in London, United Kingdom. Computed tomography scans of the tumors taken after cessation of treatment were available for 19 patients. Of these patients, 14 showed a decrease in the rate of their tumor growth.

Pour évaluer si la dépendance aux médicament observée chez les animaux est chez les humains aussi , Stuart et son équipe ont évalué 42 patients avec une résistance au vemurafenib , Chez ces patients, 14 montraient une décroissance dans le taux de croissance de la tumeur.

"This is the first evidence that the drug-addicted state that we observed in our mouse models may also occur in humans," said Stuart.

C'est la preuve que l'état de dépendance au médicament observée chez le souris peut arriver aussi chez les humains.

He and his colleagues also implanted mice with human patient-derived tumors and treated them with vemurafenib either continuously or intermittently -- four weeks on and two weeks off. They found that none of the tumors in animals assigned to intermittent dosing developed drug resistance.

Lui et ses collègues ont implanté chez les souris des tumeurs humaines et les ont traité soit en continu, soit en intermittence ( 4 semaine avec et 2 semaines sans). Ils ont découvert qu'aucune des tumeurs chez les souris soignées en intemittence n'a développé de réisistance au médicament.

"Continuous dosing maintained the selective pressure required for the few surviving tumor cells to develop resistance, and alternating the selective pressure through intermittent dosing appeared to prevent the evolution and expansion of resistant cells," said Stuart. "This study provides insight into how vemurafenib-resistant tumors evolve. Alternative dose regimens could prolong the durability of response to vemurafenib in BRAF-mutant melanoma."


Le traitement en continu maintient la pression requise pour que quelques cellules développent de la résistance et le traitement alternatif prévient l'apparition et le développement de ces cellules.. Cette étude fournit donc les raisons pour lesquelles les cellules cancéreuses traitées au vemurafenib développe de la résistance.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène BRAF   Lun 1 Avr 2013 - 11:54

Trametinib Shows Activity in Previously Treated but BRAF Inhibitor–naive BRAF-mutant Melanoma

By The ASCO Post
March 15, 2013, Volume 4, Issue 5




In a multicenter phase II study, trametinib showed “significant clinical activity” in a cohort of BRAF inhibitor–naive patients with BRAF-mutant cutaneous melanoma previously treated with chemotherapy and/or immunotherapy. Only minimal clinical activity, however, was observed among a cohort of patients who had previously been treated with a BRAF inhibitor. Results were published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Dans une étude de phase II, le trametinib a montré une activité clinique signifiante dans une cohorte de patients qui n'avaient pas expérimenté d'inhibiteurs de BRAF avant. mais traité avec de la chimio ou de l'immunothérapie avant. Mais seulement une activité minimale a été observée dans une cohorte de patients qui avaient été traité avec un inhibiteur de BRAF. Les résultats ont été plubliés dans le Journal Oncology.

All patients in the trial received 2 mg of the MEK1/MEK2 inhibitor trametinib orally once daily. The median time for receiving the study drug was 56 days for those previously treated with a BRAF inhibitor (dabrafenib or vemurafenib [Zelboraf]) and 120 days for those previously treated with chemotherapy and/or immunotherapy.

Tous les patients ont reçu 2 mg de l'inhibiteur de MEK1/MEK2 trametinib à prendre oralement. Le temps moyen pour recevoir le médicament de l'étude a été de 56 jours pour ceux qui avaient déja reçu un inhibiteur de BRAF avant et 120 jours pour ceux qui avaient été traités avant par chimiothérapie ou immunothérpie.

Among the 40 patients who had previously been treated with a BRAF inhibitor, none had confirmed objective responses and 11 (28%) had stable disease. The median progression-free survival was 1.8 months. The researchers concluded that these data suggest that “BRAF-inhibitor resistance mechanisms likely confer resistance to MEK-inhibitor monotherapy.”

Parmi les 40 patients qui avaient été traité auparavant avec un inhibiteur de BRAF : aucun a eu une réponse objective et 11 (28%) ont vu leur maladie stabilisée. La progression de survie sans maladie a été de 1,8 mois. Les chercheurs ont conclu que ces données suggèrent que les mécanismes de résistance aux inhbiteurs de BRAF confèrent la résistance à la monothérapie aux inhibiteurs de MEK.

Among the 57 patients who had not previously been treated with a BRAF inhibitor, the confirmed response rate was 25%. One patient (2%) had a complete response, and 13 patients (23%) had partial responses. In addition, 29 patients (51%) had stable disease. The median progression-free survival was 4.0 months.

Parmi les 57 patients qui n'avaient pas reçu auparavant l'inhibiteur de BRAF, le taux de réponse a été de 25%. un patient (2%) a eu une réponse complète et 13 (23%) ont eu des réponses patieilles. En plus 29 patients (51%) ont eu une stabilisation de la maladie. La moyenne de survie sans progression de la maladie a été de 4 mois.

“Activity was broad,” the researchers noted, with objective responses observed in patients with BRAF V600E and V600K (the more common BRAF mutations), as well as rare BRAF mutations. “These data support further evaluation of trametinib in BRAF inhibitor–naive BRAF-mutant melanoma, including rarer forms of BRAF-mutant melanoma,” the investigators stated. They also noted that trametinib monotherapy could be useful for patients who cannot tolerate a BRAF inhibitor.

L'activité a été générale, notent les chercheurs avec des réponses objectives obserevées chez les patients BRAF V600E te V600K (les mutations les plus communes de BRAF) aussi bien qu'avec les mutations plus rares. Ces données suportent la continuation des essais de trametinib pour les patients avec un mélanome qui n'ont pas eu d'inhibiteurs de BRAF avant. Les chercheurs notent aussi que trametinib peut être utile pour ceux qui ne tolèrent pas les inhibiteurs de BRAF.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène BRAF   Mer 6 Juin 2012 - 19:44

Des chercheurs français ont réalisé une étude démontrant l'efficacité d'une nouvelle thérapie ciblée destinée à traiter les patients atteints d'un mélanome métastatique ou avancé.

Présentés à l'occasion du 48e congrès de l'American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), les résultats de cette étude pourraient permettre à long terme d'améliorer l'arsenal thérapeutique contre ce cancer de la .

Présentée par le Dr Caroline Robert, cancérologue et chef de service de dermatologie de l'Institut Gustave Roussy (IGR), cette étude a permis de comparer la nouvelle thérapie ciblée - la molécule trametinib - à deux chimiothérapies actuellement utilisées en traitements standards : dacarbazine et paclitaxel.

Les chercheurs ont inclus 322 patients atteints d'un mélanome métastatique ou avancé porteur de la mutation «BRAF V600E/K» dans l'étude, séparés en deux groupes.


À l'issue de l'étude, les scientifiques ont observé une baisse de 56% du risque de progression du mélanome dans le groupe de patients traités par trametinib, ainsi qu'une survie sans progression de la maladie à 4,8 mois, contre 1,4 mois pour la chimiothérapie standard.

Autre constat positif : la nouvelle thérapie ciblée ne provoque que très peu d'effets indésirables. Les chercheurs ont notamment observé une éruption cutanée, de la diarrhée, des oedèmes, ou encore de l'hypertension.

«Une autorisation de mise sur le marché pour le trametinib devrait être délivrée prochainement, agrandissant ainsi l'arsenal thérapeutique contre cette maladie», concluent les principaux auteurs de l'étude.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène BRAF   Lun 4 Juin 2012 - 10:37

MEK également ciblée dans les mélanomes avancés


Alors que pendant longtemps on ne trouvait aucune solution à opposer au mélanome, un cancer des mélanocytes de la peau, les traitements font peu à peu leur apparition. Dans un essai clinique mené par le laboratoire pharmaceutique GlaxoSmithKline, le trametinib a prolongé la vie de patients atteints d’un mélanome avancé.

La molécule cible là aussi la protéine MEK : elle protège le gène Braf, qui une fois muté peut déclencher le cancer. L’essai clinique sur 322 personnes atteintes de la maladie ayant reçu le trametinib ou un autre médicament révèle que le nouveau principe actif procure des avantages sur la qualité de vie : il fallait 4,8 mois avant que la maladie n’empire contre 1,5 autrement. Six mois après le début des traitements, 81 % des personnes traitées avec le trametinib vivaient encore, contre 67 % des patients soignés par chimiothérapie classique.
Le traitement pourrait être encore plus efficace s’il était complété par une inhibition du gène Braf. Le laboratoire y travaille et tente déjà d’élaborer le dabrafenib.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène BRAF   Lun 28 Mai 2012 - 12:08

Cancer de la peau: Les traitements de GSK pourraient supplanter ceux de Roche
Mis à jour le 28.05.12 à 17h57

Deux traitements expérimentaux contre le cancer de la développés par GlaxoSmithKline - chacun conçu pour bloquer différentes voies de passage des cellules tumorales - semblent en passe de voler la vedette au Zelboraf (vemurafenib), le médicament pionner de Roche dans ce domaine, selon Citigroup.

Le courtier, qui a relevé lundi son objectif de cours sur l'action GSK, anticipe pour le groupe pharmaceutique des ventes annuelles de dabrafenib et de trametinib de l'ordre de 1,5 milliard de livres (1,87 milliard d'euros) d'ici 2020, un montant près de trois fois supérieur au consensus du marché.

Il a été démontré à l'occasion de tests à petite échelle que le dabrafenib, un inhibiteur de BRAF, et le trametinib, un inhibiteur de MEK, freinaient tous deux le développement des mélanomes avec peu d'effets secondaires.

Selon Andrew Baum, analyste de Citi, le dabrafenib devrait être commercialisé en 2013 et, vu ses effets secondaires moindres sur la peau et les articulations, grignoterait rapidement les ventes du Zelboraf de Roche, tandis que la combinaison du dabrafenib et du trametinib deviendrait à partir de 2014 la référence en matière de traitement des mélanomes.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène BRAF   Ven 18 Mai 2012 - 12:36

(May 17, 2012) — An experimental drug targeting a common mutation in melanoma successfully shrank tumors that spread to the brain in nine out of 10 patients in part of an international phase I clinical trial report in the May 18 issue of The Lancet.

Un médicament expérimental ciblant une mutation commune du cancer de la le mélanome réussit à réduire les tumeurs qui ont métastasé dans le cerveau dans 9 patients sur 10 dans un essai clinique international de phase I

The drug dabrafenib, which targets the Val600 BRAF mutation that is active in half of melanoma cases, also cut the size of tumors in 25 of 36 patients with late-stage melanoma that had not spread to the brain. The drug also showed activity in other cancer types with the BRAF mutation.

Le médicament dabrafenib, qui cible la mutation Val600 BRAF qui est active dans la moitié des cas de mélanomes, a aussi rapetissé la dimension des tumeurs de 25 patients sur 36 des patients avec un mélanome avancé qui n'a pas métastasé au cerveau. Le médicament a aussi montré une activité sur d'Autres cancers avec la mutation BRAF.

"Nine out of 10 responses among patients with brain metastases is really exciting. No other systemic therapy has ever demonstrated this much activity against melanoma brain metastases," said study co-lead author Gerald Falchook, M.D., assistant professor in the Department of Investigational Cancer Therapeutics at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

9 patients sur 10 c'est très excitant. Aucune autre thérapie n'a jamais démontré autant d'activité contre les métastases au cerveau du mélanome.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène BRAF   Jeu 9 Avr 2009 - 6:07

Des chercheurs oeuvrant pour l’Institut de recherche sur le cancer de l’Angleterre affirment que plus de 70% des mélanomes sont dus à une mutation génétique qui rend cancéreuses les cellules après une exposition aux rayons du soleil.

Les scientifiques ont remarqué que les patients souffrant de la forme la plus maligne de ce cancer de la peau présentaient un gène, appelé BRAF, qui était endommagé.

«Notre étude montre que le gène BRAF endommagé est le premier pas vers le cancer de la peau. Mieux comprendre ce phénomène nous aidera à développer de meilleurs traitements contre la maladie», a mentionné l’auteur principal, le Dr Richard Marais.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène BRAF   Lun 29 Oct 2007 - 16:57

Mise à jour 2007 :





Les cancers de la peau et en particulier les mélanomes sont en progression constante dans les pays occidentaux, l'incidence double tous les 12 ans. Les raisons épidémiologiques sont assez claires : climat, pollution, déplacement d'ethnie et façon de vivre.

Toutefois, les mécanismes moléculaires associés à cette transformation ne sont pas clairement élucidés. Les protéines B-Raf, p16, PTEN et β-caténine ont certainement un rôle dans la transformation des mélanocytes; des mutations spécifiques ont été identifiées dans un certain nombre de mélanomes. La fonction causale de B-Raf, PTEN et de β-caténine dans la transformation des mélanocytes in vivo n'a pas été montrée. En ce qui concerne p16, la fréquence d'apparition de mélanomes in vivo est faible pour les souris n'exprimant plus cette protéine. D'autres protéines comme IGF1R, cadhérine, Mitf et Brn-2 pour ne citer que celles-ci, ont été associées dans la transformation des mélanocytes mais leurs rôles sont beaucoup moins clairs.
Afin de mieux comprendre/améliorer la prévention, le diagnostic précoce, la transformation cellulaire, et la thérapie des mélanomes, il nous paraît crucial de connaître les mécanismes cellulaires et moléculaires qui ont lieu lors du développement normal et pathologique de ce lignage, et dans leur transformation en mélanomes. Les données de génétique humaine associées à la production/l'étude de modèles murins nous permettra d'appréhender les processus moléculaires et cellulaires qui ont lieu lors de l'oncogenèse mélanocytaire.
Nous avons centré notre recherche sur β-caténine et ses protéines associées dans le développement normal et pathologique des mélanocytes. β-caténine est une protéine multifonctionnelle contrôlant l'adhérence cellulaire avec les cadhérines, la transmission du signal à travers IGF1R, PTEN et Akt, la transcription avec les facteurs Mitf-Brn2, respectivement. Il nous paraît essentiel d'étudier le rôle de β-caténine, et ses protéines associées, dans la transformation mélanocytaire car cette protéine semble jouer un rôle central dans de nombreux processus et son activité est stimulée par des mutations spécifiques.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15775
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Le gène BRAF   Mer 9 Nov 2005 - 20:20

Les mutations d'un gène ( BRAF ) prédisent la sensibilité à une classe nouvelle de médicaments du cancer



Une équipe de chercheurs conduite par des scientifiques du Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center a découvert qu'une nouvelle classe de médicaments est efficace chez des patients ayant des mutations du gène BRAF. BRAF est une protéine qui joue un rôle central dans la croissance et la survie des cellules cancéreuses et qui est mutée chez la majorité des patients ayant un mélanome et chez une minorité de patients ayant un cancer du colon, du sein, et des poumons. Les résultats, disponibles dans une pré publication on line du journal Nature, montrent qu'il y a là une thérapie potentielle chez les patients dont les tumeurs contiennent cette mutation.

Les chercheurs ont trouvé que les médicaments qui inhibent une protéine appelaient MEK inhibaient sélectivement la croissance de tumeurs cancéreuses qui ont une mutation du gène BRAF. Un de ces médicaments, PD0325901 (développé par le laboratoire Pfizer), est maintenant testé chez des patients porteurs d'un mélanome, d'un cancer du colon, du sein, et des poumons.

En outre, en ré - analysant les données de plus d 42.000 combinés testés par l'institut National du cancer, les investigateurs ont identifié un petit nombre d'autres combinés qui eux aussi inhibent sélectivement les tumeurs qui ont une mutation BRAF. Le mécanisme d'action de certains de ces combinés doit encore être déterminé, mais plusieurs de ces combinés plus efficaces étaient aussi inhibiteurs de la protéine MEK .

Selon l'auteur principal, le Dr. Neal Rosen, Professeur de Médecine, toutes les tumeurs ayant une mutation BRAF et certaines ayant une mutation RAS sont sensibles aux médicaments qui inhibent MEK. Traduire ces résultats en stratégie pour traiter des patients dont les tumeurs sont dépendantes de ce changement génétique spécifique est le prochain pas, et des essais clinique sont actuellement en cours.

Selon le Dr. David Solit, du Memorial Sloan-Kettering, la mutation BRAF a été identifiée en premier par des investigateurs cherchant des protéines qui sont fréquemment mutées dans le cancer humain. L'étude est une retombée du Human Genome Project, et du Cancer Genome Project, qui a pour but d'identifier les mutations qui causent des cancers humains.

Selon les auteurs, c'est le premier d'une série de nouveaux médicaments qui spécifiquement ciblent les cellules cancéreuses qui contiennent des mutations identifiées par le Human Genome Project. L'espoir est que ces nouvelles thérapies seront plus efficaces et moins toxiques que les chimiothérapies traditionnelles.


Dernière édition par le Mar 30 Oct 2007 - 13:30, édité 1 fois
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: Le gène BRAF   Aujourd'hui à 22:11

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
Le gène BRAF
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 1
 Sujets similaires
-
» Le gène BRAF
» Enigme posée par une petite fille qui ne grandit pas ou le gène de l'immortalité
» Le gène DAPK1
» Des moyens de bloquer le gène et la protéine p21.
» Peut-on breveter un gène ?

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
ESPOIRS :: Cancer :: recherche-
Sauter vers: