AccueilCalendrierFAQRechercherS'enregistrerMembresGroupesConnexion

Partagez | 
 

 L'immuno-radiothérapie

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
AuteurMessage
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15772
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: L'immuno-radiothérapie    Sam 18 Juin 2016 - 15:19

Presenters at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) unveiled a novel radioimmunotherapy that combines a cancer-seeking antibody with potent radionuclide agents, resulting in complete remission of colorectal cancer in mouse models (Scientific Paper 33).

Theranostic drugs—a type of diagnostic therapy for individual patients that tests them for possible reaction to taking new medication and then tailors a treatment plan based on the test results—are powerful newcomers in oncology’s arsenal. In addition to providing targeted treatment, in many cases they double as imaging agents that can monitor the effectiveness of therapy.

Study Findings

An investigative treatment called pretargeted radioimmunotherapy harnesses an antibody that attaches to the cell-surface antigen glycoprotein A33, which is hyperexpressed in the vast majority of colon cancers, whether primary or metastatic. Researchers united the anti-GPA33 antibody with radionuclide agents that deliver a powerful dose of radiation directly to the tumor. The technique was found to be entirely curative in this preliminary mouse study.

“If these results can be replicated in prospective human studies, this multiplatform approach could be used with an array of antibodies to treat a number of cancers, especially colorectal and ovarian cancers,” said presenting author Sarah M. Cheal, PhD, Senior Research Scientist at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

For this study, researchers tested the efficacy of anti-GPA33 with radiotherapies using lutetium-177 benzylDOTA (Lu-177 DOTA-Bn) in mice bearing colorectal cancer grafts. In the same group of animals, the researchers were able to detect solid tumors of 10 mg or less during the course of a fractionated treatment regimen that achieved complete cures in all solid tumors without any collateral toxicity. This platform of theranostic radioimmunotherapy could have broad applicability.

To see an illustration of three-step DOTA-PRIT based on targeting with an IgG-scFv bispecific antibody (eg, huA33-C825 for detection and treatment of colorectal cancer) with dual specificity for a tumor-associated antigen (eg, GPA33) and M-DOTA haptens (eg, Lu-177 DOTA), click here. Credit: © Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center 2016.

The content in this post has not been reviewed by the American Society of Clinical Oncology, Inc. (ASCO®) and does not necessarily reflect the ideas and opinions of ASCO®.

---
:colon

Les présentateurs à l'assemblée annuelle 2016 de la Société de médecine nucléaire et l'imagerie moléculaire (SNMMI) ont dévoilé une nouvelle radioimmunothérapie qui combine un anticorps contre le cancer en quête avec des agents de radionucléides puissants, ce qui entraîne une rémission complète du cancer du dans les modèles de souris (papier scientifique 33).

Les médicaments théranostiques, un type de thérapie de diagnostic pour les patients individuels qui teste leurs réactions possibles de prendre un nouveau médicament, puis adapte un plan de traitement basé sur les résultats du test sont les nouveaux arrivants puissants dans l'arsenal de l'oncologie. En plus de fournir un traitement ciblé, dans de nombreux cas, ils doublent leur fonctions comme agents d'imagerie qui peuvent surveiller l'efficacité du traitement.

Conclusions de l'étude

Un traitement d'instruction appelé radioimmunothérapie préalablement visées exploite un anticorps qui se fixe à l'antigène la glycoprotéine de surface cellulaire A33 qui est hyperexprimée dans la grande majorité des cancers du côlon, qu'il soit primaire ou métastatique. Les chercheurs ont réunis l'anticorps anti-GPA33 avec des agents de radionucléides qui fournissent une dose puissante de rayonnement directement à la tumeur. Cette technique a été trouvée tout à fait curative dans cette étude préliminaire de la souris.

"Si ces résultats peuvent être reproduits dans des études humaines potentiels, cette approche multiplateforme pourrait être utilisé avec un ensemble d'anticorps pour traiter un certain nombre de cancers, en particulier les cancers colorectaux et ovariens», a déclaré l'auteur qui présente Sarah M. Cheal, PhD, chercheur principal au Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

Pour cette étude, des chercheurs ont testé l'efficacité du traitement anti-GPA33 à l'aide radiothérapies lutétium-177 benzylDOTA (Lu-177 DOTA-Bn) chez des souris portant des greffons d'un cancer colorectal. Dans le même groupe d'animaux, les chercheurs ont pu détecter des tumeurs solides de 10 mg ou moins au cours d'un régime de traitement fractionné qui a obtenu des guérisons complètes dans toutes les tumeurs solides, sans aucune toxicité garantie. Cette plate-forme de radioimmunothérapie théranostic pourrait avoir une large applicabilité.


_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur En ligne
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15772
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: L'immuno-radiothérapie    Dim 1 Mai 2016 - 18:54

Radiation therapy not only kills cancer cells, but also helps to activate the immune system against their future proliferation. However, this immune response is often not strong enough to be able to cure tumours, and even when it is, its effect is limited to the area that has been irradiated. Now, however, research to be presented to the ESTRO 35 conference today (Sunday) has shown that the addition of an immune system-strengthening compound can extend the radiation therapy-induced immune response against the tumour sites and that this response even has an effect on tumours outside the radiation field.

Ms Nicolle Rekers, MSc, from the Department of Radiation Oncology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, The Netherlands, will describe to the conference how a combination of radiation therapy and L19-IL2, an immunotherapy agent [1], can increase significantly the immune response when given to mice with primary colorectal tumours. L19-IL2 is a combination of an antibody that targets the tumour blood vessels and a cytokine, a small protein important in cell signalling in the immune system.

The researchers found not only that the mice were tumour-free following treatment, but also that when re-injected with cancer cells 150 days after cure, they did not form new tumours. There was also an increase in the number of cells with an immunological memory.

"Radiation therapy damages the tumour creating a sort of tumour-specific vaccine," Ms Rekers will say. "It feeds the immune system and ensures that it notices that something is wrong. What is unique about our latest experiments is that we have been able to create a so-called abscopal effect, where a localised radiation treatment has also had an effect on other tumour sites outside this radiation field."

The lifespan of mice is quite short -- about two years -- so 150 days is a relatively long time. "Of course, these mice are models of human disease and can never be 100% comparable with a patient, but the fact that the cured mice never formed new tumours, compared with a 100% tumour formation in untreated mice of the same age, is significant. We will know more after analysing results from the Phase I/II clinical study in human patients that we started recently," says Ms Rekers [2].

L19-IL2 is known to be safe in patients, with only mild side effects limited to injection site reactions. The new trial will look at the combination treatment in patients with oligometastatic [3] solid tumours. "Our ultimate aim is to increase the time during which the disease does not progress by using this combination to bring about an immune response that will attack both the primary tumour and its metastases," says Ms Rekers.

Although reprogramming the immune system has only been feasible relatively recently, research to date seems to indicate that it is without damaging long-term effects. "We believe that the risk/benefit equation is likely to come down firmly on the side of benefit. We hope that this treatment will not only destroy tumours, but also enable the immune system to develop a memory that allows it to annihilate them in the future as well," Ms Rekers will conclude.

ESTRO President Professor Philip Poortmans commented: "A couple of years after the first breakthrough of immunotherapy in medical oncology, we are now on the verge of an exciting new era that combines this novel approach with radiation therapy. This could open the door to shorter treatment durations, thereby reducing side effects and costs compared to common palliative approaches in mono-immunotherapy, as well as to potentially new curative options where we had none before. It is time to join forces with all partners, including industry, to explore these capabilities."

---

La radiothérapie non seulement tue les cellules cancéreuses, mais contribue également à activer le système immunitaire contre leur prolifération future. Cependant, cette réponse immunitaire n'est souvent pas assez forte pour être capable de guérir les tumeurs, et même quand cela se produit, son effet est limité à la zone qui a été irradié. Maintenant, cependant, la recherche qui sera présenté à la conférence ESTRO 35 aujourd'hui (dimanche) a montré que l'addition d'un composé du système de renforcement immunitaire peut étendre le rayonnement de la réponse immunitaire induite par la thérapie contre les sites de la tumeur et que cette réponse a même un effet sur les tumeurs en dehors du champ de rayonnement.

Mme Nicolle Rekers, MSc, du Département de radio-oncologie, Centre médical de l'Université de Maastricht, Maastricht, Pays-Bas, décrira à la conférence comment une combinaison de la radiothérapie et L19-IL2, un agent d'immunothérapie, peut augmenter considérablement le réponse immunitaire lorsqu'il est administré à des souris présentant des tumeurs colorectales primaires. L19-IL2 est une combinaison d'un anticorps qui cible les tumeurs des vaisseaux sanguins et une cytokine, une petite protéine important dans la signalisation des cellules dans le système immunitaire.

Les chercheurs ont découvert non seulement que les souris étaient libres de tumeurs après le traitement, mais également que, lorsque réinjectées avec les cellules cancéreuses de 150 jours après être guéries, elles ne formaient pas de nouvelles tumeurs. Il y avait eu également une augmentation du nombre de cellules avec une mémoire immunologique.

"La radiothérapie endommage la tumeur créant une sorte de vaccin spécifique de la tumeur," dit Mme Rekers  "Il nourrit le système immunitaire et assure que celui-ci remarque si quelque chose ne va pas. Ce qui est unique au sujet de nos dernières expériences c'est que nous avons été en mesure de créer un effet appelé abscopal, où un traitement de radiothérapie localisée a également eu un effet sur les autres sites tumoraux en dehors de ce champ de rayonnement ".

La durée de vie des souris est assez courte - environ deux ans - donc 150 jours est un temps relativement long. "Bien sûr, ces souris sont des modèles de maladies humaines et ne peuvent jamais être 100% comparable à celui d'un patient, mais le fait que les souris guéries ne se forment jamais de nouvelles tumeurs, par rapport à une formation de tumeur de 100% chez les souris non traitées du même âge, est significatif. Nous en saurons plus après l'analyse des résultats de l'étude de phase I / II clinique chez les patients humains que nous avons commencé récemment ", dit Mme Rekers.

L19-IL2 est connu pour être sûre chez les patients, avec des effets secondaires bénins limités à des réactions au site d'injection. Le nouveau test se penchera sur le traitement combiné chez les patients avec des tumeurs solides  oligometastatiques. «Notre but ultime est d'augmenter la durée pendant laquelle la maladie ne progresse pas en utilisant cette combinaison pour provoquer une réponse immunitaire qui attaque à la fois la tumeur primitive et ses métastases», dit Mme Rekers.

Bien que la reprogrammation du système immunitaire n'a été possible que relativement récemment, la recherche à ce jour semble indiquer que c'est sans effets néfastes à long terme. «Nous croyons que l'équation risque / bénéfice est susceptible de d'être fermement sur le côté de l'avantage. Nous espérons que ce traitement ne saura pas seulement détruire les tumeurs, mais permettra également au  système immunitaire de développer une mémoire qui lui permettra de les anéantir dans l' avenir aussi." dit Rekers.

Le Professeur Philip Poortmans a commenté: ". Un couple d'années après la première percée de l'immunothérapie en oncologie médicale, nous sommes maintenant sur le point d'une nouvelle ère passionnante qui combine cette nouvelle approche avec la radiothérapie Cela pourrait ouvrir la porte à un traitement d'une durée plus courte, réduisant ainsi les effets secondaires et les coûts par rapport aux approches palliatives communes en mono-immunothérapie, ainsi que potentiellement de nouvelles options thérapeutiques que nous avions pas auparavant. Il est temps d'unir nos forces avec tous les partenaires, y compris l'industrie, pour explorer ces possibilités. "

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur En ligne
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15772
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: L'immuno-radiothérapie    Mer 2 Déc 2015 - 17:32

Researchers at The Tisch Cancer Institute at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have discovered a key mechanism by which radiation treatment (radiotherapy) fails to completely destroy tumors. And, in the journal Nature Immunology, they offer a novel solution to promote successful radiotherapy for the millions of cancer patients who are treated with it.

The team found that when radiotherapy damages skin harboring tumors, special skin immune cells called Langerhans cells are activated. These Langerhans cells can uniquely repair the damage in their own DNA caused by radiotherapy, allowing them to become resistant to radiotherapy and to even trigger an immune response causing skin tumors such as melanoma, to resist further treatment

Investigators mimicked the effect of immunotherapy drugs called "immune checkpoint inhibitors" to boost the immune system to attack tumors. This in turn blocked the ability of Langerhans cells to repair their own DNA after radiotherapy causing them to die, preventing an immune response that protects skin tumors.

"Our study suggests that this combination approach -- combining radiotherapy with drugs that rev up a healthy immune response -- will help make radiation therapy much more effective," says the study's lead author, immunologist Jeremy Price, PhD.

While this study was conducted using mouse models of melanoma and focused on the skin where these Langerhans cells are located, the researchers believe the same process happens in organs throughout the body. There, cousins of Langerhans cells called dendritic cells are also activated by radiotherapy and the investigators stressed that it is critical we understand how they respond to treatment as well.

"Similarly, checkpoint-inhibiting drugs have revolutionized the treatment of melanoma and are being investigated in many other cancers," said co-author Miriam Merad, MD, PhD, Professor of Tumor Immunology, Oncological Sciences, and Hematology and Medical Oncology at The Tisch Cancer Institute at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. "Cancer has the ability to turn off and even evade the body's natural immune response to tumors -- the new immunotherapy drugs take the brakes off the immune system, promoting a powerful and complete immune response to the cancer."

"This is synergized by the addition of radiation, which can expose the tumor so it can better be targeted by the immune system," says Dr. Price. "By combining these treatments, the ability of Langerhans cells to use the immune system to protect cancers will be overwhelmed."

Ionizing radiation is a powerful therapeutic tool that causes toxic breaks in cellular DNA. The formation of these breaks triggers a response in Langerhans cells (which are usually dormant) to stop further damage and to repair the breaks.

The researchers discovered that when the skin is damaged by ionizing radiation, Langerhans cells travel to nearby lymph nodes to communicate with other immune cells and help program a population of "regulatory" T cells that dampen the immune system. These regulatory T cells then travel back to the damaged tumor, and shield it from attack by the immune system.

"We found melanoma grew much more quickly on mice pretreated with radiation, compared to untreated mice, because of the presence of regulatory T cells activated by Langerhans cells," Dr. Price says. "These Langerhans cells were resistant to radiation."

The researchers also discovered that Langerhans cells are able to resist lethal doses of radiation because they express very high levels of an important protein involved in the stress response that orchestrates DNA repair after radiotherapy.

"Any treatment that prevents tumor infiltrating regulatory T cells from being produced, such as immunotherapy, will improve the outcome from radiation treatment -- and that will save lives," Dr. Price added.

---

Des chercheurs de l'Institut du cancer Tisch à l'École de médecine de l'Icahn Mount Sinai ont découvert un mécanisme clé par lequel des traitements de radiothérapie ne parviennent pas à détruire complètement les tumeurs. Et, dans la revue Nature Immunology, ils offrent une solution originale pour promouvoir le succès de la radiothérapie pour les millions de patients atteints de cancer qui sont traités comme ça.

L'équipe a constaté que lorsque la radiothérapie endommage la peau hébergeant des tumeurs, les cellules immunitaires spéciale de la peau appelées cellules de Langerhans sont activées. Ces cellules de Langerhans peuvent réparer les dommages de manière unique dans leur propre ADN, les dommages provoquées par la radiothérapie, leur permettant de devenir résistantes à la radiothérapie et à même de déclencher une réponse immunitaire provoquant des tumeurs de la peau telles que les mélanomes, pour résister à un traitement ultérieur

Les enquêteurs ont imité l'effet des médicaments d'immunothérapie appelés «inhibiteurs de point de contrôle immunitaire" pour stimuler le système immunitaire à attaquer les tumeurs. Ce qui à son tour a bloqué la capacité des cellules de Langerhans de réparer leur ADN après que la radiothérapie ait causé leur mort, ce qui empêche une réponse immunitaire qui protège les tumeurs de la peau.

"Notre étude suggère que cette approche combinée - combinant la radiothérapie avec des médicaments qui reveille une réponse immunitaire saine - contribuera à rendre la radiothérapie beaucoup plus efficace», explique l'auteur principal de l'étude, immunologiste Jeremy Price, PhD.

Bien que cette étude a été menée en utilisant des modèles murins de mélanome et axée sur la peau où sont situées ces cellules de Langerhans, les chercheurs croient que c'est le même processus qui se passe dans les organes dans le corps. Là, les cousines ​​des cellules de Langerhans, appelées cellules dendritiques sont également activés par la radiothérapie et les enquêteurs ont souligné qu'il est essentiel que nous comprenions comment elles réagissent au traitement aussi.

"De même, les médicaments de point de contrôle d'inhibition ont révolutionné le traitement du mélanome et sont à l'étude dans de nombreux autres cancers», a déclaré le co-auteur Miriam Merad, «Le cancer a la capacité de désactiver et même échapper à la réponse immunitaire naturelle du corps à des tumeurs - les nouveaux médicaments d'immunothérapie enlèvent les freins du système immunitaire, et font la promotion d'une réponse immunitaire puissante et complète au cancer."

"Ceci est en synergie avec l'ajout de rayonnement, qui peut exposer la tumeur afin qu'elle puisse mieux être ciblée par le système immunitaire», explique le Dr Price. "En combinant ces traitements, la capacité des cellules de Langerhans à utiliser le système immunitaire pour protéger les cancers seront dépassés."

Le rayonnement ionisant est un outil thérapeutique puissant qui provoque des ruptures toxiques dans l'ADN cellulaire. La formation de ces pauses déclenche une réponse dans les cellules de Langerhans (qui sont généralement en sommeil) pour arrêter de nouveaux dégâts et réparer les pauses.

Les chercheurs ont découvert que lorsque la peau est endommagée par les radiations ionisantes, les cellules de Langerhans se déplacent vers les ganglions lymphatiques avoisinants pour communiquer avec d'autres cellules immunitaires et aide programme une population de cellules T «réglementaires» qui freinent le système immunitaire. Ces cellules T régulatrices se déplacent ensuite pour revenir à la tumeur endommagé, et la protéger contre une attaque par le système immunitaire.

"Nous avons trouvé que le mélanome a augmenté beaucoup plus rapidement sur des souris prétraitées avec un rayonnement, par rapport à des souris non traitées, en raison de la présence de cellules T régulatrices activées par les cellules de Langerhans», dit le Dr Price. "Ces cellules de Langerhans étaient résistantes aux radiations."

Les chercheurs ont également découvert que les cellules de Langerhans sont capables de résister à des doses létales de rayonnement parce qu'elles expriment des niveaux très élevés d'une protéine importante impliquée dans la réponse au stress qui orchestre la réparation de l'ADN après la radiothérapie.

"Tout traitement qui empêche l'infiltration tumorale des cellules T régulatrices de se produire, tels que l'immunothérapie, permettra d'améliorer les résultats du traitement de rayonnement - et cela va sauver des vies," s ajouté le dr Price.








_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur En ligne
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15772
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: L'immuno-radiothérapie    Mar 17 Nov 2015 - 22:41

La radiothérapie est l’une des armes les plus anciennes contre le cancer : son effet sur le système immunitaire dépend des doses et du choix de la cible : les irradiations à large champ induisent à la fois une mort des cellules tumorales et des lymphocytes irradiés.

L’irradiation ciblée de cellules tumorales induit des conséquences immunologiques particulièrement importantes pour la suite de la prise en charge, souligne le Docteur Sandra Demaria, professeure d'oncologie à l'Université de New-York. En effet, l’irradiation permet une triple action : lésions de la membrane modifiant les antigènes de surface, altération de l’ADN et modifications de l’expression cellulaire.

Du fait de ces actions multiples, l’irradiation peut donc interférer à différents niveaux avec l’immunothérapie. Par ailleurs, l’irradiation du site primaire de la tumeur peut induire des modifications à distance de l’immunogénicité des métastases.

C’est avec l’arrivée des immunothérapies plus récentes – et notamment les anti-CTLA-4 (ipilimumab) – que les essais de traitement combinant radiothérapie et immunothérapie ont donné les premiers résultats positifs reproductibles. Chez l’animal, la radiothérapie induit une réponse lymphocytaire T chez des souris atteintes de carcinomes et jusque-là réfractaires au traitement par anti-CTLA-4.

Chez l’homme, la combinaison thérapeutique a permis d’améliorer le devenir de petites populations de patients atteints de cancers de la , de sarcomes des :mous: , de cancers du non à petites cellules. Des essais sont aujourd’hui en cours dans le gliome , les cancers de la prostate résistant à la castration, le mélanome , les cancers du ou du col de l’utérus.

Article rédigé par Georges Simmonds pour RT Flash

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur En ligne
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15772
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: L'immuno-radiothérapie    Mar 21 Avr 2015 - 9:30

New findings about regulation of PD-L1, a protein that allows cancer to evade the immune system, has shown therapeutic promise for several cancers, including the most common form of lung cancer.

De nouvelles découvertes sur la régulation de PD-L1, une protéine qui permets au cancer d'échapper au système immunitaire ont montré de belles promesses thérapeuthiques pour plusieurs formes de cancers incluant le plus commun des cancers du  .

The PD-L1-based therapies inhibit the protein but they don't work for everyone. Now, scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have uncovered more detail about how PD-L1 is regulated by the tumor suppressor gene, p53, allowing non-small cell lung cancer to grow.

Les thérapies basées sur l'inhibition de la protéine PD-L1 ne marchent pas pour tout le monde. Maintenant, les scientifiques du centre contre le cancer de l'université du Texas MD Anderson  ont découvert plus de détails à propos de comment PD-L1 est régulé par le gène p53 suppresseur de tumeurs ce qui permet au cancer du poumon non à petites cellules de croitre.

"We identified a novel mechanism by which p53 regulates PD-L1 and tumor immune evasion through control of miR-34a expression," said James Welsh, M.D., associate professor of Radiation Oncology.

"Nous avons identifié un nouveau mécanisme par lequel p53 régule PD-L1 et par lequel se produit l'évasion du système immunitaire à travers le contrôle de l'expression de miR-34a" dit le médecin James Welch.

P53 is a tumor suppressor gene that, when mutated, plays a role in many cancers, promoting tumor growth. The microRNA known as miR-34a is a gene commonly found in the lung, and is often missing or under-expressed in tumors.

P53 est un gène suppresseur de tumeurs qui, lorsqu'il est muté, joue un rôle dans plusieurs cancers, poussant la tumeur à croitre. Le microARN miR-34a est un gène communément retrouvé dans le poumon et souvent manquant ou sous-exprimé dans les tumeurs.

"Although clinical studies have shown promise for targeting PD-1/PD-L1 signaling in non-small cell lung cancer, little is known about how PD-L1 expression is regulated," said Welsh. "Our study showed that it's regulated by miR-34a that has been activated by p53."

"Même si les études cliniques ont montré une promesse en ciblant PD-1 /PD-L1 dans le cancer du poumon non à petites cellules, on en sait peu sur comment PD-L1 est régulé" dit Welch "notre étude montre que c'est régulé par miR-34a et qu'il a été activé par p53.

Understanding more about the mechanics behind these crucial signaling pathways may open up new therapy options for patients. Welsh's team, which included Maria Angelica Cortez, Ph.D., an instructor of Experimental Radiation Oncology, looked further into how these findings can be tied to existing treatments.

En comprendre plus sur les mécanismes derrière ces chemins cellulaires importants peut ouvrir la voie à de nouvelles thérapies pour les patients. L'équipe de Welsch regarde pour savoir comment ces découvertes peuvent  être liées à des traitements existants.

"Our results suggest that miR-34a delivery combined with standard therapies, such as radiotherapy, may represent a novel therapeutic approach for lung cancer," said Cortez.

"Nos résultats suggèrent que la livraison de miR-34a combinée avec des thérapies standards, comme la radiothérapie, peut représenter une nouvelle approche thérapeutique contre le cancer du poumon" dit Cortez.

The mouse study found that MRX34, an investigational drug that mimics miR-34's tumor-suppressing abilities, increased the immune system's CD8 cells when combined with radiotherapy. A MRX34 clinical trial is currently underway at MD Anderson.

L'étude sur des souris a trouvé que MRX34, un médicament d'investigation qui imite les capacités de suppression de cellules cancéreuses des miR-34s, accroit les cellules CD8 quand combiné avec la radiothérapie. Un essai clinique de MRX34 est présentement en cours à la clinique MD Anderson.

The data was presented on April 20 at the 2015 American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting in Philadelphia.

Les données ont été présentées le 20 Avril 2015 à l'AACR annuel de Philadelphie.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur En ligne
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15772
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: L'immuno-radiothérapie    Mer 1 Oct 2014 - 19:59

Treating cancers with immunotherapy and radiotherapy at the same time could stop them from becoming resistant to treatment, according to a study published in Cancer Research.

The researchers, based at The University of Manchester and funded by MedImmune, the global biologics research and development arm of AstraZeneca, and Cancer Research UK, found that combining the two treatments helped the immune system hunt down and destroy cancer cells that weren't killed by the initial radiotherapy in mice with breast, skin and bowel cancers.

Radiotherapy is a very successful treatment for many forms of cancer, but in cancer cells that it doesn't kill it can switch on a 'flag' on their surface, called PD-L1, that tricks the body's defences into thinking that cancerous cells pose no threat.

The immunotherapy works by blocking these 'flags' to reveal the true identity of cancer cells, allowing the immune system to see them for what they are and destroy them.

The approach improved survival and protected the mice against the disease from returning.

Dr Simon Dovedi, the lead researcher based at The University of Manchester and member of the Manchester Cancer Research Centre, said: "Using the body's own defences to treat cancers has huge potential with early phase clinical trials demonstrating exciting patient benefit but we are still at the early stages of understanding how best to use these types of treatments. Combining certain immunotherapies with radiotherapy could make them even more effective and we're now looking to test this in clinical trial to see just how much of a difference it could make."

Professor Nic Jones, Cancer Research UK's chief clinician, said: "Around half of all cancer patients are given radiotherapy and it has been at the heart of helping improve survival rates so that today one in two cancer patients will survive for at least ten years. Doctors and researchers are constantly looking for ways to improve treatments and this approach could open the door to a whole new way of giving radiotherapy."

Dr Robert Wilkinson, Director of Oncology Research, MedImmune, said: "MedImmune is committed to developing strong science led collaborations, and supporting research that helps further advance our scientific understanding in the important area of immunotherapy. The findings described in the recent study with Cancer Research UK are extremely encouraging."
---
Le traitement des cancers avec l'immunothérapie et la radiothérapie en même temps pourrait les empêcher de devenir résistants au traitement, selon une étude publiée dans Cancer Research.

Les chercheurs, basés à l'Université de Manchester et financés par MedImmune, la branche mondiale de recherche et développement des produits biologiques d'AstraZeneca, et Cancer Research UK, ont constaté que la combinaison des deux traitements a contribué à la poursuite par le système immunitaire des cellules cancéreuses et la destruction de celles qui ne furent pas tuées par la radiothérapie initiale chez des souris atteintes de cancers du , de la et de l' .

La radiothérapie est un traitement très efficace pour de nombreuses formes de cancer, mais dans les cellules cancéreuses qui ne sont pas tuées, elle peut se détourner des cellules avec un «drapeau», appelée PD-L1, sur leur surface qui trompe les défenses de l'organisme en faisant penser que les cellules cancéreuses ne présentent aucune menace.

Les travaux d'immunothérapie par le blocage de ces «flags» révélent la véritable identité des cellules cancéreuses, ce qui permet au système immunitaire de les voir pour ce qu'ils sont et de les détruire.

L'approche améliore la survie et protège les souris contre le retour de la maladie.

Le Dr Simon Dovedi, a déclaré: "Utiliser les propres défenses de l'organisme pour traiter les cancers a un potentiel énorme avec des essais cliniques de phase précoce qui ont démontrés des avantages passionnants pour le patient mais nous sommes encore aux premiers stades de comprendre comment utiliser au mieux ces types de traitements. Combiner certaines immunothérapies avec la radiothérapie pourraient les rendre encore plus efficaces et nous cherchons maintenant à tester cela en essai clinique pour voir à quel point il pourrait faire la différence".

Le Professeur Nic Jones, médecin en chef de Cancer Research UK, a déclaré: "Près de la moitié de tous les patients atteints de cancer ont reçu de la radiothérapie et cela a été important pour contribuer à l'amélioration des taux de survie de sorte qu'aujourd'hui, une personne sur deux atteintes de cancer survivent pendant au moins dix ans. les médecins et les chercheurs sont constamment à la recherche des moyens d'améliorer les traitements et cette approche pourrait ouvrir la porte à une toute nouvelle façon de donner la radiothérapie. "



_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur En ligne
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15772
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: L'immuno-radiothérapie    Lun 25 Mar 2013 - 9:26


Une mise sur à jour sur cette forme de thérapie dont on entend rarement parlée. Elle consiste à lier un élément radioactif à un anticorps monoclonal.

Dans ce résumé ici, on rapporte une expérience faite sur des souris pour guérir un sarcome synovial. Les chercheurs ont ciblé une protéine, la FDZ10 avec un anticorps monoclonal murin Mab 92-13 qui a une capacité de se lier spécifiquement à cette protéine et ils ont lié cet anticorps avec le radioisotope Yttrium 90. L'expérience a supprimé la croissance du sarcome et a montré que l'on pouvait utilisé cette immunoradiothérapie chez les humains.






We previously reported Frizzled homolog 10 (FZD10), a member of the Frizzled family, to be a promising therapeutic target for synovial sarcomas. In this report, we established a murine monoclonal antibody (MAb), namely, MAb 92-13 that had specific binding activity against native FZD10 product expressed in synovial sarcoma cell lines. Subsequent immunohistochemical analyses with the MAb 92-13 confirmed an absence or hardly detectable level of FZD10 protein in any normal human organs. We confirmed the specific binding activity of this MAb in vivo after injection of fluorescent-labeled MAb i.p. or i.v. into the mice carrying synovial sarcoma xenografts by the use of the in vivo fluorescent imaging system as well as radioisotopes. Moreover, MAb 92-13 was effectively internalized into the synovial sarcoma cells after its binding to FZD10 on the cell surface. A single i.v. injection of the Yttrium-90 (90Y)-MAb 92-13 drastically suppressed tumor growth of synovial sarcoma in mice without any severe toxicity. Median time to tumor progression was 58 days for mice treated with 90Y-MAb 92-13 and 9 days for mice treated with non-labeled antibody control or untreated mice (difference = 49 days; P = 7 x 10-5). This result indicates that MAb 92-13 could be utilized as the novel treatment modality for synovial sarcoma and other FZD10-positive tumors.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur En ligne
Denis
Rang: Administrateur


Nombre de messages : 15772
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: L'immuno-radiothérapie    Mar 29 Nov 2005 - 9:05

2005-11-26



Un essai clinique de phase II, effectué à Göttingen, vient de montrer qu'une injection unique de l'anticorps monoclonal I131-Labetuzumab, marqué radioactivement, augmente significativement l'espérance de vie des patients atteints du cancer du et ayant préalablement subi une intervention chirurgicale.

Cette étude a été menée conjointement par la faculté de médecine de l'université de Göttingen et le "Garden State Cancer Center for Molecular Medecine and Immunology" de Belleville (New-Jersey, Etats-Unis) et a été publiée dans la revue "journal of clinical oncology".



Ces résultats encourageants sont dus au mode d'action particulier du I131-Labetuzumab. Cet anticorps est capable de se lier aux métastases qui ne peuvent pas être détectées par l'imagerie médicale. L'iode radioactif auquel ces anticorps sont couplés va ensuite éliminer ces cellules cancéreuses.

Le développement de cet anticorps est assuré par la société américaine Immunomedic Inc. Bien que ces résultats soient très prometteurs, la mise sur la marché de ce médicament ne sera possible que si son efficacité thérapeutique est prouvée sur un plus grand échantillon de patients, lors des essais cliniques de phase III.

----------------------


Je fais une mise à jour ce 22 juillet 2011 et sur le site de la compagnie, je ne retoruve pas le nom de ce médicament, c'est possible qu'il ait changé de nom, mais après 6 ans ça ne semble pas bouger beaucoup. Ça mériterait sans doute d'aller à la poubelle mais je mets ces nouveaux renseignements et je garde un peu.

je laisse le pipeline des médicaments avec quelques liens si ça intéresse quelqu'un :




epratuzumab

Veltuzumab

clivatuzumab

Milatuzumab


Dernière édition par Denis le Lun 20 Juin 2016 - 15:12, édité 6 fois
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur En ligne
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: L'immuno-radiothérapie    Aujourd'hui à 15:12

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
L'immuno-radiothérapie
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 1
 Sujets similaires
-
» des "leurres" pour la radiothérapie
» Radiothérapie Intra-Opératoire (IORT)
» Inauguration d'un système de radiothérapie performant.
» Effets à long terme de la radiothérapie
» Suite de la radiothérapie

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
ESPOIRS :: Cancer :: recherche-
Sauter vers: