AccueilCalendrierFAQRechercherS'enregistrerMembresGroupesConnexion

Partagez | 
 

 Robotique, cybernétique et informatique.

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
Aller à la page : 1, 2  Suivant
AuteurMessage
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16396
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Robotique, cybernétique et informatique.   Mer 2 Aoû 2017 - 19:45

A cancer diagnosis is overwhelming, the treatment often complex and uncertain. Doctors have yet to understand how a specific cancer will affect an individual, and a drug that may hold promise for one patient, may not work for another.

But a melding of medical research and high-performance computing is taking a more personalized approach to treatment by creating precise therapy options based on genetics.

"Precision medicine is the ability to fine tune a treatment for each patient based on specific variations, whether it's their genetics, their environment or their history. To do that in cancer, demands large amounts of data, not only from the patient, but the tumor, as well, because cancer changes the genetics of the tissue that it surrounds," said Rick Stevens, Associate Laboratory Director for Computing, Environment and Life Sciences for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory.

In a typical cancer study today, more than eight million measurements are taken from the biopsy of a single tumor. But even as current technologies allow us to characterize the biological components of cancer with greater levels of accuracy, the massive amounts of data they produce have out-paced our ability to quickly and accurately analyze them.

To tackle these complicated and consequential precision medicine problems, researchers globally are looking toward the promise of exascale computing. Stevens is principal investigator of a multi-institutional effort advancing an exascale computing framework focused on the development of the deep neural network code CANDLE (CANcer Distributed Learning Environment).

Part of the Joint Design of Advanced Computing Solutions for Cancer (JDACS4C), a DOE and National Cancer Institute (NCI) collaboration, CANDLE will address three key cancer challenges to accelerate research at the molecular, cellular and population levels.

The challenges will test CANDLE's advanced machine learning approach -- deep learning -- that, in combination with novel data acquisition and analysis techniques, model formulation and simulation, will help arrive at a prognosis and treatment plan designed specifically for an individual patient.

"Deep learning is the use of multi-layered neural networks to do machine learning, a program that gets smarter or more accurate as it gets more data to make predictions. It's very successful at learning to solve problems," said Stevens.

The model stores data that has already been observed and uses it later to quickly infer the solution to similar or recurring events or problems. Speech recognition, image recognition and text translation are examples of machine learning that many of us utilize every day without realizing it.

"Every time you talk to SIRI or Alexa, you're encountering deep learning," he added.

This framework will be built upon available open-source deep learning platforms that can be adapted to address different aspects of the cancer process as represented by JDACS4C's challenge topics: 1) understand the molecular basis of key protein interactions; 2) develop predictive models for drug response; and 3) automate the extraction and analysis of information from millions of cancer patient records to determine optimal cancer treatment strategies.

The process begins by compiling all the known data on how cancer functions, reacts to drugs and behaves within individuals, and creating a virtual approximation of it. While the numbers of molecular configurations, drug combinations and patient datasets are staggering, the exascale-anticipating framework will progressively "learn" to manage it.

For example, the goal of the drug response challenge is to predict how a tumor will respond to a drug based on the characteristics of both the tumor and the drug, the information for which is identified through previously available data, such as tumor samples and previous drug screens.

The CANDLE network code will be trained to assimilate millions of previous drug screen results. An open-source content management system then would search through upwards of a billion drug combinations to find those with the greatest potential to inhibit a given tumor, or a billion hypothetical compounds to identify candidates for new drug development.

Through another technique called data mining, researchers working on the treatment strategy problem can train the network to sift through and automatically interpret millions of clinical reports and patient records. From those, it can pull data related directly to a specific patient and build predictive models of treatment and outcome trajectories for that individual.

Until now, cancer researchers have been doing this in small teams, maintaining massive databases of different factors characteristic of the cancer's growth. But much of this information is peripheral. The most helpful information is buried within and among the millions of data points collected.

"This is a huge part of the challenge, because humans do this now, but by hand," explained Stevens. "We are trying to devise a means of automating the search through machine learning so that you'd start with an initial model and then automatically find models that perform better than the initial one. We then could repeat this process for each individual patient."

While the computational solutions for these training problems alone will require the largest available high-performance computers, Stevens and his team believe that the resulting models are likely to require exascale or near-exascale systems to advance each of the cancer problem areas.

CANDLE is one of three unique Argonne National Laboratory programs funded by the DOE's Exascale Computing Project (ECP), launched in 2015 to promote the design and integration of application, software and hardware technologies into exascale systems.

These systems will be able to run applications such as CANDLE 50 to 100 times faster than today's most powerful supercomputers, like those housed at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) a DOE Office of Science User Facility. Theta, ALCF's new 9.65 petaflops Intel-Cray system, delivers high performance on traditional modeling and simulation applications and was developed to more quickly and efficiently handle advanced software and data analysis methods.

"The types of things researchers would like to accomplish now require a lot more data, capacity and computing power than we have. That's why there is this effort to build a whole new framework, one focused more on data," said Paul Messina, director of ECP. "CANDLE will play an essential role in the development of applications that drive this framework, creating the ability to analyze hundreds of millions of items of data to come up with individual cancer treatments."

With the unique collaboration of JDACS4C, the CANDLE team has immediate access to NCI's formidable subject matter and domain experts on cancer. And as partners with the DOE and, specifically, CORAL (a collaboration comprising Oak Ridge, Argonne and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories), CANDLE enlists some of the nation's leading computational scientists to provide the computational and data science expertise.

Vendors involved with the labs and ECP are among the leading designers of high-performance computing architecture in the world. Companies like Intel, Nvidia, IBM, and Cray are interested in collaborating on cancer research, and are fully vested in the idea that the convergence between simulation, data and machine learning is the future, noted Stevens.

"There is a tremendous level of team work and sharing across the enterprise. Cancer is something that people can relate to personally, so having the opportunity to develop a capability that will eventually help somebody else can be very motivating," said Eric Stahlberg, director of the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research's strategic and data science initiatives.

"It's a Herculean task. But even incremental progress toward that goal will have a significant impact on many more people affected by cancer, as a result."

---

Un diagnostic de cancer est écrasant, le traitement souvent complexe et incertain. Les médecins n'ont pas encore compris comment un cancer spécifique affectera un individu et un médicament qui pourrait être prometteur pour un patient peut ne pas fonctionner pour un autre.

Mais la fusion de la recherche médicale et l'informatique haute performance adopte une approche plus personnalisée du traitement en créant des options thérapeutiques précises basées sur la génétique.

«La médecine de précision est la capacité d'affiner un traitement pour chaque patient en fonction de variations spécifiques, qu'il s'agisse de leur génétique, de leur environnement ou de leur histoire. Pour ce faire, en cas de cancer, on exige de grandes quantités de données non seulement chez le patient, mais aussi de la tumeur, parce que le cancer modifie la génétique du tissu qu'il entoure ", a déclaré Rick Stevens, directeur adjoint du laboratoire pour l'informatique, l'environnement et les sciences de la vie pour le laboratoire national Argonne de l'US Department of Energy (DOE).

Dans une étude typique sur le cancer aujourd'hui, plus de huit millions de mesures sont tirées de la biopsie d'une seule tumeur. Mais même si les technologies actuelles nous permettent de caractériser les composantes biologiques du cancer avec des niveaux de précision plus élevés, les quantités massives de données qu'elles produisent ont dépassé notre capacité à les analyser rapidement et avec précision.

Pour faire face à ces problèmes de médecine de précision complexes et conséquents, les chercheurs à l'échelle mondiale envisagent la promesse d'un calcul exascale. Stevens est le chercheur principal d'un effort multi-institutionnel en favorisant un cadre informatique exascale axé sur le développement du code de réseau neuronal profond CANDLE (CANcer Distributed Learning Environment).

Une partie de la conception conjointe de solutions informatiques avancées pour le cancer (JDACS4C), une collaboration DOE et Institut national du cancer (NCI), CANDLE abordera trois défis clés du cancer pour accélérer la recherche aux niveaux moléculaire, cellulaire et de la population.

Les défis mettront l'accent sur l'approche avancée de l'apprentissage par machine de CANDLE - apprentissage approfondi - qui, combinée à de nouvelles techniques d'acquisition et d'analyse de données, de formulation et de simulation de modèle, contribuera à un pronostic et à un plan de traitement conçus spécifiquement pour un patient individuel.

«L'apprentissage approfondi est l'utilisation de réseaux de neurones multicouches pour faire de l'apprentissage par machine, un programme qui devient plus intelligent ou plus précis car il obtient plus de données pour faire des prédictions. Il est très efficace pour apprendre à résoudre des problèmes», a déclaré Stevens.

Le modèle stocke les données déjà observées et l'utilise plus tard pour inférer rapidement la solution à des événements ou des problèmes similaires ou récurrents. La reconnaissance vocale, la reconnaissance d'image et la traduction de textes sont des exemples d'apprentissage par machine que beaucoup d'entre nous utilisent tous les jours sans s'en rendre compte.

"Chaque fois que vous parlez à SIRI ou Alexa, vous rencontrez un apprentissage approfondi", a-t-il ajouté.

Ce cadre sera basé sur les plates-formes d'apprentissage en profondeur open-source disponibles qui peuvent être adaptées pour aborder les différents aspects du processus de cancer tels que représentés par les sujets de challenge de JDACS4C: 1) comprendre les bases moléculaires des interactions protéiques clés; 2) élaborer des modèles prédictifs pour la réponse aux médicaments; Et 3) automatiser l'extraction et l'analyse d'informations provenant de millions d'enregistrements de patients atteints de cancer afin de déterminer les stratégies optimales de traitement du cancer.

Le processus commence par la compilation de toutes les données connues sur la façon dont le cancer fonctionne, réagit aux médicaments et se comporte au sein des individus, et en créant une approximation virtuelle. Bien que le nombre de configurations moléculaires, les combinaisons de médicaments et les ensembles de données de patients soient décalés, le cadre anticipant de l'exascale progressivement «apprendra» à le gérer.

Par exemple, l'objectif du défi de la réponse aux médicaments est de prédire comment une tumeur répondra à un médicament en fonction des caractéristiques de la tumeur et du médicament, dont l'information est identifiée à partir des données disponibles précédemment, telles que les échantillons de tumeurs et les précédents tests de médicaments.

Le code de réseau CANDLE sera formé pour assimiler des millions de résultats d'écran de médicaments antérieurs. Un système de gestion de contenu open-source rechercherait alors plus d'un milliard de combinaisons de médicaments pour trouver ceux qui ont le plus grand potentiel pour inhiber une tumeur donnée ou un milliard de composés hypothétiques pour identifier les candidats au développement de nouveaux médicaments.

Grâce à une autre technique appelée exploration de données, les chercheurs qui travaillent sur le problème de la stratégie de traitement peuvent former le réseau pour filtrer et interpréter automatiquement des millions de rapports cliniques et d'enregistrements de patients. De ceux-ci, il peut tirer des données directement liées à un patient spécifique et construire des modèles prédictifs de traitement et les trajectoires des résultats pour cet individu.

Jusqu'à présent, les chercheurs en cancérologie le faisaient dans de petites équipes, en maintenant des bases de données massives de différents facteurs caractéristiques de la croissance du cancer. Mais une grande partie de cette information est périphérique. L'information la plus utile est enterrée à l'intérieur et parmi les millions de points de données collectés.

"C'est une grande partie du défi, parce que les humains le font maintenant, mais à la main", a expliqué Stevens. "Nous essayons de concevoir un moyen d'automatiser la recherche par apprentissage machine afin de commencer par un modèle initial, puis de trouver automatiquement des modèles qui fonctionnent mieux que le premier. Nous pourrions alors répéter ce processus pour chaque patient".

Alors que les solutions informatiques pour ces problèmes de formation seuls nécessiteront les plus grands ordinateurs disponibles à haute performance, Stevens et son équipe croient que les modèles résultants sont susceptibles d'exiger des systèmes exascale ou presque exascale pour faire progresser chacun des problèmes liés au cancer.

CANDLE est l'un des trois programmes Argonne National Laboratory exclusifs financés par le Projet informatique Exascale (ECP) du DOE, lancé en 2015 pour promouvoir la conception et l'intégration de technologies d'applications, de logiciels et de matériel dans des systèmes exascale.

Ces systèmes pourront exécuter des applications telles que CANDLE 50 à 100 fois plus rapide que les supercalculateurs les plus puissants d'aujourd'hui, comme ceux hébergés au Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF), un bureau du DOE Office des utilisateurs scientifiques. Theta, le nouveau système Intel-Cray Pepperflops 9.65 d'ALCF, offre des performances élevées sur les applications de modélisation et de simulation traditionnelles et a été développé pour gérer plus rapidement et efficacement les logiciels avancés et les méthodes d'analyse de données.

"Les types de choses que les chercheurs voudraient accomplir maintenant nécessitent beaucoup plus de données, de capacité et de puissance informatique que ce que l'on a. C'est pourquoi il y a cet effort pour construire un tout nouveau cadre, axé davantage sur les données", a déclaré Paul Messina, directeur De ECP. "CANDLE jouera un rôle essentiel dans le développement des applications qui conduisent ce cadre, créant ainsi la possibilité d'analyser des centaines de millions de données afin de proposer des traitements individuels contre le cancer".

Avec la collaboration unique de JDACS4C, l'équipe CANDLE a un accès immédiat aux profils formidables du NCI et aux experts du domaine sur le cancer. Et en tant que partenaires du DOE et, en particulier, CORAL (une collaboration comprenant les laboratoires nationaux Oak Ridge, Argonne et Lawrence Livermore National), CANDLE recrute certains des scientifiques informatiques les plus importants au monde pour fournir l'expertise en informatique et en informatique.

Les fournisseurs impliqués dans les laboratoires et ECP sont parmi les principaux designers d'architecture informatique haute performance au monde. Des entreprises comme Intel, Nvidia, IBM et Cray sont intéressées à collaborer à la recherche sur le cancer et sont pleinement investies de l'idée que la convergence entre la simulation, les données et l'apprentissage par machine est l'avenir, a noté Stevens.

«Il existe un énorme niveau de travail en équipe et de partage dans toute l'entreprise. Le cancer est quelque chose dont les gens peuvent se rapprocher personnellement, alors avoir la possibilité de développer une capacité qui aidera éventuellement quelqu'un d'autre peut être très motivant», a déclaré Eric Stahlberg, directeur Des initiatives stratégiques et de science des données de Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research.

"C'est une tâche herculéenne. Mais même les progrès progressifs vers cet objectif auront un impact important pour beaucoup plus de personnes touchées par le cancer".

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16396
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Robotique, cybernétique et informatique.   Lun 10 Juil 2017 - 19:07

Un groupe de chercheurs de Montréal a mis au point une sonde qui utilise la lumière pour déceler des cellules cancéreuses avec une précision jamais vue. Jean François Bouthillette a rencontré l'inventeur de l'appareil, Frédéric Leblond, professeur à l'École polytechnique de Montréal et chercheur au Centre de recherche du Centre hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal (CRCHUM).

Réduire les risques de récidive

De la taille d’un stylo, l’appareil utilise des lasers et l’intelligence artificielle pour reconnaître les tissus qu’il rencontre.

Au cours d’une opération, la sonde projette un faisceau lumineux qui fait vibrer les liens moléculaires des tissus humains. Chaque tissu interagit différemment avec la lumière, et si le tissu est cancéreux, la fréquence lumineuse change de façon particulière. L’appareil transmet alors au chirurgien les résultats des changements de fréquence, et celui-ci peut savoir si le tissu est cancéreux ou non.

Grâce à cet outil, les risques que des tissus potentiellement dangereux demeurent dans l’organisme après une opération chirurgicale sont grandement réduits, ce qui permet d’éviter les récidives lorsqu’il s’agit d’un cancer. La Dre Dominique Trudel, chercheuse et pathologiste au CRCHUM, explique qu’actuellement, dans le cas des cancers de la prostate, on obtient une fois sur trois des résultats négatifs aux biopsies, même si des tissus cancéreux sont encore présents dans l’organisme.

Une innovation bientôt dans les salles de chirurgie
Frédéric Leblond a testé la sonde sur 100 patients. Maintenant que la fiabilité de celle-ci est établie, des essais cliniques vont être réalisés. Les chercheurs espèrent qu'on autorisera la distribution de l'appareil dans les hôpitaux d'ici trois ou quatre ans.


http://ici.radio-canada.ca/premiere/emissions/les-annees-lumiere/segments/reportage/30624/sonde-montreal-cancer

Un document audio de 14 minutes à cette adresse.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16396
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Robotique, cybernétique et informatique.   Mer 28 Juin 2017 - 14:05

Une sonde développée à Polytechnique Montréal et à l'Institut neurologique de Montréal, qui permet aux chirurgiens de déterminer en quelques secondes si une cellule est cancéreuse et doit être enlevée avec la tumeur, pourrait réduire grandement le taux de rechute.

« Actuellement, un chirurgien qui hésite à enlever davantage de tissu doit prélever des cellules, les congeler et les envoyer en bas à la pathologie », explique Frédéric Leblond, de Polytechnique qui, avec Kevin Petrecca de l'Institut neurologique, est l'auteur principal de l'étude publiée ce matin dans la revue Cancer Research. « Comme le tissu est gelé, l'information, souvent, n'est pas bonne. Et ça prend une heure, une heure et demie pour avoir les résultats. Ça rallonge grandement le processus de la chirurgie, et on laisse parfois des cellules cancéreuses qui provoquent des rechutes. »

LUMIÈRE RÉVÉLATRICE

La sonde mise au point par les chercheurs montréalais est optique : elle reconnaît une cellule cancéreuse grâce à la façon dont elle réagit à la lumière. « Dans le futur, on pourra même mieux définir le type de cancer pour choisir une chimio mieux adaptée, dit M. Leblond. On peut déjà graduer un cancer de la prostate aussi bien que la cytopathologie. »

La « sensibilité » de la sonde, qui a été testée pour les cancers du cerveau, du côlon, de la peau et du poumon, est de 100 %, c'est-à-dire qu'elle ne classe jamais dans la catégorie « cancer » une cellule qui n'est pas cancéreuse. La première version de la sonde, testée en 2015, avait une sensibilité de 90 %.

Le Dr Petrecca et M. Leblond ont fondé une entreprise, ODS Medical, qui a amorcé un processus d'approbation des autorités médicales américaines (FDA). « Nous avons été admis dans une voie accélérée, on nous demande des données de plusieurs centres, dit M. Leblond. Nous avons déjà commencé une étude randomisée à l'Institut neurologique. »

Un autre projet est développé en parallèle : l'utilisation de la sonde pour bien diriger le chirurgien dans un cas de cancer du cerveau. « Ça permettra d'éviter, par exemple, de couper un vaisseau sanguin. »

PRESQUE DE LA SCIENCE-FICTION

Est-ce comparable aux outils des médecins de Star Trek ? « Ça peut ressembler, mais dans Star Trek, la sonde analysait les données à l'intérieur du corps, dit M. Leblond en riant. Nous ne pouvons pas aller plus loin que quelques centimètres. C'est pour ça qu'il nous faut être au bout d'une aiguille. »

La cytopathologie, l'analyse des cellules cancéreuses par un pathologiste, sera-t-elle un jour inutile ? « Pour le cancer du cerveau, définitivement durant la chirurgie, dit M. Leblond. Mais on devra encore avoir recours à la cytopathologie pour être certain du cancer. »

L'équipe montréalaise a-t-elle des concurrents ? « Il y a des chercheurs japonais qui travaillent sur un cancer gastrique, mais avec une méthode d'imagerie complètement différente, dit M. Leblond. Ils sont à peu près au même niveau de développement. Il y a aussi une compagnie de Vancouver qui commercialise une sonde pour le cancer de la peau, mais leur algorithme d'intelligence artificielle n'est pas aussi sophistiqué et ils n'ont pas accès à toutes les bandes spectrales importantes. De plus, le modèle d'affaires ne fonctionne pas très bien pour le cancer de la peau. Plutôt que de payer 7000 $ pour utiliser la sonde, il est plus facile d'enlever des marges de sécurité autour de l'échantillon de cellules cancéreuses. »

QUELQUES MOTS SUR L'EFFET RAMAN

La sonde montréalaise utilise un phénomène optique, l'effet Raman, qui a été prédit et découvert dans les années 80 par des physiciens autrichien et indien. L'effet Raman, qui est de 10 à 100 millions trop petit pour être vu à l'oeil nu, est actuellement utilisé pour des analyses chimiques et de matériaux.

TAUX DE SURVIE À DIFFÉRENTS TYPES DE CANCER

88 % : Taux de survie à cinq ans quand toutes les cellules de cancer de la peau sont enlevées lors d'une intervention chirurgicale.

64 % : Taux de survie à cinq ans quand il reste des cellules de cancer de la peau après une opération.

54 % : Taux de survie à cinq ans quand toutes les cellules de cancer du poumon sont enlevées lors d'une intervention chirurgicale.

27 % : Taux de survie à cinq ans quand il reste des cellules de cancer du poumon après une opération.

Sources : European Journal of Surgical Oncology, Annals of Thoracic Surgery

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16396
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Robotique, cybernétique et informatique.   Mar 22 Mar 2016 - 16:29

Salvador Pané was on a trolleybus in Zurich one day after work. He was deep in thought when the bus came to a sudden stop because the cable was disrupted. He was struck by an idea: "Why can't we create a microrobot that generates an electric field wirelessly?" The idea stayed with him and, as a result, the ETH researcher and his colleagues have since succeeded in creating tiny particles that can be precisely controlled by magnetic fields and also generate electric fields.

This may sound relatively unspectacular to the uninitiated, but it is a breakthrough. What makes it unique is that a microstructure with a single source of energy is not only moved, but also can be brought to exercise another functionality. Until now, this had been possible only independently of each other. Pané and his team from the Institute of Robotics and Intelligent Systems have published their research results in the scientific journal Materials Horizons. Their findings could one day revolutionise medicine.

Like the layers of a lasagne

Pané, a chemist, has spent the past few years dealing with magnetoelectric micro and nanorobots, which can be stimulated by electromagnetic fields. Some of these materials are composed of different layers, with each exhibiting a different reaction to the magnetic field. "You have to imagine it like a lasagne with two layers: one layer responds to the field by changing its volume. These materials are magnetostrictive," explains Pané. "Due to the stress transferred, the second piezoelectric layer becomes electrically polarized.

The scientists have made good use of this effect: they coated the microparticles on one side with two different metal layers, one of cobalt ferrite (magnetostrictive) and the other of barium titanate (piezoelectric) -- two layers of the lasagne. When a magnetic field is generated around the particles, the inner layer of cobalt ferrite expands and the outer layer of barium titanate deforms, generating an electric field around the microparticles. The magnetoelectric effect was demonstrated by inducing electrochemical reactions.

Bringing drugs to their targets

The microrobots are named after Janus, the two-headed Roman god, because they are also composed of two halves. The Janus particles move by means of rotating magnetic fields. If the magnetic field is then altered, the microrobots generate an electric field. This opens up a wide range of applications, particularly in the field of medicine. "We could equip the microrobots with drugs, for example, and target them directly at cancerous tumours in the body, where they would then unload their cargo via the stimulus of the generated electric field," explains Pané. "This would virtually eliminate the side-effects of cancer drugs because only the cancer cells would be attacked. In addition, the precise application would significantly increase the efficacy of cancer therapies." However, other applications, such as the wireless electrical stimulation of cells, could expand regenerative medicine in a revolutionary way.

Much research before application

Many questions still have to be answered before the microrobots can actually be used as a vehicle to transport drugs. For example, it is not yet clear which is the most efficient structure of material combination with the highest magnetoelectric properties. In addition, the microrobots have to be tested for their compatibility with the human body. "A lot of experiments still need to be done," says Pané. He cites corrosion as an example: "This is often overlooked at the micro and nanoscale, but it needs to be thoroughly investigated." Corrosion is capable of affecting not only the function of a device but can also cause contamination.

"We have to look very carefully if we want to use a technology for a medical application," emphasises the researcher. For this reason, in the development of micro and nanorobots his team is not limiting itself to technical feasibility alone, but is also exploring the compatibility, toxicity and efficiency of the robots. Pané is convinced that the microrobots will one day have the potential to make an important contribution in the field of biomedicine. It would be the (provisional) end of a journey that began on a Zurich trolleybus.

---

Salvador Pané était sur un trolleybus à Zurich un jour après le travail. Il était plongé dans ses pensées lorsque le bus est venu à un arrêt brusque parce que le câble a été perturbé. Il a été frappé par une idée: «Pourquoi ne pas créer un micro-robot qui génère un champ électrique sans fil?" L'idée est resté avec lui et, par conséquent, le chercheur ETH et ses collègues ont depuis réussi à créer de minuscules particules qui peuvent être contrôlés avec précision par des champs magnétiques et génèrent également des champs électriques.

Cela peut sembler relativement peu spectaculaire pour les non-initiés, mais c'est une percée. Ce qui rend l'idée unique c'est qu'une microstructure avec une seule source d'énergie peut non seulement être déplacée, mais qu'elle puisse aussi être amenée à exercer une autre fonctionnalité. Jusqu'à présent, C'était possible mais une fonction idépendamment de l'autre. Pané et son équipe de l'Institut de robotique et de systèmes intelligents publient leurs résultats de recherche dans la revue scientifique Matériaux Horizons. Leurs conclusions pourraient un jour révolutionner la médecine.

Comme les couches de lasagnes

Pané, un chimiste, a passé les dernières années face à des micro et nanorobots magnétoélectrique, qui peuvent être stimulés par des champs électromagnétiques. Certaines de ces matières sont composées de différentes couches, présentant chacune une réaction différente au champ magnétique. «Il faut l'imaginer comme une lasagne avec deux couches:. Une couche répond au champ en changeant son volume Ces matériaux sont magnétostrictif», explique Pané. "En raison de la contrainte transférée, la deuxième couche piézoélectrique devient polarisée électriquement.

Les scientifiques ont fait bon usage de cet effet: ils enduisent les microparticules sur un côté avec deux couches métalliques différents, l'un de ferrite de cobalt (magnétostrictifs) et l'autre de titanate de baryum (piézoélectrique) - deux couches de la lasagne. Quand un champ magnétique est généré autour des particules, la couche intérieure de ferrite de cobalt se dilate et la couche externe de titanate de baryum se déforme, en générant un champ électrique autour des microparticules. L'effet magnétoélectrique a été démontrée en induisant des réactions électrochimiques.

Apporter des médicaments à leurs cibles

Les microrobots sont nommés d'après Janus, le dieu romain à deux têtes, car ils sont également composées de deux moitiés. Les particules Janus se déplacent au moyen de champs magnétiques rotatifs. Si le champ magnétique est ensuite modifié, les microrobots génèrent un champ électrique. Cela ouvre un large éventail d'applications, notamment dans le domaine de la médecine. "Nous pourrions équiper les microrobots avec des médicaments, par exemple, et les cibler directement les tumeurs cancéreuses dans le corps, où ils pourraient ensuite décharger leur cargaison par le stimulus du champ électrique généré», explique Pané. "Ce serait pratiquement éliminer les effets secondaires des médicaments contre le cancer car seules les cellules cancéreuses seraient attaqués. En outre, l'application précise augmenterait de manière significative l'efficacité des traitements contre le cancer." Cependant, d'autres applications, telles que la stimulation électrique sans fil de cellules, pourraient étendre la médecine régénérative de façon révolutionnaire.

De nombreuses recherches avant l'application

De nombreuses questions doivent encore être répondu avant que les microrobots puissent effectivement être utilisés comme des véhicules pour transporter des médicaments. Par exemple, il ne sait pas encore qui est la structure la plus efficace de combinaison de matériaux avec les propriétés magnétoélectriques les plus élevées. En outre, les micro-robots doivent être testés pour leur compatibilité avec le corps humain. «Beaucoup d'expériences ont encore besoin d'être faites», dit Pané. Il cite la corrosion, par exemple: "Ceci est souvent négligé à l'échelle micro et nanométrique, mais cela doit être étudié à fond." La corrosion est susceptible d'affecter non seulement la fonction d'un appareil, mais peut aussi causer une contamination.

«Nous devons examiner très attentivement si nous voulons utiliser une technologie pour une application médicale», souligne le chercheur. Pour cette raison, le développement des micros et nanorobots son équipe ne se limite à la faisabilité technique seule, mais explore également la compatibilité, la toxicité et l'efficacité des robots. Pané est convaincu que les microrobots auront un jour le potentiel d'apporter une contribution importante dans le domaine de la biomédecine. Ce serait le (provisoire) fin d'un voyage qui a commencé sur un trolleybus Zurich.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16396
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Robotique, cybernétique et informatique.   Ven 19 Juil 2013 - 5:16

Un nouvel outil chirurgical pourrait révolutionner la détection des cancers. L'iKnife serait capable, en trois secondes, de faire la différence entre du tissu sain et une tumeur cancéreuse.



Distinguer le tissu sain d'une tumeur cancéreuse pour une meilleure efficacité dans l'ablation ? C'est ce que devrait permettre l'iKnife, un nouvel outil chirurgical qui a fait l'objet d'une étude récemment parue dans la revue américaine Science Translational Medecine. Lorsqu'il fonctionne, ce bistouri « nouvelle génération » utilise un petit courant électrique créant de la vapeur quand il coupe du tissu humain. La fumée qui se dégage est ensuite analysée par l'instrument, grâce à un spectromètre de masse, qui détermine s'il s'agit d'un tissu sain ou cancéreux.

Trois secondes suffisent pour que le chirurgien soit informé de la nature du tissu qu'il sectionne. Selon le Daily Telegraph, qui s'est fait l'écho de cette avancée médicale, le rouge indique un tissu cancéreux et le vert un tissu sain. L'étude du Science Translational Medecine, portant sur des essais réalisés sur 91 patients, met en avant un « diagnostic particulièrement précis » du iKnife, qui est par ailleurs « assez fiable pour une large utilisation dans les salles d'opération ». À l'heure actuelle, les techniques pour distinguer le tissu sain d'une tumeur cancéreuse nécessitent d'envoyer un échantillon en laboratoire pour des analyses qui prennent 20 à 30 minutes.

Actuellement testé dans trois hôpitaux de Londres, l'iKnife ne devrait pas être mis sur le marché avant au moins un an.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16396
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: ScienceDaily (July 12, 2012) —    Ven 13 Juil 2012 - 8:39

ScienceDaily (July 12, 2012) — Neurosurgeons and researchers at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and the Maxine Dunitz Neurosurgical Institute are adapting an ultraviolet camera to possibly bring planet-exploring technology into the operating room.

On essaie d'amer les caméras de très haute définition qui explorent les étoiles normalement dans les salles d'opérations.

If the system works when focused on brain tissue, it could give surgeons a real-time view of changes invisible to the naked eye and unapparent even with magnification of current medical imaging technologies. The pilot study seeks to determine if the camera provides visual detail that might help surgeons distinguish areas of healthy brain from deadly tumors called gliomas, which have irregular borders as they spread into normal tissue.

Ce serait pour les opérations au cerveau pour distinguer les changements invisibles à l'oeil nu pour déterminer ou le cancer s'arrête précisément et ou le tissu sain commence dans des tumeurs appelés gliomes.

"Our goal is to revolutionize the way neurological disorders are treated. Ultraviolet imaging is one of several intraoperative technologies we are pursuing," commented Keith L. Black, MD, chair of the Department of Neurosurgery.

L'ultraviolet est une des possibilités parmi les techniques possibles.

The tumors' far-reaching tentacles pose big challenges for neurosurgeons: Taking out too much normal brain tissue can have catastrophic consequences, but stopping short of total removal gives remaining cancer cells a head start on growing back. Delineating the margin where tumor cells end and healthy cells begin never has been easy, even with recent advances in medical imaging systems, said Black, director of the Maxine Dunitz Neurosurgical Institute and the Johnnie L. Cochran, Jr. Brain Tumor Center and the Ruth and Lawrence Harvey


Dans ce genre d'opération oter trop de tissus peut handicapé une personne de façon permanente mais ne pas en enlever assez peut donner une base au cancer pour repartir.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16396
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Robotique, cybernétique et informatique.   Ven 2 Sep 2011 - 8:21

(Sep. 1, 2011) — Researchers led by ETH professor Yaakov Benenson and MIT professor Ron Weiss have successfully incorporated a diagnostic biological "computer" network in human cells. This network recognizes certain cancer cells using logic combinations of five cancer-specific molecular factors, triggering cancer cells destruction.

Des chercheurs ont incorporés un "réseau d'ordinateur biologique" dans des cellules humaines. Ce réseau reconnait certaines cellules cancéreuses en utilsant les combinaisons logiques de 5 facteurs moléculaires spécifiques au cancer et enclanche la destruction de la cellule.

Yaakov (Kobi) Benenson, Professor of Synthetic Biology at ETH Zurich, has spent a large part of his career developing biological computers that operate in living cells. His goal is to construct biocomputers that detect molecules carrying important information about cell wellbeing and process this information to direct appropriate therapeutic response if the cell is found to be abnormal. Now, together with MIT professor Ron Weiss and a team of scientists including post-doctoral scholars Zhen Xie and Liliana Wroblewska, and a doctoral student Laura Prochazka, they made a major step towards reaching this goal.

Yaakov Benenson a passé une grande partie de sa carrière a développé un ordinateur biologique qui opère dans les cellules vivantes. son but était de construire un biocomputer qui détecte les molécules qui transportent une information importante au sujet de la santé de la cellule et qui est en mesure de répondre à cette information corectement et sur le champs si la cellule est anormale. Avec son équipe, il a fait un pas majeur vers son but.

In a study that has just been published in Science, they describe a multi-gene synthetic "circuit" whose task is to distinguish between cancer and healthy cells and subsequently target cancer cells for destruction. This circuit works by sampling and integrating five intracellular cancer-specific molecular factors and their concentration. The circuit makes a positive identification only when all factors are present in the cell, resulting in a highly precise cancer detection. Researchers hope that it can serve a basis for very specific anti-cancer treatments.

Dans une étude publiée dans Science , on décrit une circuit multi gène synthétique qui a la tâche de distinguer entre les cellules cancéreuses et les cellules saines et cibler subséquemment les cancéreuses pour leur destruction. Ce circuit fonctionne en échantillonnant et en intégrant 5 des facteurs spécifiques au cancer et leur concentration. Le circuit fait une identification seulment si les 5 éléments sont présents dans la cellule ce qui résulte en une détection hautement précise du cancer. Les chercheurs ont trouvé que cela peut servir pour des traitements très spécifiquement contre le cancer

Selective destruction of cancer cells

The scientists tested the gene network in two types of cultured human cells: cervical cancer cells, called HeLa cells, and normal cells. When the genetic bio-computer was introduced into the different cell types, only HeLa cells, but not the healthy ones, were destroyed.

Les scientifiques ont testé le réseau de gènes dans 2 types de cellules humaines en culture : des cellules appelés Hela qui sont des cellules cancéreuses et des cellules saines. quand le biocomputer a été introduit dans la solution, seulement les cellules cancéreuses ont été détruites.

Extensive groundwork was required to achieve this result. Benenson and his team had to first find out which combinations of molecules are unique to HeLa cells. They looked among the molecules that belong to the class of compounds known as microRNA (miRNA) and identified one miRNA combination, or profile, that was typical of a HeLa cell but not any other healthy cell type.

Les chercheurs avaient au préalable identifié un microARN typique aux cellule HEla mais qui ne se retrouve pas dans les cellules saines.

Finding the profile was a challenging task. In the human body there are about 250 different healthy cell types. In addition, there are numerous variants of cancer cells, of which hundreds can be grown in the laboratory. Still greater is the diversity of miRNA: between 500 to 1000 different species have been described in human cells. "Each cell type, healthy or diseased, has different miRNA molecules switched on or off," says Benenson.

Trouver le profi a été une tâche très grande. Dans le corps humain il existe 250 types de cellules saines. En plus, il y a beaucoup de types de cellules cancéreuses desquelles quelques centaines peuvent être cultivées en laboratoire. La diversité des microARN est encore plus grande enter 500 et 1000 différents espèces d'ARN ont été décrite . Chaque type de cellule saine ou malde a différentes switchs de micro ARN .


Five factors for cancer profile

Creating a miRNA "profile" is not unlike finding a set of symptoms to reliably diagnose a disease: "One symptom alone, such as fever, can never characterize a disease. The more information is available to a doctor, the more reliable becomes his diagnosis," explains the professor, who came to ETH from Harvard University a year and a half ago. The researchers have therefore sought after several factors that reliably distinguish HeLa cancer cells from all other healthy cells. It turned out that a combination of only five specific miRNAs, some present at high levels and some present at very low levels, is enough to identify a HeLa cell among all healthy cells.

A network operates similar to a computer

"The miRNA factors are subjected to Boolean calculations in the very cell in which they are detected. The biocomputer combines the factors using logic operations such as AND and NOT, and only generates the required outcome, namely cell death, when the entire calculation with all the factors results in a logical TRUE value," says Benenson. Indeed, the researchers were able to demonstrate that the network works very reliably in living cells, correctly combining all the intracellular factors and giving the right diagnosis. This, according to Benenson, represents a significant achievement in the field.

Les facteurs des miARN sont sujettes aux calculs de Boolean dans la cellule dans laquelle ils sont détectées. Le biocomputer combien les facteurs en utilisant les opérations logiques AND et NOT et génère la réponse de3 la mort de la cellule quand tout le calcul avec tous les facteurs résultent dans la valeur TRUE

Animal Model and Gene Therapy

In a next step, the team wants to test this cellular computation in an appropriate animal model, with the aim to build diagnostic and therapeutic tools in the future. This may sound like science fiction, but Benenson believes that this is feasible. However, there are still difficult problems to solve, for example the delivery of foreign genes into a cell efficiently and safely. Such DNA delivery is currently quite challenging. In particular this approach requires temporary rather than permanent introduction of foreign genes into the cells, but the currently available methods, both viral and chemical, are not fully developed and need to be improved.

"We are still very far from a fully functional treatment method for humans. This work, however, is an important first step that demonstrates feasibility of such a selective diagnostic method at a single cell level," said Benenson.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16396
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Robotique, cybernétique et informatique.   Jeu 12 Mai 2011 - 13:41

Jeudi 12 Mai 2011 à 19:00

SUNNYVALE, Californie, May 12, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Accuray Incorporated (Nasdaq: ARAY), leader mondial dans le domaine de la radiochirurgie, a annoncé aujourd'hui que 85 % des centres européens équipés avec le CyberKnife(R) traitent des cancers localisés de la prostate par radiothérapie en conditions stéréotaxiques. La prise en charge des patients souffrant d'un cancer de la prostate avec un traitement hypofractionné est une pratique clinique qui se développe.

<< Plus de 25 % de nos patients traités avec le CyberKnife sont atteints d'un cancer de la prostate et nous nous attendons à ce que cette tendance continue de croître >>, explique Dr David Feltl, chef du service d'oncologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire d'Ostrava, Ostrava, République tchèque.

À l'occasion du congrès annuel de l'European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ESTRO), qui s'est déroulé à Londres, R.U., cette croissance a été mise en évidence par des données cliniques présentées au cours d'un symposium consacré au cancer de la prostate et animé par le professeur Eric Lartigau, Centre Oscar Lambret, Lille, France et le professeur Volker Budach, M.D., Ph.D., Charite - Universitatsmedizin Berlin, Allemagne.

<< Le recours à un traitement non invasif par CyberKnife nous permet d'offrir à nos patients un excellent contrôle de la tumeur à cinq ans, avec un faible niveau de toxicité, ainsi que rapporté dans la revue Radiation Oncology 2011 >>, déclare le professeur Lartigau.

<< Il existe un intérêt scientifique important de mettre en place des essais cliniques randomisés pour évaluer le traitement du cancer de la prostate par radiothérapie en conditions stéréotaxiques et le Système CyberKnife est au coeur de cette tendance >>, ajoute le professeur Volker Budach.

<< L'efficacité à long terme et les résultats de toxicité présentés par des études uniques et multicentriques, sont soutenus par de nombreuses publications et présentations sur le traitement du cancer de la prostate par radiothérapie en conditions stéréotaxiques par CyberKnife. Grâce à l'évidence clinique de plus en plus importante, nous avons constaté à une augmentation de 20 %, au niveau mondial, du traitement du cancer de la prostate par CyberKnife, comparé à une période similaire l'année dernière >>, commente Omar Dawood, vice-président, responsable des affaires médicales, Accuray Incorporated.


_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16396
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Robotique, cybernétique et informatique.   Jeu 17 Fév 2011 - 17:44

Le Cyberknife – un système de radiothérapie qui s’adapte aux mouvements respiratoires du malade et réduit la marge d’irradiation autour de la zone tumorale – était jusqu’alors essentiellement utilisé contre des tumeurs mobiles (elles bougent avec les mouvements du corps) de la tête, du poumon, du cou, du foie ou du rachis. Il permet aujourd’hui de proposer des traitements moins toxiques aux patients traités pour un cancer de la prostate de faible risque.

Plus encore, il offre des résultats comparables à la radiothérapie conventionnelle… avec beaucoup moins de séances.
Il en résulte un plus grand confort de vie pour les malades et des économies non négligeables de transports sanitaires et de prestations de soins. Ces résultats encourageants ressortent d’une première étude menée aux États-Unis pendant cinq ans. La poursuite de ce travail à plus long terme reste cependant indispensable pour que l’intérêt de ce nouveau traitement puisse être confirmé.

Les auteurs ont suivi 41 patients, respectivement à l’Université de Stanford en Californie et à l’hôpital de Naples, en Floride. Tous souffraient d’un cancer de la prostate à faible risque, et « 93 % d’entre eux n’ont connu aucune récidive pendant une période médiane de cinq ans, [et avec] de faibles niveaux de toxicité urinaire et rectale ».
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16396
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Robotique, cybernétique et informatique.   Sam 22 Jan 2011 - 12:34

Des chercheurs américains ont démontré que la radiochirurgie par "CyberKnife", un système robotisé conçu pour traiter les tumeurs de façon non-invasive, permettait d'augmenter les taux de survie à 5 ans sans récidive des patients atteints d'un cancer de la prostate. Publiés dans l'édition de janvier de la revue Radiation Oncology, leurs travaux révèlent que 93% des patients traités n'ont pas vécu de récidive de leur cancer sur une période médiane de suivi à 5 ans.



Les chercheurs ont étudié les données de 41 patients traités pour un cancer de la prostate de faible risque sur une période médiane de suivi à 5 ans. Les patients ont bénéficié d'un traitement par radiochirurgie "CyberKnife", un dispositif intégrant une technologie d'imagerie guidée qui permet la détection et la correction automatiques des déplacements de la tumeur en temps réel. A noter, ce type de traitement dure seulement 5 jours.

Résultat, plus de 9 patients traités sur 10 (93%) n'ont pas connu de récidive de leur cancer de la prostate en 5 ans. En outre, les scientifiques n'ont observé que très peu d'effets secondaires par rapport aux méthodes conventionnelles. Ce système novateur pourrait ainsi permettre d'améliorer la qualité de vie des patients.

"En constituant une option thérapeutique non-invasive réalisée en seulement 5 visites, la radiothérapie stéréotaxique par CyberKnife offre aux patients les bénéfices d'une récupération plus rapide, des frais de transport réduits et moins de temps de travail perdu, leur permettant de revenir à une routine quotidienne normale presque immédiatement comparé aux 9 semaines standard de traitement par radiothérapie", expliquent les auteurs de l'étude.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16396
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Robotique, cybernétique et informatique.   Ven 19 Mar 2010 - 18:04

(Mar. 19, 2010) — University of Florida engineering researchers have found they can ignite certain nanoparticles using a low-power laser, a development they say opens the door to a wave of new technologies in health care, computing and automotive design.

Les chercheurs de l'université de Floride ont trouvé qu'ils peuvent allumer certaines particules en utilisant un lazer à basse puissance. Ce développement ouvrirait la porte selon eux à une nouvelle ère de nouvelles technologies dans les soins de santé, l'informatique et le désign des autos.

A paper about the research appears in this week's advance online edition of Nature Nanotechnology.

Vijay Krishna, Nathanael Stevens, Ben Koopman and Brij Moudgil say they used lasers not much more intense than those found in laser pointers to light up, heat or ignite manufactured carbon molecules, known as fullerenes, whose soccer-ball-like shapes had been distorted in certain ways. They said the discovery suggests a score of important new applications for these so-called "functionalized fullerenes" molecules already being developed for a broad range of industries and commercial and medical products.

"The beauty of this is that it only requires a very low intensity laser," said Moudgil, professor of materials science and engineering and director of the engineering college's Particle Engineering Research Center, where the research was conducted.

La beauté de cela c'est que ça ne requiert qu'un lazer de faible intensité

The researchers used lasers with power in the range of 500 milliwatts. Though weak by laser standards, the researchers believe the lasers have enough energy to initiate the uncoiling or unraveling of the modified or functionalized fullerenes. That process, they believe, rapidly releases the energy stored when the molecules are formed into their unusual shapes, causing light, heat or burning under different conditions.

Les chercheurs ont utilisé un lazer de 500 milliwatts qui est un de ceux considéré come faible. Les chercheurs croient cependant que ce lazer modifie les fullerenes (particules de carbone). CE procédé relâche la lumière, la chaleur ou le feu gardé dans les fullerenes lorsqu'ils ne sont pas déformés.

The Nature Nanotechnology paper says the researchers tested the technique in three possible applications.

In the first, they infused cancer cells in a laboratory with a variety of functionalized fullerenes known to be biologically safe called polyhydroxy fullerenes. They then used the laser to heat the fullerenes, destroying the cancer cells from within.

Dans le premier essai, ils ont infusé des cellule cancéreuses avec les fullerenes reconnu pour être sécuritaire. Ils ont utilisé alors le lazer et détruit les cellules.

"It caused stress in the cells, and then after 10 seconds we just see the cells pop," said Krishna, a postdoctoral associate in the Particle Engineering Research Center.

Cela cause un stress dans les cellules et après 10 secondes celles-ci pop.

He said the finding suggests doctors could dose patients with the polyhdroxy fullerenes, identify the location of cancers, then treat them using low-power lasers, leaving other tissues unharmed. Another application would be to image the locations of tumors or other areas of interest in the body using the fullerenes' capability to light up.

La découverte suggère que les docteurs pourraient donner des doses de fulerenes aux patients ce qui identifie la location des cancers et alors traiter avec le laser à faible pouvoir tout en laissant les autres tissus intacts.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16396
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Robotique, cybernétique et informatique.   Lun 15 Mar 2010 - 13:23

Une petite révolution dans le traitement du cancer du sein 15.03.10 - 12:25
Le Mobetron, cet accélérateur installé à l'institut Bordet, permet pendant l'opération, d'irradier les tissus où l'on vient d'enlever une tumeur. Avantages : une importante réduction des séances de radiothérapie, mais aussi l’éviction de nombreuses récidives.

Notre équipe se trouve en salle d’opération où l'on se prépare à opérer un cancer du sein. La tumeur fait moins de deux centimètres, ce qui permettra probablement à la patiente de bénéficier des avantages du tout nouveau Mobetron.

Dans la première minute de l'opération, le chirurgien prélève un ganglion appelé "sentinelle", qui est envoyé d'urgence au laboratoire de biologie moléculaire de l'institut. Cette analyse unique chez nous, permet d'avoir les résultats en moins d'une heure. Si on détecte des métastases, d’autres traitements seront nécessaires. Si par contre le ganglion est indemne de métastases, on pourra utiliser le Mobetron.

L'opération devient ensuite plus classique : le chirurgien enlève la tumeur et l'envoie pour analyse immédiate. Après réception de tous les résultats du laboratoire, les médecins confirment que l’on peut passer à la fameuse radiothérapie qui se déroule en pleine salle d’opération. Une situation inédite.

Selon le docteur Catherine Philippson, radiothérapeute à l’Institut Jules Bordet, "irradier en salle d’opération est compliqué car il est difficile d’installer l’accélérateur. En principe, cela se fait dans un bunker de radiothérapie".

Place à l'irradiation

A présent, tout va se dérouler très rapidement. Alors que le sein est ouvert, l'équipe place un cône dans le tissu à irradier. On pousse la table d'opération sous l'accélérateur et on ajuste le faisceau au millimètre près. "Cela permet de stériliser les tumeurs traitées par rayons", dit Stéphane Simon, radio physicien à l’institut Bordet, "on tue les cellules cancéreuse qui seraient laissées après l’opération dans le lit tumoral".

Cette irradiation au cœur des tissus qui bordent la tumeur serait d'une efficacité redoutable. Jean-Marie Nogaret est responsable de la clinique du sein à l’institut Bordet. Selon lui, "on a déjà pu démontrer que le taux de récidives évalué avec une radiothérapie classique de 5 à 10%, descend en-dessous de 2% ". Les spécialistes constatent donc un gain de qualité mais aussi un gain de confort "puisqu’à la place de six semaines tous les jours (sauf les week-ends) en ambulatoire, le traitement est réduit en une seule radiation qui ne dure que deux minutes durant l’opération".

Cette nouvelle technique pourrait s'appliquer à la moitié des quelques 9000 femmes atteintes chaque année en Belgique d'un cancer du sein.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16396
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Robotique, cybernétique et informatique.   Jeu 15 Oct 2009 - 14:33

Cinq patients atteints de cancers de l'oesophage débutants ont déjà bénéficié, depuis début septembre, d'un tout nouveau traitement par radiofréquence au CHU de Brest. Seul dans l'Ouest à disposer de cematériel, le service de gastro-entérologie du PrMichel Robazckiewicz est le quatrième en France à en être équipé. L'achat, d'une valeur de 44.600 €, a pu être réalisé grâce à la vente aux enchères d'oeuvres d'art organisée le 29mars dernier par Finistère contre le cancer, le Rotary et la Ligue contre le cancer du Finistère. Le cancer de l'oesophage est très présent dans le Nord et l'Ouest de la France et particulièrement dans le Finistère. (Photo Catherine Le Guen)

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16396
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Robotique, cybernétique et informatique.   Mer 7 Oct 2009 - 21:48

Un laboratoire de poche capable de détecter le risque de cancer du sein
WASHINGTON - Des chercheurs canadiens ont dévoilé mercredi dans une publication américaine une technique expérimentale qui permet de détecter plus rapidement et plus facilement les femmes présentant un risque élevé de cancer du sein.

Plusieurs années d'études sont encore nécessaires avant que cet équipement, qui permet d'effectuer facilement des tests de routine mesurant le niveau des différentes hormones, puisse être commercialisé expliquent ses inventeurs, de l'Université de Toronto.

"Les femmes atteintes d'un cancer du sein ont une concentration d'oestrogènes et de ses dérivés dans les tissus mammaires nettement plus élevée que celles n'ayant pas de tumeur", relèvent-ils.

"Malgré cela, les niveaux d'oestrogènes des femmes à risque ne sont pas régulièrement mesurés car les techniques actuelles requièrent d'importants prélèvements de tissu mammaire", explique la gynécologue canadienne Noha Mousa, principal auteur de cette recherche parue dans le premier numéro de la revue en ligne Science Translational Medicine datée du 7 octobre.

La nouvelle technologie, appelée microfluidique, permet de mesurer de minuscules gouttelettes d'oestrogènes dans des échantillons mille fois plus petits que ceux requis aujourd'hui. Et elle utilise l'électricité pour séparer et purifier ces gouttelettes d'hormones à partir d'un mélange cellulaire qui tient sur une puce électronique de la taille d'une carte de crédit.

Avec cette innovation les médecins pourront aussi voir rapidement si une thérapie anti-cancéreuse est efficace ou détecter d'autres problèmes comme l'infertilité et peut-être aussi le cancer de la prostate.

Le Dr Mousa utilisera cette technique pour mesurer les niveaux d'oestrogènes dans une étude clinique devant commencer prochainement avec plus de 200 Canadiennes présentant un risque élevé de développer un cancer du sein.

Cette recherche vise à déterminer si un traitement neutralisant les oestrogènes pendant un an abaisse leur risque de cancer.

(©AFP / 07 octobre 2009 23h45)
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16396
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Robotique, cybernétique et informatique.   Mer 30 Sep 2009 - 4:32

(Sep. 30, 2009) — UofT researchers have used nanomaterials to develop a microchip sensitive enough to quickly determine the type and severity of a patient's cancer so that the disease can be detected earlier for more effective treatment.

Des chercheurs ont utilisé du nanomatériel pour développer un microchip sensible assez pour déterminer le type et la sévérité du cancer d'un patient pour que la maladie puisse êter développé plus tôt pour avoir des traitements plus efficaces.

Their groundbreaking work, reported Sept. 27 in Nature Nanotechnology heralds an era when sophisticated molecular diagnostics will become commonplace.

Leur formidable travail est rapporté dans "Nature Nanotechnology heralds"

"This remarkable innovation is an indication that the age of nanomedicine is dawning," says Professor David Naylor, president of the University of Toronto and a professor of medicine. "Thanks to the breadth of expertise here at U of T, cross-disciplinary collaborations of this nature make such landmark advances possible."

The researchers' new device can easily sense the signature biomarkers that indicate the presence of cancer at the cellular level, even though these biomolecules – genes that indicate aggressive or benign forms of the disease and differentiate subtypes of the cancer – are generally present only at low levels in biological samples. Analysis can be completed in 30 minutes, a vast improvement over the existing diagnostic procedures that generally take days.


Le nouvel outil peut facilement détecter les biomarqueurs qui indique la présence du cancer au niveau cellulaire même sices biomolécules sont à peine présentes. L'analyse est complété en 30 minutes, une grande amélioration sur la procédure de diagnostique habituelle qui prend des jours.

"Today, it takes a room filled with computers to evaluate a clinically relevant sample of cancer biomarkers and the results aren't quickly available," says Shana Kelley, a professor in the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy and the Faculty of Medicine, who was a lead investigator on the project and a co-author on the publication.

"Our team was able to measure biomolecules on an electronic chip the size of your fingertip and analyse the sample within half an hour. The instrumentation required for this analysis can be contained within a unit the size of a BlackBerry."

L'instrument n'est pas plus gros qu'un blackberry.

Kelley, along with engineering professor Ted Sargent – a fellow lead investigator and U of T's Canada Research Chair in Nanotechnology – and an interdisciplinary team from Princess Margaret Hospital and Queen's University, found that conventional, flat metal electrical sensors were inadequate to sense cancer's particular biomarkers. Instead, they designed and fabricated a chip and decorated it with nanometre-sized wires and molecular "bait."

"Uniting DNA – the molecule of life – with speedy, miniaturized electronic chips is an example of cross-disciplinary convergence," says Sargent. "By working with outstanding researchers in nanomaterials, pharmaceutical sciences, and electrical engineering, we were able to demonstrate that controlled integration of nanomaterials provides a major advantage in disease detection and analysis."

The speed and accuracy provided by their device is welcome news to cancer researchers.

La vitesse et la précision de l'appareil sont des bonnes nouvelles pour les chercheurs

"We rely on the measurement of biomarkers to detect cancer and to know if treatments are working," says Dr. Tom Hudson, president and scientific director of the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research. "The discovery by Dr. Kelley and her team offers the possibility of a faster, more cost-effective technology that could be used anywhere, speeding up diagnosis and helping to deliver a more targeted treatment to the patient."

Nous dépendons des mesures des biomarqueurs pour détecter le cancer et pour sav oir si les traitements fonctionnent.

The team's microchip platform has been tested on prostate cancer, as described in a paper published in ACS Nano, and head and neck cancer models. It could potentially be used to diagnose and assess other cancers, as well as infectious diseases such as HIV, MRSA and H1N1 flu.

"The system developed by the Kelley/Sargent team is a revolutionary technology that could allow us to track biomarkers that might have significant relevance to cancer, with a combination of speed, sensitivity, and accuracy not available with any current technology," says Dr. Fei-Fei Liu, a radiation oncologist at Princess Margaret Hospital and Head of Applied Molecular Oncology Division, Ontario Cancer Institute. "This type of approach could have a profound impact on the future management for our cancer patients."

Ce type d'approceh pourrait avoir un impact significatif sur la future façon de traiter les cancers

The research was funded by the Canada Foundation for Innovation, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, the Ontario Genomics Institute, Genome Canada, the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, the Ontario Ministry of Research and Innovation and the :Prostate: Cancer Research Foundation of Canada.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16396
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Robotique, cybernétique et informatique.   Mer 2 Sep 2009 - 16:05

Le Centre hospitalier de l'université de Montréal (CHUM) a présenté aujourd'hui son nouvel employé... et il s'agit d'un robot!
Le Cyberknife est un appareil de haute précision qui sert aux traitements de radiothérapie.

Il s'agit du premier appareil du genre à être implanté dans un hôpital canadien.

Grâce à sa grande précision, le Cyberknife peut cibler les tumeurs et les éliminer plus rapidement que grâce à des moyens plus classiques.

Pour un cancer du poumon par exemple, un patient peut être traité en une semaine au lieu de six.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16396
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Robotique, cybernétique et informatique.   Ven 12 Déc 2008 - 22:40

(Dec. 12, 2008) — In a new tactic in the fight against cancer, Cornell researcher Michael King has developed what he calls a lethal "lint brush" for the blood -- a tiny, implantable device that captures and kills cancer cells in the bloodstream before they spread through the body.

Un bidule qui capture les cellules cancéreuses dans le sang avant qu'elles ne se répandent dans le corps



A schematic of the two-receptor cancer neutralization concept. Cancer cells present in blood stick and roll on the selectins on the surface of the device. While rolling they bind to TRAIL and accumulate the self-destruct signal. Once they detach from the surface and leave the device, they will die 1-2 days later.

Les cellules roulent sur le bidule et se lie avec l'anticorps TRAIL. Quand elles repartent les cellules cancéreuses meurent 1 ou 2 jours après.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16396
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Robotique, cybernétique et informatique.   Jeu 20 Déc 2007 - 15:25

Des chercheurs américains ont mis au point un outil, des micropuces, capables de détecter et isoler des cellules d'origine tumorale circulant dans le sang de patients atteints de certains cancers, ce qui pourrait aider au diagnostic mais aussi à vérifier l'efficacité du traitement.

Les résultats de ces travaux de Mehmet Toner et ses collègues de l'école de médecine de Harvard sont publiés dans la revue scientifique britannique Nature datée de jeudi.

Des données suggèrent en effet que la quantité de cellules tumorales circulant dans le sang augmente quand le cancer, d'où elles proviennent, progresse, et que cette quantité diminue lorsque le cancer régresse grâce à la chimiothérapie.

Le nouveau système mis au point comprend schématiquement une micropuce recouverte d'anticorps destinés à piéger les cellules tumorales, sans les endommager afin de pouvoir mieux les analyser.

Ce mini-laboratoire, testé sur 116 patients atteints de cancers métastasés du poumon, de la prostate, du sein ou encore du colon, a mis en évidence la présence de ces cellules chez 115 de ces patients.

Cette technique du «laboratoire sur puce» a de surcroît permis de déceler des cellules tumorales dans le sang de 7 patients ayant un cancer de la prostate, non pas avancé cette fois, mais au stade précoce de la maladie.

Selon la revue, cette nouvelle méthode apparaît plus simple que celles qui ont été jusque là employées pour isoler ces rares cellules se déplaçant dans la circulation sanguine. Cela laisse espérer que ce dispositif puisse devenir utilisable pour un diagnostic rapide du cancer et contrôler son évolution sous traitement, selon la revue.

Les cellules dérivant de tumeurs solides (cancer du sein par exemple) qui circulent dans le sang peuvent être à l'origine de métastases (tumeurs secondaires essaimant dans l'organisme à partir du cancer de départ).

Toutefois leur présence n'est pas toujours de mauvais pronostic : une partie d'entre elles meurent rapidement après avoir atteint le sang et seule une infime portion de ces cellules possède un «potentiel métastatique», relève un spécialiste, Jonathan Uhr (Texas), dans un éditorial de la revue.

D'où l'idée de compter ces cellules et selon leur quantité, d'adopter un traitement plus ou moins agressif, d'après lui.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16396
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Robotique, cybernétique et informatique.   Mar 27 Nov 2007 - 9:55

The Centenary Institute unveiled a powerful microscope unlike any other in Australia. Representing the cutting edge in medical technology and microscopy, the unique imaging features of the multiphoton microscope will enable scientists at the Centenary Institute unprecedented access to the secret workings of living tissues at the cellular and molecular level.

L'institut a révélé un puissant microscope qui n'a pas son pareil en Australie. Représentant la fine pointe de la technologie en matière de technologie médicale et microscopique, le microscope multiphoton rendra les scientifiques capables d'accéder au secret des tissus vivants au niveau de la cellule et de la molécule.

The Centenary Institute is equally excited about the arrival of Austrian Professor Wolfgang Weninger, one of only a handful of people in the world who specialises in using the multiphoton microscope in the immunology field to view immune responses in real-time in living tissue.
At the Centenary, Professor Weninger will lead a team of researchers to study the dynamics of the immune system's response to cancer and infectious diseases.

L'institut est également content de recevoir le professeur Wolfgang Weninger, une des quelques personnes capables d'animer une équipe qui manoeuvrera le microssope. Ils étudieront la réponse immunitaire au cancer aux maladies infectueuses.

Professor Weninger said, "Cancer is still a leading cause of death in Australia. There is a need to develop improved anti-cancer therapies based on the use of the body's own resources - namely our immune system. This type of microscope is an outstanding tool to study how our bodies fight cancer both in early and advanced stages. If we can learn more about how our immune system attacks cancer cells directly in the context of intact tissues, we hope to develop improved immuno-therapies."

Ce type de microscope est un outil extraordinaire pour étudier le système immunitaire dans le but de combattre le cancer aux stages avancées et débutants.

Using the multiphoton microscope, Professor Weninger's team pioneered ground-breaking imaging models to record how the body's defences fight tumours and infectious diseases. He has made real-time videos of white blood cells invading and destroying cancer cells in living tissue.

il a déja fait une vidéo en temps réel ou l'on voit des cellules blanche du sang combattre et détruire des cellules canécreuses dans un tissu vivant.


I am confident that the results of his team's research will vastly improve our understanding of how the body's immune system fights cancer and infectious diseases. The multiphoton microscope will also support the research of other Centenary scientists particularly in autoimmune and liver diseases."



The multiphoton microscope at the Centenary Institute has two unique features, its imaging mode and laser. The unique imaging mode uses multiple laser beams and means fast moving objects and dynamic processes in living tissue can be viewed, for example, cells in the blood stream. The laser has been enhanced with a unit called an OPO that produces longer wavelengths of light than those used in other microscopes enabling researchers to potentially look deeper into living tissue than ever before.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16396
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Robotique, cybernétique et informatique.   Jeu 22 Nov 2007 - 14:56



Santé - Cette invention italienne peut détecter les cancers du sein ou de la prostate de manière non invasive. Sans contact. En générant des ondes radio à quelques centimètres du corps.

L'engin ne paye pas de mine. Long d'une trentaine de centimètres, ce tube de plastique blanc tenu à la main pourrait pourtant bien révolutionner la détection des tumeurs cancéreuses. Son principe : visualiser la résonance électromagnétique des organes exposés aux ondes radios émises par l'appareil. Et détecter ainsi l'écho anormal, pathologique, liée à la présence de cellules cancéreuses.



L'examen, relativement simple, peut être réalisé en 5 mn. Il suffit de passer la sonde le long de la zone à diagnostiquer, à une distance de quelques centimètres du corps du patient, qui peut rester habillé pour l'occasion. Les émissions électromagnétiques du TrimProbe, finement calibrées à 465, 930 et 1395 MégaHertz (MHz), provoquent au sein des cellules "scannées" l'apparition d'un signal radio. La forme de cette interférence « bioélectromagnétique » varie alors selon la présence ou non d'une tumeur.

L'onde est captée par une antenne située à moins de 2 mètres du patient et immédiatement affichée sur l'écran d'un ordinateur pour être interprétée par le médecin. Plus besoin de biopsie ou de prise de sang, l'analyse des tracés indique ou pas la présence d'une tumeur en formation. Le dispositif électronique se veut idéal pour un diagnostic préliminaire, en cas notamment de campagne de dépistage massif.

Une sensibilité de 80 à 90 %

Depuis la présentation officielle de l'appareil, en 2003, les travaux de recherches publiés dans les revues médicales se multiplient. Une dizaine sont déjà parus et autant sont en attente, confirmant la fiabilité du TrimProbe et l'intérêt des spécialistes pour ce nouvel outil. Dernière en date, l'étude multicentrique menée dans cinq hôpitaux de la péninsule italienne et publié dans la revue British Journal of Urology en novembre 2007. La sonde a décelé 4 cancers de la prostate sur 5, sans cerner la gravité de la tumeur repérée mais avec assez de précision pour limiter le risque d'erreur de diagnostic. Si plus de 20 000 patients ont déjà été examinés au sujet de la prostate, d'autres études ont débuté sur la vessie, le rein, l'estomac, la thyroïde, ainsi que le cancer du sein ou des ovaires. Avec des taux de performances analogues, de l'ordre de 80 à 90 %.

Autre atout, l'énergie électromagnétique dégagée est extrêmement faible. De l'ordre du milliwatt. Donc garantie sans risque pour la santé du patient ou du praticien. Un avantage non négligeable alors que l'exposition aux rayons x ou aux rayonnements des téléphones mobiles ne cesse d'alimenter l'actualité médicale. Une soixantaine de TrimProbe sont déjà en service, dont une dizaine hors d'Italie. Un exemplaire serait même actuellement en test en France. Prix annoncé du TrimProbe : entre 50 et 100 000 euros l'unité, selon le spectre de cancers à détecter.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16396
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Robotique, cybernétique et informatique.   Lun 19 Nov 2007 - 15:25

Les technologies d'avenir de la radiothérapie, épousant les contours de la tumeur au millimètre près et mesurant en continu la dose reçue font rêver les professionnels, alors que les risques restent difficiles à maîtriser, comme en témoignent les accidents d'Epinal et Toulouse.

Il y a «des progrès évidents dans l'efficacité des traitements», selon Jean-Marc Cosset (Institut Curie) : la «meilleure précision balistique» permet de «mieux cibler le tumeur», tandis que «la radiothérapie asservie à la respiration» tient compte des mouvements respiratoires du patient.

Sur 180 000 malades du cancer traités par radiothérapie en France, quelques milliers bénéficient de technologies innovantes auxquelles les fabricants ont parfois donné des noms dignes de romans de science-fiction (Cyberknife, Gammaknife).

Ainsi le Cyberknife, «premier vrai robot médical», selon Eric Lartigau du Centre Oscar Lambret à Lille, un des trois établissements en France équipés de cet appareil, d'une précision de l'ordre du dixième de mm, peut intégrer l'information concernant le patient, «le traiter et vérifier» si c'est bien fait.

Ce robot doit toutefois être «surveillé en permanence par l'homme», a souligné le Pr Lartigau lors d'une audition de l'Office parlementaire d'évaluation des choix scientifiques et technologiques, jeudi.

La radiochirurgie cible au millimètre près des tumeurs cérébrales que l'on peut traiter en une seule séance, selon Jean-Jacques Mazeron (Hôpital Pitié-Salpêtrière, Paris).

Un millier de patients en France ont bénéficié de la radiothérapie par modulation d'intensité (IMRT) qui permet notamment de traiter des tumeurs en forme de fer à cheval en tenant compte de l'évolution quotidienne de leurs contours, selon Jean Bourhis (Institut Gustave Roussy).

Au-delà des améliorations techniques susceptibles de réduire les risques d'accidents, d'autres progrès restent à faire pour une «maîtrise de la qualité» lors de l'utilisation des appareils, selon les experts.

Erreur d'identification de patients homonymes, erreur de calibrage de faisceaux, logiciels défaillants ou mal traduits, formation insuffisante des professionnels ou manque de communication entre eux... Le Pr Jacques Bourguignon de l'Autorité de sûreté du nucléaire (ASN) a énuméré la liste des manquements constatés au fil d'une trentaine d'«événements de radiothérapie» signalés depuis 2005.

Outre les graves accidents d'Epinal et de Toulouse, des incidents isolés ont été répertoriés par l'ASN qui incite à leur déclaration pour prévenir leur répétition.
Toutefois, «tous les signalements reçus ne sont pas systématiquement des accidents pour les patients», souligne Jean-Claude Ghislain (Agence française de sécurité sanitaire des produits de santé).

Evoquant l'écart entre les centres de traitement, André-Claude Lacoste, directeur général de l'ASN, estime qu'il «y a de l'extrêmement bon d'un côté et du sans doute extrêmement mauvais de l'autre».

Pour Dominique Maraninchi, président de l'Institut national du cancer (InCA), la fixation, pour les centres de radiothérapie, d'un seuil minimal d'activité (600 patients par an) devrait éviter l'amateurisme, car «on ne fait décemment que ce qu'on fait régulièrement».

L'ASN doit d'ailleurs inspecter les 180 centres de radiothérapies d'ici décembre 2007 pour évaluer l'organisation des services. Un rapport de synthèse est prévu «début 2008».
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16396
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Robotique, cybernétique et informatique.   Sam 27 Oct 2007 - 13:29

(Oct. 23, 2007) — MIT and University of Rochester researchers report important advances toward a therapeutic device that has the potential to capture cells as they flow through the blood stream and treat them. Among other applications, such a device could zapp cancer cells spreading to other tissues, or signal stem cells to differentiate.

Le Mit institute rapporte une importante avancée vers la mise au point d'un "gadget" qui aurait le potentiel de capturer certaines cellules alors qu'elles circulent dans le sag et les traiter.

PArmi d'Autres applications, ce bidule pourrait éviter que les cellules cancéreuses de répandent à d'autres parties du corps ou pourrait forcer les cellules souches à se différencier.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16396
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Nouvelle façon de trouver des médicaments avec l'ordi.   Dim 6 Mai 2007 - 13:03

Cest un article sur une nouvelle façon de découvrir des peptides ( des chaines d'acides aminées) qui peuvent inhiber la croissance du cancer du sein. Je laisse l'article en anglais parce que tout cela est assez compliqué, si vous découvrez des erreurs dans la traduction, n'hésitez pas à les corriger.

Les chercheurs du collège Hamilton ont identifié des molécules qui pourraient être efficaces contre le cancer. Les chercheurs ont utilisés les techniques de l'ordinateur d'une nouvelle manière pour désigner ces molécules qui selon plusieurs prédictions seront efficaces contre le cancer du sein. Les scientifiques du Collège d'Albany ont synthétisé subséquemment les molécules prédites et ont montré qu'elles avaient bien un potentiel anti-cancer dans des expériences sur des animaux.


Le cancer du sein est le plus commun des cancers ches les femmes et le taximofen est le médicament préferré pour le taitement du cancer avec des récepteurs d'oestrogène. Plusieurs de ces cancers sont résistants au taximofen ou acquièrent leur résistance durant le traitement. Conséquemment, il y a un besoin incessant pour de nouveaux médicaments qui ont des cibles différentes.


Des travaux précédents de chercheurs du collège d'Albany ont montré que des peptides de 8 ou 9 acides animés inhibaient le cancer du sein chez des souris et des rats, interagissant avec des récepteurs inconnus, mais des peptides plus petits que 8 acides aminés ne faisaient pas le travail.

Les chercheurs d'Hamilton ont donc utilisé les techniques de l'ordinateur pour prédire la structure et la dynamique des peptides, ce qui a conduit a la découverte de plus petites peptites avec une pleine activité biologique. Les résultats ont été utilisé pour identifié la strucutre en 3 dimension de peptides plus petites. Ces peptides ont été synthétisé et ont démontré efficace pour inhiber la croissance de cellule dépendantes de l'oestrogène chez la souris avec un test montrant une corrélation suffisante avec le cancer du sein humain.


Hamilton College researchers have identified molecules that have been shown to be effective in the fight against breast cancer. The Hamilton researchers used state-of-the-art computational techniques in a novel way to design molecules that they predicted would be effective lead compounds for breast cancer research. Scientists from the Albany Medical College subsequently synthesized the predicted molecules and showed that they were indeed potential anti-breast cancer compounds in animal systems.

Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women and tamoxifen is the preferred drug for estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer treatment. Many of these cancers are intrinsically resistant to tamoxifen or acquire resistance during treatment. Consequently, there is an ongoing need for breast cancer drugs that have different molecular targets.
Previous work by the Albany Medical College researchers had shown that 8-mer and cyclic 9-mer peptides inhibit breast cancer in mouse and rat models, interacting with an unsolved receptor, while peptides smaller than eight amino acids did not.

The Hamilton researchers used advanced computational methods to predict the structure and dynamics of active peptides, leading to discovery of smaller peptides with full biological activity. The results were used to identify smaller peptides with the three dimensional structure of the larger peptides. These peptides were synthesized and shown to inhibit estrogen-dependent cell growth in a mouse uterine growth assay, a test showing reliable correlation with human breast cancer inhibition.


Dernière édition par le Ven 2 Nov 2007 - 21:05, édité 2 fois
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16396
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Les robots   Dim 4 Mar 2007 - 15:30

Japon: un micro-robot évoluant dans le corps pour diagnostiquer et soigner
TOKYO (AFP),
© AFP

Des chercheurs travaillent sur les maladies de Parkinson, Alzheimer et du diabète, dans un laboratoire à Grenade le 23 janvier 2004Une équipe de chercheurs de l'Université Ritsumei-kan et de plusieurs industriels de l'électronique nippons, dont Omron, ont mis au point un prototype de micro-robot médical capable de circuler dans le corps, de prendre des photos ou encore d'y transporter des traitements.

C robot est l'aboutissement de trois années de recherches dans le cadre d'un projet courant jusqu'à 2010 et initié par le ministère des Sciences japonais, selon les documents de présentation des travaux.

Ce micro-robot de 5 grammes, qui mesure 2 centimètres de long et sur un de large, ressemble à première vue à un insecte.

Il est inséré par une petite entaille dans le corps du patient afin d'aller y photographier des anomalies, ou bien de véhiculer une substance jusqu'à une zone précise.

Outre une minuscule caméra, il intègre un micro-processeur, une diode pour éclairer, et divers capteurs pour se déplacer.

Le prototype actuel est manipulé par l'intermédiaire d'une télécommande filaire, et retransmet les images prises vers l'extérieur via un câble.

Toutefois, à terme, les chercheurs souhaitent que ce micro-robot de diagnostic et traitement soit équipé d'un émetteur/récepteur sans fil pour se déplacer sans entraves.

Un tel micro-robot pourrait permettrait de détruire patiemment une à une chaque tumeur cancéreuse détectée chez un patient, évitant ainsi les effets secondaires de la chimiothérapie ou des traitements par irradiation.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16396
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Robotique, cybernétique et informatique.   Lun 8 Mai 2006 - 10:02

Les nanoparticules sont effectives pour combattre le cancer



Le résultat des études, publié par le professeur Dennis Discher de l'école d'ingénierie et de sciences appliquées à l'université de Pennsylvanie, dans le journal Molecular Pharamaceutics et conduites à l'université de Pennsylvanie démontrent que des nanoparticules biodégradables contenant des médicaments anti cancer sont efficaces pour tuer les cellules tumorales humaines.

Les deux médicaments furent le Taxol et la doxorubicine utilisés habituellement dans le traitement de cancers.

Les particules biodégradables sont composées de molécules de phospholipides comprises entre deux couches de polymères synthétiques. La structure ressemble à une très petite cellule ou à un virus. Cette structure complexe de polymères permet de combiner et de transporter les médicaments jusqu'au site de la tumeur.

Selon les auteurs ces polymères devraient être capables d'atteindre des endroits de l'organisme que d'autres systèmes de transport de médicaments ont difficile à atteindre.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: Robotique, cybernétique et informatique.   

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
Robotique, cybernétique et informatique.
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 2Aller à la page : 1, 2  Suivant
 Sujets similaires
-
» Le modèle cybernétique dans la théorie mimétique de René Girard
» Cybernétique
» cned ou educatel
» Google et dépenses énergétique
» Champ magnétique ou autres rayonnements.

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
ESPOIRS :: Cancer :: recherche-
Sauter vers: