AccueilCalendrierFAQRechercherS'enregistrerMembresGroupesConnexion

Partagez | 
 

 Le gène PTEN

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
AuteurMessage
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16505
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène PTEN    Mer 14 Juin 2017 - 21:21


A collaboration between Saïd M. Sebti, Ph.D., chair of Moffitt Cancer Center's Drug Discovery Department, and Michele Pagano, M.D., chair of the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology at New York University's Langone Medical Center, led to the publication of an important study in the latest issue of Nature. The investigation found that the drug, geranylgeranyltransferase inhibitor GGTI-2418 suppresses a new defective PTEN cancer pathway discovered by Pagano's group.

Fully functional PTEN is well known to suppress tumor growth by antagonizing the PI3K/Akt tumor survival pathway. Pagano's group discovered a novel mechanism by which PTEN protects cells from cancer by preventing the geranylgeranylated protein FBXL2 from binding and degrading IP3R3. IP3R3 is an important anti-cancer "sensor" recognizing hyper-proliferating cells that use abnormally high levels of energy, and targeting them to self-destruct as an anti-cancer safety mechanism. The PTEN gene binds to IP3R3, protecting its cancer-sensing function. However PTEN is defective in many cancers, and as such, FBXL2 is left unchecked; too much IP3R3 is degraded and fast-multiplying cells are less able to self-destruct.

"FXBL2 may be partially responsible for cancer growth in the many patients with genetic changes that happen to disable PTEN," said Pagano. The drug GGTI-2418 blocks this cancer-causing activity of FBXL2 by inhibiting its geranylgeranylation which is required for FBXL2 to bind and degrade IP3R3. GGTI-2418 was co-discovered and developed by Sebti and NYU President Andrew Hamilton, Ph.D., while he was at Yale University. .

Another fascinating consequence of this discovery is that cancers with defective PTEN activate two tumor survival circuits to evade cell death, the PI3K/Akt and the FBXL2 pathways. "These findings have important translational implications as patients whose tumors harbor defective PTEN may benefit greatly from a combination of inhibitors of FBXL2 geranylgeranylation, such as GGTI-2418, and inhibitors of Akt, such as TCN-P," said Sebti. Both GGTI-2418 and TCN-P were co-discovered by Sebti and are now developed by the clinical-stage oncology company Prescient Therapeutics Ltd.

The researchers also found that using GGTI-2418 to block FBXL2 from degrading IP3R3 made the tumors in mice more vulnerable to photodynamic therapy (PDT)."This experimental drug, by itself and with a form of light therapy, countered FBXL2 to let abnormal cells self-destruct," said Pagano "We will be looking to collaborate with Dr. Sebti on clinical studies combining GGTI-2418 with PDT or TCN-P in patients with low PTEN."

---

Une collaboration entre Saïd M. Sebti, Ph.D., président du département Drug Discovery de Moffitt Cancer Center, et Michele Pagano, MD, président du Département de biochimie et de Pharmacologie moléculaire du Langone Medical Center de l'Université de New York, ont mené à la publication d'une étude importante dans le dernier numéro de Nature. L'enquête a révélé que le médicament, l'inhibiteur de la geranylgeranyltransférase GGTI-2418 supprime une nouvelle voie défectueuse de cancer PTEN découverte par le groupe de Pagano.

Le PTEN entièrement fonctionnel est bien connu pour supprimer la croissance tumorale en antagonisant la voie de survie de la tumeur PI3K / Akt. Le groupe de Pagano a découvert un nouveau mécanisme par lequel PTEN protège les cellules contre le cancer en empêchant la protéine gerberylgeranylée FBXL2 de lier et de dégrader IP3R3. L'IP3R3 est un «capteur» anticancéreux important qui reconnaît les cellules hyper-proliférantes qui utilisent des niveaux d'énergie anormalement élevés et les ciblant pour s'auto-détruire en tant que mécanisme de sécurité anticancéreux. Le gène PTEN se lie à IP3R3, protégeant sa fonction de détection du cancer. Cependant, PTEN est défectueux dans de nombreux cancers, et en tant que tel, FBXL2 est laissé sans contrôle; Trop d'IP3R3 est dégradé et les cellules à multiplication rapide sont moins capables de s'auto-détruire.

"FXBL2 peut être partiellement responsable de la croissance du cancer chez les nombreux patients avec des changements génétiques qui désactivent PTEN", a déclaré Pagano. Le médicament GGTI-2418 bloque cette activité cancérogène de FBXL2 en inhibant sa geranylgeranylation qui est nécessaire pour que FBXL2 se lie et dégrade IP3R3. GGTI-2418 a été co-découvert et développé par Sebti et le président de NYU Andrew Hamilton, Ph.D., alors qu'il était à l'Université de Yale. .

Une autre conséquence fascinante de cette découverte est que les cancers avec des PTEN défectueux activent deux circuits de survie des tumeurs pour échapper à la mort cellulaire, aux voies PI3K / Akt et FBXL2. "Ces découvertes ont d'importantes implications translationnelles car les patients dont les tumeurs abritent PTEN défectueux peuvent bénéficier grandement d'une combinaison d'inhibiteurs de la geranylgeranylation FBXL2, comme GGTI-2418 et des inhibiteurs d'Akt, tels que TCN-P", a déclaré Sebti. Les deux GGTI-2418 et TCN-P ont été co-découverts par Sebti et sont maintenant développés par la société d'oncologie clinique Prescient Therapeutics Ltd.

Les chercheurs ont également constaté que l'utilisation de GGTI-2418 pour empêcher FBXL2 de détériorer l'IP3R3 a rendu les tumeurs chez les souris plus vulnérables à la thérapie photodynamique (PDT). "Ce médicament expérimental, seul et avec une forme de thérapie par la lumière, a contré FBXL2 pour laisser des cellules anormales s'autodétruire ", a déclaré Pagano. Nous chercherons à collaborer avec le Dr. Sebti sur les études cliniques combinant GGTI-2418 avec la PDT ou TCN-P chez les patients à faible PTEN".

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16505
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène PTEN    Ven 12 Mai 2017 - 12:34

The loss of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN has been linked to tumor growth and chemotherapy resistance in the almost invariably lethal brain cancer glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Now, Ludwig researchers have shown that one way to override the growth-promoting effects of PTEN deletion is, surprisingly, to inhibit a separate tumor suppressor gene.

"It was an unexpected result because these are two verified tumor suppressor genes," said study senior author Frank Furnari, a member of Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, San Diego.

The finding, published in the current issue of the journal Nature Communications, could lead to new therapies for treating a common sub-type of GBM and possibly other forms of cancer. "PTEN is one of the most frequently deleted tumor suppressor genes in cancer, so if we can take our finding to the next level and develop a therapeutic around it, it could have wide utility," said Furnari, who is also a Professor of Pathology at the University of California, San Diego.

In their study, Furnari and his colleagues detail a previously unknown physical interaction between PTEN and DAXX. The latter is a so-called chaperone protein that helps guide the attachment of the protein H3.3 to compact looping fibers of DNA and its protein scaffolding, which are collectively called chromatin.

H3.3 is a variant of the histone protein H3. Most histone proteins are involved in helping package DNA into structures small enough to fit in the cell nucleus, but H3.3 appears to play a gene regulatory role instead. H3.3 has been found attached to chromatin sections containing tumor growth-promoting genes, or oncogenes, suggesting it helps suppress their activity. Thus, the discovery that PTEN interacts with DAXX indicates it can regulate oncogene expression in cells by affecting H3.3-chromatin binding.

The work by the Ludwig scientists supports this hypothesis. "What we found was that PTEN suppresses oncogene expression by increasing the deposition of DAXX and H3.3 onto chromatin," Furnari said.

In experiments involving mice injected with human GBM cells, the scientists also demonstrated that if either PTEN or DAXX were eliminated, then tumor growth occurred. However, if both genes are deleted, tumor growth slows -- a phenomenon referred to as a synthetic growth defect.

"We are proposing that in the absence of PTEN, DAXX competes with chromatin for H3.3, enabling the expression of oncogenes that would otherwise be suppressed," said study first author Jorge Benitez, a senior postdoc in Furnari's lab. "But if both PTEN and DAXX are deleted, then H3.3 is once again free to bind to the chromatin, slowing tumor growth."

In their animal experiments, the team used genetic engineering techniques to knock out the DAXX gene, but they want to develop a drug that can achieve the same result. To that end, they are working to identify how exactly DAXX and H3.3 bind to one another.

"The next step is to design molecules that can break that complex apart by binding to DAXX," Benitez said. "We think that is the first step on the way toward a therapeutic."

---


La perte du gène suppresseur de tumeur PTEN a été liée à la croissance de la tumeur et à la résistance à la chimiothérapie dans le cancer du ,le glioblastome multiforme (GBM). Maintenant, les chercheurs de Ludwig ont montré qu'une manière unique de neutraliser les effets favorisant la croissance de la suppression de PTEN est, de façon surprenante, d'inhiber un gène suppresseur de tumeur séparé.

"Ce fut un résultat inattendu, car il s'agit de deux gènes suppresseurs de tumeurs vérifiés", a déclaré Frank Furnari, un auteur de l'étude, membre de l'Institut Louiswig pour la recherche sur le cancer à San Diego.

La découverte, publiée dans le numéro actuel de la revue Nature Communications, pourrait conduire à de nouvelles thérapies pour traiter un sous-type commun de GBM et éventuellement d'autres formes de cancer. "PTEN est l'un des gènes suppresseurs de tumeurs les plus fréquemment supprimés du cancer, donc si nous pouvons passer à notre prochaine étape et développer une thérapie à son sujet, il pourrait avoir une large utilité", a déclaré Furnari, qui est également professeur de pathologie À l'Université de Californie, à San Diego.

Dans leur étude, Furnari et ses collègues détaillent une interaction physique précédemment inconnue entre PTEN et DAXX. Ce dernier est une protéine dite chaperon qui aide à guider la fixation de la protéine H3.3 à des fibres de bouclage compactes d'ADN et à ses échafaudages protéiques, appelés collectivement chromatine.

H3.3 est une variante de la protéine histone H3. La plupart des protéines d'histone sont impliquées dans l'utilisation de l'ADN de l'emballage dans des structures suffisamment petites pour s'adapter au noyau cellulaire, mais H3.3 semble jouer un rôle de régulation des gènes à la place. H3.3 a été trouvé en liaison avec des sections de chromatine contenant des gènes favorisant la croissance de la tumeur, ou des oncogènes, suggérant que cela contribue à supprimer leur activité. Ainsi, la découverte que PTEN interagit avec DAXX indique qu'elle peut réguler l'expression d'oncogène dans les cellules en affectant la liaison de la chromatine H3.3.

Le travail des scientifiques de Ludwig appuie cette hypothèse. "Ce que nous avons trouvé, c'est que PTEN supprime l'expression oncogène en augmentant le dépôt de DAXX et H3.3 sur la chromatine", a déclaré Furnari.

Dans les expériences impliquant des souris injectées avec des cellules GBM humaines, les scientifiques ont également démontré que si PTEN ou DAXX ont été éliminés, la croissance tumorale s'est produite. Cependant, si les deux gènes sont supprimés, la croissance de la tumeur ralentit - un phénomène dénommé défaut de croissance synthétique.

"Nous proposons qu'en l'absence de PTEN, DAXX est en concurrence avec la chromatine pour H3.3, permettant l'expression d'oncogènes qui seraient autrement supprimés", a déclaré l'auteur de l'étude, Jorge Benitez, un postdoc senior dans le laboratoire de Furnari. "Mais si PTEN et DAXX sont supprimés, alors H3.3 est de nouveau libre de se lier à la chromatine, ralentissant la croissance tumorale".

Dans leurs expériences sur les animaux, l'équipe a utilisé des techniques d'ingénierie génétique pour éliminer le gène DAXX, mais elles veulent développer un médicament qui peut atteindre le même résultat. À cette fin, ils travaillent à identifier comment exactement DAXX et H3.3 se lient entre eux.

"La prochaine étape consiste à concevoir des molécules qui peuvent séparer ce complexe en se liant à DAXX", a déclaré Benitez. "Nous pensons que c'est le premier pas vers une voie thérapeutique".

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16505
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène PTEN    Mar 21 Mar 2017 - 11:47

New genes which help prevent prostate, skin and breast cancer development in mice have been discovered by researchers at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators. The study identified genes that cooperate with the well-known tumour suppressor gene PTEN, and showed their relevance in human prostate tumours.

Reported in Nature Genetics, this research sheds light on new pathways involved in cancer development -- these could be possible drug targets for cancers with a faulty PTEN gene. The methods developed could also identify other genes that cooperate to suppress cancer growth.

Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in men in the UK with around 47,000 men diagnosed each year. More than half of prostate cancers have an altered or missing PTEN gene, as do many other cancers, including brain tumours, and endometrial cancers.

Tumour suppressor genes such as PTEN help prevent cancer development in healthy people. PTEN regulates an important cell pathway for growth and division. However, little is known about which other genes and pathways cooperate with PTEN to prevent cancer.

In this study, researchers designed a new method in mice in which part of the Pten gene was converted into a mobile DNA element known as a transposon. When this was mobilized from the Pten gene it was inactivated. Importantly the transposon carrying a piece of Pten would land randomly throughout the genome, damaging genes into which it inserted. Cancers would grow when the transposon damaged a tumour suppressor gene that co-operated with Pten.

Dr Jorge de la Rosa, the first author on the study from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, said: "We developed a new method that coupled Pten inactivation with mobilization of the transposon. We inserted the transposon directly inside the Pten gene, so that whenever it jumped out and inserted into another part of the genome, it inactivated Pten at the same time. By analysing which genes were disrupted in the cancers that grew, we were able to pinpoint genes that cooperate with Pten in suppressing tumours."

The researchers analysed 278 prostate, breast and skin tumors from the mice and revealed hundreds of genes that could cooperate with PTEN and act as further tumor suppressor genes. Human cell lines and data from human prostate tumours were then used to study the five most promising genes.

Dr Juan Cadiñanos, joint lead author from the Instituto de Medicina Oncologica y Molecular de Asturias, in Spain, said: "This is the first study to look specifically for tumour suppressor genes that cooperate with PTEN in a range of cancer types. We found that genetically inactivating PTEN and each of the five candidate genes in human cell lines did drive cancerous changes in the cells. We also discovered that human prostate cancer samples had lower levels of expression from the five genes than usual, indicating that these pathways may be important for suppressing tumours."

The researchers also studied one of the five genes, called Wac, in transgenic mice with mutant Pten. They discovered that removing one copy of Wac increased the size of prostate tumours, as expected for a tumor suppressor. However, removing both copies in the genome surprisingly reduced the size of the tumours. This could reveal new pathways to target for treating prostate cancer.

Prof Allan Bradley, joint lead author from the Sanger Institute, said: "Drugs that target PTEN related pathways are under development, but tumours quickly develop resistance. It would therefore be useful to also target other tumour suppressor pathways. This new method is a good way of highlighting important tumour suppressor networks, and we hope the genes identified in this study will provide a basis for the development of therapeutic strategies for prostate and other cancers."

---

De nouveaux gènes qui aident à prévenir le développement de la , de la et du cancer du chez la souris ont été découverts par des chercheurs de l'Institut Wellcome Trust Sanger et leurs collaborateurs. L'étude a identifié des gènes qui coopèrent avec le gène suppresseur de tumeur bien connu PTEN, et ont montré leur pertinence dans les tumeurs de la humaine.

Signalé dans Nature Genetics, cette recherche jette la lumière sur les nouvelles voies impliquées dans le développement du cancer - ce pourrait être des cibles de médicaments possibles pour les cancers avec un défaut du gène PTEN. Les méthodes développées pourraient également identifier d'autres gènes qui coopèrent pour supprimer la croissance du cancer.

Le cancer de la est le deuxième cancer le plus fréquent chez les hommes au Royaume-Uni avec environ 47 000 hommes diagnostiqués chaque année. Plus de la moitié des cancers de la prostate ont un gène PTEN altéré ou manquant, comme ont de nombreux autres cancers, y compris les tumeurs cérébrales et les cancers de l'endomètre.

Les gènes suppresseurs de tumeurs comme le PTEN aident à prévenir le développement du cancer chez les personnes en bonne santé. PTEN régule une voie importante pour la croissance et la division. Cependant, on sait peu de choses sur les autres gènes et voies qui coopèrent avec PTEN pour prévenir le cancer.

Dans cette étude, les chercheurs ont conçu une nouvelle méthode chez la souris dans laquelle une partie du gène Pten a été converti en un élément d'ADN mobile connu sous le nom de transposon. Lorsque celui-ci a été mobilisé à partir du gène Pten, il a été inactivé. Fait important, le transposon portant un morceau de Pten se poserait au hasard dans tout le génome, endommageant les gènes dans lesquels il s'insérait. Les cancers croissaient quand le transposon endommageait un gène suppresseur de tumeur qui coopérait avec Pten.

Le Dr Jorge de la Rosa, premier auteur de l'étude du Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, a déclaré: «Nous avons développé une nouvelle méthode qui couple l'inactivation de Pten inactivation avec la mobilisation du transposon. Nous avons inséré le transposon directement à l'intérieur du gène Pten, de sorte que chaque fois Il a sauté et s'est inséré dans une autre partie du génome, il a inactivé Pten en même temps. En analysant quels gènes ont été perturbés dans les cancers qui ont grandi, nous avons pu identifier les gènes qui coopèrent avec Pten dans la suppression des tumeurs.

Les chercheurs ont analysé 278 tumeurs de la prostate, du sein et de la peau de la souris et ont révélé des centaines de gènes qui pourraient coopérer avec PTEN et qui agissent comme des gènes suppresseurs de tumeur supplémentaires. Les lignées cellulaires humaines et les données provenant de tumeurs de la prostate humaines ont ensuite été utilisées pour étudier les cinq gènes les plus prometteurs.

Le Dr Juan Cadiñanos, co-auteur de l'Institut de Médecine Oncologique et Moléculaire des Asturies, en Espagne, a déclaré: "C'est la première étude à étudier spécifiquement pour les gènes suppresseurs de tumeurs qui coopèrent avec PTEN dans une gamme de types de cancer. Nous avons également découvert que les échantillons de cancer de la prostate humain avaient des niveaux d'expression plus faibles que d'habitude à partir des cinq gènes, ce qui indique que ces voies peuvent être importantes pour la suppression des tumeurs. "

Les chercheurs ont également étudié l'un des cinq gènes, appelé Wac, chez des souris transgéniques avec Pten mutant. Ils ont découvert que l'élimination d'une copie de Wac a augmenté la taille des tumeurs de la prostate, comme prévu pour un suppresseur de tumeur. Cependant, l'élimination des deux copies dans le génome a étonnamment réduit la taille des tumeurs. Cela pourrait révéler de nouvelles voies à cibler pour le traitement du cancer de la prostate.

Le Dr Allan Bradley, co-auteur de l'Institut Sanger, a déclaré: «Les médicaments qui ciblent les voies liées au PTEN sont en cours de développement, mais les tumeurs développent rapidement une résistance et il serait donc utile de cibler d'autres voies suppresseurs de tumeurs. Nous espérons que les gènes identifiés dans cette étude fourniront une base pour le développement de stratégies thérapeutiques pour la prostate et d'autres cancers.


_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16505
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène PTEN    Dim 5 Mar 2017 - 13:06

Mount Sinai researchers have discovered that a rheumatoid arthritis drug can block a metabolic pathway that occurs in tumors with a common cancer-causing gene mutation, offering a new possible therapy for aggressive cancers with few therapeutic options, according to a study to be published in Cancer Discovery.

Ramon Parsons, MD, PhD, Ward-Coleman Chair in Cancer Research and Chair of the Department of Oncological Sciences at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, led a team that studied how a mutation of the PTEN gene rewires a metabolic pathway in tumors, channeling increased amounts of the amino acid glutamine into the pathway, speeding up DNA production, and causing uncontrolled growth of the tumor. The team discovered that leflunomide, an oral rheumatoid arthritis drug approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, blocks an enzyme in this pathway and damages the DNA created through the pathway, killing PTEN mutant cancer cells while leaving healthy cells untouched.

Parsons and his team transplanted human breast cancer cells into mice to test leflunomide's efficacy. Leflunomide drastically reduced the breast cancer tumors in the mice.

"Finding successful targeted therapies for cancer is a challenging but important goal in the face of insufficient treatment options," said Dr. Parsons, who discovered the PTEN gene. "Targeted therapies that are tumor-specific are much needed, and identifying changes based on specific tumor suppressor or oncogene alterations will facilitate this effort. Due to the high mutation rate of PTEN in cancer, the effects of PTEN could be at the heart of targeted therapy."

This discovery has implications in aggressive cancers with the PTEN mutation and few treatment options such as triple negative breast cancer, prostate cancer, endometrial cancer, and glioblastoma, a brain cancer. Dr. Parsons hopes to create a clinical trial to further test leflunomide in patients with breast and colon cancer.

---

Des chercheurs du Mount Sinai ont découvert qu'un médicament contre l'arthrite rhumatoïde peut bloquer une voie métabolique qui se produit dans les tumeurs ayant une mutation génétique commune causant le cancer, offrant une nouvelle thérapie possible pour les cancers agressifs avec peu d'options thérapeutiques, selon une étude publiée dans Cancer Découverte.

Ramon Parsons, MD, PhD, Ward-Coleman Chaire en recherche sur le cancer et président du Département des sciences oncologiques à l'Icahn School of Medicine au mont Sinaï, a dirigé une équipe qui a étudié comment une mutation du gène PTEN recâble une voie métabolique dans les tumeurs, en canalisant des quantités accrues de l'acide aminé glutamine dans la voie, en accélérant la production d'ADN, et provoquant une croissance incontrôlée de la tumeur.

L'équipe a découvert que le leflunomide, un médicament oral contre l'arthrite rhumatoïde approuvé par la Food and Drug Administration des États-Unis, bloque une enzyme dans cette voie et endommage l'ADN créé à travers la voie, tuant le PTEN mutant des cellules cancéreuses tout en laissant les cellules saines intacte.

Parsons et son équipe ont transplanté des cellules de cancer du sein humain dans des souris pour tester l'efficacité du leflunomide. Le léflunomide a réduit de façon drastique les tumeurs du cancer du sein chez la souris.

"Trouver des thérapies ciblées qui ont du succès pour le cancer est un objectif difficile mais important en face des options de traitement insuffisantes", a déclaré le Dr Parsons, qui a découvert le gène PTEN. "Les thérapies ciblées qui sont spécifiques de la tumeur sont très nécessaires, et l'identification des changements basés sur des suppresseurs de tumeur spécifiques ou des altérations oncogène facilitera cet effort. Considérant le taux élevé de mutation de PTEN dans le cancer, les effets de PTEN pourrait être au cœur de cibles thérapie."

Cette découverte a des implications dans les cancers agressifs avec la mutation PTEN et peu d'options de traitement comme le cancer du triple négatif, le cancer de la , le cancer de l'endomètre et le glioblastome, un cancer du . Le Dr Parsons espère créer un essai clinique pour tester encore le leflunomide chez les patients atteints de cancer du et du .

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16505
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène PTEN    Jeu 16 Fév 2017 - 6:10

J'admets que c'est un peu le même sujet que le texte d'avant mais comme ces choses sont compliquées, c'est utile ici d'avoir différents textes pour en comprendre ne serait-ce qu'un peu. Ça m'intéresse parce que c'est mon cancer et que ce sont les nouvelles avenues de recherches pour ce cancer.


Synthetic lethality and collateral lethality are two well-validated conceptual strategies for identifying therapeutic targets in cancers with tumour-suppressor gene deletions1, 2, 3. Here, we explore an approach to identify potential synthetic-lethal interactions by screening mutually exclusive deletion patterns in cancer genomes. We sought to identify ‘synthetic-essential’ genes: those that are occasionally deleted in some cancers but are almost always retained in the context of a specific tumour-suppressor deficiency. We also posited that such synthetic-essential genes would be therapeutic targets in cancers that harbour specific tumour-suppressor deficiencies. In addition to known synthetic-lethal interactions, this approach uncovered the chromatin helicase DNA-binding factor CHD1 as a putative synthetic-essential gene in PTEN-deficient cancers. In PTEN-deficient prostate and breast cancers, CHD1 depletion profoundly and specifically suppressed cell proliferation, cell survival and tumorigenic potential. Mechanistically, functional PTEN stimulates the GSK3β-mediated phosphorylation of CHD1 degron domains, which promotes CHD1 degradation via the β-TrCP-mediated ubiquitination–proteasome pathway. Conversely, PTEN deficiency results in stabilization of CHD1, which in turn engages the trimethyl lysine-4 histone H3 modification to activate transcription of the pro-tumorigenic TNF–NF-κB gene network. This study identifies a novel PTEN pathway in cancer and provides a framework for the discovery of ‘trackable’ targets in cancers that harbour specific tumour-suppressor deficiencies.

---

La létalité synthétique et la létalité collatérale sont deux stratégies conceptuelles bien validées pour identifier des cibles thérapeutiques dans des cancers avec des suppressions de gènes suppresseurs de tumeurs.

Nous explorons ici une approche pour identifier des interactions potentielles synthétiques-létales en sélectionnant des schémas de délation mutuellement exclusifs dans le cancer.

Nous avons cherché à identifier les gènes «synthétiques essentiels»: ceux qui sont parfois supprimés dans certains cancers, mais sont presque toujours conservés dans le contexte d'une carence spécifique suppresseur de tumeur.

Nous avons également posé que ces gènes synthétiques essentiels seraient des cibles thérapeutiques dans les cancers qui portent des carences spécifiques de suppresseurs de tumeurs. En plus des interactions synthétiques-létales connues, cette approche a révélé le facteur de liaison à l'ADN de l'hélicase de la chromatine CHD1 comme un gène essentiel synthétique putatif dans les cancers déficients en PTEN.

Dans les cancers de la prostate et du sein déficients en PTEN, la déplétion de CHD1 a profondément et spécifiquement supprimé la prolifération cellulaire, la survie cellulaire et le potentiel tumorigène. D'un point de vue mécaniste, le PTEN fonctionnel stimule la phosphorylation de domaines de dégradation CHD1 médiée par GSK3ß, ce qui favorise la dégradation de CHD1 par la voie ubiquitination-protéasome médiée par ß-TrCP.

Inversement, la carence en PTEN entraîne une stabilisation de CHD1, qui à son tour engage la modification de l'histone H3 de la triméthyl lysine-4 pour activer la transcription du réseau génique pro-tumorigène du TNF-NF-κB. Cette étude identifie une nouvelle voie PTEN dans le cancer et fournit un cadre pour la découverte des cibles «traçables» dans les cancers qui portent des carences spécifiques suppresseurs de tumeur.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16505
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène PTEN    Lun 13 Fév 2017 - 17:00

Researchers at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in New York have discovered that a protein called Importin-11 protects the anti-cancer protein PTEN from destruction by transporting it into the cell nucleus. The study, "The nuclear transport receptor Importin-11 is a tumor suppressor that maintains PTEN protein," which will be published online February 13 in The Journal of Cell Biology, suggests that the loss of Importin-11 may destabilize PTEN, leading to the development of lung, prostate, and other cancers.

PTEN prevents tumor cells from growing uncontrollably, and mutations in the gene encoding this protein are commonly found in many different types of cancer. Some patients, however, show low levels of the PTEN protein even though their PTEN genes are normal. Lloyd Trotman, Muhan Chen, Dawid Nowak, and colleagues discovered that this may be due to defects in a protein called Importin-11 that transports PTEN into the nucleus, sheltering PTEN from cytoplasmic proteins that would otherwise target it for degradation.

Several cytoplasmic proteins -- NEDD4-1, NDFIP1, and UBE2E1 -- combine to tag PTEN with the small molecule ubiquitin. PTEN tagged with multiple ubiquitin molecules can then be recognized and destroyed by the cell's protein degradation machinery. Trotman and colleagues found that Importin-11 protects PTEN from degradation by escorting not only PTEN but also UBE2E1 into the nucleus, thereby breaking up the cytoplasmic ubiquitination apparatus.

Mice lacking Importin-11 showed lower levels of PTEN protein and developed lung adenocarcinomas and prostate neoplasias. Mutations in the gene encoding Importin-11 have been identified in human cancers, and Trotman and colleagues found that tumors from lung cancer patients lacking Importin-11 tended to show low PTEN levels as well. The researchers estimate that loss of Importin-11 may account for the loss of PTEN in approximately one third of lung cancer patients lacking this key anti-cancer protein.

In prostate cancer, loss of Importin-11 predicted disease relapse and metastasis in patients who had had their prostates removed. "We think that the degradation of PTEN after loss or impairment of Importin-11 is a very effective driver of human prostate cancer," says Trotman. "Our results suggest that Importin-11 is the "Achilles' heel" of the ubiquitination system that maintains the correct levels of PTEN inside cells."

---

Des chercheurs du Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory à New York ont ​​découvert qu'une protéine appelée Importin-11 protège la protéine anti-cancer PTEN de la destruction en la transportant dans le noyau cellulaire. L'étude "Le récepteur de transport nucléaire Importin-11 est un suppresseur de tumeur qui maintient la protéine PTEN", qui sera publié en ligne le 13 février dans The Journal of Cell Biology, suggère que la perte d'Importin-11 peut déstabiliser PTEN, menant à la Le développement des cancers du , de la et autres.

PTEN empêche les cellules tumorales de croître de façon incontrôlable, et les mutations dans le gène codant cette protéine sont couramment trouvés dans de nombreux types différents de cancer. Certains patients, cependant, montrent des niveaux faibles de la protéine PTEN même si leurs gènes PTEN sont normaux. Lloyd Trotman, Muhan Chen, Dawid Nowak et ses collègues ont découvert que cela peut être dû à des défauts dans une protéine appelée Importin-11 qui transporte PTEN dans le noyau, abritant PTEN de protéines cytoplasmiques qui autrement le ciblent pour la dégradation.

Plusieurs protéines cytoplasmiques - NEDD4-1, NDFIP1 et UBE2E1 - se combinent pour marquer le PTEN avec la petite molécule ubiquitine. Le PTEN marqué avec plusieurs molécules d'ubiquitine peut alors être reconnu et détruit par la machinerie de dégradation des protéines de la cellule. Trotman et ses collègues ont constaté que Importin-11 protège PTEN de la dégradation en escortant non seulement PTEN mais aussi UBE2E1 dans le noyau, rompant ainsi l'appareil d'ubiquitination cytoplasmique.

Les souris dépourvues d'Importin-11 ont montré des niveaux inférieurs de protéine PTEN et ont développé des adénocarcinomes pulmonaires et des néoplasies de la prostate. Des mutations dans le gène codant Importin-11 ont été identifiées dans des cancers humains et Trotman et ses collègues ont découvert que les tumeurs de patients atteints de cancer du poumon dépourvues d'Importin-11 présentaient également de faibles taux de PTEN. Les chercheurs estiment que la perte d'Importin-11 peut expliquer la perte de PTEN dans environ un tiers des patients atteints de cancer du poumon dépourvus de cette protéine clé anti-cancer.

Dans le cancer de la prostate, la perte d'Importin-11 prédisait une rechute de la maladie et des métastases chez les patients qui avaient subi une suppression de leur prostate. «Nous pensons que la dégradation de PTEN après perte ou altération d'Importin-11 est un conducteur très efficace de cancer de la prostate humain», explique Trotman. «Nos résultats suggèrent que Importin-11 est le« talon d'Achille »du système d'ubiquitination qui maintient les niveaux corrects de PTEN à l'intérieur des cellules.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16505
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène PTEN    Lun 6 Fév 2017 - 17:36

A new method has been found for identifying therapeutic targets in cancers lacking specific key tumor suppressor genes. The process, which located a genetic site for the most common form of prostate cancer, has potential for developing precision therapy for other cancers, such as breast, brain and colorectal, say researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Study results were published in the Feb. 6 online issue of Nature.

By searching for gene deletion patterns in cancer through a concept the investigators call "synthetic essentiality," the team identified a synthetic essential gene known as chromatin helicase DNA-binding factor (CHD1) as a therapeutic target for prostate and breast cancers lacking a tumor suppressor gene called phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN). Tumor suppressor genes are deleted in many cancers leading to tumor formation and growth.

"We searched for genes that are occasionally deleted in some cancers but which are retained in cancers caused by specific tumor suppressing genes, such as PTEN," said Di Zhao, Ph.D., Odyssey postdoctoral fellow in Cancer Biology and first author on the Nature paper. "We reasoned that this retained synthetic essential gene might be required for cancer-promoting actions when the cancers lose specific tumor suppressor genes."

Prostate cancer often occurs when it deletes PTEN, commonly associated with advanced prostate cancer. The Centers for Disease Control cites prostate cancer as the second leading cause of cancer-related death for men in the U.S., with 176,000 new cases and 28,000 deaths reported annually. Up to 70 percent of primary prostate tumors are PTEN-deficient.

Through analyzing prostate cancer genome databases from The Cancer Genome Atlas and other sources, the research team found that CHD1, while occasionally deleted in some prostate cancers, was consistently retained in PTEN-deficient prostate cancer. Further investigation uncovered CHD1's role as vital to PTEN signaling, and as a potential therapeutic target in prostate and breast cancers with PTEN gene loss.

"Identifying targets essential to cell survival in tumor suppressor genes has long been an investigational goal with the aim of offering cancer-specific vulnerabilities for targeted therapy," said Ronald DePinho, M.D., professor of Cancer Biology, MD Anderson president, and senior author for the Nature paper. "This study provided a conceptual framework for the discovery of 'traceable' targets in cancers harboring specific tumor suppressor deficiencies."

DePinho added that further analyses are needed to verify additional synthetic essential genes in cancer cells that harbor specific genomic alterations as well as to identify potential regulatory interactions and cell-essential mechanisms.

---

Une nouvelle méthode a été trouvée pour l'identification des cibles thérapeutiques dans les cancers dépourvus de gènes suppresseurs de tumeurs clés spécifiques. Le processus, qui a localisé un site génétique pour la forme la plus commune de cancer de la , a le potentiel pour développer la thérapie de précision pour d'autres cancers, tels que le , le et le cancer du , disent les chercheurs à l'Université du Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Les résultats de l'étude ont été publiés dans le numéro en ligne du 6 février de Nature.

L'équipe a identifié un gène essentiel synthétique connu sous le nom de chromase hélicase DNA-binding factor (CHD1) comme cible thérapeutique pour les cancers de la et du dépourvus de suppresseur de tumeur Gène appelé phosphatase et tensine homologue (PTEN). Les gènes suppresseurs de tumeur sont supprimés dans de nombreux cancers conduisant à la formation et à la croissance de tumeurs.

«Nous avons cherché des gènes qui sont parfois supprimés dans certains cancers, mais qui sont retenus dans les cancers causés par certains gènes suppresseurs de tumeur, comme PTEN», a déclaré Di Zhao, Ph.D., Odyssey postdoctoral fellow in Cancer Biology et premier auteur sur le Nature papier. «Nous avons raisonné que ce gène essentiel synthétique retenu pourrait être nécessaire pour des actions de promotion du cancer lorsque les cancers perdent des gènes suppresseurs de tumeurs spécifiques.

Le cancer de la prostate se produit souvent quand il supprime PTEN, couramment associé à un cancer de la prostate avancé. Les Centers for Disease Control cite le cancer de la prostate comme la deuxième cause de décès lié au cancer chez les hommes aux États-Unis, avec 176 000 nouveaux cas et 28 000 décès rapportés annuellement. Jusqu'à 70% des tumeurs primaires de la prostate sont déficitaires en PTEN.

Grâce à l'analyse des bases de données du génome du cancer de la prostate à partir de l'Atlas du génome du cancer et d'autres sources, l'équipe de recherche a constaté que CHD1, bien que parfois supprimé dans certains cancers de la prostate, a été constamment retenu dans le cancer de la prostate déficient en PTEN. Des recherches plus approfondies ont révélé le rôle de CHD1 comme vital pour la signalisation de PTEN et comme une cible thérapeutique potentielle dans les cancers de la et du avec la perte de gène PTEN.

«Identifier des cibles essentielles à la survie cellulaire dans les gènes suppresseurs de tumeurs a longtemps été un objectif expérimental dans le but d'offrir des vulnérabilités spécifiques au cancer pour la thérapie ciblée», a déclaré Ronald DePinho, MD, professeur de Cancer Biology, MD Anderson président et auteur principal pour Le papier Nature. "Cette étude a fourni un cadre conceptuel pour la découverte des cibles « traçables » dans les cancers hébergeant des déficiences spécifiques suppresseurs de tumeurs.

DePinho a ajouté que d'autres analyses sont nécessaires pour vérifier d'autres gènes essentiels de synthèse dans les cellules cancéreuses qui hébergent des altérations génomiques spécifiques ainsi que pour identifier les interactions potentielles de régulation et les mécanismes cellulaires essentiels.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16505
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène PTEN    Jeu 2 Juin 2016 - 15:14

Pten (short for phosphatase and tensin homolog) is a tumor suppressor that is defective in about 20-25 percent of all patients with cancers. Mayo Clinic researchers now have discovered that Pten safeguards against tumor formation by keeping chromosome numbers intact when a cell splits into two daughter cells. In this study, the last three amino acids of the Pten protein, which are often missing in human cancers, were found to be critical for forming an intact mitotic spindle, a structure required for accurate chromosome segregation. The findings appear in the online issue of Nature Cell Biology.

Pten is the most prominent human tumor suppressor after p53. The current thinking is that Pten's phosphatase activity counteracts PI3 kinase activity. Loss of this function causes tumor formation through uncontrolled stimulation of AKT, an enzyme that stimulates cell proliferation and survival and is often hyperactive in human tumors. For years, there has been speculation that Pten defects found in cancer patients also lead to the reshuffling of the cell's chromosomes, but it was unknown how that would happen and how it propels cancer growth. The Mayo study now provides definitive answers to these long-standing questions.

"We found that Pten localizes to mitotic spindle poles to recruit the 'motor' protein EG5, which moves the poles apart to form a perfectly symmetrical bipolar spindle that accurately separates duplicated chromosomes," says senior author Jan van Deursen, Ph.D., a molecular biologist and cancer researcher at Mayo Clinic. The research team further found that the recruitment process involves Dlg1, an Eg5-binding protein that docks to the last three Pten amino acids at spindles poles. Importantly, mutant mice lacking these amino acids have abnormal chromosome numbers and form tumors at high frequency. The researchers say these new findings predict that a large proportion of Pten tumors will be hypersensitive to Eg5-inhibiting drugs, providing new opportunities for targeted cancer therapy.

---

PTEN est un suppresseur de tumeur qui est défectueux dans environ 20-25 pour cent de tous les patients atteints de cancers. Des chercheurs ont maintenant découvert que PTEN garantie contre la formation de tumeurs en gardant le nombre de chromosomes intacts quand une cellule se divise en deux cellules filles. Dans cette étude, les trois derniers acides aminés de la protéine PTEN, qui font souvent défaut dans les cancers humains, se sont avérés être essentiels pour la formation d'un fuseau mitotique intacte, une structure nécessaire pour la séparation chromosomique précise. Les résultats apparaissent dans le numéro en ligne de Nature Cell Biology.

PTEN est le plus important suppresseur de la tumeur humaine après p53. La pensée actuelle est que l'activité de la phosphatase de PTEN contrecarre l'activité PI3 kinase. La perte de cette fonction entraîne la formation de tumeurs par stimulation incontrôlée de l'AKT, une enzyme qui stimule la prolifération et la survie cellulaire et est souvent hyperactif dans des tumeurs humaines. Pendant des années, il y a eu des spéculations que les défauts PTEN trouvés chez les patients atteints de cancer conduisent aussi à la redistribution des chromosomes de la cellule, mais il était inconnu comment cela pourrait se produire et comment il propulse la croissance du cancer. L'étude de la clinique Mayo fournit maintenant des réponses définitives à ces questions de longue date.

"Nous avons constaté que PTEN localise la 'pince' mitotique pour recruter la protéine EG5 de protéines, ce qui déplace les antipodes pour former un axe bipolaire parfaitement symétrique qui sépare précisément les chromosomes dupliqués», dit l'auteur principal Jan van Deursen, Ph.D., un biologiste moléculaire et chercheur sur le cancer à la Mayo Clinic. L'équipe de recherche a également constaté que le processus de recrutement implique DLG1, une protéine se liant à Eg5 qui ramène les trois derniers acides aminés aux bons pôles. Fait important, les souris mutantes dépourvues de ces acides aminés ont des nombres de chromosomes anormaux et forment plusieurs tumeurs.

Les chercheurs disent que ces nouveaux résultats prédisent qu'une grande proportion de tumeurs PTEN sera hypersensible aux médicaments inhibiteurs de Eg5, offrant de nouvelles possibilités pour la thérapie ciblée du cancer.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16505
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène PTEN    Mar 13 Oct 2015 - 11:31

Many types of leukemia are caused by loss of enzymes such as Pten, which normally keeps cell growth in check, or conversely, the over-activation of enzymes that normally enhance cell proliferation, such as Shp2. Some anti-leukemia treatments work by inhibiting Shp2 or other enzymes involved in the same cellular systems, but researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have now found that mice lacking both of these enzymes -- Pten and Shp2 -- can't produce and sustain enough red blood cells. The study, published October 12 by Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, helps explain why anemia is a common side effect of anti-cancer drugs that target enzymes involved in tumor growth.

"Based on this unexpected finding, we might want to think about screening cancer patients' genetic backgrounds for loss of Pten or Pten-regulated signals before prescribing anti-cancer drugs that might do more harm than good," said senior author Gen-Sheng Feng, PhD, professor of pathology at UC San Diego School of Medicine. "In addition, this information could help guide better design of pharmaceuticals for leukemia and other types of cancer in the era of precision medicine."

Feng and his team genetically engineered mice to lack either Pten, Shp2 or both enzymes. The Pten-deficient mice had elevated white blood cells counts, consistent with leukemia. The Shp2-deficient mice experienced the opposite -- lower white blood cell counts. Mice lacking both Pten and Shp2 had relatively normal white blood cell counts.

Yet the researchers were surprised to find that despite the apparent reversal of leukemia, the mice lacking both enzymes had shorter lifespans than normal mice or mice lacking just one of these enzymes. It turns out that combined deficiency of Shp2 and Pten induces lethal anemia. The researchers determined that the anemia they observed was due to two factors -- red blood cells failed to develop properly from bone marrow and red blood cells that did form didn't last as long as they should. Without red blood cells, the body's organs and tissues don't receive the oxygen they need.

To confirm these genetic studies, the researchers also treated the Pten-deficient leukemic mice with a Shp2 inhibitor or trametinib, a drug that inhibits another enzyme in the same cellular communication network as Shp2. Trametinib is widely used to treat pancreatic and other types of cancer, and it's known for frequently causing anemia in patients who receive the drug. Feng's team found that trametinib treatment had an effect similar to removing the Shp2 gene or chemical inhibition of Shp2 -- the mice were severely anemic.

"What we've learned is that even if we know a lot about how individual molecules function in a cell, designing effective therapeutics that target them will require a more comprehensive understanding of the cross-talk between molecules in a particular cell type, and in the context of disease," said Feng, also a professor of biological sciences.

---

De nombreux types de leucémie sont provoquées par la perte d'enzymes telles que PTEN, qui maintient normalement la croissance des cellules dans le contrôle, ou à l'inverse, la sur-activation des enzymes qui favorisent normalement la prolifération cellulaire, tels que Shp2. Certains traitements contre la leucémie agissent en inhibant Shp2 ou d'autres enzymes impliquées dans les mêmes systèmes cellulaires, mais les chercheurs de l'Université de Californie, San Diego école de médecine ont maintenant trouvé que les souris dépourvues de ces deux enzymes - PTEN et Shp2 - peuvent produire et soutenir suffisamment de globules rouges. L'étude, publiée le 12 Octobre par Actes de l'Académie nationale des sciences, contribue à expliquer pourquoi l'anémie est un effet secondaire fréquent de médicaments anti-cancer qui ciblent les enzymes impliquées dans la croissance tumorale.

"Sur la base de cette découverte inattendue, nous pourrions penser au dépistage d'origine génétique des patients atteints de cancer de la perte de PTEN ou signaux Pten réglementés avant de prescrire des médicaments anti-cancéreux qui pourraient faire plus de mal que de bien», a déclaré l'auteur principal de Gen-Sheng Feng , PhD, professeur de pathologie à l'UC San Diego School of Medicine. "En outre, cette information pourrait aider à guider une meilleure conception des produits pharmaceutiques pour la leucémie et d'autres types de cancer dans l'ère de la médecine de précision."

Feng et son équipe a génétiquement modifié des souris pour qu'elles manquent soit PTEN, soit de Shp2 ou des deux enzymes. Les souris déficientes en PTEN avait un décompte élevé de globules blancs, conformément à la leucémie. Les souris déficientes de Shp2 faisaient l'expérience de l'inverse - un nombre de globules blancs dans le sang inférieure. Les souris dépourvues à la fois PTEN et Shp2 avaient une numération des globules blancs du sang relativement normale.

Pourtant, les chercheurs ont été surpris de constater que malgré l'apparente inversion de la leucémie, les souris dépourvues de ces deux enzymes avaient une durée de vie plus courte que les souris normales et des souris manquant juste un de ces enzymes. Il se trouve que la carence combinée de Shp2 et PTEN provoque l'anémie mortelle. Les chercheurs ont déterminé que l'anémie qu'ils ont observé est dû à deux facteurs - les globules rouges ont échoué à se développer correctement à partir de la moelle des os et les globules rouges qui se sont formées n'ont pas duré aussi longtemps qu'ils auraient du. Sans les globules rouges, les organes et les tissus du corps ne reçoivent pas l'oxygène dont ils ont besoin.

Pour confirmer ces études génétiques, les chercheurs ont également traité les souris leucémiques déficientes en PTEN ou Shp2 avec un inhibiteur ou trametinib, un médicament qui inhibe une autre enzyme dans le même réseau de communication cellulaire tel que Shp2. Trametinib est largement utilisé pour traiter le pancréas et d'autres types de cancer, et il est connu pour causer fréquemment l'anémie chez les patients qui reçoivent le médicament. L'équipe de Feng constaté que le traitement de trametinib a eu un effet similaire à la suppression du gène Shp2 ou l'inhibition chimique de Shp2 - les souris ont été gravement anémique.

"Ce que nous avons appris est que même si nous savons beaucoup de choses sur la façon individuelle molécules fonctionnent dans une cellule, la conception de thérapies efficaces qui les ciblent exigeront une compréhension plus complète de la diaphonie (1) entre les molécules dans un type cellulaire particulier, et le contexte de la maladie ", a déclaré Feng, également professeur de sciences biologiques.

1-diaphonie: On nomme diaphonie l'interférence d'un premier signal avec un second. On trouve des traces du premier signal, dans le signal du second, souvent à cause de phénomènes d'induction électromagnétique.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16505
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène PTEN    Jeu 20 Aoû 2015 - 16:45

An international group of researchers led by Carnegie Mellon University physicists Mathias Lösche and Frank Heinrich have established the structure of an important tumor suppressing protein, PTEN. Their findings provide new insights into how the protein regulates cell growth and how mutations in the gene that encodes the protein can lead to cancer. The study is published online in Structure, and will appear in the Oct. 6 issue.

Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is a known tumor suppressing protein that is encoded by the PTEN gene. When expressed normally, the protein acts as an enzyme at the cell membrane, instigating a complex biochemical reaction that regulates the cell cycle and prevents cells from growing or dividing in an unregulated fashion. Each cell in the body contains two copies of the PTEN gene, one inherited from each parent. When there is a mutation in one or both of the PTEN genes, it interferes with the protein's enzymatic activity and, as a result inhibits its tumor suppressing ability.

"Membrane-incorporated and membrane-associated proteins like PTEN make up one-third of all proteins in our body. Many important functions in health and disease depend on their proper functioning," said Lösche, who with other researchers within Carnegie Mellon's Center for Membrane Biology and Biophysics aim to understand the structure and function of cell membranes and membrane proteins. "Despite PTEN's importance in human physiology and disease, there is a critical lack of understanding of the complex mechanisms that govern its activity."

Recently, researchers led by Pier Paolo Pandolfi at Harvard Medical School found that PTEN's tumor suppressing activity becomes elevated when two copies of the protein bind together, forming a dimeric protein.

"PTEN dimerization may be the key to understanding an individual's susceptibility for PTEN-sensitive tumors," said Lösche, a professor of physics and biomedical engineering at Carnegie Mellon.

In order to reveal how dimerization improves PTEN's ability to thwart tumor development, researchers needed to establish the protein's dimeric structure. Normally, protein structure is identified using crystallography, but attempts to crystallize the PTEN dimer had failed. Lösche and colleagues used a different technique called small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) which gains information about a protein's structure by scattering X-rays through a solution containing the protein. They then used computer modeling to establish the dimer's structure.

They found that in the PTEN dimers, the C-terminal tails of the two proteins may bind the protein bodies in a cross-wise fashion, which makes them more stable. As a result, they can more efficiently interact with the cell membrane, regulate cell growth and suppress tumor formation.

Now that more is known about the structure of the PTEN dimer, researchers will be able to use molecular biology tools to investigate the atomic-scale mechanisms of tumor formation facilitated by PTEN mutations. The researchers also hope that their findings will offer up a new avenue for cancer therapeutics.


---


Un groupe international de chercheurs dirigée par des physiciens de l'Université Carnegie Mellon, Mathias Lösche et Frank Heinrich, ont établi la structure d'une protéine de suppression tumorale importante, PTEN. Leurs résultats fournissent de nouveaux aperçus sur la manière dont la protéine régule la croissance cellulaire et comment les mutations dans le gène qui code pour la protéine peut mener au cancer. L'étude est publiée en ligne dans la structure, et apparaîtra dans le numéro du 6 octobre.

La phosphatase et son homologue de tensine (PTEN) est une protéine de suppression de tumeur connu qui est codée par le gène PTEN. Lorsqu'elle est exprimée normalement, la protéine agit comme une enzyme à la membrane cellulaire, l'instigateur d'une réaction biochimique complexe qui régule le cycle cellulaire et empêche les cellules de se développer ou divisant de façon non régulée. Chaque cellule du corps contient deux copies du gène PTEN, un hérité de chaque parent. Quand il existe une mutation dans une ou les deux des gènes PTEN, il interfère avec l'activité enzymatique de la protéine et, par conséquent inhibe sa capacité de suppression de tumeur.

"Des protéines de membranes et leurs protéines associées comme PTEN composent un tiers de toutes les protéines dans notre corps. Plusieurs fonctions importantes dépendent de leur bon fonctionnement», a déclaré Lösche, qui, avec d'autres chercheurs au sein de Centre de Carnegie Mellon pour Membrane Biologie et Biophysique visent à comprendre la structure et la fonction des membranes cellulaires et des protéines membranaires. "Malgré l'importance de PTEN dans la physiologie humaine et la maladie, il y a un manque critique de comprendre les mécanismes complexes qui régissent son activité."

Récemment, des chercheurs dirigés par Pier Paolo Pandolfi au Harvard Medical School ont découvert que la tumeur en supprimant l'activité de PTEN devient élevée lorsque deux copies de la protéine se lient ensemble, formant une protéine dimère.

"La dimérisation de PTEN peut être la clé pour comprendre la susceptibilité d'un individu pour des tumeurs sensibles à PTEN", a déclaré Lösche, professeur de physique et de génie biomédical à Carnegie Mellon.

Afin de révéler comment la dimérisation améliore la capacité de PTEN pour contrecarrer le développement de la tumeur, les chercheurs ont besoin pour établir la structure dimère de la protéine. Normalement, la structure de la protéine est identifié en utilisant la cristallographie, mais les tentatives pour cristalliser le dimère de PTEN a échoué. Lösche et ses collègues ont utilisé une technique différente, appelée petite-angle diffusion des rayons X (SAXS) qui gagne des informations sur la structure d'une protéine par diffusion des rayons X à travers une solution contenant la protéine. Ils ont ensuite utilisé la modélisation informatique pour établir la structure du dimère.

Ils ont constaté que dans les dimères de PTEN, la queue C-terminal des deux protéines peuvent lier les corps protéiques de manière transversale, ce qui les rend plus stable. En conséquence, ils peuvent interagir plus efficacement avec la membrane cellulaire, de réguler la croissance cellulaire et de supprimer la formation de tumeurs.

Maintenant que l'on connaît plus la structure du dimère PTEN, les chercheurs seront en mesure d'utiliser les outils de la biologie moléculaire pour étudier les mécanismes à l'échelle atomique de la formation de tumeurs facilité par des mutations de PTEN. Les chercheurs espèrent également que leurs conclusions pourront offrir une nouvelle voie pour les traitements contre le cancer.


_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16505
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène PTEN    Ven 10 Avr 2015 - 10:21

The gene called PTEN is one of the most important of the body's natural tumor suppressors. When the gene is mutated or missing, as it is often observed to be in a host of cancers, growth signals affecting cells can get stuck in the "on" position, enabling cells to proliferate out of control.

Today, scientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) publish new evidence explaining precisely how the protein encoded by PTEN (called PTEN) works -- specifically, how it is recruited to particular locations in our cells where pro-growth signals need to be shut off.

The new evidence, assembled by a team led by CSHL Associate Professor Lloyd Trotman, contradicts a long-held assumption about PTEN function, and could help scientists design more effective drugs to counteract cancer's hallmark trait, uncontrolled cellular growth.

"A whole generation of cancer investigators, including me, has been taught that PTEN performs its crucial role at the plasma membrane, which is what separates the inside of cells from the outside environment" Trotman explains. The exterior surface of the membrane is dotted with receptor molecules -- switches which growth factors can flip on from the outside to transmit growth cues into the cell's interior.

Normally, these switches are off, and no signals are transmitted. Every once in a while, however, a pro-growth-hormone molecule docks at a receptor on the surface, setting off a cascade of biochemical events inside the cell. "With respect to growth, the brakes are normally on," says Trotman. In the cell membrane, fatty molecules are decorated with the equivalent of traffic signals, and "in the default mode, the light is red." But when a growth factor switches on a receptor, special enzymes change the light embedded in the membrane from red to green. Then, after the signal is transmitted further into the cell's interior, it is time to switch the signal back to red. This is the job of the PTEN protein.

Since the discovery of these fundamental signaling mechanisms about 15 years ago, scientists have assumed that PTEN performs this crucial task at or near the interior surface of the cell membrane. But how does it get there? And where does it comes from? When Trotman and colleagues imaged the interior of ordinary cells, they found PTEN proteins everywhere -- not just near the membrane, but virtually everywhere throughout the three-dimensional space of the cells [see image 1]. Prevailing theory did not consider this a problem: "it had PTEN bouncing around, all over the cell, and abundant enough so that it was always available near the membrane," to switch a green growth signal back to red.

"What we found was that PTEN is not, as the theory suggests, literally bouncing off the walls of the cell in random fashion," Trotman says. "Using super-resolution microscopy, the technology that was awarded last year's Nobel Prize in chemistry, we were able to discover an organizing principle at work." The team was amazed to find a consistent association, throughout cells: the location of PTEN proteins closely coincided with the presence of tiny highways called microtubules that crisscross throughout every cell.

PTEN proteins travel along microtubule highways to where they are needed. But how do they know when and where, precisely? In a paper appearing in Molecular Cell, Trotman's team explains that green signals ready to be turned to red are literally pinched off from the cell membrane in tiny bubble-like structures called vesicles. This process is called endocytosis. The vesicles are coated with a protein called clathrin, which helps the vesicles to take spherical shape. Later, the coating is dissolved, exposing the naked green signal as well as a magnet-like signal to attract PTEN. This is the moment, according to Trotman's team, when PTEN is recruited. PTEN then binds the vesicle bearing the green signal and performs its essential service: it removes a phosphate group from the signal (a process called de-phosphorylation), turning the signal back to red.

Trotman's group demonstrates how PTEN's structure is precisely evolved to do the job. One domain of the protein is structured to bind to the magnet; its other domain catalyzes the phosphate-removing reaction. "It is quite an elegant mechanism," Trotman says. "It is highly efficient. And in view of PTEN's critical role as a tumor suppressor, it's also important that the process we uncovered is a controlled one, not random as was previously believed."

Many observed facts "fall into place" with the new explanation of how PTEN works. "Now we understand this fundamental process. We understand that taking growth signals inside the cell via vesicles, is directly related to the process of turning them off. The vesicle is essentially packaging. Once the growth signal gets packaged, it's being readied to be shut off."

---

Le gène appelé PTEN est un des plus importants suppresseurs de tumeurs naturel de l'organisme. Lorsque le gène est muté ou absent, comme c'est souvent observé que dans de nombreux cancers, des signaux de croissance qui affectent les cellules peuvent se coincer dans la position "marche", permettant aux cellules de se multiplier hors de contrôle.

Aujourd'hui, les scientifiques de Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) publie de nouvelles preuves expliquant précisément comment la protéine codée par PTEN (appelé PTEN) fonctionne - spécifiquement, comment elle est recrutée pour des emplacements particuliers dans nos cellules où les signaux pro-croissance doivent être fermées.

Le nouvel élément de preuve, assemblés par une équipe dirigée par le Professeur agrégé Lloyd Trotman, contredit une hypothèse de longue date sur la fonction de PTEN, et pourrait aider les scientifiques à concevoir des médicaments plus efficaces pour lutter contre les cancers dont le trait caractéristique est la croissance cellulaire incontrôlée.

"On a enseigné à toute une génération de chercheurs de cancer, y compris la mienne, que PTEN joue son rôle essentiel pour la membrane plasmique, qui est ce qui sépare l'intérieur de cellules de l'environnement extérieur" explique Trotman. La surface extérieure de la membrane est parsemée de molécules réceptrices - sortes d'interrupteurs à partir desquels les signaux de croissance peuvent être mis en fonction de l'extérieur pour transmettre des signaux de croissance dans l'intérieur de la cellule.

Normalement, ces commutateurs sont éteints, et aucun signal n'est transmis. De temps en temps, cependant, une molécule pro-hormone de croissance s'attache à un récepteur sur la surface, et déclenche une cascade d'événements biochimiques à l'intérieur de la cellule. "En ce qui concerne la croissance, les freins sont appliqués normalement», dit Trotman. Dans la membrane cellulaire, les molécules gras sont décorées avec l'équivalent de feux de circulation, et "dans le mode par défaut, la lumière est rouge." Mais quand un facteur de croissance commute sur un récepteur, des enzymes spéciales modifient la lumière incorporé dans la membrane du rouge au vert. Puis, après que le signal supplémentaire est transmis dans l'intérieur de la cellule, il est temps de changer le signal pour revenir au rouge. C'est le travail de la protéine PTEN.

Depuis la découverte de ces mécanismes de signalisation fondamentales ya environ 15 ans, les scientifiques ont supposé que PTEN effectue cette tâche essentielle au niveau ou près de la surface intérieure de la membrane cellulaire. Mais comment fait-elle pour y arriver? Et comment arrive-t-elle là ? Lorsque Trotman et ses collègues ont imagées l'intérieur des cellules ordinaires, ils ont trouvé des protéines PTEN partout - pas seulement à proximité de la membrane, mais pratiquement partout dans l'espace en trois dimensions des cellules. La théorie en vigueur n'a pas considérer cela comme un problème: «il avait PTEN rebondissant autour, partout dans la cellule, et assez abondante de sorte qu'il était toujours disponible à proximité de la membrane," pour passer un signal de retour de la croissance verte au rouge.
"Nous avons constaté que PTEN est pas, comme la théorie suggère, littéralement rebondi sur les parois de la cellule de façon aléatoire», dit Trotman. «Utilisation de la microscopie de super-résolution, la technologie qui a reçu le prix Nobel de l'année dernière dans la chimie, nous avons pu découvrir un principe d'organisation au travail." L'équipe a été surpris de trouver une association cohérente, tout au long de cellules: l'emplacement des protéines PTEN coïncide de près avec la présence de routes minuscules appelés microtubules qui sillonnent à travers chaque cellule.
Les protéines PTEN voyagent le long des routes de microtubules à l'endroit où elles sont nécessaires. Mais comment savent-ils quand et où, précisément? Dans un article publié dans Molecular Cell, l'équipe de Trotman explique que les signaux verts prêts à être tourné au rouge sont littéralement coincés hors de la membrane cellulaire dans les structures en forme de bulles minuscules appelés vésicules. Ce processus est appelé endocytose. Les vésicules sont revêtues d'une protéine appelée la clathrine, qui aide les vésicules à prendre la forme sphérique. Par la suite, le revêtement est dissous, ce qui expose le signal vert nu ainsi que d'un signal en forme d'aimant pour attirer PTEN. C'est le moment, selon l'équipe de Trotman, ou PTEN est recruté. PTEN se lie alors la vésicule portant le signal vert et effectue son service essentiel: il supprime un groupe phosphate à partir du signal (un processus appelé de-phosphorylation), qui transforme le signal de retour vers le rouge.
Le groupe de Trotman montre comment la structure de PTEN a précisément évolué pour faire le travail. Un domaine de la protéine est structuré de façon à se lier à l'aimant; son autre domaine catalyse la réaction pour enlever le phosphate. "C'est tout à fait élégant comme mécanisme" dit Trotman. "et c'est très efficace". Et compte tenu du rôle essentiel de PTEN comme un suppresseur de tumeur, il est également important que le processus que nous avons découvert soit contrôlé, pas aléatoire comme on le croyait auparavant."
Beaucoup de faits observés "se mettent en place" avec la nouvelle explication de la façon dont fonctionne PTEN. "Maintenant nous comprenons ce processus fondamental. Nous comprenons que la prise de signaux de croissance à l'intérieur de la cellule par des vésicules, est directement liée au processus pour les éteindre. La vésicule est essentiellement un emballage. Une fois que le signal de croissance s' est emballé, c'est comme être près à une fermeture. "


_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16505
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène PTEN    Mer 17 Déc 2014 - 12:40

Cancer Research UK scientists have shown that loss of a gene called PTEN triggers some cases of an aggressive form of ovarian cancer, called high-grade serous ovarian cancer, according to a study published in Genome Biology.

In a revolutionary approach the researchers from the Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute made the discovery by combining images from cancer samples with genetic data. They proved conclusively that loss of PTEN was commonly found only in the cancerous cells and not the 'normal' cells that help make up the tumour mass.

PTEN acts as a brake in healthy cells, preventing a chain of events from occurring that triggers cells to rapidly divide and make new copies. Loss of this gene removes this brake -- a genetic mistake that is already known to trigger the development of many cancer types.

The discovery could pave the way for new treatments that are able to block cell signals switched on in tumours with low levels of PTEN.

Study author, Dr Filipe Correia Martins, at the Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute, said: "Very little is known about the genetic faults behind this form of aggressive ovarian cancer. But our important study conclusively proves that PTEN is a key player in this disease. The next step is to develop our approach to be able to rapidly identify tumours with low levels of PTEN, so that doctors can pick the best treatments."

The study looked at images and genetic data from The Cancer Genome Atlas -- a collection of samples from hundreds of different cancer types cataloguing all the genetic changes. The team analysed levels of PTEN in around 500 ovarian tumour samples. The images helped researchers to home in on PTEN levels in the cancer cells while ignoring the other cells in the samples.

Around 7,000 women are diagnosed with ovarian cancer each year in the UK and 35 per cent will survive for at least 10 years.

Nell Barrie, senior science information manager at Cancer Research UK, said: "We urgently need better treatments for ovarian cancer. Research like this gives scientists and doctors a clearer view of what is driving this form of ovarian cancer and has the potential to lead to new treatments.

"The mix of genetic faults within cancers has posed a major challenge in taking tumour samples that give a more accurate snap-shot of the disease. Combining imaging and genetic data could be a major step forward in this conundrum."

---

Des scientifiques ont montré que la perte d'un gène appelé PTEN déclenche certains cas d'une forme agressive de cancer de l'ovaire, cancer de l'ovaire appelé de haute qualité séreuse, selon une étude publiée dans Genome Biology.

Dans une approche révolutionnaire des chercheurs de l'Institut de recherche du Royaume-Uni Cambridge cancer ont fait la découverte en combinant des images à partir d'échantillons de cancer avec des données génétiques. Ils ont prouvé de façon concluante que la perte de PTEN a été couramment trouvé seulement dans les cellules cancéreuses et non les cellules "normales" qui contribuent à rendre la masse tumorale.

PTEN agit comme un frein dans les cellules saines, prévenant une chaîne d'événements qui déclenche l'apparition de cellules se divisent rapidement qui font de nouvelles copies d'elles-mêmes. La perte de ce gène supprime ce frein - une erreur génétique qui est déjà connu pour déclencher le développement de nombreux types de cancer.

La découverte pourrait ouvrir la voie à de nouveaux traitements qui sont en mesure de bloquer les signaux cellulaires allumé dans les tumeurs avec de faibles niveaux de PTEN.

L'auteur de l'étude, le Dr Filipe Correia Martins, à l'Institut Cambridge Cancer Research UK, a déclaré: "On sait très peu sur les défauts génétiques à l'origine de cette forme de cancer de l' agressif Mais notre importante étude prouve de façon concluante que PTEN est un acteur clé dans cette maladie. . La prochaine étape est de développer notre approche pour être en mesure d'identifier rapidement les tumeurs avec de faibles niveaux de PTEN, de sorte que les médecins puissent choisir les meilleurs traitements ".

L'étude a examiné les images et les données génétiques de l'atlas du génome du cancer - une collection d'échantillons provenant de centaines de différents types de cancer de cataloge de tous les changements génétiques. L'équipe a analysé les niveaux de PTEN dans environ 500 échantillons de tumeurs de l'ovaire. Les images ont aidé les chercheurs à domicile sur les niveaux de PTEN dans les cellules cancéreuses tout en ignorant les autres cellules dans les échantillons.

Environ 7000 femmes sont diagnostiquées avec le cancer de l'ovaire chaque année au Royaume-Uni et 35 pour cent vont survivre pendant au moins 10 ans.

Nell Barrie, directeur de l'information scientifique principale au Cancer Research UK, a déclaré: "Nous avons urgemment besoin de meilleurs traitements pour le cancer de l'ovaire et de recherche comme celle-ci qui donne aux scientifiques et aux médecins une vision plus claire de ce qui est le moteur de cette forme de cancer de l'ovaire et qui a le potentiel de mener à de nouveaux traitements.

"Le mélange de défauts génétiques dans les cancers a posé un défi majeur dans la prise des échantillons de tumeurs qui donnent un instantané plus précis de la maladie. La combinaison des données d'imagerie et génétiques pourrait être un grand pas en avant dans ce casse-tête."



_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16505
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène PTEN    Mer 15 Oct 2014 - 18:37

The dirt in your backyard may hold the key to isolating cancerous tumors and to potential new treatments for a host of cancers.

University of Iowa researchers have found a gene in a soil-dwelling amoeba that functions similarly to the main tumor-fighting gene found in humans, called PTEN.

When healthy, PTEN suppresses tumor growth in humans. But the gene is prone to mutate, allowing cancerous cells to multiply and form tumors. PTEN mutations are believed to be involved in 40 percent of breast cancer cases, up to 70 percent of prostate cancer cases, and nearly half of all leukemia cases, according to a review of the literature by the UI researchers. Combined, more than 465,000 new cases of breast and prostate cancer have been documented in 2014, according to data from the American Cancer Society.

"If you look at tumors across the board -- and that doesn't mean just breast cancer or prostate cancer -- you find that PTEN is the most generally mutated gene. And when you mutate PTEN in mice, you cause tumors," says David Soll, biology professor and corresponding author on the study, published in the journal PLOS ONE.

While it's unknown how to prevent PTEN mutations, the UI researchers became interested in finding out whether other human genes may substitute for PTEN, like a player coming off the bench when the star has been injured.

After some searching, the team found that an amoeba, Dictyostelium discoideum, has the gene ptenA, which mutates similarly to the human PTEN gene and causes behavioral defects in the cell. They also found a close relative of ptenA in the amoeba, which they called lpten that performs the same functions of ptenA, but to a lesser degree -- a possible bench player in the amoeba's genome.

The researchers hypothesized that ramping up the presence of lpten, making it the star on the court, could overcompensate for the mutated ptenA.

Soll and his team tested their hypothesis by placing lpten in a plasmid behind a powerful promoter designed to over-express the gene - essentially cranking up its power. They then introduced the super-charged lpten into a cell with the mutated ptenA gene. The researchers found that the over-expressed lpten gene fully overcompensated for all of the defects in the ptenA mutant.

If the hypothesis holds true for human cells, it could lead to a new way to treat cancer. The researchers want to look for a drug that would activate the promoter for one of PTEN's close relative genes. Once a patient is diagnosed with cancer caused by a PTEN mutation, the patient could take the drug, over-express the PTEN bench player gene, and potentially stop cancer in its tracks, Soll says.

That could save many cancer patients from undergoing chemotherapy and radiation treatment for breast and other common cancers.

The finding has led the UI team to study other human genes that may be able to step in for the mutated PTEN gene and perform the same tumor-suppressing role. There are at least two close relatives of PTEN the researchers are currently studying.

"And nature might have put them there just for that, that's the curious thing," Soll explains. "Somewhere, there may be a backup system, what we call 'redundancy,' that might be the basis for better identifying tumors and possibly creating cancer-fighting drugs. You have another gene which might be able to step in for the broken gene to keep things normal, and that's what we're playing with here. It's very sophisticated."


---


La saleté dans votre jardin peut détenir la clé pour isoler les tumeurs cancéreuses et à de nouveaux traitements potentiels pour un grand nombre de cancers.

Université de l'Iowa chercheurs ont découvert un gène dans une amibe vivant dans le sol qui fonctionne de façon similaire au principal gène qui lutte contre le cancer chez l'humain c'est-à-dire PTEN.

Lorsque sain, PTEN inhibe la croissance tumorale chez l'homme. Mais le gène est susceptible de muter, ce qui permet aux cellules cancéreuses de se multiplier et de former des tumeurs. Les Mutations de PTEN sont soupçonnés d'être impliqués dans 40 pour cent des cas de cancer du , jusqu'à 70 pour cent des cas de cancer de la , et près de la moitié de tous les cas de leucémie , selon une revue de la littérature par les chercheurs de l'interface utilisateur. Ensemble, plus de 465.000 nouveaux cas de cancer du sein et de la prostate ont été documentés en 2014, selon les données de l'American Cancer Society.

"Si vous regardez le tableau des tumeurs - et cela ne signifie pas seulement le cancer du sein ou le cancer de la prostate -. Vous trouvez que PTEN est le gène le plus généralement muté Et quand vous muter PTEN chez la souris, vous causer des tumeurs," dit David Soll, professeur de biologie et auteur correspondant de l'étude, publiée dans la revue PLoS ONE.

Bien qu'il ne sait pas comment prévenir les mutations de PTEN, les chercheurs de l'assurance-chômage se sont intéressés à découvrir si d'autres gènes humains peuvent se substituer à PTEN, comme un joueur venant du banc quand l'étoile a été blessé.

Après quelques recherches, l'équipe a constaté que l'amibe, Dictyostelium discoideum, a le gène ptenA, qui mute de façon similaire au gène PTEN humain et provoque des anomalies de comportement dans la cellule. Ils ont également trouvé un proche parent de ptenA dans l'amibe, qu'ils ont appelé lpten qui effectue les mêmes fonctions de ptenA, mais à un degré moindre - un joueur de banc possible dans le génome de l'amibe.

Les chercheurs ont émis l'hypothèse que faire monter la présence et la puissance de lpten en ferait l'étoile sur le terrain et pourrait surcompenser la ptenA muté.

Soll et son équipe ont testé leur hypothèse en plaçant lpten dans un plasmide derrière un promoteur puissant conçu pour sur-exprimer le gène - essentiellement ça fait monter sa puissance. Ils ont ensuite introduit le super-chargé lpten dans une cellule avec le gène muté ptenA. Les chercheurs ont découvert que le gène lpten sur-exprimé surcompensation pleinement pour tous les défauts dans le mutant ptenA.

Si l'hypothèse reste vraie pour les cellules humaines, elle pourrait conduire à une nouvelle façon de traiter le cancer. Les chercheurs veulent trouver un médicament qui activerait le promoteur de l'un des gènes relatifs à proximité de PTEN. Une fois qu'un patient est diagnostiqué avec un cancer provoqué par une mutation de PTEN, le patient pourrait prendre le médicament, sur-exprimer le gène PTEN joueur de banc, et, empêcher que le cancer poursuive sa progression, dit Soll.

Cela pourrait sauver de nombreux patients atteints de cancer de subir un traitement de chimiothérapie et la radiothérapie du cancer du sein et d'autres cancers communs.

Le constat a conduit l'équipe de l'interface utilisateur d'étudier d'autres gènes humains qui peuvent être en mesure d'intervenir pour le gène PTEN muté et jouer le même rôle suppresseur de tumeur. Il ya au moins deux proches parents de PTEN les chercheurs étudient actuellement.

"Et la nature aurait pu les mettre là juste pour ça, c'est le plus curieux», explique Soll. "Quelque part, il peut y avoir un système de sauvegarde, ce que nous appelons« redondance », qui pourrait être la base pour mieux identifier les tumeurs et, éventuellement, la création de médicaments contre le cancer. Vous avez un autre gène qui pourrait être en mesure d'intervenir pour le gène défectueux à garder les choses normales, et c'est ce sur quoi nous jouons ici. C'est très sophistiqué."

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16505
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène PTEN    Mer 27 Nov 2013 - 16:50

Nov. 27, 2013 — A protector for PTEN, a tumor-thwarting protein often missing in cancer cells, has emerged from research led by scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center published online at Nature Cell Biology this week.

Un protecteur de Pten, une protéine qui contrecarre les tumeurs est souvent manquante dans les cellules cancéreuses .

"We discovered that the enzyme USP13 stabilizes the PTEN protein by reversing a process that marks various proteins for destruction by the cell's proteasome," said the paper's senior author Li Ma, Ph.D., assistant professor of Experimental Radiation Oncology.

Nous avons découvert que l'enzyme USP13 stabilise PTEN en renversant un processus qui marquent divers protéines pour la destruction par les proteasomes.

"USP13 also suppresses tumor formation and glycolysis though PTEN," Ma said. Glycolysis is a glucose metabolism pathway that tumors rely on to thrive and grow.

USP13 supprime aussi la formation des tumeurs et de la glycolise au travers PTEN. La glycolise est un chemin de métabolisation sur lequel les tumeurs s'appuient pour survenir et croitre.

After establishing the relationship in cell lines and mouse model experiments, the team found low levels of USP13 in human breast tumors correlate with lower levels of PTEN. Both proteins were more abundantly present in normal breast tissue.

L'équipe a trouvé de bas niveaux de USP13 dans les tumeurs du corrélé avec de bas niveaux de PTEN, les deux protéines sont plus abondantes dans les tissus sains.

PTEN regulates cell growth and division. It also inhibits signaling by the AKT molecular pathway, which is involved in cell survival, metabolism and growth and is often overactive in human cancers.

PTEN régule la croissance de la cellule et sa division. Elle inhibe aussi le chemin moléculaire AKT qui est impliqué dans la survie de la cellule, et dont le métabolisme et la croissance est souvent suractive dans les cancers humains.

This discovery provides a new way to think about PTEN deficiency and how it might be remedied. Ma noted the likely keys to possible treatment would be identifying druggable oncogenes that suppress USP13 in cancer cells, or hitting targets usually controlled by PTEN.

"In our paper, we showed that loss of USP13 leads to loss of PTEN and activation of AKT signaling, and that treatment of a breast cancer cell line with the AKT inhibitor MK-2206 can abolish the effect of USP13 loss on promoting tumor cell proliferation," Ma said. MK-2206 is actively being tested in clinical trials against a variety of cancers at MD Anderson and elsewhere, including advanced breast cancer.

Genetic defects alone don't explain PTEN's absence

"The rationale of our work is that despite the frequent genetic alterations seen in the PTEN gene in human cancer, loss of the PTEN protein has been observed in a much higher percentage of human tumors," Ma said. "For example, approximately 5 percent of non-inherited breast tumors carry PTEN gene mutations, but loss of the PTEN protein is actually reported in nearly 40 percent of breast tumors."

This suggested, Ma said, that regulation of PTEN after gene expression or after its translation into a protein "may contribute substantially to development of human breast cancer."

Ma and colleagues focused on ubiquitylation, a process that regulates proteins by attaching molecules called ubiquitins to them. When more than one ubiquitin is attached to a protein, a chain forms that is both a target and a handle for the proteasome -- a protein complex that degrades proteins and recycles bits of them for other use.

Previous studies had revealed several proteins that attach ubiquitins to PTEN to initiate its destruction. Nothing had been identified that reverses that process for PTEN.

Auditioning 30 DUBs to find one PTEN defender

The team screened 30 known deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs). Of those, USP13 was noteworthy for its ability to stabilize PTEN by directly binding to it and removing ubiquitins.

A series of experiments showed that overexpressing USP13 in breast cancer cells:

Increased PTEN expression and decreased cell multiplication and conversion to a cancerous state.
Reduced cancer-promoting AKT signaling.
Had no effect in cancer cells that lacked the PTEN gene.

The team also confirmed that USP13 removes ubiquitins from PTEN. Silencing USP13 expression tripled the polyubiquitylation of PTEN, expressing USP13 reduced it by 65 percent. Knocking down USP13 in breast cancer cells increased cell multiplication and growth, while restoring either PTEN or USP13 completely reversed the effect.

Lower USP13, larger tumors in mice

In mice, those implanted with a breast cancer cell line with USP13 depleted had a 2.5-fold increase in tumor volume and a 3.5-fold increase in tumor weight over 65 days compared with a control group.

Ma and colleagues also analyzed USP13 and PTEN using human breast cancer progression tissue microarrays from the National Cancer Institute.

Lower PTEN levels were found in 152 of 206 tumors (73.8 percent) and lower USP13 levels in 83 of 201 (41.3 percent).
Of the 83 tumors with low USP13, 73 (88 percent) also had low PTEN.
In normal breast tissue, only 31.8 percent had low levels of PTEN; 13.2 percent had low USP13.

"Our future studies aim to determine the physiological function of USP13 and how USP13 expression is lost in human cancer," Ma said.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16505
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène PTEN    Mer 27 Fév 2013 - 8:35

Même chose à partir d'un article en français

Les chercheurs de l'Institut Karolinska en Suède, en collaboration avec des scientifiques de la Scripps Research Institute et de l'Université de New South Wales, en Australie, ont identifié un nouveau pseudogène qui régule le gène suppresseur de tumeur PTEN (Phosphatase and TENsin homolog).

Les pseudogènes (autrefois qualifiés de « gènes-poubelle ») sont réputés inactifs car ne pouvant pas produire de protéine. Certains pseudogènes peuvent néanmoins jouer un rôle dans le développement et l'homéostasie des organismes.

Les chercheurs pensent que ce pseudogène sera en mesure d'agir sur PTEN et d'inverser le processus tumoral, de rendre la tumeur cancéreuse plus sensible à la chimiothérapie et d'éviter l'apparition d'une résistance aux médicaments.

On sait désormais que le développement d'un cancer nécessite à la fois l'activation de plusieurs "oncogènes" et l'inhibition d'autres gènes suppresseurs de tumeurs. Dans ces travaux, les chercheurs ont montré que le gène PTEN, l'un des gènes suppresseurs de tumeurs le plus courant, pouvait être réactivé par un "pseudogène".

"Ce qui est singulier dans cette découverte, c'est que ce gène ne produit que des ARN qui, à travers une série de mécanismes, contrôlent le gène PTEN.

98 % de nos gènes sont constitués d'ADN non-codant mais, contrairement à ce qu'on a longtemps pensé, on sait à présent que ces gènes jouent un rôle important, y compris dans l'activation des protéines.

"Ces résultats montrent qu'il est envisageable de reprogrammer par cette voie les cellules cancéreuses afin qu'elles cessent de proliférer et deviennent plus résistantes aux médicaments", souligne Per Johnsson, l'auteur principal de ces recherches. Celui-ci ajoute que "Le génome humain comporte au moins 15.000 pseudogènes, et il n'est pas déraisonnable de penser que beaucoup d'entre eux peuvent être impliqués dans l'apparition du cancer. "

Article rédigé par Georges Simmonds pour RT Flash

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16505
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène PTEN    Lun 25 Fév 2013 - 9:56

"We identified a new non-protein encoding pseudogene, which determines whether the expression of PTEN is to be switched on or off," says research team member Per Johnsson, doctoral student at Karolinska Institutet's Department of Oncology-Pathology. "What makes this case spectacular is that the gene only produces RNA, the protein's template. It is this RNA that, through a sequence of mechanisms, regulates PTEN. Pseudogenes have been known about for many years, but it was thought that they were only junk material."

Nous avons identifié un nouveau pseudogène non encodant une protéine quelconque, qui détermine si l'expression de PTEN doit être mise à "ON" ou à "OFF". CE qui rend cela spectaculaire c'est que le gène produit seulement de l'ARN. C'est cet ARN qui à travers divers mécanismes régulePTEN. Les pseudogènes sont connus depuis nombre d'années mais on pensait que ce n'était que du matériel de rebut.

No less than 98 per cent of human DNA consists of non-protein encoding genes (i.e. pseudogenes), and by studying these formerly neglected genes the researchers have begun to understand that they are very important and can have an effect without encoding proteins. Using model systems, the team has shown that the new pseudogene can control the expression of PTEN and make tumours more responsive to conventional chemotherapy

Pas moins de 98% de l'ADN consiste en pseudogènes et l'étude de ces oncogènes a été négligée. L'étude a montré que cet oncopgène peut contrôler l'expression de PTEN et rendre les tumeurs plus répondantes aux chimios traditionelles

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16505
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène PTEN    Mar 6 Mar 2012 - 18:25

(Mar. 6, 2012) — In a perfect world, we could eat to our heart's content without sacrificing our health and good looks, and now it appears that maybe we can. Mice with an extra dose of a known anti-cancer gene lose weight even as their appetites grow. Not only that, but according to the report in the March issue of the Cell Press journal Cell Metabolism, the animals also live longer, and that isn't just because they aren't getting cancer, either.

Dans un monde parfait, nous pourrions manger à volonté et ne pas engraisser et on dirait bien que c'est possible maintenant. Les souris avec un extra dose d'un gene anti cancer reconnu perdent du poids même si leur appétit augmente. Pas seulement cela, mais selon un rapport publié dans Cell Metabolism les animaux vivent plus vieux et ce n'est pas parce qu'ils ne contractent pas de cancer non plus.

One of the animals' youthful secrets is hyperactive brown fat, which burns energy instead of storing it. The findings add to evidence that tumor suppressors aren't designed only to protect us against cancer, the researchers say. They also point to new treatment strategies aimed to boost brown fat and fight aging.

Un des secrets de la jeunesse des animaux est le gras brun, qui brûle de l'énergie au lieu de l'alimenter. Ces découvertes ajoutent à l'évidence que les supresseurs de tumeurs ne sont pas faites seulement pour nous protéger contre le cancer. Les chercheurs parlent aussi de nouvelles stratégies de traitement pour combattre le veillissement en boostant le gras brun.

"Tumor suppressors are actually genes that have been used by evolution to protect us from all kinds of abnormalities," said Manuel Serrano of the Spanish National Cancer Research Center.

Les supresseurs de tumeurs sont des gènes que l'évolution a utilisé pour nous protéger contre toutes sortes d'anormalités.

In this case, the researchers studied a tumor suppressor commonly lost in human cancers. Mice with an extra copy of the gene known as Pten didn't get cancer, but that's not the half of it. Those mice were also leaner, even as they ate more than controls, Serrano said. That suggested that the animals were experiencing some sort of metabolic imbalance -- and a beneficial one at that.

Dans ce cas, les chercheurs ont étudié un suppresseur de tumeurs souvent perdu dans les cancers humain. Les souris avec une copie supplémentaire du gène Pten ne contractent pas le cancer mais ce n'est pas tout. Ces souris sont aussi plus minces même si elles mangent plus que les souris contrôles. Cela suggère que les souris bénéficie d'un débalencement métabolique.

Cancer protection aside, the animals lived longer than usual. They were also less prone to insulin resistance and had less fat in their livers. Those benefits seem to trace back to the fact that those Pten mice were burning more calories thanks to overactive brown fat. Studies in isolated brown fat cells confirmed that a boost in Pten increases the activity of those cells. Pten also made it easier for brown fat to form.

Mise à part la protection contre le cancer, les souris vivent plus longtemps que d'habitude. Elles sont moins susceptible de résistance à l'insuline et ont le foie moins gras. Ces bénéfices semblent être dû au fait qu'elles brulent plus de calories avec le gras brun hyperactif. Les études sur des cellules du gras brun isolés confirment que de booster Pten rend ces cellules plus actives. Pten rend plus facile aussi pour les cellules de gras brun de se former.

"This tumor suppressor protects against metabolic damage associated with aging by turning on brown fat," Serrano says.

A small compound inhibitor that mimics the effects of Pten also came with those varied benefits. That's encouraging news for the prospect of finding a drug that might do for us what the extra Pten gene did for the mice.

Une petite molécule inhibitrice qui mime les effets de Pten copie aussi ces bénifices. C'est encourageant car on pourra peut-être trouver un médicament qui fera pour nous ce que fait Pten pour ces souris.

After all, Serrano said, humans were built for a time when 30 would have been considered old age. "We're well protected against cancer and cardiovascular disease" early in life. As it has become commonplace to live to the age of 80, we could all use a little help.

Pour un humain des premiers temps, 30 ans était un âge respectable comme limite de vie. Aussi nous sommes relativement bien protéger contre le cancer jusqu'à 30 ans mais après nous auriions besoin d'une aide pour vivre jusqu'à 80 comme il est fréquent de nos jours.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16505
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène PTEN    Mer 21 Déc 2011 - 15:48

(Dec. 21, 2011) — A new study published in the journal Nature Cell Biology has discovered how normal cells in tumors can fuel tumor growth.

Une nouvelle étude a démontré comment les cellules normales dans les tumeurs nourrissent le cancer.

Led by researchers at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center -Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC -- James), the study examines what happens when normal cells called fibroblasts in mouse mammary tumors lose an important tumor-suppressor gene called Pten (pronounced "P-ten").

L'étude examine ce qui arrice lorsque des cellules normales appelées fibroblasts dans les tumeurs de souris perdent une important gène suppresseur de tumeurs appelé P-TEN.

The findingssuggest new strategies for controlling tumor growth by developing drugs that disrupt the communication between tumor cells and the normal cells within the tumor. They also provide insight into the mechanisms that control the co-evolution of cancer cells and surrounding normal cells in tumors, and they demonstrate how the Pten gene normally suppresses cancer development, the researchers say.

Cela suggère de nouvelles stratégies pour contrôler la croissance de la tumeur en développant des médicaments qui interrompent la communication entre les cellules cancéreuses et normales dans la tumeur. Cela fournit aussi des insights sur les mécanismes de la co-évolution des cellules cancéreuses et normales dans les tumeurs et cela démontre comment le gène PTEN supprime normalement le développement du cancer.

"Our study is the first to define a specific pathway in tumor fibroblasts that reprograms gene activity and the behavior of multiple cell types in the tumor microenvironment, including tumor cells themselves," says co-principal investigator Dr. Michael Ostrowski, professor and chair of molecular and cellular biochemistry.

Notre étude est la première à définir un chemin cellulalire spécifique dans les tumeurs fibroblastiques qui reprogramment l'activité de gènes et le comportement de beaucoup de types de cellules dans ce micro-environnement, incluant les cellules cancéreuses elles-mêmes.

"Along with increasing basic knowledge about how tumors grow and spread, these findings have direct translational implications for the treatment of breast-cancer patients," says Ostrowski, who is a member of the OSUCCC -- James Molecular Biology and Cancer Genetics program.

Cette étude a des implications pour le cancer du

The researchers found that Pten regulates a molecule called microRNA-320 (miR-320), and that the loss of Pten leads to a dramatic drop in levels of that molecule in a tumor fibroblast. With little miR-320 around, levels of a protein called ETS2 (pronounced Ets-two) rise in the fibroblast.

Les chercheurs ont découvert que PTEN régule une molécule appellé microARN-320 et que la perte de Pten conduit à une baisse prononcée de cette molécule dans la tumeur fibroblastique . Quand miR-320 baisse, les niveaux d'une protéine appelé ETS2 montent dans le fibroblatome.

Finally, the abundance of ETS2 activates a number of genes that cause the fibroblast to secrete more than 50 factors that stimulate the proliferation and invasiveness of nearby cancer cells. It also causes the reprogramming of other fibroblasts in the tumor and throughout the mammary gland.

L'abondance de ETS2 active beaucoup de gènes qui causent la sécrétion de plus de 50 facteurs qui stimulent la prolifération et l'invasion des cellules canécreuses à proxomité. Cela fait aussi que les autres fibroblast dans la tumeur se reprogramment à travers la glande mammaire.

"The cancer field has long focused solely on targeting tumor cells for therapy," says co-principal investigator Gustavo Leone, associate professor of molecular virology, immunology and medical genetics. "Our work suggests that modulation of a few key molecules such as miR-320 in noncancer cells in the tumor microenvironment might be sufficient to impede the most malignant properties of tumor cells."

Le travail suggère que la modulation de quelques molécules clés comme miR-320 dans les cellules non-canécreuses pourrait être suffisant pour empêcher les propriétés les plus malignes des tumeurs.

Ostrowski, Leone and their colleagues began this study by examining human invasive breast tumors from 126 patients for microRNA changes after PTEN loss.

126 patientes ont été examinées pour les changements de la microARN dans la perte de PTEN.

Key technical findings include the following:

on a trouvé que :

·Using mouse models, they found that miR-320 levels and ETS2 levels were inversely correlated in human breast-tumor tissue, suggesting that Pten and miR-320 work together to block ETS2 function and suppress tumor growth.

Les niveaux de micro ARN et ETS2 sont inversement proportionnels.

·miR-320 in mammary fibroblasts influences the behavior of multiple cell types, making it a critical molecule for suppressing epithelial tumors.

Le miR-320 influence le comportement de plusieurs types de cellules dans les fibroblasts mammaires.

·miR-320 functions as a regulatory switch in normal fibroblasts that operates to inhibit the secretion of more than 50 tumor-promoting factors (i.e., a tumor-promoting secretome). In doing so, it blocks the expression of genes in other cell types in the tumor microenvironment and suppresses tumor-cell growth and invasiveness.

Le miR-320 fonctionne comme un régulateur dans les fibroblasts pour inhiber la sécrétion de plus de 50 facteurs qui promeuvent le cancer.

·Overall, loss of Pten in tumor fibroblasts results in downregulation of miR-320 and release of the secretome factors. This causes the genetic reprogramming of neighboring endothelial and epithelial cells of the mammary gland, inciting profound changes in these cells that are typical of malignant tumors.

La perte de PTEN résulte dans la baisse de miR-320 ce qui cause le reprogrammation génétique des cellules endothéliales et épithéliales de la glande mammaire typique des tumeurs malignes.

"Remarkably, the molecular signature of the miR-320 secretome could distinguish normal breast tissue from tumor tissue, and it predicted the outcome in breast-cancer patients," says Leone, who is also a member of the OSUCCC -- James Molecular Biology and Cancer Genetics program. "This underscores the potential clinical importance of the Pten-miR-320 regulatory pathway on human breast cancer."

Cela peut prédire le sort du cancer.



_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16505
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène PTEN    Ven 7 Jan 2011 - 21:40

Les cellules cancéreuses se reproduisent en se scindant en deux, mais, selon une équipe de chercheurs dirigée par le docteur Gerardo Ferbeyre, du département de biochimie de l'Université de Montréal, une molécule connue sous le nom de PML limite le nombre de fois où cela peut se produire.

Ainsi, les scientifiques peuvent savoir pourquoi certains cancers deviennent malins et que d'autres demeurent bénins. Les cancers malins auraient du mal avec cette molécule (PML). En son absence, ils continuent à croître et à se propager à d'autres organes. La présence de la molécule PML se détectent aisément, pouvant déterminer de ce fait si le cancer est malin ou bénin.

«Nous avons découvert que les cellules cancéreuses bénignes produisent la molécule PML et affichent des structures de PML en abondance, ce qui les maintient dans un état de dormance, de sénescence. Les cellules cancéreuses malignes, pour leur part, ne produisent pas de PML ou ne l’organisent pas en structures et, par conséquent, prolifèrent de manière incontrôlable», a expliqué le Dr Ferbeyre par voie de communiqué.

L'équipe de chercheurs a fondé ses recherches sur une découverte antérieure du docteur Ferbeyre démontrant que la molécule PML est capable de forcer les cellules à entrer en état de sénescence, c'est-à-dire un état de maturité, dans la vie d'une cellule, où elle ne peut plus se reproduire et cela constitue une défense naturelle contre la formation de cancers.

«Notre découverte ouvre de nouvelles possibilités pour explorer le rôle de d'autres molécules dans la génération de la sénescence. C'est un objectif que nous estimons important si nous voulons concevoir des thérapies qui changent les tumeurs malignes en tumeurs bénignes», a conclu Gerardo Ferbeyre.

Les résultats ont été publiés le 1er janvier 2011 dans Genes and Development.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16505
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène PTEN    Jeu 6 Jan 2011 - 12:16

ScienceDaily (Jan. 5, 2011) — Cancer cells reproduce by dividing in two, but a molecule known as PML limits how many times this can happen, according to researchers led by Dr. Gerardo Ferbeyre of the University of Montreal's Department of Biochemistry. The team showed that malignant cancers have problems with this molecule, meaning that in its absence they can continue to grow and eventually spread to other organs. Importantly, the presence of PML molecules can easily be detected, and could serve to diagnose whether a tumor is malignant or not.

Les cellules canécreuses se reproduisent en se divisant en deux mais une molécule appelé PML limite le nombre de fois que cela peut arriver. L'équipe de chercheurs a démontré que les cancers malins ont des problèmes avec cette molécule parce qu'en son absence elles peuvent continuer à croitre et éventuellement se répandre vers d'autres organes. La présence de PML peut être détecter facilement et pourrait servir à savoir si une tumeur est maligne ou pas.

"We discovered that benign cancer cells produce the PML molecule and display abundant PML bodies, keeping them in a dormant, senescent state. Malignant cancer cells either don't make or fail to organize PML bodies, and thus proliferate uncontrollably," Ferbeyre explained. Senescence is the mature stage in a cell's life at which in can no longer reproduce and it is a natural defense against cancer formation. When tumor cells are benign, it means that they cannot spread or grow into other parts of the body.

Nous avons découvert que les cellules d'un cancer bénin produisent le PML et le fournissent dans le corps en quantité abondante et cela garde le caner dans un stage dormant. Les cellules d'un cancer agressif ou malin soit ne produisent pas de PML soit ne l'organisent pas suffisamment ce qui fait que le cancer se répand. La sénescence est le stage mature des cellules dans laquelle elles ne peuvent plus se reproduire et c'est une défense naturelle contre le cancer. quand un cancer est bénin, cela veut dire qu'il ne peut se répandre ou croitre dans les autres parties du corps.

The team of researchers based both on campus and at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre built on Dr. Ferbeyre's prior discovery that PML is able to force cells to enter senescence. However, for the past ten years, the mechanism by which this was achieved remained mostly unknown. Hospital researchers worked with patients to collect samples that enabled the team to make their discovery.

Le chercheur a découvert que le PML peut forcer les cellules à entrer en sénescence. Le mécanisme est resté inconnu dans les dix dernières années mais le chercheur a fait cette découverte avec des échantillons pris sur des patients.

"Our findings unravel the unexpected ability of PML to organize a network of tumor suppressor proteins to repress the expression or the amount of other proteins required for cell proliferation," explained researcher Véronique Bourdeau. Such proteins are essential molecules in our body that play a key role in controlling the birth, growth and death of cells. Researcher Mathieu Vernier emphasized that "this is an important finding with implications for our understanding on how the normal organism defends itself from the threat of cancer."

Notre découverte c'est que le PML a la capacité d'organiser un réseau de protéines qui suppriment la tumeur pour annuler l'effet d'autres protéines requises pour sa prolifération. De telles protéines sont des molécules essentielles dans le corps et jouent un rôle dans la naissance, la croissance et la mort des cellules.. C'est une importante découverte qui a des implications sur notre compréhension de comment un organisme se défends contre le cancer.

The work offers exciting avenues for future research. "Our discovery opens new possibilities to explore what other molecules are involved in generating senescence: a goal we consider important if we want to design therapies that turn malignant tumors into benign tumors," Ferbeyre said. The research was published on January 1, 2011 in Genes and Development, and received funding from the Canadian Cancer Society and by the Fonds de la recherche en Santé du Québec.

Ce travail offre des perspectives intéressantes pour établir des thérapies qui pourraient transformer les cancers malins en cancers bénins.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16505
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: MAnipulation de PTEN pour supprimer plus de tumeurs.   Sam 23 Aoû 2008 - 10:30

aout. 23, 2008 — The PTEN tumor suppressor gene controls numerous biological processes including cell proliferation, cell growth and death. But PTEN is frequently lost or mutated; in fact, alteration of the gene is so common among various types of human cancer that PTEN has become one of the most frequently mutated of all tumor suppressors.

Le gène suppresseur de tumeurs Pten contôle beaucoup de processus biologique incluant celui de la prolifération des celllules, celui de l acroissance des celllules et celui de leur mort. Mais PTEN est un gène fréquemment muté ou perdu. En fait la perte ou la mutation de PTEN est si commune dans une grande variété de cancer humain que c'est un des gènes les plus fréquemment altéré de tous les gènes suppresseurs de tumeurs.

Now, a study led by researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and Harvard Medical School provides important new insights into PTEN regulation. Reported in the August 20 advance on-line issue of Nature, the findings define a pathway that maintains PTEN in the nucleus and offer a novel target for enhancing this gene's tumor suppressive function.

Des cehrcheurs ont cependant trouvé un chemin cellulaire qui maintient PTEN dans le noyeau de la cellule et, grâce à de nouvellesw découvertes, on pourra augmenter sa capacité de combattre les tumeurs.

"Our laboratory recently discovered that even when PTEN is produced normally by a cell, it has to be properly localized within the nucleus in order to maintain its full tumor suppressive abilities," explains senior author Pier Paolo Pandolfi, MD, PhD, Director of Basic Research in BIDMC's Cancer Center and Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. "Indeed, it's been demonstrated that in a variety of cancers, PTEN has broken away from the nucleus. With these new findings, we now understand how this happens."

Les chercheurs ont découvert que même dans le cas ou PTEN est produit normalement par une cellule, il faut qu'il soit localisé de manière approprié dans la cellule pour garder sa fonction de suppresseur de tumeurs. On a découvert que ce n'était pas toujours le cas et pourquoi c'était ainsi.

Examination of the abnormal blood cells of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) led to the discovery that PTEN had become loosened from the nucleus.

L'examen des cellules atteintes d'une forme de leucémie (APL) a conduit les chercheurs a observé que PTEN se libérait du noyau de la cellule.

"From there, we observed that the loss of another tumor suppressor known as PML [whose mutation is a main cause of acute promyelocytic leukemia] was at the root of PTEN's escape from the nucleus," adds the study's first author Min Sup Song, PhD, a member of the Pandolfi laboratory. Further investigations revealed that PML was blocking the function of an enzyme known as HAUSP, which under normal circumstances, serves to direct PTEN out of the nucleus.

La perte d'un autre suppresseur de tumeur, le PML, dont la mutation est la principale cause de ce cancer du étati à l'origine de l'échappement de PTEN du noyeau., bloque la fonction d'une enzyme appelée HAUSP qui dans des circonstances mormales sert à conduire PTEN en dehors du noyeau.

"We discovered that this pathway is disrupted through the loss or mutation of PML, as well as through unchecked HAUSP expression, either of which can force PTEN from the nucleus and prevent its ability to act as a tumor suppressor," notes Pandolfi.

Donc et PML et un HAUSP déréglé force PTEN en dehors du noyeau et par la manipulation de ces deux molécules nous pouvons arriver à augmenter la capacité de PTEN de supprimer les tumeurs.

"The modulation of the PML-HAUSP pathway offers us an exciting and unique approach to enhancing the tumor suppressive actions of PTEN," he adds. "Because PML is known to be 'druggable,' we believe that in cases of APL, modulation of PTEN function can be achieved with drugs already being used for the treatment of human cancers, including interferon and all trans-retinoic acid."

Des médicaments déja employés pour le cancer, peuvent servir cette tâche de manipulation(les interférons et les acides trans rétinoiques.)

This study was supported, in part, by grants from the National Institutes of Health International Human Frontier Science Program Organization and the European Molecular Biology Organization.

In addition to Pandolfi and Song, study coauthors include BIDMC investigators Leonardo Salmena, Arkaitz Carracedo, and Ainara Egia; Francesco Lo-Coco of the University of Tor Vergata, Italy; and Julie Teruya-Feldstein of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16505
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le gène PTEN    Lun 11 Déc 2006 - 16:39



Cela est su depuis longtemps que les cellules cancéreuses ont de nombreux moyens pour éviter le système immunitaire, incluant des stratégies pour cacher les protéines normalement exprimées à la surface des cellules ou faire que que ces protéines fassent semblant de répondre au système immunitaire. quelques chercheurs croient même que l'immunorésistance peut contribuer à la progression du cancer.


Depuis 4 ans, le laboratoire de Parsa a essayé de comprendre comment des mutations spécifiques dans le gliome interagissaient avec le phénomène d"immuno-résistance.

"Mon collègue James Waldron et moi avons commencé à chercher différentes sortes de mutations et avons essayer de les mettre en présence de protéines que supprime le système immunitaire." dit Parsa.


Les chercheurs commencent à voir des phénomènes intéressants. Les cellules du gliome avec la mutation appelé "phosphatase et tensin homologue gène" (PTEN), semblent plus résistant au système immunitaire que les cellules avec la fonction normale de PTEN. Déterminer le méchanisme responsable pour l'immunorésistance se révèle plus difficille.


Chez les patients atteints de gliome les fonctions normales de PTEN sont absentes, les cellules cancéreuses ont de haut niveaux de B7-H1, une protéine qui contribue à l'immuno-résistance. Selon Parsa, de hauts niveaux de B7-H1 sur une cellule cancéreuse peut être vu comme une barrière protectrice et les cellules T qui viennent en contact avec B7-H1 sont inefficaces.


Plusieurs types de mutations génétiques peuvent donner naissance à une tumeur du cerveau explique-t-il "mais avec ce type particulier de mutation, la perte de PTEN et l'expression de B7-H1, ce sera plus difficille pour le système immunitaire de tuer les cellules cancéreuses."

Les résultats de cette étude pourraient avoir des implications plus loin que dans le cancer du . La perte de la fonction de Pten est commune à beaucoup de cancers, incluant la et le .


"L'immunothérapie a été efficace pour traiter le cancer dans quelques cas et a échoué dans quelques autres. C'est possible que ce soit ce lien entre la perte de la fonction de PTEN et l'expression de B7-H1 soit responsable de cela. Nous avons besoin de plus d'étude" dit Parsa.


Dernière édition par Denis le Mar 6 Mar 2012 - 21:21, édité 2 fois
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16505
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Le gène PTEN    Lun 17 Avr 2006 - 23:27



Les découvertes en laboratoires faites par les scientifiques peuvent conduire à de nouveaux médicaments en thérapie du cancer. Les chercheurs ont trouvés qu'une "switch" génétique impliqué dans le dévelopement et la croissance d'un animal est la même qui est utilisée pour prévenir que les cellules deviennent cancéreuses.

Les découvertes sont rapportés dans le numéro du 18 avril de "Current Biology". Les expériences étaient menés premièrement par le docteur Masamitsu Fukuyama, un scientifique qui travaille dans les laboratoires de Joel H. Rothman, un professeur dans le département du développemtn cellulaire moléculaire et à l'université de Californie et Ann Rougvie, une professeur du département de génétique de l'université du Minésota. Fukuyama est maintenant assistant professeur à l'université de Tokyo.

"Les parralèles entre le controle du développement durant le processus normal de maturation et le controle de la croissance du cancer sont frappant" dit Rothman " nous reconnaissons que les cellules cancéreuses copie de plusieurs façons ce que les cellules normales font dans le développement animal mais elles le font à un mauvais temps et à un mauvais endroit.

"Dans la vie, il y a un temps pour attendre et un temps pour croitre" explique Rothman "plusieurs créatures restent dans un état d'attente jusqu'à ce que certaines conditions soient correctes pour croitre. un petit séquoia par exemple peut rester pendant des années sous l'état de graine et quand la graine sent qu'il y a suffisamment d'eau elle initie son développement vers le stade adulte de l'arbre. Plusieurs animaux arrêtent leur développement jusqu'à ce que les conditions soient réunies pour leur développement optimal.

Le processus est le même avec les cellules, les unités de base de la vie. Plusieurs cellules restent dans un état de tranquilité, ne croissent pas ni ne se multiplient jusqu'à ce qu'un signal environnemental leur soit donné, parune hormone ou une attaque quelconque. Les cellules possèdent des moyens de se stopper elle-même et de rester dans cet état. Quand les freins tombent les cellules qui devraient être tranquilles se mettent à croitre et à se diviser et conduisent au cancer. Ces freins sont des protéines appelés suppresseurs de tumeurs.

En travaillant avec un petit ver appelé Caenorhabditis élégant, un model animal important pour la science biomédicale, les chercheurs ont découverts qu'un suppresseur de tumeur connue sous le nom de PTEN a aussi des fonctions pour garder l'animal dans un état d'attente en blocquant la croissance des cellules quand la nourriture est absente.
Si ces animaux couvent leurs oeufs sans aucune source de nourriture, ils sont capables de rester dans le dans un état de jeunesse pour longtemps. Quand la nourriture est disponible, ils se mettent à croitre et à devenir adulte.

Les chercheurs ont découverts que cette fonction "jeune/adulte" est controlé par PTEN. quand le gène PTEN est anormal, les animaux essaye de croitre et de devenir mature même s'il n'y a pas de nourriture.
"L'essai de ces animaux de croitre quand ils ne devraient pas n'est pas seulement analogue à la croissance et à la prolifération des cellules durant la formation d'une tumeur cancéreuse, cela implique les mêmes joueurs" dit Rothman. Les chercheurs ont trouvé que les fonctions de PTEN  avec celle de 2 autres protéines kinases sont aussi impliquées dans la progression du cancer.

Cette découverte veut dire que d'autres protéines qui gardent les freins sur la croissance pourraient être découvertes.

"Maintenant que nous avons de l'information sur la "switch" qui garde le développement de ces animaux stoppé, nous pouvons identifier d'autres gènes impliqué dans le processus." dit Rothman. De tels gènes pourraient être impliqué de façon similaire et pourraient fournir de nouvelles cibles pour guérir le cancer.

Les découvertes ont prises 4 années a être faites. Les vers utilisés dans la recherche se développent rapidement, passant du stage de l'oeuf à celui de l'adulte en 3 jours, comparé à la souris, par exemple, ce qui prend plusieurs mois. Les similaritées entre le nombre et l'identité des gènes chez l'humain et les vers permet aux chercheurs d'extrapoller les résultats chez l'humain.


Dernière édition par Denis le Mer 14 Juin 2017 - 21:26, édité 8 fois
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: Le gène PTEN    

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
Le gène PTEN
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 1
 Sujets similaires
-
» Enigme posée par une petite fille qui ne grandit pas ou le gène de l'immortalité
» Le gène p53
» La protéine et le gène RAS.
» Le gène DAPK1
» Le gène BRAF

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
ESPOIRS :: Cancer :: recherche-
Sauter vers: