AccueilCalendrierFAQRechercherS'enregistrerMembresGroupesConnexion

Partagez | 
 

 prostate

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
Aller à la page : 1, 2  Suivant
AuteurMessage
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16151
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: prostate   Aujourd'hui à 17:29

Prostate cancer has lagged behind breast cancer in the identification of predictive and prognostic biomarkers, but the field is catching up. Researchers have identified a molecular signature that can distinguish aggressive prostate cancer that is androgen-indifferent and will have a better response to platinum-based therapy than to androgen receptor–based therapy. These aggressive variants include cancers with clinical features of small cell prostate cancer.

    Prostate cancer is a heterogeneous disease, and there is even heterogeneity within risk groups. This work is a first step in defining clinically relevant subsets based on molecular characteristics.
    — Ana Aparicio, MD

“We are interested in androgen-indifferent tumors—that is, tumors that don’t respond to androgen-directed therapy. These aggressive tumors do respond to platinum-based therapy, so our work is important in selecting patients for the right therapy,” explained Ana Aparicio, MD, of The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston. “This discovery is critical, not only for our daily practice, but it should also make our clinical trials more effective by enriching patient selection for clinical trials.”

The molecular signature was identified in patients with castrate-resistant prostate cancer who have clinical features, but not morphologic features, of aggressive prostate cancer.

In routine practice, seven clinical features have been defined for aggressive variants of prostate cancer, Dr. Aparicio explained. They include predominantly lytic bone lesions, exclusive visceral metastases, low prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level relative to tumor burden, presence of neuroendocrine markers plus elevated carcinoembryonic antigen or lactate dehydrogenase level, < 6 months of response to androgen-deprivation therapy, bulky primary tumor > 5 cm, and small cell prostate cancer on biopsy.

“We have learned that patients may present with clinical features of small cell prostate cancer, but biopsy reveals a range of morphologies. We were interested in whether clinical features of aggressive prostate cancer alone can suggest response to therapy,” she continued. “When we studied this, we found that the answer is yes.”

Study Details

Dr. Aparicio and co-investigators conducted a phase II trial of patients with castrate-resistant prostate cancer and clinical features (as distinct from morphologic features) of small cell prostate cancer.1 “The study demonstrated that, in fact, if you selected men with clinical features of small cell prostate cancer, the response to platinum-based chemotherapy was high—as high as you would expect if patients had morphologic features of small cell prostate cancer,” she said.
Tailoring Treatment for Prostate Cancer

    Researchers have identified a molecular signature for aggressive prostate cancer variants that are likely to be androgen-indifferent.
    The signature was found in men with castrate-resistant prostate cancer.
    The signature can be used to identify patients who should be treated with platinum-based therapy instead of androgen-directed therapy.

Next, they identified molecular features of small cell prostate cancer and then looked at clinically defined aggressive variants of prostate cancer to determine whether these variants had the same molecular signature. “The answer was yes,” she emphasized.

The molecular signature comprises genetic alterations in RB1, PTEN, and TP53—all related to tumor suppression. If a patient had two or more of these features, the cancer was defined as aggressive.

After validating the molecular signature in aggressive variants of prostate cancer, they conducted a trial of 160 unselected patients with metastatic prostate cancer randomized to cabazitaxel (Jevtana) vs cabazitaxel plus carboplatin (unpublished data). Patients were stratified for the presence or absence of features of the molecular signature. Again, they found that patients with the molecular signature (ie, abnormalities in at least two of the key genes) all had a good response to platinum-based therapy.

How Common Is Aggressive Prostate Cancer?

An older series of patients with castrate-resistant disease found small cell prostate cancer histology and gene expression in 8% of all tumors, combined genetic defects in 2 or more of these markers in 20%, and primary resistance to androgen receptor–signaling inhibitors in 20%. Among newly diagnosed patients, < 1% have small cell histology, 10% have combined genetic defects, and 10% have primary resistance to androgen receptor signaling.

“There is a spectrum of morphologic features that overlap with the genetic signature, and these cancers are platinum sensitive,” she emphasized.

She and her colleagues have mounted the ongoing DynaMO trial, which will enroll 265 men with castrate-resistant prostate cancer treated with abiraterone (Zytiga) and apalutamide (an investigational nonsteroidal antiandrogen) for 8 weeks. Serum markers will be measured at 8 weeks, and if there is a satisfactory decline in serum PSA level, patients will continue on chemotherapy with or without ipilimumab (Yervoy); if there is no satisfactory decline, patients will continue on abiraterone plus apalutamide with the addition of platinum-based chemotherapy with cabazitaxel and carboplatin. The expectation is that patients with an unsatisfactory response to the first 8 weeks of therapy will have aggressive cancers.

At the time of Dr. Aparicio’s presentation, 56 patients were accrued. In the first 35 evaluable patients, about one-third did not have a satisfactory decline in markers at 8 weeks and were allocated to chemotherapy.

“We believe that an understanding of genetic markers can categorize patients with prostate cancer into at least two major types: androgen-sensitive and androgen-indifferent. We have gone from morphologic features (ie, to define small cell prostate cancer) to clinical features that define aggressive variants, and now we have a molecular signature for these androgen-indifferent aggressive tumors. We hope that this will lead to improved outcomes in our patients,” she stated.

Translation to Clinical Practice

In routine clinical practice, oncologists can look for the seven criteria for aggressive variants of prostate cancer. Then the tumor can be sent out for genomic sequencing to look for alterations in RB1, PTEN, and/or TP53. These findings will inform treatment selection. Platinum-based therapy would be recommended for the androgen-indifferent tumors, she said.

“Prostate cancer is a heterogeneous disease, and there is even heterogeneity within risk groups. This work is a first step in defining clinically relevant subsets based on molecular characteristics,” Dr. Aparicio said.

The next study she and her colleagues are planning will enroll 160 patients with de novo metastatic disease and the presence of a bulky tumor (one of the clinical features of aggressive variants) to evaluate whether there is any benefit of removing the primary tumor surgically. Patients will get 6 months of systemic therapy, and then they will be randomized to undergo surgical excision of the primary tumor or not. “We will look for the molecular signature in these patients,” she noted. ■

---

Le cancer de la prostate est en retard par rapport au cancer du sein dans l'identification des biomarqueurs prédictifs et pronostiques, mais le retard se rattrape. Les chercheurs ont identifié une signature moléculaire qui peut distinguer un cancer de la prostate agressif qui est indifférent aux androgènes et aura une meilleure réponse à la thérapie à base de platine qu'au traitement basé sur les récepteurs des androgènes. Ces variantes agressives comprennent les cancers présentant des caractéristiques cliniques du cancer de la prostate à petites cellules.

   

Citation :
Le cancer de la prostate est une maladie hétérogène, et il existe même une hétérogénéité dans les groupes à risque. Ce travail est une première étape dans la définition de sous-ensembles cliniquement pertinents basés sur des caractéristiques moléculaires.
    - Ana Aparicio, MD


«Nous sommes intéressés par les tumeurs indifférentes aux androgènes, c'est-à-dire les tumeurs qui ne répondent pas à la thérapie dirigée sur les androgènes. Ces tumeurs agressives répondent à la thérapie à base de platine, de sorte que notre travail est important dans la sélection des patients pour la bonne thérapie ", a expliqué Ana Aparicio, MD, du University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center à Houston. "Cette découverte est essentielle, non seulement pour notre pratique quotidienne, mais elle devrait aussi rendre nos essais cliniques plus efficaces en enrichissant la sélection des patients pour les essais cliniques".

La signature moléculaire a été identifiée chez les patients atteints de cancer de la prostate résistant à la castration qui ont les caractéristiques cliniques, mais pas les caractéristiques morphologiques, d'un cancer agressif de la prostate.

Dans la pratique courante, sept caractéristiques cliniques ont été définies pour les variantes agressives du cancer de la prostate, a déclaré M. Aparicio. Ils incluent principalement des lésions osseuses lytiques, des métastases viscérales exclusives, un faible taux d'antigène prostatique (PSA) par rapport au fardeau tumoral, la présence de marqueurs neuroendocrines plus l'antigène carcino-embryonnaire élevé ou le taux de lactate déshydrogénase, <6 mois de réponse au traitement de privation d'androgènes, volumineux Tumeur primaire> 5 cm et cancer de la prostate à petite cellule lors d'une biopsie.

"Nous avons appris que les patients peuvent présenter des caractéristiques cliniques du cancer de la prostate à petites cellules, mais la biopsie révèle une gamme de morphologies. Nous étions intéressés à savoir si les caractéristiques cliniques du cancer de la prostate agressif seules peuvent suggérer une réponse au traitement ", at-elle poursuivi. "Lorsque nous avons étudié cela, nous avons constaté que la réponse est oui".

Détails de l'étude

Le Dr Aparicio et les co-chercheurs ont mené un essai de phase II de patients atteints de cancer de la prostate résistant à la castration et des caractéristiques cliniques (à la différence des caractéristiques morphologiques) du cancer de la prostate à petites cellules. L'étude a démontré que, en fait, si vous avez sélectionné des hommes avec des caractéristiques cliniques du cancer de la prostate à petites cellules, la réponse à la chimiothérapie à base de platine était élevée, comme on peut s'y attendre si les patients avaient des caractéristiques morphologiques du cancer de la prostate à petites cellules ", a-t-elle déclaré.

Traitement sur mesure pour le cancer de la prostate

   

Citation :
Les chercheurs ont identifié une signature moléculaire pour des variantes agressives du cancer de la prostate susceptibles d'être indifférentes aux androgènes.
    La signature a été trouvée chez les hommes atteints de cancer de la prostate résistant à la castration.
    La signature peut être utilisée pour identifier les patients qui devraient être traités avec une thérapie à base de platine au lieu de la thérapie dirigée contre les androgènes.



Ensuite, ils ont identifié des caractéristiques moléculaires du cancer de la prostate à petites cellules et ont ensuite examiné des variantes agressives cliniquement définies du cancer de la prostate pour déterminer si ces variantes avaient la même signature moléculaire. "La réponse était oui", a-t-elle souligné.

La signature moléculaire comprend des modifications génétiques dans RB1, PTEN et TP53 - tous liés à la suppression tumorale. Si un patient avait deux ou plusieurs de ces caractéristiques, le cancer était défini comme agressif.

Après avoir validé la signature moléculaire dans des variantes agressives du cancer de la prostate, ils ont mené un essai de 160 patients non sélectionnés avec un cancer de la prostate métastatique randomisé au cabazitaxel (Jevtana) contre le cabazitaxel plus le carboplatine (données non publiées). Les patients ont été stratifiés pour la présence ou l'absence de caractéristiques de la signature moléculaire. Encore une fois, ils ont constaté que les patients atteints de la signature moléculaire (c.-à-d. Des anomalies dans au moins deux des gènes clés) avaient tous une bonne réponse à la thérapie à base de platine.

Quelle est la fréquence du cancer de la prostate agressif?

Une série plus ancienne de patients atteints d'une maladie résistante à la castration a trouvé une histologie du cancer de la prostate à petites cellules et une expression génique dans 8% de toutes les tumeurs, des anomalies génétiques combinées dans 2 ou plus de ces marqueurs chez 20% et une résistance primaire aux inhibiteurs de la signalisation des récepteurs des androgènes de 20%. Parmi les patients nouvellement diagnostiqués, <1% ont une histologie de petites cellules, 10% ont des défauts génétiques combinés et 10% ont une résistance primaire à la signalisation des récepteurs androgènes.

"Il existe une gamme de caractéristiques morphologiques qui se chevauchent avec la signature génétique, et ces cancers sont sensibles au platine", a-t-elle souligné.

Elle et ses collègues ont monté l'essai DynaMO en cours, qui regroupera 265 hommes avec un cancer de la prostate résistant à la castration traités avec l'abiratérone (Zytiga) et l'apalutamide (un antiandrogène non stéroïdien expérimental) pendant 8 semaines. Les marqueurs de sérum seront mesurés à 8 semaines, Et s'il existe un déclin satisfaisant du taux de PSA sérique, les patients continueront à subir une chimiothérapie avec ou sans ipilimumab (Yervoy); S'il n'y a pas de déclin satisfaisant, les patients continueront à utiliser l'abiratérone plus l'apalutamide avec l'addition de la chimiothérapie à base de platine avec le cabazitaxel et le
carboplatine. On s'attend à ce que les patients ayant une réponse insatisfaisante aux 8 premières semaines de traitement auront des cancers agressifs.

Au moment de la présentation du docteur Aparicio, 56 expériences de patients ont été accumulés. Dans les 35 premiers patients évaluables, environ un tiers n'avaient pas de baisse satisfaisante des marqueurs à 8 semaines et ont continué avec la chimiothérapie.

«Nous croyons qu'une compréhension des marqueurs génétiques peut classer les patients atteints de cancer de la prostate en au moins deux types majeurs: les sensibles aux androgènes et les indifférents aux androgènes. Nous sommes passés de caractéristiques morphologiques (c'est-à-dire pour définir le cancer de la prostate à petites cellules) à des caractéristiques cliniques qui définissent des variantes agressives, et maintenant nous avons une signature moléculaire pour ces tumeurs agressives indigènes androgènes. Nous espérons que cela entraînera des résultats améliorés chez nos patients ", a-t-elle déclaré.

Traduction à la pratique clinique

Dans la pratique clinique de routine, les oncologues peuvent rechercher les sept critères pour les variantes agressives du cancer de la prostate. Ensuite, la tumeur peut être envoyée pour le séquençage génomique pour rechercher des altérations dans RB1, PTEN et / ou TP53. Ces résultats éclaireront la sélection du traitement. Une thérapie à base de platine serait recommandée pour les tumeurs indifférentes aux androgènes, at-elle déclaré.

«Le cancer de la prostate est une maladie hétérogène, et il existe même une hétérogénéité dans les groupes à risque. Ce travail est une première étape dans la définition de sous-ensembles cliniquement pertinents basés sur des caractéristiques moléculaires ", a déclaré M. Aparicio.

La prochaine étude menée par elle et ses collègues permettra d'inscrire 160 patients atteints d'une maladie métastatique nouvelle et la présence d'une tumeur volumineuse (une des caractéristiques cliniques des variantes agressives) afin d'évaluer s'il existe un avantage à éliminer chirurgicalement la tumeur primaire. Les patients recevront 6 mois de thérapie systémique, puis ils seront randomisés pour subir une excision chirurgicale de la tumeur primaire ou non. "Nous allons chercher la signature moléculaire chez ces patients", at-elle noté. ■


_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16151
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: prostate   Mar 18 Avr 2017 - 16:00

In the past, all forms of metastatic prostate cancer have been considered incurable. In recent years, the FDA has approved six drugs for men with metastatic disease, all of which can increase survival. In a study published in Urology®, researchers demonstrate for the first time that an aggressive combination of systemic therapy (drug treatment) with local therapy (surgery and radiation) directed at both the primary tumor and metastasis can eliminate all detectable disease in selected patients with metastatic prostate cancer.

While the study is only a first step, one-fifth of the patients treated had no detectable disease, with an undetectable prostate-specific-androgen (PSA) and normal blood testosterone, after 20 months. The results suggest that some men who have previously been considered incurable can possibly be cured; investigators also establish a new paradigm for testing various drug combinations in conjunction with local treatment of the prostate to determine which is the best approach (ie, has the highest undetectable disease rate). Such results could not have been achieved with any single therapy alone.

According to lead investigator Howard I. Scher, MD, Chief of the Genitourinary Oncology Service at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, "The sequential use of the three different modalities helped illustrate the role and importance of each in achieving the undetectable PSA with normal testosterone level end point, which represents a 'no-evidence of disease' status." Longer follow-up is needed to determine whether these patients were in fact cured.

Twenty men with metastatic prostate cancer, five with extra-pelvic lymph nodal disease and 15 with bone with or without nodal disease, were treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), radical surgery that included a retroperitoneal lymph node dissection as needed, and radiation therapy to visible metastatic lesions in bone. ADT was stopped after a minimum of six months if an undetectable PSA was achieved after combined modality therapy. Other patients were treated continuously.

The combined treatment regimen including surgery was well tolerated. Matthew J. O'Shaughnessy, MD, PhD, Urology Service, Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, commented "While the role of local therapy in metastatic prostate cancer is still under investigation, aggressive resection of visible disease performed by experienced surgeons was critical to the outcome."

Of the five patients with extra-pelvic lymph node involvement, four achieved an undetectable PSA after ADT and surgery, while the fifth needed radiation to reach this milestone. However, none achieved the primary end point of undetectable PSA with testosterone recovery at 20 months after initiation of therapy with ADT alone, although one patient had a PSA of <.05 ng/mL with a testosterone level of 47 ng/dL at 39 months.

Of the 15 patients with bone metastases, 14 (93%) reached an undetectable PSA when ADT, surgery, and radiation were used. Ultimately, four (27%) achieved the proposed end point, a PSA of <.05 ng/mL and serum testosterone of >150 ng/dL at 20 months after the start of ADT, which remained undetectable in two patients for 27 and 46 months, respectively.

Commenting on the study, Oliver Sartor, MD, Cancer Research, Department of Medicine and Urology, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, stated, "The end point deserves special mention, as the end point of undetectable PSA after testosterone recovery has been previously discussed but rarely studied. The authors proposed that this end point may serve as a first step toward establishing a curative paradigm. Many in the field agree, but note that the longevity of effect is essential to prove the point of curability. Regardless, the movement toward a curative paradigm is much needed and the investigators are to be congratulated for setting forth a paradigm that can be used to assess the possibility of cure in a reasonable period of time."

"A multimodal treatment strategy for patients who present with disease that is beyond the limits of curability by any single modality enables the evaluation of new approaches in order to prioritize large-scale testing in early stages of advanced disease. The end point also shifts the paradigm from palliation to cure," remarked Dr. Scher. It is expected that an upcoming Phase 2 trial will further test this endpoint and combined modality approach.

---

Dans le passé, toutes les formes de cancer de la prostate métastatique ont été considérées comme incurables. Au cours des dernières années, la FDA a approuvé six médicaments pour les hommes atteints de maladie métastatique, qui peuvent tous augmenter la survie. Dans une étude publiée dans Urology®, les chercheurs démontrent pour la première fois qu'une combinaison agressive de thérapie systémique (traitement médicamenteux) avec une thérapie locale (chirurgie et radiothérapie) dirigée à la fois sur la tumeur primaire et la métastase peut éliminer toute maladie détectable chez certains patients avec le cancer de la prostate métastatique.

Bien que l'étude ne soit qu'une première étape, un cinquième des patients traités n'a pas eu de maladie détectable, avec un androgène indétectable spécifique de la prostate (PSA) et une testostérone sanguine normale, après 20 mois. Les résultats suggèrent que certains hommes qui ont déjà été considérés comme incurables peuvent éventuellement être guéris; Les enquêteurs établissent également un nouveau paradigme pour tester diverses combinaisons de médicaments en conjonction avec le traitement local de la prostate afin de déterminer quelle est la meilleure approche (c'est-à-dire le taux de maladie le plus élevé indétectable). De tels résultats n'auraient pas été réalisés avec une seule thérapie seule.

Selon l'enquêteur principal Howard I. Scher, MD, chef du service d'oncologie génito-urinaire au Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center à New York City, «l'utilisation séquentielle des trois modalités différentes a permis d'illustrer le rôle et l'importance de chacun pour atteindre le PSA indétectable Avec un point final de niveau de testostérone normal, ce qui représente un statut de «preuve de non-maladie». Un suivi plus long est nécessaire pour déterminer si ces patients étaient en fait guéris.

Vingt hommes atteints de cancer de la prostate métastatique, cinq avec une maladie lymphatique lymphatique extra-pelvienne et 15 avec des os avec ou sans maladie nodale, ont été traités avec une thérapie antidrogue androgène (ADT), une chirurgie radicale qui comprenait une dissection de ganglions rétropéritonéaux au besoin et une radiothérapie À des lésions métastatiques visibles dans l'os. L'ADT a été arrêté après un minimum de six mois si un PSA indétectable a été atteint après un traitement combiné de modalité. D'autres patients ont été traités en continu.

Le schéma de traitement combiné comprenant la chirurgie était bien toléré. Matthew J. O'Shaughnessy, MD, Ph.D., Service d'urologie, Département de chirurgie, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, a déclaré: "Alors que le rôle de la thérapie locale dans le cancer de la prostate métastatique est encore à l'étude, une résection agressive de la maladie visible effectuée par des chirurgiens expérimentés est critique pour le résultat. "

Parmi les cinq patients atteints d'un ganglion lymphatique extra-pelvien, quatre ont atteint un PSA indétectable après l'ADT et la chirurgie, tandis que le cinquième avait besoin de rayonnement pour atteindre ce jalon. Cependant, aucun n'a atteint le point final primaire du PSA indétectable avec la récupération de la testostérone 20 mois après l'initiation du traitement avec ADT seul, bien qu'un patient ait un PSA de <0,05 ng / mL avec un taux de testostérone de 47 ng / dL à 39 mois .

Sur les 15 patients atteints de métastases osseuses, 14 (93%) ont atteint un PSA indétectable lorsque l'ADT, la chirurgie et le rayonnement ont été utilisés. En fin de compte, quatre (27%) ont atteint le point final proposé, un PSA de <0,05 ng / mL et une testostérone sérique> 150 ng / dL à 20 mois après le début de l'ADT, qui est restée indétectable chez deux patients pour 27 et 46 Mois, respectivement.

En ce qui concerne l'étude, Oliver Sartor, MD, Cancer Research, Département de médecine et d'urologie, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, a déclaré: "Le point final mérite une mention spéciale, en tant que point final du PSA indétectable après récupération de la testostérone a été discutés précédemment mais a rarement été étudié. Les auteurs ont proposé que ce point final puisse servir de première étape vers l'établissement d'un paradigme curatif. Beaucoup d'entre eux acceptent, mais notons que la longévité de l'effet est essentielle pour prouver le point de guérison. Le mouvement vers un paradigme curatif est très nécessaire et les enquêteurs doivent être félicités pour avoir exposé un paradigme qui peut être utilisé pour évaluer la possibilité de guérir dans un délai raisonnable ".

"Une stratégie de traitement multimodal pour les patients qui présentent une maladie dépassant les limites de la curabilité par une seule modalité permet d'évaluer de nouvelles approches afin de donner la priorité aux tests à grande échelle dans les premiers stades de la maladie avancée. Le point final déplace également le paradigme De la palliation à la guérison ", a commenté le Dr Scher. On s'attend à ce qu'un prochain essai de phase 2 permettra de tester davantage cette approche de point final et de mode combinée.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16151
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: prostate   Dim 12 Mar 2017 - 17:07

Advanced prostate cancer resistant to castration therapy appears to respond well to a combination of immune checkpoint blockades and treatments that target certain immune-busting cells commonly associated with poor patient prognosis and therapy resistance.

Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center developed a novel chimeric mouse model to test the combination therapy using immune checkpoint blockades with therapies targeting myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). MDSCs are immune cells originating from bone marrow stem cells that possess strong immunosuppressive abilities and are known to play a role in tumor formation and metastasis. The team's findings were published in the March 9 online issue of Nature.

"A significant number of advanced prostate cancer patients treated with a chemical castration therapy called androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) experience relapse with relentless progression to lethal metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer," said Ronald DePinho, M.D., professor of Cancer Biology. "While immune checkpoint blockade therapy is effective in many cancers, it has been less successful for this particular form of prostate cancer, which has motivated a search for targeted therapies that overcome this resistance."

The investigation first tested anti-CTLA4 and anti-PD1 checkpoint blockades in combination, but found only "modest efficacy," said the paper's first author Xin Lu, Ph.D., formerly a DePinho trainee, now an independent investigator at the University of Notre Dame. Targeted therapy using MDSC-inhibiting drugs, such as cabozantinib (Cabo) and BEZ, also demonstrated minimal anti-tumor capabilities. However, the combination of both therapeutic approaches proved successful.

"Strikingly, both primary and metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer responded to a combined checkpoint blockade and MDSC targeted therapeutic approach," said DePinho. "These observations in mouse models of prostate cancer, using a sophisticated genetic approach developed by James Horner at MD Anderson, illuminate a clinical path hypothesis for combining immune checkpoint blockades with MDSC-targeted therapies in the treatment of this aggressive cancer."

DePinho added that clinical trials will be needed to substantiate the team's findings and to further explore the combination therapy with selective anti-androgen drugs for both established castration-resistant prostate cancer and newly diagnosed cases to achieve "durable clinical response."

---

Le cancer avancé de la prostate résistant à la thérapie de castration semble bien répondre à une combinaison de blocages de contrôle immunisés et de traitements ciblant certaines cellules immunodéprimées couramment associées à un mauvais pronostic du patient et à une résistance thérapeutique.

Des chercheurs de l'Université du Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center ont développé un nouveau modèle de souris chimérique pour tester la thérapie combinée en utilisant des blocages de contrôle immunitaire avec des thérapies ciblant myéloïde-suppresseur de cellules dérivées (MDSCs). Les MDSC sont des cellules immunitaires provenant de cellules souches de moelle osseuse qui possèdent de fortes capacités immunosuppressives et sont connues pour jouer un rôle dans la formation de tumeurs et de métastases. Les résultats de l'équipe ont été publiés dans le numéro en ligne du 9 mars de Nature.

"Un nombre important de patients atteints de cancer de la prostate avancés traités avec une thérapie de castration chimique appelée thérapie de privation d'androgène (ADT) rechute avec une progression implacable de métastatique mortelle, résistant à la castration cancer de la prostate», a déclaré Ronald DePinho, M.D., professeur de biologie du cancer. "Bien que la thérapie de blocage de checkpoint immunitaire est efficace dans de nombreux cancers, il a été moins efficace pour cette forme particulière de cancer de la prostate, ce qui a motivé une recherche de thérapies ciblées qui surmontent cette résistance.

L'enquête a d'abord testé les inhibiteurs de contrôle anti-CTLA4 et anti-PD1 en combinaison, mais n'a trouvé qu'une "efficacité modeste", a déclaré le premier auteur du document, Xin Lu, Ph.D., ancien stagiaire DePinho, actuellement chercheur indépendant à l'Université de Notre Dame. La thérapie ciblée utilisant des médicaments inhibiteurs du MDSC, tels que le cabozantinib (Cabo) et BEZ, a également démontré des capacités anti-tumorales minimales. Cependant, la combinaison des deux approches thérapeutiques a été couronnée de succès.

«De façon frappante, le cancer de la prostate résistant à la castration primaire et métastatique a répondu à un blocage de contrôle combiné et à une approche thérapeutique ciblée MDSC», a déclaré DePinho. "Ces observations sur les modèles murins de cancer de la prostate, en utilisant une approche génétique sophistiquée développée par James Horner au MD Anderson, a éclairé une hypothèse de chemin clinique pour combiner blocage immunitaire bloquer avec des thérapies de ciblage de MDSC dans le traitement de ce cancer agressif.

DePinho a ajouté que des essais cliniques seront nécessaires pour étayer les résultats de l'équipe et d'explorer plus loin le traitement combiné avec des médicaments anti-androgènes sélectifs pour le cancer de la prostate établi résistant à la castration et les cas nouvellement diagnostiqués pour obtenir une «réponse clinique durable»

Vous pourriez être intéressé aussi par cet article qui explique pourquoi le brocoli est bon pour éviter ou ralentir le cancer de la prostate que j'ai mis dans la section "alimentation" :

http://espoirs.forumactif.com/t1484-pizza-avec-brocolis-contre-le-cancer-de-la-prostate


_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16151
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: prostate   Ven 10 Mar 2017 - 18:19

Cabozantinib, a drug already used to treat patients with certain types of thyroid or kidney cancer, was able to eradicate invasive prostate cancers in mice by causing tumor cells to secrete factors that entice neutrophils -- the first-responders of the immune system -- to infiltrate the tumor, where they triggered an immune response that led to tumor clearance.

The drug, marketed as Cometriq®, enhances the release of specific chemical signals, known as CXCL12 and HMGB1, from prostate cancer cells. These signals cause the neutrophils, produced in the bone marrow, to flock to the tumor and attack the cancerous cells. In mice with aggressive prostate cancer, it produced near-complete clearance of invasive prostate cancers within 48 to 72 hours.

The authors of this study (published online March 8, 2017, in Cancer Discovery) note that this is the first demonstration that a drug of this type (a tyrosine kinase inhibitor) could activate innate anti-tumor immunity, resulting in the eradication of invasive cancer. They also suggest it could be used as part of a novel approach to combination cancer immunotherapy.

"We saw dramatic anti-tumor responses," said the study's lead author and investigator, medical oncologist and physician-scientist Akash Patnaik, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Director of the Developmental Therapeutics Laboratory and Attending Physician within the Genitourinary Oncology Program at the University of Chicago Medicine. "We used a difficult-to-treat, aggressive prostate cancer mouse model. We were very surprised to see complete eradication of the most invasive, poorly differentiated tumors within days."

"The results of this study were really unexpected," said co-author Lewis Cantley, PhD, Director of the Sandra and Edward Meyer Cancer Center at Weill Cornell Medicine in New York City.

Cabozantinib, FDA approved in 2012 for metastatic medullary thyroid cancer and in 2015 for advanced renal cell carcinoma, was recently tested in the COMET-1 trial in men with metastatic prostate cancer. But the results were disappointing. Some of the patients had a good response, but many did not.

"Why some of these patients responded and others did not was unclear," Cantley said.

Following the dramatic results in a subset of advanced prostate cancer patients in the Phase II trial, Patnaik and colleagues began testing the drug in the lab. In their mouse model for prostate cancer, cabozantinib caused dramatic shrinkage of the tumors within a few days. But when tested on prostate cancer cell lines in a petri dish, it had relatively little effect.

Why was there a dramatic in vivo effect with little ex vivo effect? Patnaik and colleagues wondered.

"The drug was not actually killing the tumor cells," Cantley said. "Instead, it was inducing them to release factors that stimulated an attack by the innate immune system."

The key was the neutrophil-attracting chemical signals CXCL12 and HMGB1, released by tumor cells. When the researchers blocked production of these signals, the drug was no longer effective. The neutrophils -- Patnaik refers to them as the "suicide bombers of the immune system" -- never engaged in battle.

"Our findings could also explain why some patients in the COMET-1 trial did not benefit from the drug," Patnaik said. "This Phase-III trial included patients who had already received aggressive chemotherapy, which may have compromised their immune systems."

While additional research is being done to understand how cabozantinib accomplishes this effect, "this paper raises the possibility that a new class of drugs could be developed to treat cancers by stimulating attack by neutrophils," Cantley said.

For several years now, the most exciting development in cancer research has been the emergence of immunotherapies, especially checkpoint blockade drugs such as ipilimumab, nivolumab and pembrolizumab that enable the adaptive immune system, in this case T cells, to enter and attack tumors. But there has been little attention paid to inducing the innate immune system, such as neutrophils, to go after tumors.

"Neutrophils can be just as potent as T cells," Patnaik stated. He now hopes to use them in combination.

"Based on our results showing that cabozantinib can activate innate immunity and overcome an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment, we are planning clinical trials to test the combination of cabozantinib and T cell checkpoint immunotherapy in specific subtypes of advanced kidney and prostate cancer. Our goal," Patnaik said, "is to enhance long-term anti-cancer responses from activating both innate and adaptive immunotherapy."

---

Le cabozantinib, un médicament déjà utilisé pour traiter des patients atteints de certains types de cancer de la thyroïde ou du , a pu éliminer les cancers invasifs de la chez les souris en provoquant la sécrétion de cellules tumorales qui attirent les neutrophiles - les premiers intervenants du système immunitaire - à Infiltrer la tumeur, où ils ont déclenché une réponse immunitaire qui a conduit à la clairance tumorale.

Le médicament, commercialisé sous le nom de Cometriq®, améliore la libération de signaux chimiques spécifiques, connus sous le nom de CXCL12 et HMGB1, de cellules de cancer de la prostate. Ces signaux font que les neutrophiles, produits dans la moelle osseuse, se précipitent vers la tumeur et attaquent les cellules cancéreuses. Chez les souris ayant un cancer de la prostate agressif, il a produit une clairance presque complète des cancers de la prostate invasifs en 48 à 72 heures.

Les auteurs de cette étude (publiée en ligne le 8 mars 2017 dans Cancer Discovery) notent que c'est la première démonstration qu'un médicament de ce type (un inhibiteur de la tyrosine kinase) pourrait activer une immunité innée antitumorale, ce qui a pour résultat l'éradication de la maladie invasive cancer. Ils suggèrent également qu'il pourrait être utilisé dans le cadre d'une nouvelle approche de l'immunothérapie de cancer combiné.

"Nous avons vu des réponses anti-tumorales dramatiques", a déclaré l'auteur et chercheur principal de l'étude, l'oncologue médical et le médecin-scientifique Akash Patnaik, MD, Ph.D., professeur adjoint de médecine, directeur du Laboratoire thérapeutique du développement et médecin assistant au sein du Programme d'oncologie génito-urinaire À l'Université de Chicago Médecine. «Nous avons utilisé un modèle de souris de cancer de la prostate agressif et difficile à traiter. Nous avons été très surpris de voir l'éradication complète des tumeurs les plus invasives et mal différenciées en quelques jours.

«Les résultats de cette étude ont été vraiment inattendus», a déclaré le co-auteur Lewis Cantley, Ph.D., directeur du Sandra et Edward Meyer Cancer Center à Weill Cornell Medicine à New York.

Le cabozantinib, approuvé par la FDA en 2012 pour le cancer métastatique médullaire de la thyroïde et en 2015 pour le carcinome rénal avancé, a récemment été testé dans l'essai COMET-1 chez les hommes atteints de cancer de la prostate métastatique. Mais les résultats ont été décevants. Certains des patients ont eu une bonne réponse, mais beaucoup ne l'ont pas eu.

«Pourquoi certains de ces patients ont répondu et d'autres non», a déclaré Cantley.

Après les résultats dramatiques dans un sous-ensemble de patients atteints de cancer de la prostate avancés dans l'essai de phase II, Patnaik et ses collègues ont commencé à tester le médicament en laboratoire. Dans leur modèle de souris pour le cancer de la prostate, le cabozantinib a provoqué un retrait spectaculaire des tumeurs en quelques jours. Mais quand il a été testé sur les lignées cellulaires de cancer de la prostate dans une boîte de Petri, il avait relativement peu d'effet.

Pourquoi y a-t-il un effet in vivo dramatique avec peu d'effet ex vivo?  se sont demandés Patnaik et ses collègues.

"Le médicament n'a pas réellement tué les cellules tumorales", a déclaré Cantley. "Au lieu de cela, il a  induit à libérer des facteurs qui ont stimulé une attaque par le système immunitaire inné."

La clé était les neutrophiles attirant les signaux chimiques CXCL12 et HMGB1, libérés par les cellules tumorales. Lorsque les chercheurs ont bloqué la production de ces signaux, le médicament n'était plus efficace. Les neutrophiles - Patnaik se réfère à eux comme les «kamikazes du système immunitaire» - jamais engagés dans la bataille.

"Nos résultats pourraient également expliquer pourquoi certains patients de l'essai COMET-1 n'ont pas bénéficié du médicament", a déclaré Patnaik. "Cet essai de phase III comprenait des patients qui avaient déjà reçu une chimiothérapie agressive, qui peut avoir compromis leur système immunitaire."

Alors que d'autres recherches sont faites pour comprendre comment cabozantinib accomplit cet effet, «ce document soulève la possibilité qu'une nouvelle classe de médicaments pourraient être développés pour traiter les cancers en stimulant l'attaque par les neutrophiles», a déclaré Cantley.

Depuis plusieurs années, le développement le plus intéressant de la recherche sur le cancer a été l'émergence d'immunothérapies, en particulier les médicaments de blocage du point de contrôle tels que l'ipilimumab, le nivolumab et le pembrolizumab qui permettent au système immunitaire adaptatif, dans ce cas, les cellules T d'entrer et d'attaquer les tumeurs. Mais on a peu fait attention à induire le système immunitaire inné, tel que les neutrophiles, pour aller attaquer les tumeurs.

«Les neutrophiles peuvent être tout aussi puissants que les lymphocytes T», a déclaré Patnaik. Il espère maintenant les utiliser en combinaison.

«Sur la base de nos résultats montrant que le cabozantinib peut activer l'immunité innée et surmonter un micro-environnement de tumeur immunosuppressive, nous planifions des essais cliniques pour tester la combinaison de cabozantinib et d'immunothérapie de thérapie de checkpoint de cellule T dans des sous-types spécifiques de cancer du avancé et cancer de la .  "Notre but est d'améliorer à long terme des réponses anticancéreuses de l'activation à la fois innée et immunothérapie adaptative." a dit Patnaik.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16151
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: prostate   Jeu 9 Mar 2017 - 19:24

Scientists on the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have designed two new drug candidates to target prostate and triple negative breast cancers.

The new research, published recently as two separate studies in ACS Central Science and the Journal of the American Chemical Society, demonstrates that a new class of drugs called small molecule RNA inhibitors can successfully target and kill specific types of cancer.

"This is like designing a scalpel to precisely seek out and destroy a cancer -- but with a pill and without surgery," said TSRI Professor Matthew Disney, senior author of both studies.

A Tool to Fight Prostate Cancer

RNAs are molecules that translate our genetic code into proteins. RNA defects can lead to cancers, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), myotonic dystrophy and many other diseases.

In their ACS Central Science study, Disney and his colleagues used DNA sequencing to evaluate thousands of small molecules as potential drug candidates. The researchers were on the lookout for molecules that could bind precisely with defective RNAs -- like keys fitting in the right locks.

This strategy led them to a compound that targets the precursor molecule to an RNA called microRNA-18a. This RNA had caught the attention of scientists who found that mature microRNA-18a inhibits a protein that suppresses cancer. When microRNA-18a is overexpressed, cancers just keep growing.

Disney and his team tested their compound, called Targapremir-18a, and found that it could target microRNA-18a and trigger prostate cancer cell death.

"Since microRNA-18a is overexpressed in cancer cells and helps to maintain them as cancerous, application of Targapremir-18a to cancer cells causes them to kill themselves," Disney said.

Disney said the precise binding of Targapremir-18a to microRNA-18a means a cancer drug that follows this strategy would be likely to kill prostate cancer cells without causing the broader side effects seen with many other cancer therapies.

And there may be even bigger implications. "We could apply the strategy used in this study to quickly identify and design small molecule drugs for other RNA-associated diseases," explained study first author Sai Velagapudi, a research associate in the Disney lab.

Testing the Strategy in Breast Cancer

The same screening strategy led the researchers to a drug candidate to target triple negative breast cancer, as reported in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Triple negative breast cancer is especially hard to treat because it lacks the receptors, such as the estrogen receptor, targeted with other cancer drugs. The Disney lab aimed to get around this problem by instead targeting an RNA called microRNA-210, which is overexpressed in solid breast cancer tumors.

The researchers tested their drug compound, Targapremir-210, in mouse models of triple negative breast cancer. They found that the therapy significantly slowed down tumor growth. In fact, a single dose decreased tumor size by 60 percent over a three-week period. The researchers analyzed these smaller tumors and discovered that they also expressed less microRNA-210 compared with untreated tumors.

Targapremir-210 appears to work by reversing a circuit that tells cells to "survive at all costs" and become cancerous. With microRNA-210 in check, cells regain their normal function and cancer cannot grow.

"We believe Targapremir-210 can provide a potentially more precise, targeted therapy that would not harm healthy cells," said study first author TSRI Graduate Student Matthew G. Costales.

Next, the researchers plan to further develop their molecule-screening strategy into a platform to test molecules against any form of RNA defect-related disease.

---

Les scientifiques du campus de l'Institut de recherche Scripps de la Floride (TSRI) ont conçu deux nouveaux médicaments candidats pour cibler le cancer de la et le cancer du triple négatif.

La nouvelle recherche, publiée récemment comme deux études distinctes dans ACS Central Science et le Journal de l'American Chemical Society, démontre qu'une nouvelle classe de médicaments appelés inhibiteurs d'ARN à petites molécules peuvent cibler avec succès et tuer types spécifiques de cancer.

«C'est comme concevoir un scalpel pour chercher précisément et détruire un cancer - mais avec une pilule et sans chirurgie», a déclaré TSRI professeur Matthew Disney, auteur principal des deux études.

Un outil pour lutter contre le cancer de la

Les ARN sont des molécules qui traduisent notre code génétique en protéines. Les défauts d'ARN peuvent conduire à des cancers, la sclérose latérale amyotrophique (SLA), la dystrophie myotonique et de nombreuses autres maladies.

Dans leur étude ACS Central Science, Disney et ses collègues ont utilisé le séquençage de l'ADN pour évaluer des milliers de petites molécules comme candidats potentiels à servir de médicaments. Les chercheurs étaient à l'affût des molécules qui pourraient se lier précisément avec des ARN défectueux - comme les clés de montage s'ajuste dans des verrous.

Cette stratégie les a conduits à un composé qui cible la molécule précurseur d'un ARN appelé microARN-18a. Cet ARN a attiré l'attention des scientifiques qui ont découvert que le microARN mature 18a inhibe une protéine qui supprime le cancer. Lorsque le microARN-18a est surexprimé, les cancers continuent de croître.

Disney et son équipe ont testé leur composé, appelé Targapremir-18a, et ont trouvé qu'il pourrait cibler le microRNA-18a et déclencher la mort de cellules de cancer de prostate.

«Puisque le microARN-18a est surexprimé dans les cellules cancéreuses et contribue à les maintenir cancéreuses, l'application de Targapremir-18a aux cellules cancéreuses les amène à se tuer», a déclaré Disney.

Disney a déclaré que la fixation précise de Targapremir-18a à microRNA-18a signifie un médicament contre le cancer qui suit cette stratégie serait susceptible de tuer les cellules de cancer de la prostate sans causer les effets secondaires plus larges observés avec de nombreuses autres thérapies contre le cancer.

Et il peut y avoir des implications encore plus importantes. «Nous pourrions appliquer la stratégie utilisée dans cette étude pour identifier et concevoir rapidement des molécules de petites molécules pour d'autres maladies associées à l'ARN», a expliqué l'auteur de l'étude premier Sai Velagapudi, un associé de recherche dans le laboratoire de Disney.


_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16151
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: prostate   Mar 21 Fév 2017 - 19:34

Advanced prostate cancer and high blood cholesterol have long been known to be connected, but it has been a chicken-or-egg problem.

Now a team led by researchers at the Duke Cancer Institute have identified a cellular process that cancer cells hijack to hoard cholesterol and fuel their growth. Identifying this process could inform the development of better ways to control cholesterol accumulation in tumors, potentially leading to improved survival for prostate cancer patients.

The findings are published online this month in the journal Cancer Research.

"Prostate cancer cells, as well as some other solid tumors, have been shown to contain higher cholesterol levels than normal cells," said senior author Donald McDonnell, Ph.D., chairman of the Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology at Duke. "All cells need cholesterol to grow, and too much of it can stimulate uncontrolled growth.

"Prostate cancer cells somehow bypass the cellular control switch that regulates the levels of cholesterol allowing them to accumulate this fat," McDonnell said. "This process has not been well understood. In this study, we show how prostate cancer cells accomplish this."

McDonnell and colleagues began by identifying genes involved in cholesterol regulation in prostate tumors. They homed in on a specific gene, CYP27A1, which is a key component of the machinery that governs the level of cholesterol within cells.

In patients with prostate cancer, the expression of the CYP27A1 gene in tumors is significantly lower, and this is especially true for men with aggressive cancers compared to the tumors in men with more benign disease. Downregulation of this gene basically shuts off the sensor that cells use to gauge when they have taken up enough cholesterol. This in turn allows accumulation of this fat in tumor cells. Access to more cholesterol gives prostate cancer cells a selective growth advantage.

"It remains to be determined how this regulatory activity can be restored and/or whether it's possible to mitigate the effects of the increased cholesterol uptake that result from the loss of CYP27A1 expression," McDonnell said.

He said statin use alone might help, but perhaps not enough, since tumors could simply rev up the regulation of the cholesterol manufacturing process in tumors to compensate.

McDonnell said is lab is continuing the research, including finding ways to induce cells to eject cholesterol, reverse the inhibition of CYP27A1 activity, or introduce compounds that interfere with cholesterol-production in the tumor.

---

Le cancer avancé de la prostate et le taux élevé de cholestérol sanguin ont longtemps été connus pour être liés, mais il a été longtemps le problème de la poule ou l'œuf.

Maintenant, une équipe dirigée par des chercheurs du Duke Cancer Institute ont identifié un processus cellulaire que les cellules cancéreuses détournent pour amener le cholestérol et alimenter leur croissance. L'identification de ce processus pourrait informer le développement de meilleures façons de contrôler l'accumulation de cholestérol dans les tumeurs, ce qui pourrait conduire à une meilleure survie pour les patients atteints de cancer de la prostate.

Les résultats sont publiés en ligne ce mois dans la revue Cancer Research.

«Les cellules cancéreuses de la prostate, ainsi que d'autres tumeurs solides, se sont avérées contenir des taux de cholestérol plus élevés que les cellules normales», a déclaré l'auteur principal Donald McDonnell, Ph.D., président du département de Pharmacologie et Cancer Biology chez Duke. «Toutes les cellules ont besoin de cholestérol pour pousser, mais trop de cholestérol peut stimuler la croissance incontrôlée.

«Les cellules cancéreuses de la prostate contournent d'une manière ou d'une autre le commutateur de commande cellulaire qui régule les niveaux de cholestérol leur permettant d'accumuler cette graisse», a dit McDonnell. "Ce processus n'a pas été bien compris. Dans cette étude, nous montrons comment les cellules de cancer de la prostate accomplissent cela."

McDonnell et ses collègues ont commencé par identifier les gènes impliqués dans la régulation du cholestérol dans les tumeurs de la prostate. Ils ont trouvé un gène spécifique, CYP27A1, qui est une composante clé de la machine qui régit le niveau de cholestérol dans les cellules.

Chez les patients atteints de cancer de la prostate, l'expression du gène CYP27A1 dans les tumeurs est significativement plus faible, ce qui est particulièrement vrai chez les hommes atteints de cancers agressifs par rapport aux tumeurs chez les hommes présentant une maladie plus bénigne. La downregulation de ce gène, essentiellement ferme le capteur que les cellules utilisent pour mesurer quand ils ont pris assez de cholestérol. Ceci permet à son tour l'accumulation de cette graisse dans les cellules tumorales. L'accès à plus de cholestérol donne aux cellules de cancer de la prostate un avantage de croissance sélectif.

"Il reste à déterminer comment cette activité de régulation peut être restaurée et / ou s'il est possible d'atténuer les effets de l'augmentation de la consommation de cholestérol qui résultent de la perte de l'expression de CYP27A1", a déclaré McDonnell.

Il a dit que l'utilisation de la statine seule pourrait aider, mais peut-être pas assez, puisque les tumeurs pourraient simplement augmenter la régulation du processus de fabrication du cholestérol dans les tumeurs pour compenser.

McDonnell a déclaré qque le laboratoire poursuit la recherche, y compris la recherche de moyens d'induire des cellules à éjecter le cholestérol, inverser l'inhibition de l'activité CYP27A1, ou d'introduire des composés qui interfèrent avec la production de cholestérol dans la tumeur.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16151
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: prostate   Mar 14 Fév 2017 - 17:55

Analysis of free-floating cancer DNA from blood samples has yielded leads for new prostate cancer treatment targets. Using a commercially available “liquid biopsy” test in patients with advanced prostate cancer, researchers found a number of genetic changes in cell-free, circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in the patient’s bloodstream. The study will be presented by Sonpavde et al at the upcoming 2017 Genitourinary Cancers Symposium in Orlando, Florida (Abstract 149).

Cell-free ctDNA provides comprehensive information about all the different genetic changes in the tumor. Treatments can sometimes be tailored to the genetic changes in a tumor, but these changes evolve over time. The cell-free ctDNA tests can be used to track new genetic changes, and this information can be used to stop treatment to which resistance is emerging and to switch the patient to another treatment.

Study Details

In the study, researchers found genetic changes linked to poor outcomes, as well as changes that appear to arise as tumors become resistant to therapy. The changes in ctDNA found by the blood tests were similar to those previously reported in analyses of tumor tissue specimens, suggesting that ctDNA testing may be a viable alternative to tissue biopsy.

“This circulating tumor DNA test is now a valuable research tool to discover new molecular targets,” said lead study author Guru Sonpavde, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine at the University of Alabama. “Eventually, it may also serve as a noninvasive alternative to the traditional tumor biopsy in cases where tissue biopsy is not safe or feasible. However, we’ll need a controlled, prospective clinical trial to confirm that selecting treatment based on the molecular information from this blood test improves patient outcomes.”

The researchers analyzed cell-free ctDNA from blood samples of 514 patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. The blood test (Guardant360), which requires only two teaspoons of patient blood, examined changes in 70 cancer-related genes. The association between DNA changes and clinical outcomes was explored in 163 patients. In addition, the researchers explored how genomic changes evolved over time in 64 patients who underwent serial blood tests.

Key Findings

Nearly all patients (94%) had at least one change detected in their ctDNA. A higher overall number of genetic changes, including changes in the androgen receptor (AR) gene, were associated with poorer treatment outcomes, such as a tendency toward shorter survival (although the difference in survival was not statistically significant).

The genes that were most often mutated included TP53 (36%); AR (22%); APC (10%); NF1 (9%); EGFR, CTNNB1, and ARID1A (6% each); and BRCA1, BRCA2, and PIK3CA (5% each). The most common genes with increased copy numbers were AR (30%), MYC (20%), and BRAF (18%). Increased cancer gene copy number can lead to overabundance of proteins that drive cancer growth. Currently, there are no approved treatments for prostate cancer that target these specific genetic mutations, although several are being tested in clinical trials.

In the group of patients who underwent periodic blood tests, new changes in AR gene were particularly common. According to the researchers, this finding suggests that developing treatments that target AR mutations may hold promise.

“As we work to tailor treatment to the molecular changes driving the growth of cancer in each patient, these blood tests appear very promising, especially for patients who are unable to undergo a tumor biopsy,” said ASCO Expert Sumanta Pal, MD, of the results.

This study was unfunded; deidentified data were provided by Guardant Health.

---

L'analyse de l'ADN du cancer flottant libre à partir d'échantillons de sang a donné des pistes pour de nouvelles cibles de traitement du cancer de la prostate. En utilisant un test de «biopsie liquide» disponible dans le commerce chez les patients atteints d'un cancer de la prostate avancé, les chercheurs ont trouvé un certain nombre de changements génétiques dans la cellule-libre, circulant ADN de tumeur (ctDNA) dans le sang du patient. L'étude sera présentée par Sonpavde et al au prochain Symposium sur les cancers génitaux de 2017 à Orlando, en Floride (Résumé 149).

Les ctDNA fournissent des informations complètes sur tous les différents changements génétiques dans la tumeur. Les traitements peuvent parfois être adaptés aux changements génétiques dans une tumeur, mais ces changements évoluent avec le temps. Les tests d'ADNc peuvent être utilisés pour suivre de nouveaux changements génétiques, et cette information peut être utilisée pour arrêter le traitement auquel une résistance est en train d'émerger et pour passer le patient à un autre traitement.

Détails de l'étude

Dans l'étude, les chercheurs ont trouvé des changements génétiques liés à des résultats médiocres, ainsi que des changements qui semblent se produire lorsque les tumeurs deviennent résistantes à la thérapie. Les changements dans l'ADNc trouvé par les tests sanguins étaient semblables à ceux précédemment rapportés dans les analyses d'échantillons de tissus tumoraux, ce qui suggère que le test ADNc peut être une alternative viable à la biopsie tissulaire.

«Ce test d'ADN de tumeur circulant est maintenant un outil de recherche précieux pour découvrir de nouvelles cibles moléculaires», a déclaré l'auteur principal de l'étude Guru Sonpavde, MD, professeur agrégé de médecine à l'Université de l'Alabama. "Eventuellement, il peut également servir comme une alternative non invasive à la biopsie tumorale traditionnelle dans les cas où la biopsie tissulaire n'est pas sûre ou faisable. Cependant, nous aurons besoin d'un essai clinique contrôlé, prospectif pour confirmer que la sélection du traitement basé sur les informations moléculaires de cette analyse sanguine améliore les résultats des patients.

Les chercheurs ont analysé le ctDNA sans cellules à partir d'échantillons de sang de 514 patients atteints de cancer de la prostate résistant à la castration métastatique. L'analyse sanguine (Guardant360), qui exige seulement deux cuillères à café de sang patient, a examiné les changements dans 70 gènes liés au cancer. L'association entre les modifications de l'ADN et les résultats cliniques a été explorée chez 163 patients. En outre, les chercheurs ont exploré la façon dont les changements génomiques ont évolué au fil du temps chez 64 patients qui ont subi des analyses sanguines en série.

Principales conclusions

Presque tous les patients (94%) avaient au moins un changement détecté dans leur ctDNA. Un nombre global plus élevé de modifications génétiques, y compris des modifications du gène des récepteurs androgènes (AR), a été associé à des résultats médiocres du traitement, comme une tendance à une survie plus courte (bien que la différence de survie n'ait pas été statistiquement significative).

Les gènes qui ont été le plus souvent mutés comprennent TP53 (36%); AR (22%); APC (10%); NF1 (9%); EGFR, CTNNB1 et ARID1A (6% chacun); Et BRCA1, BRCA2 et PIK3CA (5% chacun). Les gènes les plus courants avec un nombre de copies augmenté étaient AR (30%), MYC (20%) et BRAF (18%). Augmentation du nombre de copies du gène du cancer peut conduire à une surabondance de protéines qui stimulent la croissance du cancer. Actuellement, il n'existe pas de traitements approuvés pour le cancer de la prostate ciblant ces mutations génétiques spécifiques, bien que plusieurs soient testés dans des essais cliniques.

Dans le groupe de patients qui ont subi des tests sanguins périodiques, de nouveaux changements dans le gène AR étaient particulièrement fréquents. Selon les chercheurs, cette découverte suggère que le développement de traitements ciblant les mutations AR peut contenir une promesse.

"Comme nous travaillons à adapter le traitement aux changements moléculaires entraînant la croissance du cancer chez chaque patient, ces tests sanguins semblent très prometteurs, en particulier pour les patients qui sont incapables de subir une biopsie tumorale", a déclaré ASCO expert Sumanta Pal, MD, de la résultats.


_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16151
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: prostate   Sam 4 Fév 2017 - 15:50

Adding hormonal therapy to radiation treatment can significantly improve the average long-term survival of men with prostate cancer who have had their prostate gland removed, according to a new Cedars-Sinai study published in the Feb. 2 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. The regimen also can reduce the frequency of spread of the cancer, the study found.

Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in U.S. men. An estimated 161,300 new cases will be diagnosed and nearly 27,000 deaths are expected in 2017, according to the American Cancer Society.

"Our study indicates that hormonal treatments should be incorporated into the management of men who need radiation therapy after surgery for prostate cancer," said Howard Sandler, MD, chair of the Department of Radiation Oncology the Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute at Cedars-Sinai and senior author of the multicenter study.

More than 30 percent of prostate cancer patients face the return of disease one to four years after removal of the prostate gland, Sandler said.

When a patient experiences a recurrence, physicians typically prescribe radiation therapy. "Our results show that adding hormone therapy could add years to patients' lives," Sandler said.

The study, which included researchers at 17 medical institutions, tracked 761 prostate cancer patients in the U.S. and Canada during a 12-year period after they had participated in a randomized clinical trial of the combined treatment, from 1998 to 2003.

The study's findings include:

• After 12 years, the incidence of deaths from prostate cancer was 5.4 percent for patients who underwent radiation therapy plus hormone treatment, compared with 13.4 percent for those who had only radiation therapy.

• The incidence of prostate cancer metastasis was 14.5 percent for patients who received both treatments, compared with 23 percent for those who had only radiation therapy.

• Side effects were low and similar in both groups of patients. The hormonal treatment used in the study was designed to suppress male hormones, known as androgens, which can stimulate growth of prostate cancer cells. Randomized study participants took the drug daily for two years. The specific drug they received, bicalutamide, has since been supplanted by another drug, GnRH agonists, in clinical practice, Sandler said. But because both drugs suppress hormone production, he said the study presents "proof of principle" that combining hormonal therapy with radiation treatment significantly reduces the rate of metastases and death in the patient group studied.

"This important research addressed a significant question in the care of patients with prostate cancer, showing the continued advancement in extending a good quality of life to those patients," said Steven Piantadosi, MD, PhD, director of the Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute. "Dr. Sandler's leadership demonstrates how Cedars-Sinai is contributing significantly to improving the outcomes of patients with cancer."

Sandler said that future studies will explore whether all or only some prostate cancer patients need hormone therapy, the duration of treatment and the role of more powerful hormone therapies.

---

L'ajout d'une thérapie hormonale au traitement par radiothérapie peut améliorer de façon significative la survie à long terme moyenne des hommes atteints d'un cancer de la prostate dont la glande de la prostate a été retirée, selon une nouvelle étude Cedars-Sinai publiée dans le numéro du 2 février du New England Journal of Medicine . Le régime peut également réduire la fréquence de la propagation du cancer, l'étude a révélé.

Le cancer de la prostate est le deuxième cancer le plus fréquent chez les hommes américains. On estime que 161 300 nouveaux cas seront diagnostiqués et près de 27 000 décès sont attendus en 2017, selon l'American Cancer Society.

"Notre étude indique que les traitements hormonaux doivent être intégrés dans la gestion des hommes qui ont besoin de radiothérapie après la chirurgie pour le cancer de la prostate", a déclaré Howard Sandler, MD, président du Département de radiothérapie oncologie Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute à Cedars-Sinai et Auteur principal de l'étude multicentrique.

Plus de 30 pour cent des patients atteints de cancer de la prostate font face au retour de la maladie de un à quatre ans après l'enlèvement de la prostate, Sandler dit.

Quand un patient éprouve une récidive, les médecins prescrivent habituellement la radiothérapie. «Nos résultats montrent que l'ajout de la thérapie hormonale pourrait ajouter des années à la vie des patients», a déclaré Sandler.

L'étude, qui comprenait des chercheurs de 17 établissements médicaux, a suivi 761 patients atteints de cancer de la prostate aux États-Unis et au Canada pendant une période de 12 ans après avoir participé à un essai clinique randomisé du traitement combiné, de 1998 à 2003.

Les résultats de l'étude comprennent:

• Après 12 ans, l'incidence des décès par cancer de la prostate était de 5,4 pour cent pour les patients qui ont subi une radiothérapie plus traitement hormonal, comparativement à 13,4 pour cent pour ceux qui avaient seulement la radiothérapie.

• L'incidence des métastases du cancer de la prostate était de 14,5 pour cent pour les patients qui ont reçu les deux traitements, comparativement à 23 pour cent pour ceux qui avaient seulement la radiothérapie.

• Les effets secondaires étaient faibles et semblables dans les deux groupes de patients. Le traitement hormonal utilisé dans l'étude a été conçu pour supprimer les hormones mâles, connus sous le nom d'androgènes, qui peuvent stimuler la croissance des cellules de cancer de la prostate. Les participants à l'étude randomisée ont pris le médicament tous les jours pendant deux ans. Le médicament spécifique qu'ils ont reçu, le bicalutamide, a depuis été supplanté par un autre médicament, agonistes de GnRH, dans la pratique clinique, a dit Sandler. Mais parce que les deux médicaments suppriment la production d'hormones, il a dit que l'étude présente la «preuve de principe» que la combinaison de la thérapie hormonale avec un traitement par rayonnement réduit considérablement le taux de métastases et la mort dans le groupe de patients étudiés.

«Cette importante recherche a abordé une question importante dans le soin des patients atteints de cancer de la prostate, montrant la poursuite de l'avancement dans l'extension d'une bonne qualité de vie à ces patients», a déclaré Steven Piantadosi, MD, PhD, directeur de la Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute. "Le leadership de M. Sandler démontre comment Cedars-Sinai contribue de manière significative à l'amélioration des résultats des patients atteints de cancer."

Sandler a déclaré que les futures études exploreront si tous ou seulement certains patients atteints de cancer de la prostate ont besoin d'une thérapie hormonale, de la durée du traitement et du rôle des traitements hormonaux plus puissants.


Voir aussi : http://espoirs.forumactif.com/t820-le-gene-pten Dans le cancer de la prostate, la perte d'Importin-11 prédisait une rechute de la maladie et des métastases chez les patients qui avaient subi une suppression de leur prostate.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16151
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: prostate   Jeu 2 Fév 2017 - 11:35

Les hommes dont le cancer de la prostate réapparaît après une ablation de la glande accroissent nettement leurs chances de survie s'ils sont traités, en plus d'une radiothérapie standard, avec une hormonothérapie pour bloquer les hormones mâles, selon un essai clinique.

L'étude a été menée avec 761 hommes atteints d'un cancer de la prostate qui ont été suivis dans 17 centres hospitaliers aux États-Unis et au Canada pendant douze ans.

Les résultats, qui sont publiés mercredi dans le New England Journal of Medicine, devraient selon les cancérologues aider à clarifier le traitement de ces malades qui connaissent une récurrence de leur cancer.

Après une prostatectomie, plus de 30% des hommes ont une réapparition du cancer sous forme de métastases.

L'essai clinique financé par l'Institut national du cancer (NCI) a montré que parmi les hommes traités avec une radiothérapie et une hormonothérapie, l'incidence de la mortalité par ce cancer était 5,4% contre 13,4% chez ceux n'ayant eu qu'une radiothérapie.

La fréquence des métastases du cancer de la prostate était de 14,5% chez les malades ayant reçu une radiothérapie combinée à un traitement pour neutraliser les hormones mâles comparativement à 23% dans le groupe de radiothérapie seule.

Le cancer de la prostate est le second cancer le plus fréquent chez les hommes aux États-Unis. Quelque 161 300 nouveaux cas y sont diagnostiqués chaque année et le cancer devrait être la cause de 27 000 décès en 2017, selon l'American Cancer Society.

«Notre étude clinique indique que des traitements hormonaux devraient être ajoutés aux soins des hommes atteints d'un cancer de la prostate qui ont besoin d'une radiothérapie après une prostatectomie», indique le Dr Howard Sandler, chef du service de radiologie cancéreuse à l'Institut du cancer du centre médical Cedars-Sinai, qui a mené cet essai clinique.

«Nos résultats montrent que le fait de faire également de l'hormonothérapie peut ajouter des années de vie pour les malades», souligne-t-il.

Les futures études chercheront à déterminer si tous les patients atteints d'un cancer de la prostate bénéficient d'une hormonothérapie ainsi que la durée optimale de ce traitement. Elles examineront également le rôle d'hormonothérapies plus puissantes.

Ces thérapies peuvent avoir des effets secondaires néfastes comme une diminution de la libido, des dysfonctionnements érectiles, un gain de poids et une fonte musculaire.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16151
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: prostate   Dim 29 Jan 2017 - 13:34

University of Adelaide researchers have uncovered a new pathway which regulates the spread of prostate cancer around the body.

Published in the journal Cancer Research, the discovery has potential to lead to the development of a blood test that could predict whether cancer will spread from the prostate tumour to other parts of the body. The research also reveals potential new targets for drugs that may inhibit the spread of cancer.

"Prostate cancers only kill men after they have spread or 'metastasised' from the prostate," says project leader Dr Luke Selth, Senior Research Fellow at the University of Adelaide's Dame Roma Mitchell Cancer Research Laboratories and a member of the Freemasons Foundation Centre for Men's Health.

"The identification of markers that accurately predict, at an early stage, prostate tumours that are likely to metastasise could guide the urgency and aggressiveness of treatment -- and this could save lives."

The international research team -- led by the University of Adelaide and including members from the University of Michigan, Vancouver Prostate Centre, the Mayo Clinic and Johns Hopkins University -- showed that a specific microRNA (a type of molecule involved in regulating the level and activity of genes) called miR-194 promotes cancer metastasis by inhibiting a key protein called SOCS2. SOCS2 can suppress the spread of cancer cells.

"In previous work, we had found that a high level of miR-194 in a patient's blood was associated with rapid relapse of prostate cancer following surgical removal of the tumour," says Dr Selth. "This new work explains why miR-194 is associated with a poor outcome, and in the process reveals a completely novel pathway regulating prostate cancer metastasis.

"Importantly, measuring miR-194 in a patient's blood at the time of diagnosis could become a test for the likelihood of metastasis. Patients with high levels of miR-194 in their blood could receive more aggressive treatment to reduce the chance of the cancer spreading to other parts of the body." Dr Selth's team is currently testing this idea using larger patient groups to validate their findings.

Dr Selth says miR-194 also represents a potential therapeutic target. "There are currently no drugs that effectively inhibit the spread of prostate cancer," he says. "We propose that inhibiting miR-194 could reduce rates of metastasis in patients with aggressive disease, but the development of a drug to achieve this goal is still a long way off."

---

À l'Université d'Adelaide, les chercheurs ont découvert une nouvelle voie qui régule la propagation du cancer de la prostate autour du corps.

Publié dans la revue Cancer Research, la découverte a le potentiel de conduire au développement d'un test sanguin qui pourrait prédire si le cancer se propage de la tumeur de la prostate à d'autres parties du corps. La recherche révèle également de nouvelles cibles potentielles pour les médicaments qui peuvent inhiber la propagation du cancer.

«Les cancers de la prostate tuent seulement les hommes après qu'ils se sont propagés ou« métastasés »de la prostate», explique le Dr Luke Selth, chercheur principal du Laboratoire de recherche sur le cancer Dame Roma Mitchell de l'Université d'Adélaïde et membre du Freemasons Foundation Center for Men Santé.

"L'identification de marqueurs qui prédisent avec précision, à un stade précoce, les tumeurs de la prostate qui sont susceptibles de métastases pourrait guider l'urgence et l'agressivité du traitement - et cela pourrait sauver des vies."

L'équipe de recherche internationale, dirigée par l'Université d'Adelaide et comprenant des membres de l'Université du Michigan, du Centre de la Prostate de Vancouver, de la Mayo Clinic et de l'Université Johns Hopkins, a montré qu'un microARN spécifique (un type de molécule impliqué dans la régulation du niveau et Activité des gènes) appelée miR-194 favorise la métastase du cancer en inhibant une protéine clé appelée SOCS2. SOCS2 peut supprimer la propagation des cellules cancéreuses.

"Dans des travaux antérieurs, nous avons constaté qu'un niveau élevé de miR-194 dans le sang d'un patient était associé à une rechute rapide de cancer de la prostate après l'ablation chirurgicale de la tumeur", dit le Dr Selth. "Ce nouveau travail explique pourquoi miR-194 est associée à un mauvais résultat, et dans le processus révèle une toute nouvelle voie de régulation des métastases du cancer de la prostate.

Il est important de noter que mesurer le miR-194 dans le sang d'un patient au moment du diagnostic pourrait devenir un test de risque de métastase. Les patients présentant des taux élevés de miR-194 dans leur sang pourraient recevoir un traitement plus agressif pour réduire le risque de propagation du cancer À d'autres parties du corps. " L'équipe du Dr Selth teste actuellement cette idée en utilisant des groupes de patients plus importants pour valider leurs résultats.

Dr Selth dit que miR-194 représente également une cible potentielle thérapeutique. «Il n'existe actuellement aucun médicament qui inhibe efficacement la propagation du cancer de la prostate», dit-il. «Nous proposons que l'inhibition de miR-194 pourrait réduire les taux de métastases chez les patients atteints de maladie agressive, mais le développement d'un médicament pour atteindre cet objectif est encore loin.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16151
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: prostate   Mar 24 Jan 2017 - 23:54

Metastasis, or spread of a tumor from the site of origin to additional organs, causes the vast majority of cancer-related deaths, but our understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind metastasis remains limited. A research team led by Dean Tang, PhD, Chair of the Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics at Roswell Park Cancer Institute, examined the multistep process that leads to metastasis and their work, which illuminates the role of prostate cancer stem cells that promote tumor growth and metastasis, has been published online ahead of print in the journal Nature Communications.

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small genetic molecules that play an essential role in regulating many aspects of cancer cell behavior. When they performed a screening of the miRNA library, Dr. Tang and colleagues found that, surprisingly, only a few miRNAs are commonly deficient or not expressed in prostate cancer stem cells.

The team found that one specific miRNA molecule, miR-141, not only inhibited tumor growth but significantly retarded cancer metastasis in several preclinical prostate cancer models. Taken together with the findings from previous studies reporting the molecule's powerful tumor-suppression capability, the current study demonstrates the potential of miR-141 as an inhibitor of prostate cancer cell invasion and metastasis, and suggests that synthetic miR-141 may be developed as a "replacement" therapeutic to target prostate cancer metastasis.

"This study represents the most comprehensive investigation to date of the role of the miR-141 molecule in regulating prostate cancer stem cells and their role in metastasis," says Dr. Tang, senior author of the new study. "These preliminary findings suggest that miR-141 may suppress the metastatic cascade at an early stage and that the overexpression of miR-141 in prostate cancer cells results in less metastasis. Our observations provide a rationale for developing these targeted miRNA molecules into novel antitumor and antimetastasis replacement therapies."

---

La métastase, ou la propagation d'une tumeur du site d'origine à d'autres organes, cause la grande majorité des décès liés au cancer, mais notre compréhension des mécanismes moléculaires derrière la métastase demeure limitée. Une équipe de recherche dirigée par Dean Tang, Ph.D., présidente du département de pharmacologie et de thérapeutique au Roswell Park Cancer Institute, a examiné le processus à plusieurs étapes qui mène à la métastase et de leur travail, qui éclaire le rôle des cellules souches du cancer de la prostate qui favorisent la croissance tumorale et les métastasea, et l'étude a été publiée en ligne avant l'impression dans la revue Nature Communications.

Les MicroRNAs (miRNAs) sont de petites molécules génétiques qui jouent un rôle essentiel dans la régulation de nombreux aspects du comportement des cellules cancéreuses. Lorsqu'ils ont effectué un dépistage de la banque de miARN, le Dr Tang et ses collègues ont constaté que, de façon surprenante, seuls quelques miARN sont communément déficients ou non exprimés dans les cellules souches du cancer de la prostate.

L'équipe a découvert qu'une molécule d'miARN spécifique, miR-141, inhibait non seulement la croissance tumorale, mais retardait de façon significative les métastases cancéreuses dans plusieurs modèles précliniques de cancer de la prostate. Prenant en compte les résultats d'études antérieures faisant état de la puissante capacité de suppression de tumeurs de la molécule, la présente étude démontre le potentiel du miR-141 comme inhibiteur de l'invasion et de la métastase des cellules de cancer de la prostate et suggère que le miR-141 synthétique peut être développé en tant que «Remplaçant» thérapeutique pour cibler les métastases du cancer de la prostate.

"Cette étude représente l'enquête la plus complète à ce jour du rôle de la molécule miR-141 dans la régulation des cellules souches du cancer de la prostate et de leur rôle dans les métastases", explique le Dr Tang, auteur principal de la nouvelle étude. "Ces résultats préliminaires suggèrent que miR-141 peut supprimer la cascade métastatique à un stade précoce et que la surexpression de miR-141 dans les cellules cancéreuses de la prostate se traduit par moins de métastases. Nos observations fournissent une raison pour le développement de ces molécules ciblées miARN dans les nouvelles thérapies antitumorales et des thérapies de remplacement de l'antimétastase. "

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16151
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: prostate   Sam 24 Sep 2016 - 9:37

While searching for a non-invasive way to detect prostate cancer cells circulating in blood, Duke Cancer Institute researchers have identified some blood markers associated with tumor resistance to two common hormone therapies.

In a study published online this month in the journal Clinical Cancer Research, the Duke-led team reported that they isolated multiple key gene alterations in the circulating prostate tumor cells of patients who had developed resistance to abiraterone or enzalutamide.

Enzalutamide is a drug that blocks the male androgen receptor, and abiraterone is a drug that lowers testosterone levels. Both drugs are approved to treat hormone-resistant prostate cancer, but the tumors typically develop resistance within a few years.

The study, focusing on a small number of patients and using sophisticated blood analysis technology, demonstrated that circulating tumor cells detected in blood have the potential to reveal important genetic information that could guide treatments selection in the future, and suggest targets for new therapies.

"We have developed a method that allows us to examine the whole genome of rare circulating cancer cells in the blood, which is unique in each patient, and which can change over time during treatment," said senior author Andrew Armstrong, M.D., a medical oncologist and co-director of Genitourinary Clinical-Translational Research at the Duke Cancer Institute (DCI).

"Among the genomic changes in the patients' individual cancers, we were able to find key similarities between the cancer cells of men who have hormone-resistant prostate cancer," Armstrong said. "Our goal is to develop a 'liquid biopsy' that would be non-invasive, yet provide information that could guide clinical decisions."

Armstrong and colleagues from the DCI and the Duke Molecular Physiology Institute used a process called array-based comparative genomic hybridization to analyze the genome of the circulating tumor cells of 16 men with advanced, treatment-resistant prostate cancer. The technique enabled them to determine which genes had extra copies and which regions were deleted.

Focusing both on genes that have previously been implicated in tumor progression, plus other genes important to cancer biology, the researchers found changes in multiple genetic pathways that appear to be in common among the men's circulating tumor cells.

"Our research provides evidence supporting the ability to measure gains and losses of large scale sections of the circulating tumor cells genome in men with prostate cancer," said co-author Simon Gregory, Ph.D., director of the Section of Genomics and Epigenetics in the Duke Molecular Physiology Institute. "We are now evaluating this method combined with higher resolution DNA mutational studies and measurements of RNA splice variants in CTCs to determine their clinical relevance to patients and treatment resistance."

Should these common alterations be similarly identified in larger studies, they could be used as biomarkers as part of a blood-based liquid biopsy to help determine what treatments would be most effective. The findings could also point to new targets for drug development.

One such large prospective clinical validation study is underway now at the Duke Cancer Institute, which is examining how the mutations develop in the context of enzalutamide or abiraterone therapy, and how the mutations relate to other key genetic events.

---

Alors qu'ils étaient à la recherche d'une manière  non invasive de détecter les cellules cancéreuses de la prostate circulant dans le sang, les chercheurs de l'Institut Duke Cancer ont identifié certains marqueurs sanguins associés à la résistance de la tumeur à deux traitements hormonaux communs.

Dans une étude publiée en ligne ce mois-ci dans la revue Clinical Cancer Research, l'équipe de Duke  a rapporté qu'ils ont isolé plusieurs altérations des gènes clés dans les cellules tumorales de la prostate circulants de patients qui avaient développé une résistance à l'abiratérone ou à l'enzalutamide.

L'enzalutamide est un médicament qui bloque le récepteur d'androgène mâle et l'abiratérone est un médicament qui fait baisser le taux de testostérone. Les deux médicaments sont approuvés pour traiter le cancer de la prostate hormono-résistant, mais les tumeurs développent généralement la résistance dans quelques années.

L'étude, en se concentrant sur un petit nombre de patients et en utilisant la technologie d'analyse de sang sophistiquée, a démontré que les cellules tumorales circulantes détectées dans le sang ont le potentiel de révéler des informations génétiques importantes qui pourraient guider le choix des traitements à l'avenir, et de proposer des cibles pour de nouvelles thérapies.

"Nous avons mis au point une méthode qui nous permet d'examiner l'ensemble du génome des rares cellules cancéreuses circulant dans le sang, ce qui est unique chez chaque patient, et qui peut changer au fil du temps au cours du traitement», a déclaré l'auteur principal Andrew Armstrong, MD, un médecin oncologue et co-directeur de la clinique génito-recherche translationnelle à l'Institut du cancer Duke (DCI).

"Parmi les changements génomiques dans les cancers individuels des patients, nous avons pu trouver des similitudes importantes entre les cellules cancéreuses des hommes qui ont cancer de la prostate hormono-résistant», a déclaré Armstrong. «Notre objectif est de développer une« biopsie liquide »qui serait non-invasive, mais fournir des informations qui pourraient guider les décisions cliniques."

Armstrong et ses collègues de l'ICD et l'Institut moléculaire Duke Physiologie ont utilisé un processus appelé hybridation génomique comparative pour analyser le génome des cellules tumorales circulantes de 16 hommes à un stade avancé du cancer de la prostate résistant au traitement. La technique leur a permis de déterminer quels gènes ont des copies supplémentaires et que les régions ont été supprimés.

Mise au point à la fois sur les gènes qui ont déjà été impliqués dans la progression tumorale, ainsi que d'autres gènes importants pour la biologie du cancer, les chercheurs ont constaté des changements dans de multiples voies génétiques qui semblent être en commun parmi les cellules circulantes tumorales des hommes.

«Notre recherche fournit des preuves à l'appui de la capacité de mesurer les gains et les pertes de sections à grande échelle de cellules tumorales circulantes génome chez les hommes atteints d'un cancer de la prostate", a déclaré le co-auteur Simon Gregory, Ph.D., directeur de la Section de la génomique et épigénétique dans le moléculaire Institut Duke Physiology. "Nous évaluons actuellement cette méthode combinée avec des études et des mesures de variantes d'épissage d'ARN dans CTCs mutationnels haute résolution ADN afin de déterminer leur pertinence clinique pour les patients et la résistance au traitement."

Si ces modifications communes sont identifiées de façon similaire dans des études plus importantes, ils pourraient être utilisés comme biomarqueurs dans le cadre d'un liquide à base de biopsie de sang pour aider à déterminer quels traitements seraient les plus efficaces. Les résultats pourraient également pointer vers de nouvelles cibles pour le développement de médicaments.

Une telle grande étude de validation clinique prospective est actuellement en cours à l'Institut du cancer Duke, qui examine comment les mutations se développent dans le cadre de thérapies de l'enzalutamide ou d'abiratérone, et la façon dont les mutations se rapportent à d'autres événements génétiques clés.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16151
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: prostate   Mar 16 Aoû 2016 - 17:18

Prostate cancer, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's... these three diseases are associated with proteins that share a common feature, namely disordered regions that have no apparent rigid three-dimensional structure. In spite of the potential of these regions as therapeutic targets, it was believed that drugs could not be directed to them. But now scientists at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) have rediscovered their utility as drug targets. Published in the journal ACS Chemical Biology, the results pave the way towards identifying new therapeutic targets for many diseases.

Xavier Salvatella, ICREA researcher and head of the Molecular Biophysics lab, studies the structure and function of the Androgen Receptor (AR), a protein involved in prostate cancer. Although a slow-growing cancer and with good prognosis (about 70% of patients are cured with surgery), there are many cases in which the cancer cells spread throughout the body. This stage of the disease is commonly addressed by preventing the activation of AR, thereby causing cancer cells to die. However, tumours adapt by becoming resistant to treatments, and currently there are no other treatment options.

"This protein is chameleonic," explains Salvatella. "Instead of being rigid, it's highly flexible and dynamic, and these properties allow it to take on many forms." The AR is a protein that carries out its activity in the cell nucleus, where it regulates gene expression. It has a structured region, which binds to DNA, and an intrinsically disordered region, that is to say without structure. "We know that the disordered region is crucial for the activity of this protein. However, because of the absence of its three-dimensional structure, it was ruled out as a drug target."

Through high-resolution molecular analysis, the researchers, including Eva de Mol, former "la Caixa" PhD student at IRB Barcelona and first author of the study, discovered that there is a certain degree of structure within the disordered region. "In its natural context, bound to DNA in the cell nucleus, it's possible that this protein is highly structured, even possibly resembling a conventional therapeutic target," says Salvatella.

Furthermore, the scientists have observed that an experimental drug against prostate cancer binds to this region. "It's an important finding because it opens up a whole series of possibilities to reconsider the discovery of drug targets that had previously been ruled out," says the researcher.

Salvatella is optimistic about the relevance of the findings. "These disordered proteins are crucial in the development of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, for example. What we need to do now is to apply this knowledge and begin a systematic search for drugs." The lab will begin drug screening within two years. "It'll be difficult to identify drugs that specifically target these regions, but I think it's achievable and worth the effort."

---

Cancer de la prostate, la maladie d'Alzheimer, la maladie de Parkinson ... ces trois maladies sont associées à des protéines qui partagent une caractéristique commune, à savoir les régions désordonnées qui ont pas de structure tridimensionnelle rigide apparente. Malgré le potentiel de ces régions en tant que cibles thérapeutiques, on croyait que les médicaments ne peuvaient pas être dirigées vers eux. Mais maintenant, les scientifiques de l'Institut de recherche en biomédecine (IRB Barcelona) ont retrouvé leur utilité comme cibles de médicaments. Publié dans la revue "ACS Chemical Biology" , les résultats ouvrent la voie vers l'identification de nouvelles cibles thérapeutiques pour de nombreuses maladies.

Xavier Salvatella, chercheur ICREA et responsable du laboratoire de biophysique moléculaire, il étudie la structure et la fonction du récepteur des androgènes (AR), une protéine impliquée dans le cancer de la prostate. Bien que ce soit un cancer à croissance lente avec un bon pronostic (environ 70% des patients sont guéris par la chirurgie), il existe de nombreux cas où les cellules cancéreuses se propagent dans tout le corps. A ce stade de la maladie est souvent résolu en empêchant l'activation AR, ce qui provoque la mort des cellules cancéreuses. Cependant, les tumeurs s'adaptent en devenant résistantes aux traitements, et actuellement il n'y a pas d'autres options de traitement.

"Cette protéine est caméléonique », explique Salvatella. "Au lieu d'être rigide, elle est très flexible et dynamique, et ces propriétés lui permettent de prendre de nombreuses formes." AR est une protéine qui exerce son activité dans le noyau cellulaire où il régule l'expression génique. Elle dispose d'une région structurée, qui se lie à l'ADN, et une région intrinsèque en désordre, qui est-à-dire sans structure. "On sait que la région désordonnée est cruciale pour l'activité de cette protéine. Cependant, en raison de l'absence de sa structure tridimensionnelle, elle a été écarté comme une cible de médicament".

Grâce à l'analyse moléculaire à haute résolution, les chercheurs, y compris Eva de Mol, ancienne étudiante de "la Caixa" au doctorat à l'IRB Barcelona et première auteure de l'étude, a découvert qu'il existe un certain degré de structure au sein de la région désordonnée. "Dans son contexte naturel, lié à l'ADN dans le noyau de la cellule, il est possible que cette protéine soit très structuré, même peut-être ressemblant à une cible thérapeutique conventionnelle», dit Salvatella.

En outre, les chercheurs ont observé qu'un médicament expérimental contre le cancer de la prostate, se lie à cette région. «C'est une découverte importante car elle ouvre toute une série de possibilités de reconsidérer la découverte de cibles médicamenteuses qui avaient déjà été écartées», dit le chercheur.

Salvatella est optimiste quant à la pertinence des résultats. "Ces protéines désordonnées sont cruciales dans le développement de la maladie d'Alzheimer et la maladie de Parkinson, par exemple. Ce que nous devons faire maintenant est d'appliquer cette connaissance et de commencer une recherche systématique de médicaments." Le laboratoire va commencer le dépistage des médicaments dans les deux ans. "Il sera difficile d'identifier des médicaments qui ciblent spécifiquement ces régions, mais je pense que c'est réalisable et que ça vaut la peine."

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16151
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: prostate   Lun 15 Aoû 2016 - 15:02

Prostate cancer researchers studying genetic variations have pinpointed 45 genes associated with disease development and progression.

Principal investigator Hansen He says the findings published online today in Nature Genetics show how these genes -- known as "noncoding RNA" -- function in activating the disease process. Dr. He, an epigeneticist, is a Scientist at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network. He is also Assistant Professor in the Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, and talks about his research at (https://youtu.be/SySA8jCBLIM).

"Our research looked at genetic variations associated with prostate cancer and found that about half of these variations may function through noncoding genes rather than the protein-coding genes. In other words, we have discovered that noncoding RNA has a very important function in driving prostate cancer development and disease progression."

Dr. He says: "In prostate cancer there are more than 100 known risk regions associated with the development and progression of the disease but for most of them we don't know how. In our work, we found that half those risk regions may function through noncoding genes."

Dr. He says that integrating this new knowledge about genetic variations and the function of noncoding RNA moves the science closer to developing a clinical biomarker to advance personalized cancer medicine for patients by being able to predict who will develop prostate cancer and whether or not it will be aggressive.

The research team collaborated with the Princess Margaret Genome Centre and delved further into the genetic variations associated with noncoding RNA PCAT1, which is already known to be highly expressed in prostate cancer patients, to zero in on how the noncoding genes function.

"Noncoding RNA has many functions and in this study we found that PCAT1 functions as a kind of glue to attract different protein complexes together and guide them to specific genomic location to activate their target gene expression that starts the disease process.

"We are going to expand this knowledge as we research the other 44 genes associated with genetic variations," says Dr. He.

"Cancer is very smart to take every possible way to survive and use every piece of our genome. If research only focuses on the two percent of the genome that is the protein- coding genes, we will have limited understanding of how the cancer can survive. We cannot achieve personalized cancer medicine without understanding the other 98 percent of our genome."

The other 98 percent -- what used to be called 'junk DNA' because it was outside the protein-coding genes with no known function -- is now providing a treasure trove to epigeneticists such as Dr. He.

"The major contribution of our work is to the link genetic variations outside of the gene to noncoding genes rather than protein-coding genes, which have been the traditional research focus."

---

Les chercheurs sur le cancer de la prostate qui étudient les variations génétiques ont identifié 45 gènes associés au développement de la maladie et de la progression.

Le chercheur principal Hansen He dit que les résultats publiés en ligne aujourd'hui dans Nature Genetics montrent comment ces gènes - connus sous le nom "ARN non codants" - fonctionnent dans l'activation du processus de la maladie. Le Dr He, un épigénéticien, est un scientifique au Centre du cancer Princess Margaret, Réseau universitaire de santé. Il est également professeur adjoint au département de biophysique médicale, Université de Toronto, et parle de ses recherches à (https://youtu.be/SySA8jCBLIM).

«Notre recherche a porté sur les variations génétiques associées au cancer de la prostate et a constaté que près de la moitié de ces variations peut fonctionner par le biais de gènes non codants plutôt que par les gènes codant pour des protéines. En d'autres termes, nous avons découvert que l'ARN non codantes a une fonction très importante dans la prostate pour la conduite le développement du cancer et de la progression de la maladie ».

Dr. He dit: ". Dans le cancer de la prostate, il y a plus de 100 régions de risque connus associés au développement et à la progression de la maladie, mais pour la plupart d'entre elles nous ne savons pas comment le développement se fait. Dans notre travail, nous avons constaté que la moitié de ces régions à risque peut fonctionner par les gènes non codants ".

Dr. He dit que l'intégration de ces nouvelles connaissances sur les variations génétiques et la fonction de l'ARN non codantes déplace la science plus proche de développer un biomarqueur clinique pour faire avancer la médecine personnalisée en cancérologie pour les patients en étant en mesure de prédire qui développera un cancer de la prostate et si oui ou non il sera être agressif.

L'équipe de recherche a collaboré avec le Princess Margaret Centre de génomique et fouillé plus loin dans les variations génétiques associées à l'ARN non codantes PCAT1, qui est déjà connu pour être fortement exprimée chez les patients atteints de cancer de la , pour faire le point sur la façon dont fonctionnent les gènes non codants.

"l'ARN Non codant a de nombreuses fonctions et dans cette étude, nous avons constaté que PCAT1 fonctionne comme une sorte de colle pour attirer différents complexes protéiques ensemble et de les guider vers l'emplacement génomique spécifique pour activer leur expression du gène cible qui démarre le processus de la maladie.

"Nous allons élargir cette connaissance alors que nous recherchons les 44 autres gènes associés à des variations génétiques», explique le Dr He.

«Le cancer est très intelligent et prend tous les moyens possibles pour survivre et utiliser chaque morceau de notre génome. Si la recherche se concentre uniquement sur les deux pour cent du génome qui est la protéine de gènes codants, nous avons une compréhension limitée de la façon dont le cancer peut survivre . Nous ne pouvons pas atteindre la médecine du cancer personnalisé sans comprendre l'autre 98 pour cent de notre génome ".

L'autre 98 pour cent - ce qui est appelé «ADN poubelle» parce qu'il était en dehors des gènes codant pour des protéines sans fonction connue - offre maintenant un trésor à des épigénéticiens comme le Dr He.

"La contribution majeure de notre travail est le lien des variations génétiques en dehors des gènes, venant des gènes non codants plutôt que les gènes codant pour des protéines, qui font l'objet de la recherche traditionnelle."


_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16151
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: prostate   Jeu 28 Juil 2016 - 17:16

Although it reads like European license plate number, a protein known as ZMYND8 has demonstrated its ability to block metastasis-linked genes in prostate cancer, according to a study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. The findings, resulting from cell line and mouse model studies, are published in the July 28 online issue of Molecular Cell.

"These findings are important as cancer metastasis is a complicated process and is both devastating and clinically challenging," said Min Gyu Lee, Ph.D., associate professor of Molecular and Cellular Oncology. "For metastasis, cancer cells acquire migratory and invasive abilities and so gaining new insight into how this occurs and how to stop metastasis is crucial. We believe this study opens a window into this process."

Lee's study centered on modification of proteins crucial to gene regulation, known as histones. Alterations in histone modifications, including acetylation and methylation, are frequently associated with cancer development. Lee's group looked at ZMYND8 as a histone "reader" that could possibly impact gene expression by recognizing these histone modifications known as histone "marks."

"It has been well documented that the effects of histone acetylation and methylation on gene expression can be mediated by specific binding proteins called 'readers,'" said Lee. "We identified ZMYND8 as a reader for histone marks called H3K4me1 and H3K14ac, both of which are tied to metastasis-linked genes."

The research group also noted that ZMYND8 cooperated with a type of histone mark "eraser" called JARID1D to suppress metastasis-linked genes.

"These findings are of special interest in light of our earlier study that JARID1D levels are lower in metastasized prostate tumors than in normal prostate and primary prostate tumors," said Lee. "This study revealed a previously unknown metastasis-suppressive mechanism in which ZMYND8 counteracts the expression of metastasis-linked genes by reading dual histone marks H3K4me1 and H3K14ac and cooperating with JARID1D."

---

Bien qu'elle se lit comme un numéro de plaque d'immatriculation européenne, une protéine connue sous le nom ZMYND8 a démontré sa capacité à bloquer les gènes de métastases liées au cancer de la prostate, selon une étude de l'Université du Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Les résultats, obtenus à partir d'études de lignées cellulaires et des modèles de souris, sont publiées dans la Juillet 28 numéro en ligne de Molecular Cell.

«Ces résultats sont importants car les métastases du cancer est un processus compliqué et est à la fois dévastateur et cliniquement difficile", a déclaré Min Gyu Lee, Ph.D., professeur agrégé de Molecular and Cellular Oncology. "Pour les métastases, les cellules cancéreuses acquièrent des capacités migratoires et invasives et donc acquérir de nouvelles connaissances sur la façon dont cela se produit et comment arrêter la métastase est cruciale. Nous croyons que cette étude ouvre une fenêtre dans ce processus."

L'étude de Lee est centrée sur la modification des protéines essentielles à la régulation des gènes, connu sous le nom d'histones. Les altérations dans la modification des histones, y compris l'acétylation et la méthylation, sont fréquemment associés au développement du cancer. Le groupe de Lee a regardé ZMYND8 comme un histone «lecteur» qui pourrait avoir un impact sur l'expression des gènes reconnaissant ces modifications des histones appelés «marques d'histones».

"Il a été bien documenté que les effets de l'acétylation des histones et la méthylation sur l'expression génique peuvent être médiés par des protéines de liaison spécifiques appelés« lecteurs », dit Lee. "Nous avons identifié ZMYND8 comme un lecteur pour les marques d'histone appelés H3K4me1 et H3K14ac, qui sont tous deux liés à des gènes liés aux métastases."

Le groupe de recherche a également noté que ZMYND8 a coopéré avec un type d'histone de type "effaceur" appelé JARID1D pour supprimer les gènes liées aux métastases.

«Ces résultats sont d'un intérêt particulier à la lumière de notre étude antérieure disant que les niveaux JARID1D sont plus faibles dans les tumeurs de la prostate métastasé que dans la prostate normale et les tumeurs primaires de la prostate", a déclaré Lee. "Cette étude a révélé un mécanisme de suppression de métastases  précédemment inconnu dans lequelle ZMYND8 contrecarre l'expression de gènes liés à des métastases en lisant les marques à double histone  H3K4me1 et H3K14ac et en coopérant avec JARID1D".


_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16151
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: prostate   Mer 13 Juil 2016 - 20:29

Restoring tumor-specific immunity is a treatment strategy that works well in melanoma and lung cancer patients. Now a new study out of the OHSU Knight Cancer Institute is reviving hope that the approach also may help men with life-threatening prostate cancer.

It is a surprising turnaround because prior results in men with aggressive, advanced-stage prostate cancer showed no evidence of anti-tumor activity with immune therapies that work by blocking PD-1 signals.

In the study published in the journal Oncotarget, 10 men with metastatic prostate cancer resistant to androgen deprivation therapy and the androgen receptor antagonist enzalutamide were treated with pembrolizumab, a monoclonal antibody that binds to the PD-1 receptor.

Three of the first 10 participants enrolled in the ongoing clinical trial experienced rapid reductions in prostate specific antigen, or PSA, an early measure of treatment effect. Subsequent imaging scans showed that tumors shrank in two of these three men, including metastatic liver tumors in one patient. Two of the three participants who responded to the treatment gained relief from cancer pain and were able to stop taking opiate pain medication.

The research team led by Julie Graff, M.D.,says the data provide, for the first time, evidence for meaningful clinical activity for PD-1 blockade in men with metastatic prostate cancer that is resistant to androgen deprivation.

"It's pretty remarkable, especially in light of the fact that many people doubted this approach could work at all," said Graff, lead study author and an oncologist specializing in prostate cancer at the OHSU Knight Cancer Institute. "You don't get responses like this with almost any other treatment."

Men in the study had been treated with the androgen-receptor inhibitor enzalutamide, but their cancers showed signs of progression in spite of this therapy.

The three participants who responded to PD-1 blockade started with serum PSA levels of 46, 71 and 2,503 ng/ml. These PSA levels plummeted to less than 0.1 ng/ml after treatment, and these three patients remain free of progression at 30, 55 and 16 weeks of follow-up, respectively.

Important questions remain unanswered. It's not yet known whether PD-1 blockade can improve survival in men with metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer, and it's not possible to select which patients are likely to respond to the treatment.

Three of the 10 men in the study had stable disease at 30, 47 and 50 weeks, while the remaining four patients did not show evidence of clinical benefit. One of those four men died of prostate cancer.

In spite of the uncertainties, Graff and colleagues say the results in the men whose cancer responded to the treatment clearly stand out. Approved agents for metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer rarely produce PSA reduction to less than 0.2 ng/ml when enzalutamide has stopped working. Significant responses in liver metastases are also relatively uncommon with androgen receptor-targeting drugs or cytotoxic chemotherapies, they said.

The researchers had previously reported on two participants who were exceptional responders to immunotherapy and hypothesized that the immune-modifying actions of androgen receptor blockers such as enzalutamide might enhance immunotherapy. That prompted them to develop the phase II study to evaluate the efficacy of the PD-1 inhibitor pembrolizumab.

"There are considerable data showing that androgen-ablation may augment an anti-tumor immune response," the researchers wrote in the paper describing early results. "Enzalutamide therapy represents a more potent form of androgen suppression and may therefore be associated with previously underappreciated immune modulatory effects."

As these results report on the experience of the first 10 patients, they must be viewed as preliminary. The ongoing study, which is continuing to follow these men and has enrolled additional participants, will provide more robust answers about the potential benefits of PD-1 for men with metastatic prostate cancer, Graff says.

Future studies are in the planning stages.

---


Rétablir l'immunité spécifique de la tumeur est une stratégie de traitement qui fonctionne bien dans le mélanome et le cancer du poumon patients. Maintenant une nouvelle étude sur l'Institut du cancer Chevalier OHSU ravive l'espoir que l'approche peut aussi aider les hommes avec cancer de la dont la vie est en danger.

C'est un revirement surprenant parce que les résultats antérieurs chez les hommes atteints, cancer de la prostate agressif à un stade avancé ont montré aucune preuve d'activité anti-tumorale avec des thérapies immunitaires qui fonctionnent en bloquant les signaux PD-1.

Dans l'étude publiée dans la revue Oncotarget, 10 hommes atteints du cancer de la prostate métastatique résistant à la thérapie de privation androgénique et le récepteur des androgènes antagoniste enzalutamide ont été traités avec lambrolizumab, un anticorps monoclonal qui se lie au récepteur PD-1.

Trois des 10 premiers participants inscrits à l'essai clinique en cours ont connu des réductions rapides de l'antigène spécifique de la prostate, ou PSA, une mesure précoce de l'effet du traitement. Des scans d'imagerie ultérieurs ont montré que les tumeurs ont diminué dans deux de ces trois hommes, y compris les tumeurs hépatiques métastatiques chez un patient. Deux des trois participants qui ont répondu au traitement ont gagné le soulagement de la douleur cancéreuse et ont été en mesure d'arrêter de prendre des médicaments contre la douleur opiacé.

L'équipe de recherche dirigée par Julie Graff, M.D., dit que les données fournissent, pour la première fois, la preuve de l'activité clinique significative pour le blocus de PD-1 chez les hommes atteints d'un cancer de la prostate métastatique résistant à la privation androgénique.

"C'est assez remarquable, surtout à la lumière du fait que beaucoup de gens doutaient que cette approche pourrait fonctionner du tout", a déclaré Graff, auteur principal de l'étude et un oncologue spécialisé dans le cancer de la prostate à l'Institut du cancer Chevalier OHSU. "Vous ne recevez pas des réponses comme celle-ci avec presque tous les autres traitements."

Les hommes dans l'étude ont été traités avec l'inhibiteur de récepteur d'androgène, l'enzalutamide, mais leurs cancers ont montré des signes de progression en dépit de cette thérapie.

Les trois participants qui ont répondu au blocus de PD-1 ont commencé avec des niveaux de 46, 71 et 2503 ng / ml PSA sérique. Les taux de PSA ont chuté à moins de 0,1 ng / mL après le traitement, et ces trois patients restent libres de progression à 30, 55 et 16 semaines de suivi, respectivement.

Des questions importantes restent sans réponse. On ne sait pas encore si le blocus de PD-1 peut améliorer la survie chez les hommes avec cancer de la prostate métastatique résistant à la castration, et il est impossible de sélectionner quels patients sont susceptibles de répondre au traitement.

Trois des 10 hommes dans l'étude ont eu une stablisation de la maladie à 30, 47 et 50 semaines, tandis que les quatre autres patients ne présentaient pas de signes bénéfices cliniques. Un de ces quatre hommes est mort du cancer de la prostate.

Malgré les incertitudes, Graff et ses collègues disent que les résultats chez les hommes dont le cancer a répondu au traitement ressortent clairement. Les agents approuvés pour le cancer de la prostate métastasique et résistant à la castration produisent rarement la réduction du PSA à moins de 0,2 ng / ml quand l'enzalutamide a cessé de travailler. Des réponses significatives dans les métastases hépatiques sont aussi relativement rare avec des médicaments ciblant des récepteurs androgènes ou chimiothérapies cytotoxiques, ont-ils dit.

Les chercheurs avaient déjà fait des rapports sur deux participants qui étaient des répondeurs exceptionnels à l'immunothérapie et l'hypothèse que des actions immunitaires modificatrices des bloqueurs des récepteurs androgènes tels que enzalutamide pourraient améliorer l'immunothérapie. Cela les a incité à développer l'étude de phase II pour évaluer l'efficacité de l'inhibiteur de PD-1 lambrolizumab.

"Il y a beaucoup de données montrant que l'ablation des androgènes peut augmenter une réponse immunitaire anti-tumorale», les chercheurs ont écrit dans le document décrivant les premiers résultats. «La thérapie à l'enzalutamide représente une forme plus puissante de la suppression des androgènes et peut donc être associée à des effets modulateurs immunitaires précédemment sous-estimé."

Comme ces résultats rendent compte de l'expérience des 10 premiers patients, ils doivent être considérés comme préliminaires. L'étude en cours, qui continue à suivre ces hommes et a inscrit d'autres participants, fournira des réponses plus solides sur les avantages potentiels de PD-1 pour les hommes atteints d'un cancer de la prostate métastatique, dit Graff.

Les études futures sont à l'étape de planification.


_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16151
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: prostate   Dim 3 Juil 2016 - 6:28


_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16151
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: prostate   Ven 19 Fév 2016 - 20:29

Florida State University researchers are working on new approaches to deciphering genetic data that may lead to new, more targeted prostate cancer treatments.

Prostate cancer, which affects one in seven men in the United States, tends to have multiple tumor sites within an individual prostate and each might be genetically different. Tumor characteristics also differ among racial and ethnic groups.

"With the availability of patient genomic data, we can look deep inside a tumor to consider its genetic background and find more effective prostate cancer treatments," said Jennifer S. Myers, a graduate student in the FSU Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry.

Patient genomic data has spurred an increased drive toward personalized medicine or therapies tailored to the patient's tumor characteristics. However, the relative ease of genomic sequencing and the push for patient-specific treatment has created a different challenge: How can scientists best sift through data of more than 20,000 genes to pinpoint genetic changes that matter in cancer development, progression or treatment?

Myers and undergraduate researchers Ariana K. von Lersner and Charles J. Robbins identified genetic changes in prostate cancer by looking at altered signal pathways instead of focusing on individual genes. They were led by Qing-Xiang Amy Sang, professor of chemistry and biochemistry and the Endowed Professor of Cancer Research at Florida State.

Their findings, "Differentially Expressed Genes and Signature Pathways of Human Prostate Cancer," were published in the journal PLOS One.

"Imagine trying to find a single altered gene among a haystack of more than 20,000 genes," Myers said. "Now imagine doing this for the hundreds of thousands of men diagnosed with prostate cancer each year. The task is daunting."

Because genes work in concerted networks to exert their molecular effects, changes in gene expression should be indicative of altered pathways.

"By looking for altered pathways, we've significantly increased the size of our target," she said.

Although genetic profiles vary from patient to patient, the authors hypothesized that genetic changes should converge at the pathway level.

Two findings in their work stood out -- the alteration of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling pathway in prostate cancer and the regulation by Ran, a type of protein, of the mitotic spindle formation pathway in prostate cancer.

While the TGF-β pathway has been extensively studied in prostate cancer, the Ran/mitotic spindle pathway and the role of Ran overexpression in prostate cancer is not yet clear.

"The fact that we identified a well-studied pathway in prostate cancer gives us confidence in our method," Myers said. "Our next steps will be to confirm the significance of the Ran/mitotic spindle pathway in prostate cancer."


---

Les chercheurs de l'Université d'État de Floride travaillent sur de nouvelles approches pour déchiffrer les données génétiques qui peuvent conduire à de nouveaux traitements contre le cancer de la prostate plus ciblées.

Le cancer de la prostate qui affecte une à sept hommes aux États-Unis, a tendance à avoir plusieurs sites de tumeurs dans une personne et chacun pourrait être génétiquement différent. Les caractéristiques tumorales diffèrent également entre les groupes raciaux et ethniques.

«Avec la disponibilité de données génomiques de patients, nous pouvons regarder profondément à l'intérieur d'une tumeur et considérer son patrimoine génétique et trouver des traitements plus efficaces contre le cancer de la prostate", a déclaré Jennifer S. Myers, un étudiant diplômé du Département FSU de chimie et biochimie.

Les données génomiques du patient ont suscité un effort accru vers la médecine personnalisée ou les thérapies adaptées aux caractéristiques de la tumeur du patient. Cependant, la facilité relative de séquençage génomique et la poussée pour le traitement spécifique du patient a créé un défi différent: Comment les scientifiques peuvent mieux passer au crible les données de plus de 20.000 gènes pour rélever les changements génétiques qui comptent dans le développement du cancer, la progression ou le traitement?

Myers et les chercheurs de premier cycle Ariana K. von Lersner et Charles J. Robbins ont identifié des changements génétiques dans le cancer de la prostate en regardant les voies de signalisation altérées au lieu de se concentrer sur des gènes individuels. Ils étaient dirigés par Qing-Xiang Amy Sang, professeur de chimie et biochimie et le professeur Doté de recherche sur le cancer à l'État de Floride.

Leurs résultats, "Les gènes exprimés de manière différentielle et les chemins du cancer de la prostate humaine », ont été publiés dans la revue PLoS ONE.

"Imaginez que vous essayez de trouver un seul gène modifié dans une botte de foin de plus de 20.000 gènes", a déclaré Myers. "Maintenant, imaginez le faire pour les centaines de milliers d'hommes diagnostiqués avec un cancer de la prostate chaque année. La tâche est énorme."

Parce que les gènes fonctionnent dans des réseaux concertés pour exercer leurs effets moléculaires, les changements dans l'expression des gènes devrait être indicatif de voies altérées.

"En recherchant des voies modifiées, nous avons augmenté de manière significative la taille de notre cible», dit-elle.

Bien que les profils génétiques varient d'un patient à l'autre, les auteurs ont émis l'hypothèse que les changements génétiques devraient converger au niveau de la voie.

Deux conclusions dans leur travail se détachaient - la modification dans la voie du facteur bêta de croissance transformant (TGF-β)  dans le cancer de la prostate et de la réglementation par Ran, un type de protéine, de la voie de la formation du fuseau mitotique (1) dans le cancer de la prostate.

Alors que la voie TGF-β a été largement étudié dans le cancer de la prostate,  la voie du fuseau mitotique de Ran et le rôle de la surexpression de Ran dans le cancer de la prostate n'est pas encore clair.

"Le fait que nous avons identifié une voie bien étudiée dans le cancer de la prostate nous donne confiance dans notre méthode", a déclaré Myers. «Nos prochaines étapes consisteront à confirmer l'importance de la voie du fuseau mitotique de Ran dans le cancer de la prostate."

1- définition mitotique : Du grec mitos qui signifie « le filament » (référence à l'aspect des chromosomes en microscopie), la mitose désigne les événements chromosomiques de la division cellulaire. Il s'agit d'une duplication non sexuée/asexuée (contrairement à la méiose). C'est la division d'une cellule mère en deux cellules filles.

Voir aussi : http://espoirs.forumactif.com/t1923-inhibiteurs-de-hsp-90

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16151
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: prostate   Mar 2 Avr 2013 - 11:57




Des chercheurs de l'Université de Californie, menés par Hsian-Rong Tseng, ont développé une méthode qui permet d'isoler et d'analyser les cellules cancéreuses qui se détachent des tumeurs et circulent dans le sang. Ce procédé utilise une technologie semblable au Velcro mais à l'échelle nanométrique.

Les cellules tumorales circulantes (CTC), jouent un rôle crucial dans la production des métastases distantes et lorsque ces cellules sont isolées précocement, elles peuvent fournir aux médecins des informations essentielles sur le type de cancer d'un patient, son profil moléculaire et ses risques d'évolution.

Concrètement, lorsque le sang passe à travers la puce, des fibres nanométriques, recouvertes d'anticorps de protéine qui correspondent à des protéines sur la surface des cellules cancéreuses, agissent comme du velcro, et piègent les cellules malades. Ce système permet une véritable «biopsie liquide» de la tumeur et fournit des informations précieuses sur les risques de métastases. En utilisant cet outil sur des patients porteurs de cellules de mélanome en circulation dans le sang, les chercheurs ont réussi à isoler ces cellules et à déterminer leurs caractéristiques génétiques. Ils ont ainsi pu repérer si ces cellules présentaient la mutation dans la protéine BRAF qui apparaît dans environ 60 % des cas de mélanome et les rend sensibles à certains médicaments.

"Avec cette technologie à base de puces NanoVelcro, nous serons bientôt en mesure de mieux personnaliser les traitements pour les patients et d'augmenter ainsi sensiblement leurs chances de guérison" souligne Hsian-Rong Tseng.

Article rédigé par Georges Simmonds pour RT Flash

-----------

"We are optimistic that the use of our NanoVelcro CTC technology will revolutionize prostate cancer treatment. We know that cancers evolve over time and that every patient's cancer is a unique problem -- the 'one-size-fits-all' approach is not going to allow us to cure prostate cancer or any other cancer," said Edwin M. Posadas, MD, medical director of the Urologic Oncology Program at Cedars-Sinai's Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute and senior author of the article in the March online issue of Advanced Materials.

Nous sommes optimistes que l'usage de la technologie de Nanovelcro va révolutionner les traitements du cancer de la . nous savons que cancer évolue à travers le temps et qu'il y a autant de cancers qu'il y a de patients. l'ère du "one size fits all" est révolue.

"This evolution means that we need to be able to monitor these changes over time and to ensure a patient's treatment is individualized and optimized. The molecular characterizations of CTCs will provide real-time information allowing us to choose the right treatment for the right patient at the right time. This improvement will be a great step toward developing personalized medicine," he added.

Cette évolution veut dire que nous avons besoin d'être capable de monitorer les changements dans le temps pour s'assurer que le traitement du patient est individuel et optimisé. La caractérisation des cellules circulantes cancéreuses fournira de l'information en temps réel ce qui nous permettra de choisir le bon traitement, pour le bon patient, au bon moment. Cet amélioration sera un grand pas en avant pour la médecine personnalisée.

The existence of CTCs and their role in cancer metastasis was first suspected more than 140 years ago, and the first test for the routine measurement of CTCs became available in 2004, but earlier methods have produced low capture efficiencies and limited capability of captured cells to be utilized for later molecular analysis.

"Our technology is the combination of three state-of-the-art technologies: the NanoVelcro CTC chip, laser capture microdissection and whole exome sequencing," said Yi-Tsung Lu, MD, a postdoctoral scientist at the Cedars-Sinai Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, and one of the article's first authors. "This advancement will, in principle, allow us to track the genomic evolution of prostate cancer after we initiate a therapy and will allow us to better understand the mechanism of drug resistance that is common in prostate cancer patients. We hope the comprehensive understanding of cancer biology at the individual level will ultimately lead to better therapy choice for patients suffering from advance.

Cette avancée nous permettra en principe de suivre l'évolution génomique du cancer de la prostate après avoir initier une thérapie et de mieux comprendre les mécanismes de la résistance aux médicaments. Nous espérons que la compréhension des mécanismes généraux impliqués débouchera sur de meilleurs thérapie pour les patients avec un cancer avancé de la prostate.



_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16151
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: prostate   Ven 13 Mai 2011 - 13:53

Les options thérapeutiques face au cancer de la prostate hormono-résistant
S'il choisit de traiter son patient, le médecin peut recourir à chimiothérapie par docétaxel (Taxotère®), le traitement standard du cancer de la prostate résistant à la castration. Mais depuis plusieurs années, de nouvelles molécules sont en cours de développement pour offrir une alternative à la chimiothérapie en seconde ligne, après que le recours à la castration chimique a fait remonter le taux de PSA, explique le Pr Thierry Lebret (hôpital Foch, Suresnes). Parmi ces nouvelles drogues, dont les mécanismes d'action sont différents tout comme les récepteurs sur lesquels elles agissent, on distingue :

-L'abiratérone . Cette molécule empêche l'activation des androgènes sécrétés par les cellules tumorales, les plus toxiques pour la prostate. Associée à la prednisone (dont le rôle est d'éviter les effets tensionnels et métaboliques), l'abiratérone a permis, en clinique, d'obtenir une réponse biologique sur le taux de PSA chez 80 % des patients n'ayant jamais eu de chimiothérapie et chez la moitié de ceux qui avaient reçu un tel traitement, rapporte le Pr Lebret. Mais à ce jour, le niveau de preuve reste insuffisant et des questions persistent quant à sa tolérance. Par ailleurs, "on ne sait pas encore s'il faut l'utiliser en 2ème ou 3ème ligne", souligne le Pr Lebret qui salue néanmoins l'arrivée de médicaments "entre castration et chimiothérapie".
-Les inhibiteurs de l'endothéline A sont finalement apparus décevants sur les cancers résistants à la castration, ne prolongeant pas la survie des patients. Une nouvelle étude est cependant en cours, qui pourrait aboutir à des résultats plus encourageants, note le Pr Lebret.
-De nouveaux anti-androgènes, avec une plus forte affinité pour le récepteur aux androgènes, ont été développés. Baptisés RD162 et MDV3100 , ils ont permis de réduire le taux de PSA chez plus de la moitié des patients dans une étude de phase 1-2. Une étude de phase 3 devait prochainement être lancée.
"Ces trois molécules, pour l'instant, se positionnent après la résistance à la castration chimique. Mais on peut imaginer l'inverse dans 10 ans", s'enthousiasme le Pr Lebret.

Amélie Pelletier, propos recueillis le 20 novembre 2010.

Source :

Conférence de presse donnée à l'occasion du 104ème congrès français d'urologie, organisé du 17 au 20 novembre 2010.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16151
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: prostate   Dim 24 Avr 2011 - 16:24

(Apr. 24, 2011) — The long-standing prohibition against testosterone therapy in men with untreated or low-risk prostate cancer merits reevaluation, according to a new study published in The Journal of Urology.

La prohibition de longue durée contre les thérapies à base de testostéronepour les hommes avec un cancer à bas risque ou intraité mérite une réévaluation selon une nouvelle étude publiée dans le journal "Urology"

"For many decades it had been believed that a history of prostate cancer, even if treated and cured, was an absolute contraindication to testosterone therapy, due to the belief that testosterone activated prostate cancer growth, and could potentially cause dormant cancer cells to grow rapidly," says Abraham Morgentaler, MD of Men's Health Boston. "Generations of medical students and residents were taught that providing testosterone to a man with prostate cancer was like pouring gasoline on a fire."

Depuis plusieurs décades on croyait qu'une histoire de cancer de la prostate, même si traitée et guérie était en contradiction absolue avec une thérapie à base de testostérone, parce qu'on croit que la testtostérone active le cancer de la prostate et pourrait potentiellement faire que les cellules du cancer dormantes pourraient croitre rapidement. Des générations d'étudiants et de résidents ont appris que fournir de la testostérone à un homme qui a le cancer de la prostate c'était comme jeter de la gazoline sur du feu.

This study, involving 13 symptomatic testosterone deficient men who also had untreated prostate cancer, suggests this traditional view is incorrect, and that testosterone treatment in men does not cause rapid growth of prostate cancer. It is the first to directly and rigorously assess changes in the prostate among men with prostate cancer who received testosterone therapy.

Cette étude a impliqué 13 hommes en déficience de testotérone et qui avait eu un cancer intraité de la suggère que cette mani;re de voir traditionnelle est incorrecte. et un traitement à base de testéstérone ne cause pas une rapide croissance au cancer de la prostate.


The men received testosterone therapy while undergoing active surveillance for prostate cancer for a median of 2.5 years. Median age was 58.8 years. The initial biopsy Gleason score was 6/10 for 12 of the men, 7/10 for the other (Gleason score grades the aggressiveness of prostate cancer by its microscopic appearance on a scale of 2-10. Gleason 6 is generally considered low to moderately aggressive, and Gleason 7 moderately aggressive).

Mean testosterone concentration increased from 238 to 664 ng/dl with treatment, yet neither prostate specific antigen (PSA) concentrations nor prostate volume showed any change. Follow-up biopsies of the prostate were performed in all men at approximately yearly intervals, and none developed cancer progression. In fact, 54 percent of the follow-up biopsies revealed no cancer at all.

Although the number of men in the study was small, and none had aggressive or advanced prostate cancer, Morgentaler observed, "These men were rigorously followed. The cancers in these men were typical of the prostate cancers for which men have undergone invasive treatment with surgery or radiation for 25 years. Clearly, the traditional belief that higher testosterone necessarily leads to rapid prostate cancer growth is incorrect."

In a Journal of Urology editorial comment, Martin M. Miner, MD, of the Miriam Hospital and Warren Alpert School of Medicine of Brown University notes the conclusions represent "a remarkable shift in thinking from only five years ago. … If testosterone therapy was not associated with disease progression in men with untreated prostate cancer, how concerned must we be about testosterone therapy in men with treated prostate cancer?"

"An increasing number of newly diagnosed men with prostate cancer opting for active surveillance, and with many of them also desiring treatment for their signs and symptoms of testosterone deficiency, the results suggest a reevaluation of the long standing prohibition against offering testosterone therapy to men with prostate cancer," says Morgentaler.

Refraining from testosterone therapy due to unmerited prostate cancer fears may have adverse lifestyle and health consequences, since testosterone therapy in testosterone deficient men has been shown to improve symptoms of fatigue, decreased libido, and erectile dysfunction. Testosterone therapy may also improve mood, blood sugar control, increase muscle, decrease fat, and improve bone density. Four recent studies have shown that men with high testosterone levels appear to live longer than men with low levels, although it has not yet been shown that treating men with testosterone increases longevity.

Morgentaler commented on an Italian study that showed that low levels of testosterone were associated with aggressive prostate cancer. The risk of aggressive cancer was reduced for men with normal testosterone compared with men with low testosterone.

In an editorial in the journal Cancer, "Turning Conventional Wisdom Upside Down: Low Serum Testosterone and High-Risk Prostate Cancer Morgentaler wrote, "After seven decades of circumstantial evidence pointing us in the wrong direction, perhaps it is time to consider the once unthinkable -- conducting a testosterone therapy trial of sufficient size and duration to determine whether normalization of serum testosterone in older men many reduce the risk of prostate cancer, particularly high-risk prostate cancer."

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16151
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: prostate   Lun 14 Mar 2011 - 11:08

Pour rester jeune, il y a ceux qui ne jurent que par le Botox ou l’acide hyaluronique. Et il y a ceux qui misent sur… le sexe. De nouvelles études internationales, exposées par le docteur Frédéric Saldmann dans « la Vie et le Temps », qui vient de paraître chez Flammarion*, nous révèlent que des rapports sexuels réguliers protègent notre santé.
SUR LE MÊME SUJET

Un bébé à 40 ans triple les chances d’être centenaireLe sexe, en effet, freine l’apparition de nombreuses maladies, comme le cancer ou les maladies cardio-vasculaires.

L’hormone de l’amour protège les femmes du cancer du sein. Concernant les femmes, c’est l’ocytocine qui joue un rôle clé. Cette hormone est celle qui déclenche l’accouchement, permet l’allaitement et favorise l’attachement de la mère à son enfant et de la femme à son homme. Or il se trouve, explique Frédéric Saldmann, praticien attaché des Hôpitaux de Paris, cardiologue et nutritionniste, que « l’ocytocine qui est libérée lors des rapports sexuels a un effet protecteur contre le cancer du sein ». D’ailleurs, au XVIIIe siècle déjà, un médecin italien, le professeur Ramazzini, avait pressenti ce phénomène en constatant qu’il y avait beaucoup plus de cancers du sein dans les couvents…

Chez les hommes, des rapports fréquents éloignent le cancer de la prostate. Du côté de ces messieurs, une étude américaine réalisée sur 30000 hommes conclut que l’éjaculation fréquente protège l’homme du cancer de la prostate. « On a découvert que 21 éjaculations par mois réduisent le risque de cancer de la prostate d’un tiers », explique Frédéric Saldmann. L’étude précise que le bénéfice en matière de prévention du cancer de la prostate devient significatif à partir de 12 éjaculations par mois. Qu’en est-il d’un point de vue médical? Les éjaculations fréquentes permettent à la glande prostatique d’évacuer les carcinogènes qui s’accumulent dans la prostate. « Les émissions de sperme contribuent au nettoyage régulier de la prostate », résume Frédéric Saldmann.

Pour eux comme pour elles, faire trois fois l’amour par semaine fait gagner dix ans d’espérance de vie. Le cœur — au sens propre — a lui aussi ses raisons d’adopter l’amour physique. « On sait aujourd’hui que les rapports physiques ne sont pas nuisibles pour le cœur, mais tendent au contraire à le préserver », note Frédéric Saldmann. Pourquoi? « Parce que le rapport déclenche un effort physique qui s’apparente au sport : fréquence cardiaque à la hausse, sueurs et sollicitations de nombreux muscles, cuisses, fesses, bras, cou et thorax. » Par ailleurs, faire l’amour favorise la sécrétion de testostérone qui entretient ces muscles. « Un bon rapport sexuel fait perdre environ 200 calories, soit l’équivalent de vingt minutes de course à pied », constate le cardiologue, qui ajoute qu’« une activité sexuelle soutenue limite la formation de plaques d’athérosclérose sur les artères ». Enfin, le professeur David Weeks, de l’hôpital d’Edimbourg, conclut, au terme d’une étude portant sur 3500 personnes de 18 à 102 ans, que « trois rapports sexuels par semaine permettent d’allonger la durée de vie de dix ans ».

Et vive les cercles vertueux. Amélioration de la qualité du sommeil (critère qui lui-même favorise la santé cardiaque), réduction du stress, de l’anxiété, des états dépressifs… Le fait d’être épanoui sexuellement entraîne une cascade d’effets bénéfiques. A l’heure où ce que l’on appelle l’« hygiène de vie » nous dicte sans arrêt des commandements rébarbatifs — tu ne grignoteras point, tu ne mangeras pas trop gras, trop salé, trop sucré — en voici enfin un qui fait plaisir : tu feras l’amour, et souvent!



Dernière édition par Denis le Mer 25 Fév 2015 - 14:24, édité 1 fois
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16151
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: prostate   Dim 26 Sep 2010 - 4:57

Une équipe internationale de chercheurs associant l’Inserm et l’Université Paris Descartes a publié dans la revue scientifique de l'Académie des Sciences américaine (PNAS) une étude montrant que la prolactine, une hormone produite au sein de la prostate, stimule la multiplication désordonnée de certaines cellules et favorise ainsi le développement de la tumeur. Une nouvelle cible pour les cancers résistant aux traitements conventionnels ?

« La plupart des cancers de la prostate, seconde cause de mortalité par cancer chez l’homme, sont traités avec succès par ablation totale ou partielle de la prostate ou par radiothérapie » indique le communiqué de l’Inserm. Et d’ajouter : « pour les formes avancées, les traitements dirigés contre les hormones mâles ou la chimiothérapie ne parviennent souvent qu’à retarder la progression de la maladie et la formation ultime de métastases osseuses. La recherche s’attache donc à développer des thérapies alternatives capables d’empêcher le développement de la tumeur ».

Des travaux récents ont démontré que le cancer de la prostate prenait naissance dans une population cellulaire spécifique : les cellules « basales ». Il s'agit de cellules primitives qui vont ultérieurement donner naissance aux cellules sécrétant le fameux marqueur PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen). Le taux sanguin de ce marqueur est aujourd’hui l’un des outils de dépistage du cancer de la prostate.

On sait par ailleurs que la prolactine, une hormone produite par une petite glande à la base du cerveau (hypophyse) et connue essentiellement pour ses effets sur la lactation, est aussi produite par la prostate. Elle favorise la croissance des cellules prostatiques, et est retrouvée en plus grande quantité au niveau local dans les cancers avancés. Les chercheurs ont donc supposé que la prolactine produite au sein de la prostate pouvait être un facteur local favorisant le développement de la tumeur.

A l’aide de souris modifiées génétiquement pour mimer la pathologie humaine, Vincent Goffin et son équipe viennent en effet de montrer qu’une production excessive de prolactine par la prostate induisait des tumeurs dont la caractéristique principale était l'accumulation totalement anarchique de cellules basales.

Dans son communiqué, l’Inserm souligne que « l’hormone prolactine pourrait donc jouer un rôle dans les étapes très précoces du processus tumoral. Inversement, on parvient chez l’animal à prévenir la formation de tumeurs grâce à une molécule qui empêche la prolactine d’exercer ses effets ».

« Nous avons montré que la prolactine était peut-être une sorte d’interrupteur que l’on pouvait éteindre pour empêcher une tumeur de se développer » précise Vincent Goffin de l’Unité Inserm 845 à la Faculté de Médecine Necker à Paris. Reste à développer une version thérapeutique de cette molécule, capable de jouer ce rôle d’interrupteur à long terme. « Vincent Goffin et son équipe travaillent actuellement au développement d’une molécule de synthèse prometteuse » conclut le communiqué.

En 2005, le cancer de la était le cancer le plus fréquent en France, avec 62 245 nouveaux cas diagnostiqués dans l’année. Il est le quatrième en termes de mortalité, avec 9 202 décès estimés.


Vendredi 17 Septembre 2010
Source : Inserm
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16151
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: prostate   Mar 21 Sep 2010 - 13:13

MONTREAL — Des chercheurs canadiens ont découvert qu'un médicament communément prescrit aux patients atteints d'un taux élevé de cholestérol pouvait aussi être efficace pour traiter le cancer de la prostate, selon une étude publiée ce mois-ci.

La rosuvastatine, vendue au Canada sous le nom de Crestor, semble empêcher la croissance d'une tumeur de la prostate chez les souris, selon l'étude parue dans European Urology, la revue de l'association européenne d'urologie.

"Nos résultats sont une preuve solide et une bonne raison de commencer des essais cliniques sur l'effet de l'enzyme statine dans le traitement du cancer de la prostate", a déclaré le Dr Xiao-Yan Wen, de l'hôpital St.Michael's de Toronto.

La statine agirait comme un inhibiteur angiogénique, c'est-à-dire qu'elle empêcherait la tumeur de former des vaisseaux sanguins à partir des vaisseaux préexistant pour croître.

Le cancer de la prostate touche un Canadien sur sept, et un sur 27 en mourra. Malgré les progrès de la chirurgie, des radiations et de la chimiothérapie, de nombreux patients atteignent des stades avancés de cette affection.

Le Dr Wen et ses collègues canadiens et chinois ont administré 2.000 molécules à des poissons tropicaux, des dard-perches, et en ont identifié sept qui ont ralenti ou arrêté le développement de vaisseaux sanguins secondaires.

Les dard-perches qui vivent en eau douce sont fréquemment utilisés par les scientifiques car leur organisme présente des similitudes avec le corps humain.

Les chercheurs de Toronto ont ensuite testé l'efficacité d'une des molécules, la rosuvastatine, sur une souris porteuse de cellules de cancer de la prostate et ont découvert qu'elle empêchait la tumeur de croître, apparemment sans effets secondaires.

Chez l'homme, cette molécule rendrait les radiations plus efficaces, supposent les scientifiques. Si cette hypothèse est validée par des essais cliniques, le traitement du cancer de la prostate de certains patients sera moins cher et moins toxique.



Dernière édition par Denis le Dim 26 Sep 2010 - 4:59, édité 1 fois
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Denis
Rang: Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 16151
Date d'inscription : 23/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: prostate   Mer 15 Sep 2010 - 10:25

Une équipe internationale de chercheurs associant l’Inserm et l’Université Paris Descartes vient de publier dans la revue de l'Académie des Sciences américaine (PNAS) une étude révélant l’importance de l’hormone prolactine dans le déclenchement du cancer de la prostate. A terme, cette recherche pourrait déboucher sur une avancée majeure dans la prévention de ce cancer qui tue près de 10 000 Français par an.


Seconde cause de mortalité par cancer chez l’homme, le cancer de la prostate pourra peut-être à l’avenir être évité grâce à la découverte d’un « interrupteur de la tumeur », la prolactine. « Nous avons montré que la prolactine était peut-être une sorte d’interrupteur que l’on pouvait éteindre pour empêcher une tumeur de se développer » affirme Vincent Goffin de l’Unité Inserm 845 à la Faculté de Médecine Necker à Paris.

Reste à développer une version thérapeutique de cette molécule, capable de jouer ce rôle d’interrupteur à long terme. Vincent Goffin et son équipe travaillent actuellement au développement d’une molécule de synthèse prometteuse
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: prostate   

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
prostate
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 2Aller à la page : 1, 2  Suivant
 Sujets similaires
-
» L'adénome de la prostate de Napoléon Premier
» Le piment, bienfaiteur de la prostate?
» Prostate et alimentation

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
ESPOIRS :: Cancer :: recherche-
Sauter vers: